Migration

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how migrants arriving or departing from London Victoria Coach Station are accounted for in the net migration statistics. [R] [117380]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to respond to your Parliamentary Question asking how migrants arriving or departing from London Victoria Coach Station are accounted for in the net migration statistics. (117380)

The main source from which ONS calculates net migration is the International Passenger Survey, which is a continuous voluntary sample survey. It samples passengers travelling via the principal air, sea and Channel Tunnel routes between the UK and countries outside the British Isles. Passengers arriving or departing from London Victoria Coach Station could be sampled in the IPS at the port at which they entered or left the UK. Therefore, these migrants are included in the UK net migration estimate but figures are not available separately for migrants travelling via London Victoria Coach Station.

16 July 2012 : Column 542W

Performance Appraisal

Ian Lavery: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps he has taken to ensure that black and minority ethnic, disabled, part-time and employees aged over 50 do not receive disproportionately low markings in performance appraisals; and if he will make a statement. [117351]

Mr Maude: The Cabinet Office applies a rigorous moderation process on performance assessments to ensure fairness and consistency across the Department. End-year markings are analysed for equality to ensure any issues in the distribution of markings are identified and addressed.

Procurement

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of contracts issued by his Department were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises in 2011-12; and what proportion this represented of the monetary value of contracts awarded by his Department in 2011-12. [111925]

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the total (a) number and (b) value of contracts issued by (i) his Department and (ii) bodies for which he is responsible which were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises was in the latest period for which figures are available. [111213]

Mr Maude: Since January 2011, my Department has published its contracts above the value of £10,000 on the Contracts Finder website:

www.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk

863 (61.9%) of the contracts published up to May 2012 were awarded to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

On 9 March the Cabinet Office published its report ‘Making Government Business More Accessible to SMEs—One Year On':

https://update.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/making-Government-business-more-accessible-smes-one-year

This report includes details of Cabinet Office spend with SMEs and highlights that the proportion of Central Government direct spend with SMEs is on track to double, from 6.5% of direct spend in 2009-10, to 13.7%.

Public Sector: Billing

Gordon Banks: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what systems are in place to ensure that main contractors for public sector contracts pay their subcontractors within 30 days in line with the Government’s prompt payment code; and if he will make a statement. [117037]

Mr Maude [holding answer 13 July 2012]: There is a requirement in central Government contract terms for contractors to pay their subcontractors within 30 days in line with the Government’s prompt payment code.

We urge subcontractors to use the ‘Mystery Shopper’ service, anonymously if necessary, to report to Government instances where this is not happening; and we regularly publish investigated cases on the Cabinet Office website.

16 July 2012 : Column 543W

We are also making increasing use of project bank accounts, which ensure that subcontractors down to at least tier 3 are paid directly and promptly.

I stressed the importance of this policy to the chief executive officers of some of the most significant suppliers at a meeting on 28 June, and the Government is collecting evidence to ensure this is happening.

Renewable Energy: Employment

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people are employed in the energy sector in (a) Nottinghamshire and (b) Ashfield constituency. [117492]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated July 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people are employed in the energy sector in (a) Nottinghamshire and (b) the Ashfield constituency. [117492]

Annual statistics on the number of employees are available from the ONS release Business Register Employment Survey (BRES) at

www.ons.gov.uk

The following table contains the latest statistics available, which show the number of employees in the energy sector for Nottinghamshire and the Ashfield constituency in 2010.

 Number of employees in the energy sector in 2010

Nottinghamshire

2,200

Ashfield constituency

(1)

(1) Unavailable

Please note that the estimate for the Ashfield constituency is designated as disclosive.

Space Weather

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what assessment he has made of (a) the (i) likelihood and (ii) potential severity of changes in space weather and (b) the potential effects of such changes on the UK power infrastructure; [116751]

(2) whether he plans to provide information to the public on the risks and consequences of changes in space weather. [116753]

Mr Maude [holding answer 13 July 2012]: The Government published its assessment of the risk posed by severe space weather in the National Risk Register at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/national-risk-register

The potential impacts of such events fall mainly on infrastructure, and the Government’s assessment of the broad kinds of impact was provided to the House of Commons Defence Select Committee and published as part of its Report on Developing Threats: Electro-Magnetic Pulses (EMP) (HC 1552—8 February 2012).

16 July 2012 : Column 544W

Work Experience

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how many interns work in his Department’s press office; [116177]

(2) how many interns work in the Prime Minister’s press office. [116181]

Mr Maude: The Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet Office Communications Directorate provides the press office function for both the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Prime Minister.

The Communications Directorate currently has one graduate intern who is a salaried employee on a short-term contract.

Justice

Assets

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assets his Department has sold and leased back over the last 12 months; what the sale price was of each asset so sold; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of leasing back each such asset over the period of the lease. [116771]

Mr Blunt: The Ministry of Justice has not sold and leased back any land or property assets in the last 12 months.

Cemeteries

Lyn Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment his Department has made of the need for further burial space and grounds (a) in London and (b) nationally. [116700]

Mr Djanogly: After careful consideration, I took the view last autumn that introducing a policy of reusing graves was not critical at this time. We have nevertheless committed to keeping the situation under review. In some circumstances section 74 of the London Local Authorities Act 2007 allows for the reuse of graves in London.

