Ivory Coast

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to work with the Government of the Ivory Coast to ensure a stable and secure future for its people. [115434]

Mr Bellingham: The British Government, along with its international partners, is working closely with the Government of Ivory Coast (Cote d'lvoire) to ensure a stable and secure environment for its people. I formally reopened the British embassy in Abidjan in May 2012. A fully accredited ambassador to Ivory Coast has been appointed and is resident in Abidjan. As a permanent member of the UN Security Council, the UK is a financial contributor to the United Nations Operation in Ivory Coast (UNOCI), which is made up of 10,900 military personnel. The UK contributes £30 million to UNOCI for ongoing security sector reform in Ivory Coast. A new, small commercial team is working within the embassy to promote UK bilateral trade and investment in Ivory Coast, which will contribute to economic growth in both countries.

South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many officials in his Department are stationed in (a) South Georgia and (b) the Sandwich Isles. [115508]

Mr Bellingham: There is no British diplomatic presence on the UK Overseas Territory of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.

South Sudan

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what support his Department is providing to the South Sudanese Government. [115496]

6 July 2012 : Column 839W

Mr Bellingham: Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials and I are in regular dialogue with the Government of South Sudan over the economic, security and humanitarian challenges they face, and I visited South Sudan myself in May, meeting the Vice President and a number of other Ministers.

We support our objectives in South Sudan through funding from the FCO's bilateral programme budget (£50,000 in 2012-13) and the tri-departmental Africa Conflict Prevention Pool. In 2012-13, up to £9 million from the pool is available for support to conflict prevention and stability in South Sudan and Sudan. The FCO also provides funding for the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) through our contribution to the UN peacekeeping budget. We estimate the UK share of the cost of UNMISS in 2012-13 to be around £35 million.

This is in addition to the Department for International Development's assistance programme of approximately £90 million per year.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much the Turks and Caicos Islands Government has committed to pay Interhealth Canada under the terms of the 2008 contract with Interhealth Canada. [115501]

Mr Bellingham: The contract with Interhealth Canada is a matter for the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) Government. In a public statement on health care funding in October last year, the TCI Government gave the figure for the total annual cost of health care as approximately US$ 61.5 million, of which US$ 44 million is paid to Interhealth Canada for infrastructure and clinical costs.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with Interhealth Canada on the refinancing of its contract with the Government of the Turks and Caicos Islands. [115502]

Mr Bellingham: The contract with Interhealth Canada is a matter for the Government of the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI). They held discussions with Interhealth Canada in October last year.

The TCI Government commissioned an independent review of the hospital financing arrangements which recommended against pursuing a refinancing option.

The TCI Government continues to explore opportunities to deliver greater value for money from the hospital contracts.

Health

Chronic Illnesses

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether he plans to publish the long-term conditions outcomes strategy and its companion document on diabetes at the same time; [115620]

6 July 2012 : Column 840W

(2) when he plans to publish the long-term conditions outcomes strategy; and if he will make a statement. [115621]

Paul Burstow: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave her on 2 July 2012, Official Report, columns 515-16W.

Diabetes

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the scope is of the companion document on diabetes to the long-term conditions outcomes strategy. [115619]

Paul Burstow: The diabetes companion document will explore how the principles and goals of the long-term conditions outcomes strategy could be applied to the issues around diabetes, so that people with diabetes have improved outcomes. The scope of the document will include preventing diabetes, preventing complications, and looking at all public services to see how outcomes for people with diabetes can be improved.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health by what means the NHS Commissioning Board monitors the implementation of the diabetes quality standard by local clinical commissioning groups. [115622]

Paul Burstow: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published quality standards for diabetes in 2011. It is currently for primary care trusts to ensure that NICE quality standards are taken account of when commissioning services..

We also have a best practice tariff for paediatric diabetes since April 2012, and we are awaiting confirmation of best practice tariffs for diabetic ketoacidosis and hypoglycaemia in adults. If confirmed these best practice tariffs will take effect from April 2013.

The Health and Social Care Act (2012) makes it clear that the Secretary of State for Health and NHS Commissioning Board, in discharging their duties to improve the quality of health services:

“must have regard to the quality standards prepared by. NICE”.

The NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) will be expected to use NHS Quality Standards to develop the Commissioning Outcomes Framework (COF) and as the basis for producing guidance for commissioners.

