£
Local authorityGovernment contribution towards discretionary housing payments 2011-12Reported expenditure on discretionary housing payments in 2011-12

Adur

21,421

13,749

Arun

80,180

27,150

Ashford

42,111

38,496

Aylesbury Vale

37,836

47,267

Basingstoke and Deane

42,407

34,920

Bracknell Forest

21,716

14,940

Brighton and Hove

387,835

148,693

Canterbury

48,030

48,019

Cherwell

90,326

64,824

Chichester

129,619

140,206

Chiltern

38,759

15,277

Crawley

52,388

89,971

Dartford

25,507

22,387

Dover

71,209

65,704

East Hampshire

23,066

19,320

Eastbourne

88,847

88,053

Eastleigh

20,028

13,518

Elmbridge

126,926

46,427

Epsom and Ewell

32,780

21,197

Fareham

23,076

19,628

Gosport

18,358

13,866

Gravesham

22,864

25,201

Guildford

43,929

32,981

Hart

13,872

5,219

Hastings

98,509

95,963

Havant

33,584

33,584

Horsham

34,414

21,677

Isle of Wight

65,820

40,226

Lewes

58,716

33,459

Maidstone

109,924

37,345

Medway

109,500

82,912

Mid Sussex

25,054

21,461

Milton Keynes

94,404

73,387

Mole Valley

23,365

12,681

New Forest

57,765

46,376

Oxford

105,520

143,027

Portsmouth

95,125

91,888

Reading

102,237

88,706

Reigate and Banstead

25,106

21,046

Rother

73,222

37,537

Runnymede

20,996

21,865

Rushmoor

15,303

12,757

Sevenoaks

46,746

23,923

Shepway

54,651

38,260

Slough

82,579

39,585

11 Sep 2012 : Column 177W

South Bucks

27,737

10,643

South Oxfordshire

27,489

16,056

Southampton

100,882

48,272

Spelthorne

25,811

21,860

Surrey Heath

17,589

24,925

Swale

83,537

68,496

Tandridge

29,291

20,186

Test Valley

29,957

32,523

Thanet

75,708

66,399

Tonbridge and Malling

32,834

32,783

Tunbridge Wells

35,904

21,471

Vale of White Horse

24,533

11,315

Waverley

42,011

19,639

Wealden

81,775

77,719

West Berkshire

59,456

72,398

West Oxfordshire

23,385

12,944

Winchester

20,708

11,838

Windsor and Maidenhead

75,801

84,635

Woking

33,480

7,426

Wokingham

18,060

8,447

Worthing

38,742

14,779

Wycombe

57,617

20,758

Industrial Health and Safety

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what target was recommended by the Lofstedt Report for reductions in health and safety regulations through sector-specific consolidation; what target he has set for such reductions; and what the evidence base was which informed his decision on the level at which to set the target. [120544]

Mr Hoban: Professor Lofstedt in his independent review of health and safety legislation recommended that the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) undertake a programme of sector-specific consolidations in order to simplify the regulatory framework, reduce duplication and avoid gold plating. His recommendation was based on submissions from industry in the call for evidence for his review and from the wider public via the Government's Red Tape Challenge. No target for reduction by consolidation was set by the Professor nor have the Government set one.

HSE is currently consulting with the relevant industry sectors on proposals for consolidation and it is expected this work will have been completed by the end of 2014,

11 Sep 2012 : Column 178W

reducing burdens on business and leaving Great Britain with a simpler, more effective regulatory framework.

Jobseeker’s Allowance

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people were prosecuted for illegally claiming jobseeker’s allowance while working in each of the last 10 years. [119051]

Mr Hoban: It is not possible to say how many people were prosecuted for failing to declare work or earnings while claiming jobseeker’s allowance (JSA). However departmental records indicate that the number of people prosecuted for failing to declare any income or circumstance affecting JSA claims were:

November 2009 to March 2010: 216

2010-11: 1,264

2011-12: 1,480.