Chief Coroner

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will place in the Library a copy of the job description for the post of Chief Coroner; and if he will make a statement. [116656]

Mr Djanogly: A summary job description was produced when the appointment of His Honour Judge Peter Thornton QC as Chief Coroner was announced on 22 May 2012. With the agreement of the Lord Chief Justice, a copy of this summary has been placed in the House Libraries. A full job description will be published in due course.

A written ministerial statement was made on 22 May 2012. Further information about the role and appointment can be found on the Judicial Office website at:

http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/about-the-judiciary/the-chief-coroner#headingAnchor3

16 July 2012 : Column 545W

Claims Management Services

Jonathan Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of regulation of claims management companies who submit non-sale claims to lenders and the Financial Ombudsman Service; and if he will make a statement. [117574]

Mr Djanogly: The effectiveness of the regulatory response to claims management companies (CMC) is under continuous review. The Department's Claims Management Regulation Unit has established a specialist team to respond to growing concerns over the practices of some CMCs providing services for consumers bringing payment protection insurance (PPI) claims against lenders. One of the main priorities is to deal with the unacceptable increase in incidence of non sale claims made to lenders. The unit is carrying out a comprehensive programme of audits of CMCs to root out the bad practices and bring CMCs to compliance. The unit is working with the Financial Ombudsman Service and many of the major lenders to gather the evidence needed to target these investigations and has issued further guidance on the standards which CMCs must meet. Enforcement action has been and will be taken against CMCs which fail to comply.

Criminal Injuries Compensation: Scotland

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) whether he has received any request from the Scottish Government to transfer responsibility for the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in Scotland to Ministers in the Scottish Government; [117127]

(2) whether his Department has proposed transferring responsibility for the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in Scotland to the Scottish Government. [117128]

Mr Djanogly: Neither Scottish Government Ministers nor the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. and learned Friend the Member for Rushcliffe (Mr Clarke), have proposed any such changes.

Driving Offences: Nottinghamshire

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many motorists were prosecuted for speeding offences in (a) Nottinghamshire and (b) Ashfield constituency in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [117396]

Mr Blunt: The number of proceedings at magistrates court for speed limit offences in the Nottinghamshire police force area, from 2009 to 2011, can be viewed in the following table.

Information available centrally does not allow a breakdown of cases by parliamentary constituency.

Proceedings at magistrates court for speed limit offences in the Nottinghamshire police force area, 2009 to 2011
 200920102011

Speeding limit offences

3,686

3,345

3,286

16 July 2012 : Column 546W

Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Employment Tribunals Service: Scotland

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many individuals in (a) Scotland and (b) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency took a case to an employment tribunal in each year since 2007. [116685]

Mr Djanogly: Employment tribunals in Scotland have power to deal with proceedings, in the main, where the respondent (or one of the respondents) to proceedings resides or carries on business in Scotland.

Initially, all proceedings in Scotland are processed by the Glasgow Office. Subsequently, the office that deals with a case is determined (subject to judicial direction to the contrary) by the postcode of the respondent (i.e. the employer, or former employer, against which a claim is brought). Claims where a respondent is based in the Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency would (without further direction) remain at the Glasgow Office.

Information on the addresses of claimants (i.e. the individuals bringing proceedings) is not collated centrally and (to the extent it is held at all) could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Electronic records held by local tribunal offices are anonymised and archived one year after the disposal of the proceedings, and hard copy files are disposed of at the same time.

However, by interrogating internal management information, it is possible to provide data on the number of claims received by employment tribunals in Scotland in each financial year since 2006-07; and the number of claims accepted by employment tribunals where the respondent was based in the Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency. Insofar as that latter category is concerned, the only information that is collated centrally dates from June 2011.

Information relating to the period March 2012 to June 2012 is subject to internal data cleansing and will not be available until the Ministry of Justice publishes its 2012-13 Quarter 1 statistics covering the tribunals administered by HM Courts and Tribunals Service.

Table 1: Employment tribunal claims accepted in Scotland in each financial year 2006-07 to 2011-12
Financial yearTotal claimsSingle claimsMultiple claims

2006-07

28,822

4.643

24,179

2007-08

33,017

4.230

28,787

2008-09

22,345

4.983

17,362

2009-10

22,754

5.885

16,869

2010-11

19,212

5.125

14,087

2011-12

17,678

4.973

12,705

Source: (1 )2009-10 ET Annual Report Database (Official Statistics) (2 )2006-07 to 2008-09 ET Central Database (Management Information)

16 July 2012 : Column 547W

16 July 2012 : Column 548W

Table 2: Employment tribunal claims accepted where the respondent was based in the Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency June 2011 to March 2012
Financial yearTotal claimsSingle claimsMultiple claims

June 2011 to March 2012

75

64

11

Notes: 1. Claims can be either a single or multiple claim. A single claim is where a claimant brings an individual action against one or more respondents. Multiple claims are where two or more claimants bring an action against one or more respondents. 2. The figures given in Table 2 are for the postcodes that are covered by the Kilmarnock & Loudoun constituency. These postcodes are KA1, 3, 4, 5, 16, 17 & 18. There is some overlap in all of these postcodes with other constituencies, but it is not possible to break the postcode data down further. 3. Rounding All figures are independently rounded and thus may not add to totals. The following conventions have been used throughout: Values less than 100 remain as unit values; Values > 1,000 are rounded to the nearest 100. Source: Local ET Ml System—Glasgow (Management Information)

Ex Gratia Payments

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate his Department has made of the monetary value of ex gratia payments made through schemes administered by his Department in the last two years. [116772]

Mr Djanogly: The Department and its three executive agencies made ex gratia payments totalling £1.22 million in 2010-11 and £1.15 million in 2011-12.