The COF will drive up quality improvement by allowing clinical commissioning groups to benchmark their progress and by providing clear comparative information on quality and outcomes to patients and the public. The COF will allow the NHS CB to identify the contribution of clinical commissioning groups to achieving the priorities for health improvement in the NHS Outcomes Framework, while also being accountable to patients and local communities.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the NHS Commissioning Board about the expiration of the National Service Framework for Diabetes and its effect on the quality of diabetes services; and if he will make a statement. [115623]

6 July 2012 : Column 841W

Paul Burstow: Although the National Service Framework for Diabetes has now reached the end of its intended reference period, many of the ambitions expressed through that framework continue to be relevant.

We understand that the designate directors and chief executive of the NHS Commissioning Board are currently considering further steps to improve outcomes for national health service patients with diabetes. We expect that they will contribute to the Diabetes Action Plan, to be published later this year. This will set out the actions the NHS will be encouraged to take to improve diversion, increase identification, and improve the management of diabetes both for its own sake and as a critical risk factor in health outcomes generally.

Diabetes will also be included in The Long Term Conditions (LTCs) Outcomes Strategy to be published by the Department, which will be aimed at improving outcomes for all people with LTCs. It will outline how key Government Departments, local authorities, charities and individuals can act in future in order to reduce LTC incidence, and improve outcomes for those with LTCs. We aim to publish the strategy towards the end of 2012; a companion document on diabetes will be published at the same time.

Considerations about diabetes care will also inform the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Outcomes Strategy. As diabetes is a major risk factor for CVD, it will be considered as part of the strategy's development.

National Childbirth Trust

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what incentives his Department provides to encourage people to train as National Childbirth Trust practitioners; and if he will make a statement. [115657]

Anne Milton: I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave my hon. Friend the Member for Winchester (Steve Brine) on 24 May 2012, Official Report, column 865W.

Out of Area Treatment

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 21 June 2012, Official Report, column 1107W, on health services: reciprocal arrangements, how many patients registered at an address in England received treatment at a hospital in Scotland in each month since May 2007. [115407]

Mr Simon Burns: The Department does not hold information about patients registered at an address in England who receive treatment at a hospital in Scotland.

Parliamentary Private Secretaries: Visits Abroad

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on which occasions his parliamentary private secretary has travelled overseas with him or on his behalf since May 2010. [115346]

Mr Simon Burns: There have been no such occasions.

6 July 2012 : Column 842W

Primary Care Trusts: Redundancy

Mr Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 25 June 2012, Official Report, column 113W, on primary care trusts: redundancy, what methodology his Department used to determine the (a) best estimate of system-wide redundancy costs of £810 million and (b) sub-total of £634 million for overall primary care trust redundancy costs; and if he will estimate the number of full-time equivalent posts lost in both cases. [115090]

Mr Simon Burns: The Health and Social Care Bill's impact assessment (now an Act) estimated system wide redundancy costs of £810 million. £634 million of the £810 million is for staff employed in primary care trusts (PCT) prior to the reforms. The following assumptions were used to calculate the costs:

The whole non-provider administrative spend reduces by one-third real over four years;

Natural wastage (the proportion of staff that leaves of their own accord, for example through finding new jobs or through retirement) is 3%, per annum;

57% of PCT and 63%, of strategic health authority (SHA) staff transfer to the new organisations; and

The redundancy multipliers (the number of times their salary an individual can expect to receive if made redundant) are 1.5 for the Department, SHAs and arms length bodies, and 1.2 for PCTs. These are based on the best information available, including data from the electronic staff records database.

The estimated number of full-time equivalent posts lost are 13,900 (8,900 redundancies and 5,000 natural wastage) system-wide of which 11,400 (7,900 redundancies and 3,500 natural wastage) are for staff employed by PCTs.

This upfront cost will result in a £1.5 billion saving per year by 2014-15, and £4.5 billion over the course of the parliament. The upfront costs of the modernisation will be more than recouped from the cost-savings by the end of 2012-13.