The above figures include all offences (not just working while claiming benefit) and could therefore also relate to:

non-declaration of capital

non-declaration of a partner in employment

non-declaration of other income affecting JSA.

The number of prosecutions arising from fraudulent claims to JSA is not available prior to November 2009 because information by benefit type was not recorded before that date.

Data source:

Fraud Referral and Intervention Management System (FRAIMS)

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he intends to answer the letter concerning Ms K Billington sent to him by the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton on 23 July 2012. [119552]

Mr Hoban: The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chingford and Woodford Green (Mr Duncan Smith), replied to the right hon. Member on 6 September 2012.

Social Security Benefits

Richard Graham: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the cost to the public purse was of benefits received in (a) Gloucester constituency, (b) the south-west and (c) England in each of the last five years. [119906]

Mr Hoban: 2011-12 data will be published on 21 September. Benefit expenditure for the last five years published is shown in the following table, where estimates are available:

Total identified benefit expenditure
     £ million
 2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-11

Cash terms

     

(a) Gloucester

168

178

190

208

197

(b) South West

9,820

10,483

11,282

12,425

12,902

(c) England

98,156

104,050

111,015

122,070

126,382

11 Sep 2012 : Column 179W

11 Sep 2012 : Column 180W

      

Real terms (2010-11 prices)

     

(a) Gloucester

185

191

198

214

197

(b) South West

10,820

11,290

11,796

12,761

12,902

(c) England

108,144

112,056

116,070

125,376

126,382

Notes: 1. “Gloucester” is defined as the parliamentary constituency, not Gloucester city council area. 2. All figures include expenditure for the following benefits: attendance allowance, bereavement benefits, carer's allowance, disability living allowance, employment and support allowance, incapacity benefit, income support, jobseeker's allowance, pension credit, severe disablement allowance, state pension, winter fuel payments. This covers approximately 80% of all DWP benefit expenditure; information on the remaining benefits is not available at constituency level. 3. Figures for the south-west and England also include: council tax benefit, housing benefits, industrial injuries benefits, maternity allowance, statutory maternity pay, and over-75 TV licences. In total, this represents around 99% of all DWP benefit expenditure. 4. Figures rounded to nearest £ million. Source: DWP Statistical and Accounting data, and local authority subsidy returns

This information can be found on the Department for Work and Pensions website at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/index.php?page=expenditure

Social Security Benefits: Married People

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will take steps to provide that spousal benefits paid in respect of a benefit recipient are payable to no more than one wife at any one time; and if he will make a statement. [119693]

Mr Hoban: The Government have decided that universal credit will not recognise polygamous marriages. As universal credit is to be introduced from 2013 and will replace means tested benefits for working-age people there are no plans to change current rules.

There are no plans to change pension credit which only provides for polygamous marriages where the marriage was contracted in a country where polygamy was legal when the parties concerned were domiciled there.

Work Capability Assessment

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many work capability assessments Atos completed per week in the latest period for which figures are available. [118585]

Mr Hoban: The information requested is not available.

Work Capability Assessment: Birkenhead

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will provide a guarantee that any benefit claimant in Birkenhead asking for their work capability assessment interview with ATOS to be recorded shall be recorded. [120561]

Mr Hoban: Benefit claimants in Birkenhead can request their Work Capability Assessment with Atos Healthcare to be audio recorded or can ask to record it themselves and all requests will be accommodated where possible. However, DWP has the right to impose reasonable conditions on recordings, and does not have any legal obligation to provide recording equipment.

While Atos will do all that they can to accommodate requests for audio recording, there may be times when this service cannot be offered, for example, where it has not been possible to get access to recording equipment on the date/time of the WCA. In these circumstances, claimants will be told in advance that their request cannot be accommodated. Currently, appointments may be deferred for up to four weeks for any circumstance, including the non-availability of recording equipment.