Further information on ex gratia payments is also available on page 142 of the Department's Annual Report and Accounts 2011-12 which were laid in Parliament on 11 July 2012.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the cost to HM Courts and Tribunals Service of enforcing the payment of financial penalties levied by courts in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [117087]

Mr Djanogly: HM Courts and Tribunals Service costs of criminal enforcement for the last three financial years was:

Financial yearCost (£ million)

2011-12

54.0

2010-11

58.5

2009-10

59.9

Costs are the direct staff, office and court costs relating to the enforcement of financial penalties imposed by the courts. Bailiff costs which are reimbursed by the offender, and central overhead costs are not included.

Legal Aid Scheme

Mark Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much legal aid funding was paid to Leigh Day & Co in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [116958]

Mr Djanogly: The following sums have been paid to Leigh Day & Co in each of the past five years:

 Expenditure (£)

2007-08

1,539,133

2008-09

1,348.631

2009-10

992,334

2010-11

1,182,080

2011-12

1,216,889

These payments are for all of the firm's legal aid work over the last five years and cover multiple legal aid clients. The sums include VAT and disbursements, such as expenses incurred on cases, expert fees and translation of documents, and barristers' fees. Although paid by the LSC directly to the solicitors firm, these costs may then be paid to other parties involved in the case, so the totals do not represent the firm's earnings.

Offenders: Females

Mrs Grant: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many female prisoners have children under the age of 18; and if he will make a statement; [117015]

(2) how many and what proportion of women with a previous conviction have children under the age of 18; and if he will make a statement. [117016]

Mr Blunt: Data on the number of prisoners with dependent children under 18 are not routinely collected. However, research studies have explored this issue. One estimate of the proportion of female prisoners with dependent children under the age of 18 comes from the Ministry of Justice’s Surveying Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR) survey, which followed 1,435 adult prisoners sentenced to between one month and four years in prison in 2005 and 2006 in England and Wales. This study found that around 59% of female prisoners in the sample reported having dependent children under the age of 18 and that those women had an average of two children each. For women with a previous conviction or caution (85% of the sample), the proportion with children was the same, around 59%.

Police Custody: Young People

Sir Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 so that 17-year-olds are no longer treated as adults in police custody. [116315]

Nick Herbert: Having considered carefully the benefits, costs and risks of treating 17-year-olds as children under the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, the Government have concluded that it would not be appropriate to amend the law at the present time.

16 July 2012 : Column 549W

Prisoners: Kent

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners in Kent have keys to their own cells. [117227]

Mr Blunt: As at 12 July 2012, a total of 1,153 prisoners held in prison establishments in Kent had courtesy keys to their cells.

Governors may permit prisoners to hold a courtesy key to their cell. This permits the prisoner to open and close their cell door during set times. Prison staff have a key that overrides these courtesy locks and thereby ensures complete control overall cell doors.

Prostitution

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many sex workers were cautioned in the Metropolitan police area during 2011; [117501]

(2) how many persons in the Metropolitan police area were convicted of controlling prostitutes for gain in 2011; [117505]

(3) how many sex workers were arrested and proceeded against during 2011. [117502]

Mr Blunt: The number of offenders cautioned for selected prostitution related offences in the Metropolitan police force area, in 2011, can be viewed in table 1.

The number of defendants found guilty at all courts for controlling prostitutes for gain in the Metropolitan police force area, in 2011, can be viewed in table 2.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates court for selected prostitution related offences in England and Wales, in 2011, can be viewed in table 3.

Statistical information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice from the Police National Computer on cautions issued in England and Wales does not identify all the specific circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify the specific activities behind each offence.

The Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. This database holds information on offences provided by the statutes under which proceedings are brought but not all the specific circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify the specific activities behind each offence.

The requested data on arrests are not collected centrally. Available data on arrests held by the Home Office cover notifiable offences, broken down at offence group level only; covering categories such as violence against the person and sexual offences. From these centrally reported categories it is not possible to separately identify arrests for specific offences. It is also not possible to identify from information on arrests whether the alleged offender was a sex worker.

Further, offences under section 46 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 and section 1 of the Street Offences Act 1959 are not notifiable offences and therefore do not form part of the arrests collection.

16 July 2012 : Column 550W

Table 1: Offenders cautioned(1, 2) for selected prostitution related offences(3), in Metropolitan police force area, 2011(4)
Metropolitan police force area(5)Number

Prostitution offences

130

(1) The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence. (2) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. (3) Offences include: Causing or inciting prostitution—Sexual Offences Act 2003 s52 Keeping a brothel for prostitution—Sexual Offences Act 1956 33a Keeping a brothel—Sexual Offences Act 1956 s33 Placing of advertisement relating to prostitution—Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 s46 Person persistently loitering or soliciting for the purposes of prostitution—Street Offences Act 1959 s1 (4) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (5) Includes Metropolitan and City of London police force areas. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.
Table 2: Defendants found guilty at all courts under "controlling prostitutes for gain", in Metropolitan police force area(1), 2011(2, 3)
StatuteOffenceNumber