The impact assessment has already been placed in the Library and is available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsLegislation/DH_123583

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

Mr Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many occasions Ministers from his Department have met representatives of South London Healthcare NHS Trust since May 2010. [115399]

Mr Simon Burns: On 1 August 2011, my right hon. Friend State for Health visited Princess Royal University Hospital where he had a meeting with the Bexley Clinical Cabinet and other parties, including representatives from South London Healthcare NHS Trust, to discuss progress on the Queen Mary Sidcup campus project, known as the Bexley Health and Well-Being Campus.

Diary records held by the Department's individual ministerial private offices show that there have been no other occasions where Ministers have met representatives of South London Healthcare NHS Trust since May 2010.

6 July 2012 : Column 843W

Stress: Long Term Unemployed People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 12 June 2012, Official Report, columns 369-439W, on mental illness, if he will fund research into assessing the levels of stress in the long-term unemployed. [115796]

Paul Burstow: The Department's National Institute for Health Research welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including stress in the long-term unemployed. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made.

Home Department

Essex Police Authority

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will discuss with Essex Police Authority improving its response to requests for information. [115079]

Nick Herbert [holding answer 3 July 2012]: No, this issue is for Essex Police Authority to address.

Self-defence

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on the practice and promotion of self-defence; and if she will make a statement. [115488]

Mr Blunt: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Justice.

Being attacked at home or on the street is a terrifying prospect. The current law permits members of the public to defend themselves using a level of force that is reasonable in the circumstances.

We added provisions to the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 to provide the public with further reassurance that the law is on their side. Those provisions make it clear that that a person acting in self defence is under no duty to retreat from an attacker; and can use reasonable force to protect property.

We have also been working with the Home Office to update Code of Practice G (Arrest) made under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984. This will encourage officers when making decisions on arrest to take account of the circumstances under which the law allows the use of reasonable force. The provisions in the 2012 Act and revised guidance for the police will come into effect later this year.

International Development

Sahel

Susan Elan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he is taking to address the food crisis in the Sahel. [115198]

6 July 2012 : Column 844W

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The United Nations currently estimates that the food crisis in the Sahel region of west Africa has left over 18 million people at risk of food shortage over the next few months. Of these, 8 million people require urgent assistance.

UK contributions stand at £25.4 million.

This British aid will support 1.6 million people at risk of hunger across Mali, Niger, Chad, Mauritania and Burkina Faso, to achieve the following results:

Improved nutrition for 185,000 children and women, including therapeutic treatment to save the lives of over 110,000 severely malnourished children under five years old;

Food and cash vouchers for over 250,000 men, women and children;

Livelihoods support to over 980,000 people through:

1. The provision of seeds and tools for families to enable them to feed themselves for the next year and;

2. Animal feed and vaccinations to keep farmers' livestock alive.

These direct funds are in addition to £27 million of UK contributions also being provided in 2012 to the Sahel region through multilateral agencies such as the European Commission Humanitarian Office (ECHO) and the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).

UK officials continue to monitor the situation closely, and liaise with our opposite numbers in other governments to urge other countries also to take their fair share of the response.

Justice

Parliamentary Private Secretaries: Visits Abroad

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice on which occasions his parliamentary private secretary has travelled overseas with him or on his behalf since May 2010. [115349]

Mr Kenneth Clarke: My parliamentary private Secretary, the hon. Member for Wyre and Preston North (Mr Wallace), has accompanied me overseas on one occasion, on a visit to St Petersburg between 14 and 17 May 2012. I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 360W.

There was no cost to the Ministry of Justice as my parliamentary private secretary paid his own travel expenses.

Re-offenders

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what information his Department holds on the reconviction rates of prisoners released from each prison in England and Wales in the last five years. [115420]

Mr Blunt: Your question has been answered using the Ministry of Justice's published proven re-offending statistics for England and Wales. These statistics, which include a breakdown of re-offending by individual prison, are published on a quarterly basis and the latest bulletin, for the period July 2009 to June 2010, was published on 26 April 2012.

6 July 2012 : Column 845W

The tables show the following:

Table 1; Proven re-offending of adult offenders (aged 18 and over) given sentences of less than 12 months by individual prison, based on first discharge from each prison, 2007 to June 2010.

Table 2; Proven re-offending of adult offenders given sentences of 12 months or more by individual prison, based on first discharge from each prison, 2007 to June 2010.

Table 3: Proven re-offending of juvenile offenders, by individual prison, based on first discharge from each prison, 2007 to June 2010.