Work Programme

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will estimate the average cost to the public purse of a successful Work programme applicant to date. [118930]

Mr Hoban: The Department has not yet developed an estimate of the cost to the public purse of a successful Work programme applicant this is because the programme is still in its early days and the Department has not yet made public adequate information required to estimate these costs. Under its obligation under the transparency agenda the Department is making these costs publicly available by 13 November 2012.

The Department will also consider whether it is feasible to produce the statistics requested within the disproportionate cost limit ahead of their publication under the transparency agenda, and if so, will issue them in an official statistics release in accordance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what percentage increase was accounted for by the introduction of a cumulative job outcome target when calculating the minimum performance level for the Work programme. [120545]

Mr Hoban: The minimum performance level set for Work programme providers in respect of some of their payment groups was calculated as a 10% uplift in the number of job outcomes achieved compared to an estimated of the non-intervention level of performance. The non-intervention level was calculated by the Department based on analysis of historical job entry

11 Sep 2012 : Column 181W

rates, with deductions made for the estimated impact of previous employment programmes in operation during the period analysed (which did not include the Flexible New Deal).

Work programme job outcome targets are designed so that providers have an incentive to help people to spend longer in employment than under previous programmes, meaning that performance levels are not directly comparable with those programmes.

Work Programme: Harrogate

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people from Harrogate and Knaresborough constituency have (a) volunteered and (b) been required to take part in the Work programme in the last 12 months. [120406]

Mr Hoban: The number of Work programme referrals in the last 12 months for which figures are available (1 June 2011 to 30 April 2012) are shown in the following table:

  Referral type
Parliamentary constituencyTotalMandatoryVoluntary

Harrogate and Knaresborough

520

510

10

Notes: 1. Figures are cumulative and rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Referrals shown are ‘net’ referrals which do not include rejections, cancellations or referrals to ESA information sessions. 3. Geographies are at the time of referral. 4. Customer groups are assigned by Jobcentre Plus, on the basis of a claimant's circumstances, and benefit they receive. A small number of claimants appear in an incorrect group caused by the way information is recorded on the administrative system. 5. Mandatory referrals are classified as referrals to the following customer groups: JSA 18-24, JSA 25+, JSA NEET, JSA claiming 22 of 24 months, JSA ExIB, ESA (IR) WRAG 3/6 month Mandatory, ESA (IR) WRAG 3/6 month Mandatory ExIB and JSA Ex-offender Day 1 Mandation. More detailed information can be found at: http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/wp-pg-chapter-2.pdf Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate (IGS)

Deputy Prime Minister

Constituencies

Joan Walley: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what estimate he has made of the costs incurred so far on the parliamentary constituency boundary proposed changes; what estimate he has made of the likely cost of the remaining proceedings connected with the publication of the revised proposals to be published on 16 October 2012; and if he will make a statement. [119561]

Miss Chloe Smith: We estimated that the cost of the boundary review would be £11.9 million. The four Boundary Commissions have spent around £5.6 million up to the end of July 2012 on the boundary review and related purposes; they expect to spend around £4 million from August 2012 to the end of the review. A significant portion of that sum has already been committed.

11 Sep 2012 : Column 182W

Rachel Reeves: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what the cost was of the Boundary Commission's consultation hearings in (a) the Liberty Stadium, Swansea and (b) the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff. [119945]

Miss Chloe Smith: The cost to the Boundary Commission for Wales of the public hearings in (a) the Liberty stadium, Swansea and (b) the Millennium stadium, Cardiff were as follows:

(a) the Liberty stadium, Swansea: £15,053.13

(b) the Millennium stadium, Cardiff: £12,354,03.

Work Experience: Social Mobility

Hazel Blears: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what assessment he has made of the effect of unpaid internships on social mobility. [120183]

Mr Willetts: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Government appointed Alan Milburn as Independent Reviewer on Social Mobility and Child Poverty. In that role he has provided evidence on the range of barriers that restrict social mobility. His progress report on Access to the Professions (published in May 2012) concludes that that unpaid internships can present a barrier to those from less affluent backgrounds progressing and that internships are increasingly important to finding employment.