Sexual Offences Act 2003, s53

Controlling prostitution for gain

4

(1) Includes Metropolitan and City of London police force areas. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.
Table 3: Defendants proceeded against at magistrates court for selected prostitution related offences, in England and Wales, 2011(1,)()(2)
England and WalesNumber

Prostitution offences(3)

261

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Offences include: Causing or inciting prostitution—Sexual Offences Act 2003 s52 Keeping a brothel for prostitution—Sexual Offences Act 1956 33a Keeping a brothel—Sexual Offences Act 1956 s33 Placing of advertisement relating to prostitution—Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001 s46 Person persistently loitering or soliciting for the purposes of prostitution—Street Offences Act 1959 s1 Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Reoffenders: Females

Mrs Grant: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many and what proportion of women with a previous conviction reoffended in (a) 2010 and (b) 2011; and if he will make a statement. [117017]

16 July 2012 : Column 551W

Mr Blunt: Reoffending rates for offenders released, convicted or released from custody in 2010-11 are not yet available. This is because we allow a one-year follow up period for reoffending to occur, and a further six-month waiting period for offences to be processed by the courts. Figures for the calendar year 2010 will not be available until October 2012.

16 July 2012 : Column 552W

However, there are statistics on the number and percentage of female offenders sentenced for indictable offences in 2010 and 2011 who had at least one previous conviction in England and Wales. These figures are derived from table A7.2 of “Criminal Justice Statistics Quarterly Update to December 2011” which was published by the Ministry of Justice on 24 May 2012.

Number and percentage of female offenders(1) sentenced for indictable offences who had at least one previous conviction(s) in England and Wales, 2010-11
 Of those with previous conviction(s)All offendersPercentage (%)

2010

35,743

23,451

65.6

2011

33,816

22,866

67.6

(1) Figures presented in the table are distinct offenders unlike the figures in table A7.2 which are sentencing occasions. Note: The previous convictions include all convictions for indictable and summary offences.

The latest statistics on the criminal histories of offenders can be found at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/statistics/criminal-justice-stats/criminal-justice-stats-dec-2011.pdf

The figures have been drawn from the police’s administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Sentencing: Females

Mrs Grant: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many custodial sentences of (a) two weeks or less, (b) one month and (c) two months were served by female prisoners in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. [117102]

Mr Blunt: The following table shows the number of female prisoners serving short sentences in prison establishments in England and Wales, as at 30 June of each year from 2007 to 2011, broken down by detailed sentence length band.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Female population in prison serving short sentences, England and Wales 30 June 2007 to 2011
Sentence length2007200820092009(1)20102011

Two weeks or less

8

4

4

2

4

6

More than two weeks to less than one month

8

6

5

9

3

4

One month

19

20

18

18

14

13

More than one month to less than two months

24

45

49

49

50

58

Two months

17

24

9

10

5

10

More than two months to six months

391

450

369

395

426

402

Unrecorded less than or equal to six months(2)

0

21

9

Less than or equal to six months

(3)466

(3)552

(3)458

483

523

502

(1) Due to the introduction of a new prison IT system the 2010 prison population is now taken from a different source. The 2009 figures from the old and new system have been presented for comparison. (2) Sentence length is not recorded centrally for a small proportion of prisoners. For these cases we have estimated the broad sentence length band, but they cannot be allocated to a more detailed sentence length band. (3) Sum of sub totals may not equal the overall total as these figures are based on scaled data.

Solicitors: Fees and Charges

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what steps he is taking in respect of excessive legal charges levied by solicitors in no-win-no-fee cases; [117018]

(2) what representations he has received on lawyers using minor compensation cases to charge high legal fees to small employers in no-win-no-fee cases; [117019]

(3) whether his Department plans to meet the Law Society on no-win-no-fee cases; [117020]

(4) what discussions he has had with representatives of small business on lawyers charging high fees in no-win-no-fee cases. [117021]

Mr Djanogly: The Government is taking firm action to tackle the high costs in civil litigation under the current no-win no-fee conditional fee agreement (CFA) regime. Part 2 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 makes fundamental changes to the CFA arrangements to reduce legal costs which often fall on businesses and other defendants. Under our changes, CFAs will continue to be available to fund such claims, although any success fee and after the event (ATE) insurance premium will no longer be recoverable from the losing party. Both claimants and defendants will have an incentive to keep legal costs down. The changes will be implemented in April 2013.

The changes are based on Lord Justice Jackson's recommendations in his Review of Civil Litigation Costs. The Government conducted a full public consultation in November 2010 on implementing the reforms. The Ministry of Justice engaged with and received representations from a wide range of interested parties

16 July 2012 : Column 553W

during and after the consultation process including the Law Society and the Federation of Small Businesses. We will continue to engage with key stakeholders as we move towards implementation.

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many staff of his Department were in the civil service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116773]

Mr Djanogly: As at 31 May the Ministry of Justice had 427 staff seeking permanent redeployment. Of these, 180 have been on the redeployment register for more than six months. These figures represent staff at all grades including senior civil servants.

While seeking suitable alternative permanent roles the majority are engaged in work that needs to be done to contribute to the delivery of public services, including core frontline activities, policy and project work and other operational roles.

Young Offenders: Nottinghamshire

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many young adult offenders aged 18 to 20

16 July 2012 : Column 554W

years from

(a)

Ashfield constituency and

(b)

Nottinghamshire were held in (i) young offender institutions, (ii) local prisons, (iii) women's prisons and (iv) other parts of the secure estate in each month since May 2009. [117331]

Mr Blunt: All young offenders serving sentences of DYOI are held in appropriately designated young offender institution (YOI) accommodation within the prison estate. The majority of this accommodation is in dedicated YOIs, although some establishments in the estate have a dual designation (designated both as a prison and a YOI) and hold both adult prisoners and young offenders.