Proven re-offending is defined as any offence committed in a one year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand or warning in the one year follow-up. Following this one year period, a further six month waiting period is allowed for cases to progress through the courts.

Please note that the published figures only go back to 2007 and 2009 is the latest full calendar year for which data are available.

6 July 2012 : Column 846W

A large part of the variability in the re-offending rates reflects the mix of offenders who are held in different prisons and therefore comparisons between prisons should not be made using the raw re-offending rates provided in the tables.

To account for the variability in the mix of prisoners, a model has been developed to help explain if re-offending rates are affected by the specific prison they are discharged from or if the rate of re-offending reflects the mix of offenders. For example, a group of prisoners with a high number of previous offences is more likely to re-offend than a group with a low number of previous offences.

Further information on this model can be found in the latest bulletin and the accompanying ‘Definitions and Measurement' document.

For your information, re-offending statistics are available from the Ministry of Justice website at:

www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/reoffending/proven-re-offending

Table 1: Proven re-offending of adult offenders given sentences of less than 12 months by individual prison, based on first discharge from each prison, 2007 to June 2010 (1,2)
 20072008200912 months ending June 2010
 Proportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offenders

Category B

        

Dovegate

*

1

60.3

68

61.3

240

         

Category C

        

Acklington

62.3

61

66.7

39

*

28

43.8

32

Ashwell

54.8

31

57.7

52

*

18

*

7

Blundeston

71.9

32

*

23

*

16

*

5

Buckley Hall

*

28

*

15

*

15

*

16

Bullwood Hall

38.4

73

27.4

113

22.4

125

34.8

115

Bure

*

9

Canterbury

40.0

85

30.6

121

24.6

122

29.8

124

Channings Wood

56.1

98

51.2

125

56.3

144

53.5

127

Coldingley

*

5

*

1

*

2

*

4

Dartmoor

57.6

59

59.5

131

55.4

92

58.5

82

Edmunds Hill

53.9

382

59.1

325

47.2

214

44.2

156

Erlestoke

63.2

38

63.9

36

62.2

37

56.7

30

Everthorpe

59.2

284

65.0

200

56.1

198

64.2

176

Featherstone

*

21

*

4

*

1

*

1

Guys Marsh

63.6

217

58.0

195

60.5

134

59.0

117

Haverigg

59.3

162

63.5

197

51.1

88

45.1

51

Highpoint

61.5

96

59.1

66

56.1

57

55.0

40

Kennet

50.9

55

50.9

59

43.5

69

48.9

45

Lancaster

*

29

75.4

69

63.0

81

66.2

74

Lindholme

65.5

261

55.4

222

48.5

130

39.8

113

Littlehey

*

19

*

19

*

10

*

29

Maidstone

*

3

*

3

*

5

*

4

Moorland Closed

59.8

82

56.7

150

66.7

102

65.2

69

Mount (The)

*

4

*

2

Onley

66.9

290

59.6

314

56.0

252

64.6

189

Ranby

64.0

367

63.9

371

59.8

318

54.1

294

Risley

75.6

78

59.8

87

60.0

60

60.5

43

Shrewsbury

63.3

300

65.3

369

54.5

514

55.4

332

Stafford

39.3

61

55.0

111

48.6

72

42.4

33

Stocken

56.0

75

66.3

98

54.1

98

49.4

83

Usk/Prescoed

38.5

109

41.0

134

33.3

93

32.4

68

6 July 2012 : Column 847W

6 July 2012 : Column 848W

Wayland

56.4

78

57.7

85

64.1

78

55.3

38

Wealstun

43.7

359

43.5

170

*

26

*

20

Wellingborough

59.4

32

54.7

53

34.9

43

48.8

43

Whatton

*

15

*

9

*

4

*

2

Wolds

*

9

66.1

56

52.2

46

42.1

38

Wymott

35.0

40

61.5

39

*

26

43.3

30

         

Female

        