Alan Milburn's report welcomed the Government's position that employers should pay interns a wage that reflects the value of their contribution. High quality internships offer many benefits to employers and interns. Government believe that fair access to such opportunities is paramount. We want to make as many high quality internship opportunities as possible available to talented young people from all backgrounds. This means avoiding unfair and restrictive practices and poor quality internships that exploit young people.

We have updated our guidance on the payment of work experience and interns to ensure that individuals and employers are clear about their rights and responsibilities. We will ensure that enforcement of the minimum wage continues to be effective and that resources are focused on where they will have maximum impact.

We also endorse the ‘Common Best Practice Code for High Quality Internships’, published by the Gateways to the Professions Collaborative Forum, which we believe will help improve access to the professions for young people from all backgrounds.

The BIS-sponsored Graduate Talent Pool has provided 49,000 internship opportunities to date. Improved quality assurance processes have ensured that in recent months, unpaid and expenses only vacancies represent between 2% and 5% of vacancies.

Cabinet Office

Prisoners: Voting Rights

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when he expects to introduce votes for prisoners; and if he will make a statement. [119472]

11 Sep 2012 : Column 183W

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government will consider carefully the recent judgment on prisoner voting in the case of Scoppola v. Italy (No. 3) and its implications for the UK and will respond in due course.

Private Sector: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the net change in private sector jobs was in the Humber region from May 2010 to the latest period for which figures are available. [120568]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated September 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question of what the net change in private sector jobs was in the Humber region from May 2010 to the latest period for which figures are available (120568).

Private sector employment estimates are produced using official quarterly (March, June, September, December) public sector employment estimates and total employment estimates from the Labour Force Survey. Estimates for interim months are unavailable. The latest available estimates are currently for March 2012.

Estimates are available for Yorkshire and The Humber combined. Estimates are not available for the Humber region excluding Yorkshire.

Estimates of private sector employment for Yorkshire and The Humber are:

 Headcount (thousands), not seasonally adjusted

June 2010

1,840

March 2012

1,840

Net change

0

Further information is available at

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/quality/quality-information/business-statistics/quality-and-methodology-information-for-public-sector-employment--pse-.pd

Justice

Anti-slavery Day

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has to mark Anti-slavery Day on 18 October 2012. [120101]

Mrs Grant: The Government are committed to marking Anti-Slavery Day. Plans are still being considered and will be announced in due course.

Claims Management Services

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to prevent claims management companies from exploiting claims of mis-selling of personal protection insurance. [119526]

Mrs Grant: The Department's Claims Management Regulation (CMR) Unit has established a specialist compliance team to tackle bad practices used by some claims management companies dealing with claims for

11 Sep 2012 : Column 184W

mis-sold payment protection insurance (PP1). Specific steps include a comprehensive programme of audits of companies to bring them to compliance and enforcement action against those which fail to remedy failings.

The CMR Unit is working with the Financial Ombudsman Service, the British Bankers Association and directly with many of the major lenders to gather the evidence needed to target investigations and inform new specific guidance on standards which claims companies must follow when handling PPI claims. This includes the development of improved information for consumers.

Community Orders: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many community payback schemes have taken place in Brigg and Goole constituency in each of the last five years. [120566]

Jeremy Wright: The Community Payback Scheme is currently delivered by 35 probation trusts covering England and Wales. The number of Community Payback work projects undertaken by each probation trust is not recorded by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS). Humberside Probation Trust has been able to provide data for the period from 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2012. During this period a total of 130 offenders with a Brigg or Goole address undertook Community Payback. They worked on 31 work projects and 10,491 hours were worked. A snapshot survey of Community Payback undertaken by NOMS during March 2011 showed that approaching 5,000 individual Community Payback work projects are operated each month across England and Wales.