Those serving sentences of DYOI are held in appropriately designated young offender institution (YOI) accommodation within the prison estate. The majority of this accommodation is in dedicated YOIs, although some establishments in the estate have a dual designation (designated both as a prison and a YOI) and hold both adult prisoners and young offenders.

The first table as follows shows the number of young adult offenders aged 18 to 20-years-old from (a) Ashfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire on a set day in each month where data are available since May 2009. The second table provides the information for Nottinghamshire which Ashfield is a part of. The data have only been recorded centrally since May 2009 and from September 2010 are available on a bi-monthly basis.

Ashfield
Number
 2009201020112012
LocationMaySeptNovJanMarMayJulySeptNovJanMarMay

(a) Male young offender institutions

5

12

13

7

10

7

5

10

10

9

2

2

(b) Male local prisons

0

1

2

0

1

4

2

3

3

2

0

4

(c) Female prisons

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

(d) Other prisons

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Nottinghamshire
Number
 2009201020112012
LocationMaySeptNovJanMarMayJulySeptNovJanMarMay

(a) Male young offender institutions

40

45

46

39

55

48

56

54

47

46

28

38

(b) Male local prisons

8

14

8

9

4

13

9

13

16

12

2

20

(c) Female prisons

2

4

1

0

3

3

1

2

0

3

0

1

(d) Other prisons

0

8

5

3

5

5

4

2

3

1

1

2

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Information on offenders' residences is provided by offenders on reception into prison and recorded on a central IT system. Addresses can include a home address, an address to which offenders intend to return on discharge or next of kin address and these figures are provided in the table above.

If no address is given, an offenders committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. These figures are also included in the table above. No address has been recorded and no court information is available for around 3% of all offenders, these figures are excluded from the table above.

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many juvenile offenders from (a) Ashfield constituency and (b) Nottinghamshire were held in a (i) secure children's home, (ii) secure training centre and (iii) young offender institution in each month since May 2009. [117461]

16 July 2012 : Column 555W

Mr Blunt: Data on juvenile offenders are not held at a constituency level therefore it is not possible to answer part (a) of this question. The answer to part (b) of this question is as follows:

The following table shows the number of juvenile offenders (aged 10 to 17) either sentenced or remanded in custody attached to the Nottinghamshire Youth Offending Team (YOT) who have been held in each under 18 young offender institution in each month since May 2009 to April 2012.

These data have been provided by the Youth Justice Board (YJB). The YJB holds data at the YOT area level, not at the local authority level. YOT area data may cover more than one local authority area.

These are based upon monthly snapshot data. Therefore one young person who is serving more than one month in custody will be shown in more than one month in the table.

The data from April 2011 onwards are provisional and will be finalised when the 2011-12 Youth Justice Statistics are published in 2013. Data from 2012-13 will be finalised in 2014.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Young people (aged 10 to 17) in custody attached to Nottinghamshire Youth Offending Team (YOT) by establishment type in each month since May 2009
MonthSecure children’s homesSecure training centresYoung offender institutions

2009

   

May

2

4

15

June

1

2

15

July

4

5

17

August

3

3

14

September

3

5

12

October

3

4

21

November

4

4

22

December

4

3

14

    

2010

   

January

5

4

12

February

4

5

12

March

2

4

12

April

2

4

11

May

2

5

10

June

2

4

13

July

2

5

13

August

2

5

11

September

2

5

10

October

2

3

9

November

2

4

8

December

2

3

8

    

2011

   

January

1

4

12

February

1

7

10

March

1

4

10

April

2

4

6

May

2

2

10

June

2

2

8

16 July 2012 : Column 556W

July

1

2

7

August

2

2

7

September

1

2

8

October

2

2

11

November

3

4

7

December

3

3

5

    

2012

   

January

3

2

4

February

3

1

6

March

2

1

6

April

2

2

7

Notes: 1. The data come from the Youth Justice Board's Secure Accommodation Clearing House System (SACHS). 2. These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and may be subject to change over time. 3. The YJB does not hold data at constituency or local authority level. However, it does hold data down to Youth Offending Team (YOT) area, some of which cover more than one local authority area. Nottinghamshire YOT is the same area as Nottinghamshire. 4. The table shows the number of young people aged under 18 attached to the Nottinghamshire Youth Offending Team who have been held in a (a) secure children's home, (b) secure training centre and (c) young offender institution in each month since May 2005. This includes those sentenced and on remand. 5. This is based upon monthly snapshot data. Therefore one young person who is serving more than one month in custody, may be shown in more than one month in the table. 6. Please note, data from April 2011 onwards are provisional. Data from April 2011 onwards will be finalised when the 2011-12 Annual Youth Justice Statistics are published in 2013 and data from April 2012 will be finalised in 2014.

Youth Custody: Education

Hywel Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment he has made of progress in ensuring appropriate educational provision for Welsh-speaking young people held on the secure estate. [117507]

Mr Blunt: There has been progress in ensuring appropriate educational provision for Welsh-speaking young people in the secure estate, in particular for those from North Wales held in secure accommodation in England at HMYOI Hindley. The Youth Justice Board implemented from September last year an enhanced service specification for Welsh young people held there to ensure that their distinct educational and cultural needs are addressed in the curriculum.