Askham Grange

*

10

14.6

48

10.6

47

*

28

Bronzefield

62.2

481

63.3

616

59.8

572

60.5

539

Downview

41.4

58

50.5

107

48.2

56

39.3

61

Drake Hall

48.1

183

41.5

159

44.8

154

39.4

137

East Sutton Park

*

10

*

8

*

20

*

19

Eastwood Park

68.0

512

65.4

489

61.7

475

63.7

438

Foston Hall

65.8

199

64.5

200

62.6

211

66.5

155

Holloway

58.0

567

60.4

601

58.0

576

55.2

529

Low Newton

71.6

225

72.6

292

70.1

241

64.1

220

Morton Hall

17.7

34

25.2

107

22.9

131

24.8

105

New Hall

74.7

391

70.6

449

62.9

313

59.7

263

Send

*

8

47.6

42

*

25

*

21

Styal

67.6

416

69.7

534

58.9

494

53.8

461

         

Male local

        

Altcourse

64.6

1,044

64.7

1,434

61.7

1,595

60.5

1,391

Bedford

57.6

689

58.3

636

54.0

622

59.6

510

Belmarsh

63.7

479

67.4

423

62.3

514

63.4

486

Birmingham

65.2

1,040

66.6

1,299

61.1

1,267

59.1

1,041

Bristol

70.1

434

70.2

524

68.3

485

65.7

434

Brixton

63.6

626

66.6

635

62.8

728

66.1

661

Bullingdon

64.7

570

62.0

661

59.4

741

57.2

717

Cardiff

67.0

436

68.6

449

65.8

483

66.7

445

Chelmsford

65.9

637

66.1

654

62.7

649

63.8

613

Doncaster

65.7

1,139

64.5

1,061

65.0

1,058

62.0

1,019

Dorchester

70.2

208

73.6

216

65.5

229

69.6

207

Durham

67.8

680

67.7

742

65.7

609

69.5

531

Exeter

66.0

680

72.0

718

65.2

574

69.0

474

Forest Bank

66.9

752

63.3

1,073

62.6

828

59.1

840

Gloucester

72.4

275

75.0

260

68.2

214

64.2

215

High Down

69.3

505

64.7

903

62.6

725

59.8

681

Holme House

69.7

680

66.3

694

65.3

597

65.3

629

Hull

71.7

481

70.2

477

66.5

499

71.5

488

Leeds

71.9

705

70.4

607

64.0

728

63.0

638

Leicester

60.2

389

63.8

320

65.0

303

62.3

257

Lewes

67.2

341

63.2

467

62.5

419

61.3

375

Lincoln

66.7

529

63.1

674

61.9

653

64.0

553

Liverpool

62.0

1,412

61.6

1,751

56.4

1,430

54.5

1,305

Manchester

61.8

806

59.9

838

61.6

698

60.1

562

Norwich

68.2

444

64.5

389

63.3

491

65.8

562

Nottingham

67.5

425

63.7

438

64.1

359

67.0

376

Parc

66.6

556

61.5

649

61.7

790

61.4

735

Pentonville

66.2

707

63.6

816

64.0

892

62.6

886

Peterborough

61.3

963

62.6

1,020

58.7

936

57.0

939

Preston

67.0

400

68.7

479

66.4

515

66.3

495

Swansea

63.6

313

62.2

328

64.0

300

63.9

299

Wandsworth

63.0

622

65.3

812

64.7

675

62.5

717

6 July 2012 : Column 849W

6 July 2012 : Column 850W

Winchester

63.8

378

62.2

437

63.1

488

64.8

418

Woodhill

61.3

563

62.4

633

60.9

652

59.5

598

Wormwood Scrubs

56.4

826

60.2

1,088

59.0

1,165

58.7

1,057

         

Male open and semi-open

        

Ford

41.8

395

34.4

387

33.5

442

28.1

388

Grendon/Spring Hill

28.1

160

36.3

193

30.6

157

30.0

120

Hollesley Bay

36.3

262

47.4

344

33.7

306

34.2

222

Kirkham

37.9

536

33.4

416

27.0

204

23.8

105

Kirklevington Grange

*

1

*

4

*

3

*

6

Latchmere House

*

1

Leyhill

40.7

393

34.4

427

21.4

290

22.7

203

Moorland Open

41.4

140

31.1

148

36.7

128

35.2

71

North Sea Camp

40.1

421

35.7

415

31.3

348

29.6

291

Sudbury

42.9

140

32.3

192

26.4

110

22.5

49

         

Male YOI

        

Ashfield

66.2

68

78.1

32

65.0

40

69.4

36

Aylesbury

*

4

*

1

Brinsford

75.8

153

77.4

261

66.4

223

63.6

217

Castington

79.4

165

87.9

132

77.7

139

79.3

116

Cookham Wood

47.9

48

*

4

*

3

*

8

Deerbolt

69.5

259

71.1

291

65.7

216

63.7

179

Feltham

70.4

115

70.1

154

63.9

180

65.8

146

Glen Parva

69.0

551

67.0

587

63.3

536

64.6

506

Hindley

67.2

67

80.5

41

87.1

31

77.1

35

Huntercombe

70.6

68

66.7

51

68.6

35

*

22

Lancaster Farms

80.8

203

78.8

255

79.3

270

75.2

278

Northallerton

72.3

394

71.7

442

66.8

346

66.8

328

Portland

66.3

184

62.0

237

62.1

211

67.5

163

Reading

73.3

191

74.8

151

74.0

150

75.2

145

Rochester

68.6

194

68.3

183

60.4

396

60.4

376

Stoke Heath

70.7

447

66.8

358

70.2

295

67.2

250

Swinfen Hall

*

1

Thorn Cross

58.7

104

48.1

235

40.4

193

34.8

161

Warren Hill

*

29

*

19

*

27

*

17

Werrington

*

20

*

22

*

22

*

24

Wetherby

78.7

75

87.5

32

*

24

*

29

         

Male Cluster

        

Camp Hill

62.5

56

59.4

69

59.2

76

54.9

51

Parkhurst

*

6

*

2

*

1

*

1

Isle of Wight

*

21

Blakenhurst

66.4

946

71.4

434

Brockhill

47.1

102

71.1

38

Hewell Grange

30.4

115

34.9

83

Hewell

61.9

543

57.0

1,095

55.5

1,071

Sheppey Cluster (Elmley)

72.0

425

70.1

428

68.9

373

65.4

347

Sheppey Cluster (Standford Hill)

42.0

467

42.8

549

32.5

486

28.7

377

Sheppey Cluster (Swaleside)

*

13

6 July 2012 : Column 851W

6 July 2012 : Column 852W

Table 2: Proven re-offending of adult offenders given sentences of 12 months or more by individual prison, based on first discharge from each prison, 2007 to June 2010(1,2)
 20072008200912 months ending June 2010
 Proportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)Number of offenders

Category B

        

Dovegate

42.6

61

30.1

83

37.0

92

44.5

128

Garth

30.2

53

39.3

56

27.5

69

30.6

49

Gartree

*

1

Kingston (Portsmouth)

*

1

Lowdham Grange

34.0

47

38.1

42

36.0

50

32.8

58

Rye Hill

34.2

38

18.8

32

20.0

35

24.4

41

         

Category C

        

Acklington

35.4

495

39.9

474

37.3

494

37.2

427

Ashwell

30.1

209

36.3

240

34.8

118

32.1

56

Blundeston

39.5

147

45.2

157

31.7

142

34.2

111

Buckley Hall

34.4

154

35.3

201

23.7

198

26.9

171

Bullwood Hall

*

28

21.2

33

*

26

*

26

Bure

*

24

Canterbury

17.1

35

18.8

48

24.3

37

19.3

57

Channings Wood

35.6

346

37.9

375

32.9

420

32.4

405

Coldingley

34.0

53

28.4

88

38.1

113

40.7

91

Dartmoor

28.5

316

36.8

315

36.2

337

36.2

318

Edmunds Hill

40.6

318

41.5

328

36.3

344

39.6

283

Erlestoke

32.2

174

38.2

178

35.5

183

42.3

187

Everthorpe

41.8

502

45.3

525

40.3

551

43.6

511

Featherstone

31.5

292

30.4

224

28.7

174

33.3

150

Guys Marsh

44.2

299

39.1

294

37.6

306

37.7

316

Haverigg

45.3

322

43.6

401

43.1

325

39.9

253

Highpoint

42.0

350

39.5

410

34.5

444

34.6

376

Kennet

*

27

30.7

179

28.0

229

24.6

195

Lancaster

39.5

162

44.9

178

44.2

172

41.3

138

Lindholme

44.8

511

44.2

606

34.8

477

39.1

414

Littlehey

12.6

231

19

258

14.8

216

20.8

207

Maidstone

29.5

112

20.7

111

15.9

107

8.5

106

Moorland Closed

43.2

431

37.4

444

37.2

374

38.4

281

Mount (The)