International Development

Assets

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assets his Department has sold and leased back over the last 12 months; what the sale price was of each asset so sold; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of leasing back each such asset over the period of the lease. [116804]

16 July 2012 : Column 557W

Mr Duncan: DFID has not sold any assets within the last 12 months which have been leased back. There has therefore been no cost to the public purse.

Burma

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps his Department is taking to (a) improve access for international aid agencies to all areas of Arakan State, Burma and (b) monitor the distribution of aid in that area on the basis of need without discrimination. [117450]

Mr Duncan: We are working with other donors through the UN in relation to the needs in Arakan State and await the needs assessment based on the findings of OCHA and aid agency partners. This will set out the actions proposed and mechanisms for distribution and monitoring. The British ambassador has repeatedly raised concerns with Ministers and directly with the President about the humanitarian and political situation in Arakan and called on all sides to allow unrestricted humanitarian access for international and local aid agencies to the affected communities.

Commonwealth Development Corporation

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development on what date his Department referred allegations that CDC had invested in companies reported to have been money laundering fronts for James Ibori to the (a) Serious Fraud Office and (b) Metropolitan Police. [116577]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: DFID's Counter Fraud Unit met the London Metropolitan Police on 15 May 2009 during the time of the last Government to discuss the allegations by Mr Dotun Oloko. The Department, CDC and London Metropolitan Police met the Serious Fraud Office on 23 April 2010 to discuss the allegations.

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he has taken to investigate allegations that Emerging Capital Partners defrauded CDC and other investors. [116578]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: In February 2009 during the regime of the last Government, DFID and CDC received allegations that certain CDC fund managers had invested the capital of CDC and other investors in a number of Nigerian companies that have been linked to politically exposed persons and which may have been engaged in corrupt practices. CDC has investigated these allegations and has found no evidence to substantiate the allegations. DFID and CDC stand ready to look again into these matters should they receive new evidence.

Developing Countries: Education

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent steps his Department has taken to meet the Millennium Development Goal to ensure universal education. [116967]

16 July 2012 : Column 558W

Mr Duncan: The UK is playing its part in helping to achieve the millennium development goal of universal primary education.

DFID's 2012 Annual Report shows that the UK is supporting 5.3 million children in primary education (2.5 million girls) and 600,000 in lower secondary education in developing countries. The UK has also helped to train 90,000 teachers. Over the comprehensive spending review period the UK has pledged to support nine million children in primary school, over half of whom will be girls and two million in lower secondary education.

In addition DFID recently launched a new mechanism called the Girls Education Challenge, which will support up to an additional one million of the world's poorest girls to complete their education. GEC will encourage innovation in the non-state sector to find new ways to reach girls in marginalised communities.

Dotun Oloko

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether his Department has offered legal assistance to the Nigerian whistleblower Mr Dotun Oloko under the provisions of the UN Convention Against Corruption. [116579]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: DFID has not offered any legal assistance to Mr Oloko under Article 46 of the UN Convention Against Corruption as Article 46 places an obligation of mutual legal assistance on state parties, not on individuals.

Human Trafficking

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which organisations his Department is funding to counter human trafficking; and where these organisations are based. [116563]

Mr O'Brien: DFID is currently providing funding to the following organisations to counter human trafficking and slavery. The location of each organisation's headquarters is shown in brackets.

Asia Regional Trafficking Programme:

NIMBUS Social Enterprise Consulting (Southampton, UK); Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (Bangkok, Thailand); International Labour Organization (Geneva, Switzerland); Anti-Slavery International (London, UK). The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (London, UK) has the contract for monitoring and evaluation.

Malawi Anti-Child Trafficking Project:

Salvation Army (London, UK).

Challenging Descent-Based Slavery in West Africa:

Anti-Slavery International (London, UK).

Slavery and Child Labour: Governance and Social Responsibility:

Anti-Slavery International (London, UK).

Mali

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent assessment he has made of (a) food shortages and (b) levels of conflict in Mali; if he will reconsider Mali's exclusion from the list of priority countries for bilateral aid; what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of

16 July 2012 : Column 559W

State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on the flow of arms to Mali; and if he will make a statement. [117024]

Mr Andrew Mitchell: The United Nations currently estimates that the number of people at risk of food shortages across the Sahel region of West Africa in 2012 is 18 million. Of these, 3.5 million are in Mali.

The security situation in Mali remains of particular concern, and over 350,000 men, women and children have been directly affected by the conflict in the northern regions of the country. Over 235,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries, and over 155,000 people have been internally displaced following months of armed conflict. The deterioration in security conditions has severely limited the humanitarian response, by reducing access to those acutely affected by this crisis in the north of the country.

The UK Government is supporting efforts led by the Economic Community Of West African States and the African Union to bring about a resolution to the crisis in Mali. We will continue to work closely with our international partners, including the United Nations and the European Union, to help return the country to full democracy, including the holding of elections.

Mali is not one of the priority countries for UK bilateral aid, following a fundamental review of all such programmes based on need and where the UK can make the most positive difference. Others with stronger links to this part of the world are better placed to provide long term bilateral development assistance to Mali, but the UK does have a significant stake through our contributions to the European Union and United Nations.

I have had no recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on the flow of arms to Mali.