33.3

87

34.8

115

29.5

105

30.9

110

Onley

44.6

446

45.5

435

45.6

445

42.3

421

Ranby

40.6

609

41.4

614

36.3

634

40.7

514

Risley

35.9

569

32.4

562

32.0

466

35.6

368

Shepton Mallet

*

2

Shrewsbury

41.5

65

53.2

62

42.1

107

36.2

130

Stafford

33.4

350

33.1

459

31.4

494

33.5

418

Stocken

38.8

330

41.8

424

37.0

405

37.8

336

Usk/Prescoed

14.5

241

12.2

245

8.6

222

7.6

223

Verne (The)

20.6

68

14

43

17.8

45

18.2

33

Wayland

30.3

277

38.7

354

33.3

423

34.7

317

Wealstun

24.0

488

35.8

313

41.4

191

40.7

118

Wellingborough

37.7

257

38.1

307

37.6

287

36.0

242

Whatton

3.3

274

8.7

288

9.3

225

10.7

168

Wolds

34.2

155

32.7

156

36.9

195

40.4

208

Wymott

23.7

472

27.6

485

25.4

457

26.5

377

         

Female

        

Askham Grange

7.2

97

8.3

109

5.7

122

5.5

127

Bronzefield

25.0

40

37.5

72

30.9

81

27.4

95

Downview

25.6

133

23.5

179

29.1

134

28.9

121

Drake Hall

12.0

192

11

209

13.4

179

16.9

183

6 July 2012 : Column 853W

6 July 2012 : Column 854W

East Sutton Park

6.9

72

0

53

5.1

59

5.5

55

Eastwood Park

24.2

91

29.9

117

39.5

109

35.6

90

Foston Hall

26.6

94

34.7

75

21.7

83

23.2

69

Holloway

30.5

95

28.6

91

36.6

93

35.9

103

Low Newton

38.3

120

34

153

43.6

133

44.3

113

Morton Hall

8.2

85

9.3

108

12.4

113

15.7

108

New Hall

47.0

132

41.4

145

35.4

144

35.3

139

Send

26.2

65

20.9

110

27.7

94

24.7

85

Styal

32.3

155

25.2

163

25.2

155

29.6

152

         

Male local

        

Altcourse

34.7

496

39.4

554

42.9

623

44.5

582

Bedford

41.7

115

50

132

45.5

167

51.4

146

Belmarsh

43.5

115

39.4

104

39.7

136

41.6

149

Birmingham

45.2

473

44

475

37.2

376

39.5

398

Bristol

52.8

106

42.4

118

47.0

132

54.1

146

Brixton

52.2

115

47.1

85

54.7

117

54.0

126

Bullingdon

37.3

279

35.6

292

44.8

339

47.7

300

Cardiff

43.1

195

42.1

183

43.9

269

50.7

274

Chelmsford

46.5

157

46.9

145

44.0

150

46.7

152

Doncaster

44.6

296

40.9

257

42.1

366

45.5

389

Dorchester

52.6

38

38.2

55

34.0

50

43.9

66

Durham

50.5

317

53.3

300

49.6

280

43.5

246

Exeter

49.0

100

53.9

89

43.7

103

51.4

105

Forest Bank

47.6

389

44.1

415

41.6

445

42.7

567

Gloucester

55.7

79

54.1

85

35.5

110

44.1

93

High Down

37.9

169

48.6

212

40.1

257

45.9

246

Holme House

50.0

408

44.7

385

47.3

429

50.0

424

Hull

39.3

280

37.6

277

48.9

307

50.4

252

Leeds

50.2

267

46.2

247

46.5

314

47.1

340

Leicester

47.4

57

50.6

81

50.0

76

46.3

67

Lewes

54.9

133

41.5

188

40.2

194

44.4

171

Lincoln

41.9

191

47.5

242

41.2

291

41.3

298

Liverpool

43.9

524

42.1

627

41.3

656

42.3

650

Manchester

42.0

281

42.2

320

37.2

312

39.9

286

Norwich

37.1

202

38.8

209

39.6

207

41.7

252

Nottingham

49.5

109

54

113

41.3

126

45.5

176

Parc

49.1

574

48.7

598

45.4

625

48.4

663

Pentonville

50.7

142

43.4

173

50.5

192

54.1

220

Peterborough

43.4

348

42

286

36.9

344

38.2

401

Preston

38.5

122

47.1

138

43.8

194

50.3

203

Swansea

40.5

153

40.3

119

39.7

131

50.7

144

Wandsworth

31.8

214

35.1

231

32.0

241

37.6

234

Winchester

32.5

157

37.3

161

37.4

187

30.3

175

Woodhill

51.0

155

43.6

149

46.3

164

49.5

200

Wormwood Scrubs

46.3

242

43.7

252

44.7

465

44.2

423

         

Male open and semi-open

        

Blantyre House

3.3

30

3.2

31

*

29

*

24

Ford

12.2

327

13.1

350

13.1

366

13.6

330

Grendon/Spring Hill

8.9

269

11.1

253

12.9

186

8.9

146

Hollesley Bay

13.5

281

21

309

16.8

340

18.0

284

Kirkham

11.8

465

10.9

551

11.2

499

11.6

388

Kirklevington Grange

7.3

137

12.2

164

18.0

111

10.9

101

6 July 2012 : Column 855W

6 July 2012 : Column 856W

Latchmere House

6.7

105

6.7

119

5.9

118

8.7

103

Leyhill

14.1

276

10.1

328

12.2

354

12.7

323

Moorland Open

13.3

241

17.1

252

15.4

175

18.1

138

North Sea Camp

17.9

201

16.1

292

13.2

287

12.1

264

Sudbury

17.1

422

12.3

424

13.4

434

12.7

355

         

Male YOI

        

Ashfield

64.4

45

72.5

40

54.7

53

55.0

60

Aylesbury

33.3

87

27.3

88

29.9

77

40.5

79

Brinsford

67.2

61

53.9

128

36.3

168

45.0

149

Castington

58.0

69

64.6

65

62.7

67

64.2

53

Cookham Wood

29.4

51

*

1

*

14

*

15

Deerbolt

53.5

331

54

387

47.9

340

47.2

301

Feltham

54.1

37

*

25

34.4

32

52.0

50

Glen Parva

52.9

420

46.2

461

48.1

478

48.2

409

Hindley

47.7

149

53.7

136

61.9

42

80.7

31

Huntercombe

49.4

81

51.5

68

56.9

58

58.3

48

Lancaster Farms

56.9

72

56.3

71

53.2

94

52.8

108

Northallerton

55.5

247

58.6

292

53.1

258

49.8

261

Portland

40.9

301

45.9

314

40.6

345

41.6

308

Reading

51.8

56

45.5

66

40.0

40

42.6

54

Rochester

44.0

248

46.7

353

42.0

472

47.5

503

Stoke Heath

47.6

313

51

288

47.1

293

54.0

285

Swinfen Hall

29.4

143

34

144

32.8

116

30.6

98

Thorn Cross

28.8

177

28.6

224

21.7

276

25.1

267

Warren Hill

*

29

*

21

70.6

34

*

29

Werrington

*

29

*

25

*

22

*

21

Wetherby

62.9

62

54.3

35

65.9

41

58.3

36

         

Male Cluster

        

Albany

*

22

*

23

*

18

*

19

Camp Hill

38.5

327

39.5

306

33.9

248

31.1

222

Parkhurst

34.4

32

*

14

*

13

*

12

Isle of Wight

*

25

Blakenhurst

44.8

239

51.3

80

Brockhill

25.5

110

34.9

66

Hewell Grange

9.5

148

13.9

65

Hewell

39.6

288

32.0

606

32.9

578

Sheppey Cluster (Elmley)

36.0

272

41.2

284

39.9

193

45.5

202

Sheppey Cluster (Standford Hill)

11.6

337

15.2

342

14.0

315

16.1

279

Sheppey Cluster (Swaleside)

*

6

*

7

*

5

*

18

         

Dispersal

        

Frankland

5.7

35

*

19

*

14

*

15

Full Sutton

*

27

*

19

*

11

*

9

Long Lartin

*

4

*

8

*

5

*

4

Wakefield

*

15

*

23

*

26

*

18

Whitemoor

*

8

*

2

*

3

*

2