Overseas Aid: Fraud

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what fraud losses his Department (a) identified and (b) recovered in each country to which it provided aid in each of the last three years; and what the financial value was in each case. [117371]

Mr Duncan: Since October 2010, DFID has reported detected fraud and error in quarterly data summaries. They are not split by country. The quarterly data summaries are published on DFID's website. DFID's actual losses to fraud are shown in the following table:

£
 GrossRecoveredNet

2009-10

459,392.40

198,620.78

260,771,62

2010-11

592,216.85

477,034.71

115,182.14

2011-12

3,099,044.27

1,920,973.25

1,178,071.02

The Department has accelerated its work on the prevention and early identification of fraud. We take a robust approach once fraud has been identified (with effective incident investigation and strengthening of controls to prevent recurrence) and have a good record on recovery of lost funds (61% for 2011-12).

16 July 2012 : Column 560W

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development with reference to the answer of 26 October 2011, Official Report, column 277W, on overseas aid: fraud, whether there has been a change in the number of full-time equivalent officials responsible for fraud investigations since his Answer. [117463]

Mr Duncan: In addition to the resources set out in the previous answer, counter-fraud capacity has since been strengthened by the secondment of an Advisory and Liaison officer from the Serious and Organised Crime Agency into the Counter Fraud Unit; we have also expanded our Fraud Liaison Network to include a liaison officer in all of our focus countries (32 in total).

Public Sector Staff

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many staff of his Department were in the civil service redeployment pool on the latest date for which figures are available; and how many of these had been in the redeployment pool for more than six months at that date. [116806]

Mr Duncan: DFID currently has nine staff receiving redeployment support. All DFID staff receiving redeployment support are fully utilised in an appropriate role. Only one member of staff has been receiving support for more than six months.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Air Travel

Jessica Morden: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on what occasions he has flown on official business (a) by budget airline and (b) in economy class in the last 12 months. [117510]

Mr Lidington: The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), has been issued with 13 economy tickets in the last 12 months. He has not flown by budget airline over the same period.

Section 10 of the Ministerial Code provides guidance on travel for Ministers and makes clear that Ministers must ensure that they always make efficient and cost-effective travel arrangements.

Arab Partnership Participation Fund

Mr Douglas Alexander: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the breakdown is of the spending of the Arab Partnership Participation Fund. [117527]

Mr Hague: In the financial year 2011-12, the Arab Partnership Participation Fund (APPF) spent £5.27 million across 11 countries, broken down as follows by the APPF thematic priorities: Political Participation—£1.72 million; Public Voice—£1.31 million; Rule of Law —£0.77 million; Anti-Corruption—£0.54 million; Private Sector Development—£0.32 million; Youth Employability —£0.25 million. The Fund also spent £0.24 million on

16 July 2012 : Column 561W

“Tactical Funds”, small, quick-win interventions spanning the themes. Additionally, £0.12 million funded 11 locally engaged staff to manage the projects. In the financial year 2012-13 we have so far approved 56 projects, totalling over £10 million.

Assets

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assets his Department has sold and leased back over the last 12 months; what the sale price was of each asset so sold; and what estimate his Department has made of the cost to the public purse of leasing back each such asset over the period of the lease. [116816]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office has not sold and leased back any property asset in the past 12 months.

Crisis Management Centre

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much his Department has (a) allocated to and (b) spent on the new Crisis Management Centre. [117363]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office Operations Committee approved a budget for the build-elements of this project of 1.96 million pounds. Construction work continues on schedule for completion this month, and our current forecast spend is 1.89 million pounds. In addition we have spent approximately 400,000 pounds on new equipment for the centre (although this figure cannot be confirmed until the work is complete and all payments processed). The new crisis centre will significantly enhance our capability to respond to crises overseas, and staff began moving back in on 9 July.

Data Protection

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many cases of (a) data loss and (b) breaches of confidentiality have occurred in his Department since January 2012. [117514]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has a formal procedure for reporting, investigating and monitoring any incidents involving the loss or compromise of personal data for which it is responsible. According to our records, since 1 January this year, there have been two incidents involving the loss of data and four involving a breach of confidentiality. None were considered significant enough to report to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

The FCO takes its data handling responsibilities very seriously. Our policies and procedures are designed to ensure that we are compliant with the Data Protection Act 1998 and HMG’s Security Policy Framework. All our staff, including those who work for our delivery partners, have a responsibility to manage personal data effectively and securely in line with those policies and procedures. Training in data handling is mandatory for all staff.

16 July 2012 : Column 562W

Diamond Jubilee 2012

Yvonne Fovargue: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much his Department has spent on events to celebrate the Queen's Diamond Jubilee (a) in the UK and (b) overseas. [117274]

Mr Bellingham: Her Majesty the Queen's diamond jubilee offers an excellent opportunity to demonstrate the strengths of the UK to the world, alongside our efforts linked to the London Olympics and Paralympics and the GREAT campaign, while the country enjoys unprecedented levels of attention.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has sought to promote Britain as an open, connected, creative and dynamic country that successfully combines history and tradition with modernity and innovation. We have created opportunities overseas to allow everyone who wants to celebrate the jubilee to be able to, in a manner befitting the current financial climate.

The FCO GREAT and 2012 programme fund allocated £123,000 for 30 specific diamond jubilee events overseas (most supplemented by local sponsorship) reaching an estimated media audience of hundreds of millions.

There are many other jubilee events taking place in the UK and overseas throughout the whole year and it will take time for all the relevant expenditure to be charged and accounted for after the end of the year. In addition, the majority of events organised by our network of posts overseas have been wholly or partially paid out of locally held budgets and these figures are therefore not available without incurring disproportionate cost.

EU Institutions

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many UK nationals on secondment from each Government Department were working in an EU (a) institution and (b) agency in each year since 2009. [117436]

Mr Lidington: Information on the numbers of UK civil servants on secondment to EU Institutions and Agencies, by UK Government Department or agency, during each year from 2009 to 2012 is in the following table. The statistics are for UK civil servants, not British nationals. (Nationality data are classed as personal information so cannot be used for these quantities where individuals could be identified.)

It is important to note that:

This information includes secondments ranging from five-month special traineeships for civil servants ('Experts on Professional Training') to postings lasting up to four years.

Many secondments run over several years. It is therefore not correct to add the figures per year to obtain a total number of secondments for the period 2009 to 2012. For instance, the total number of civil servants seconded from BIS from 2009 to 2012 is lower than 33.

16 July 2012 : Column 563W

16 July 2012 : Column 564W

 2012201120102009
Home DeptInstitutionsAgenciesInstitutionsAgenciesInstitutionsAgenciesInstitutionsAgencies

BIS

5

0

13

0

10

0

5

0

CEFAS

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

DCSF

0

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

DECC

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

DEFRA

8

1

12

1

9

0

4

0

DFID

24

0

22

0

25

0

11

0

DFT

3

0

9

1

10

1

8

0

DH

1

0

2

0

2

0

1

0

DIUS

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

DWP

4

0

4

0

4

0

4

0

Environment Agency

2

1

2

1

1

0

0

0

FCO

5

0

8

0

9

0

12

0

FERA

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Financial Services Authority

5

0

7

0

6

0

4

0

Food Standards Agency

3

0

3

0

3

0

1

0

HMRC

3

0

5

0

4

0

4

0

HMT

4

0

8

0

7

0

6

0

Home Office

2

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

HSE

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

ICO

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

IPO

4

1

4

1

3

1

3

0

JIU

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

JNCC/DEFRA

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

LES

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Marine Management Organisation

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

MCA

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

2

MFA

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

MOD

3

0

1

0

1

0

1

0

MOJ

1

0

2

0

3

0

3

0

Natural England

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

OFCOM

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

OFT

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

ONS

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

SOCA

0

0

0

1

0

1

1

0

TSol

0

0

3

0

4

0

4

0

UKBA

0

1

1

1

2

0

1

0

VMD-DEFRA

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

WSRA

0

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

Total

90

5

119

8

111

4

77

2

European External Action Service

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the monetary value was of the UK’s contribution to the EU External Action Service in each year since 2009; and what estimate he has made of that contribution in each of the next five years. [117513]

Mr Lidington: The UK contributes to the EU budget as a whole, not to individual elements of it. Details of the UK’s contributions to the EU budget over the period 2006-07 to 2011-12 were published on 13 July 2012 in table 3C (page 17) of European Union Finances 2012 (Cm 8405). This document is available in the House Library. The European External Action Service (EEAS) was launched on 1 January 2011. The EEAS budget in 2011 was €464 million, which represents less than 1% of the EU budget. However, €441 million (over 91%) was existing money transferred from the Commission and Council. The EEAS budget in 2012 is €489 million (£396 million). Discussions are ongoing on the EEAS 2013 budget.

European External Action Service: Secondment

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what information his Department holds on how many UK nationals from each Government Department are on secondment to the European External Action Service. [117512]

Mr Lidington: Our records show that we have 17 seconded national experts to the European External Action Service (EEAS). Of these, two are from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), 11 from the Ministry of Defence and four from the Department for International Development.

16 July 2012 : Column 565W

In addition, we also have 15 FCO staff working as temporary agents in the EEAS. We expect this number to increase.

Ex Gratia Payments

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what estimate his Department has made of the monetary value of ex gratia payments made through schemes administered by his Department in the last two years. [116817]

Mr Bellingham: We have not run any schemes involving ex gratia payments during the past two years.

Exports

Michael Fallon: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with London-based business organisations on increasing exports to (a) other EU member states, (b) China, (c) India and (d) Brazil. [117429]

Mr Bellingham: Ministers meet with a range of individual businesses and business organisations to discuss a variety of topics including our ambitions to increase trade with emerging markets such as China, India and Brazil, as well as with traditional trading partners across the EU.

The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague) also pointed to the importance of these markets and our determination to support British exporters in his speech to the CBI on 17 May 2012.

Fuels

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much (a) the UK Embassy network and (b) his Department spent on petrol and diesel costs in each of the last five years. [116544]

Mr Lidington: The total expenditure by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) on petrol, diesel and oil for official vehicles in our overseas network in each of the last five financial years was as follows:

 £ million

2007-08

1.55

2008-09

1.91

2009-10

1.69

2010-11

1.99

2011-12

1.63

Our overseas fleet currently comprises 1,534 vehicles. We have measures in place to ensure that Posts purchase fuel at competitive prices and obtain value for money overall, including by ensuring that regular checks are made on fuel consumption by official vehicles.

FCO Services operates a UK Fleet of 43 vehicles. Total expenditure on petrol, diesel and oil for the UK fleet in 2011-12 was £101,958. Comparable figures for earlier years are unavailable.