Coroners

Joseph Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the average length of time taken for the completion of coroner inquests was in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011; [119427]

(2) what steps he is taking to reduce the length of time taken for the completion of coroner inquests; [119428]

(3) what effect he expects the appointment of a chief coroner will have on the time taken to complete coroner inquests. [119429]

Mrs Grant: The estimated average time taken by coroners to complete inquests in 2009, 2010 and 2011 was 27 weeks. The Ministry of Justice collects statistical information on the length of inquests in aggregate form by asking coroners to state the number of inquests completed within specified time bands. The latest published National Statistics on the work of coroners relates to 2011 and is available on the Ministry of Justice website at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/coroners-and-burials/deaths

The Ministry of Justice is preparing to implement a number of measures in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 that will help to reduce the length of time taken to complete coroner investigations. In particular, coroners will be required to notify the Chief Coroner of any investigation that lasts more than 12 months. The Chief Coroner will be required to keep a register of such

11 Sep 2012 : Column 185W

notifications and to report annually to the Lord Chancellor on the number and length of these investigations, the reasons for delays and the measures taken to prevent delays from becoming unnecessarily lengthy. This will bring about a much greater focus on the length of, and reasons for, delays within the system and put pressure on coroners to keep delays to a minimum.

The Ministry intends to bring these measures into force as soon as practicable.

Driving Offences

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many individuals were convicted of (a) causing death by careless driving and (b) causing death by dangerous driving and sentenced to (i) an unsuspended sentence of imprisonment, (ii) a suspended

11 Sep 2012 : Column 186W

sentence, (iii) a young offender institution, (iv) a community order, (v) a fine and (vi) another non-custodial sentence in each of the last five years; [118734]

(2) if he will undertake a comparative analysis of sentences received by individuals convicted of causing the deaths of cyclists and those convicted of causing the deaths of other road users; and if he will make a statement. [118735]

Jeremy Wright: The number of persons found guilty at all courts, by sentence breakdown, for causing death by careless driving and by dangerous driving in England and Wales, from 2007 to 2011 can be viewed in the tables.

Other than where specified in a statute, information held centrally does not include all the circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify from data held centrally on criminal motoring offences whether the victim was a cyclist.

Persons found guilty at all courts, by sentence breakdown, for causing death by careless driving and by dangerous driving, England and Wales, 2007-11(1, 2)
2007
Offence descriptionFound guiltyTotal sentencedImmediate custodyOf which: YOISuspended sentencesCommunity sentenceOf which: Community orderFineOther sentences(4)

4.6 Causing Death by Careless Driving when under the influence of Drink or Drugs

67

67

65

10

1

1

4.4 Causing Death by Dangerous Driving

233

233

214

38

14

1

1

3

1

2008
Offence descriptionFound guiltyTotal sentencedImmediate custodyOf which: YOISuspended sentencesCommunity sentenceOf which: Community orderFineOther sentences(4)

4.6 Causing Death by Careless Driving when under the influence of Drink or Drugs

46

46

45

4

1

4.8 Causing Death by careless or inconsiderate driving(3)

4

4

4

4.4 Causing Death by Dangerous Driving

221

221

206

29

9

2

2

3

1

2009
Offence descriptionFound guiltyTotal sentenced(5)Immediate custodyOf which: YOISuspended sentencesCommunity sentenceOf which: Community orderFineOther sentences(4)

4.6 Causing Death by Careless Driving when under the influence of Drink or Drugs

35

35

33

6

2

          

4.8 Causing Death by careless or inconsiderate driving(3)

81

73

3

14

49

49

5

2

4.4 Causing Death by Dangerous Driving

225

233

218

46

14

1

11 Sep 2012 : Column 187W

11 Sep 2012 : Column 188W

2010
Offence descriptionFound guiltyTotal sentenced(5)Immediate custodyOf which: YOISuspended sentencesCommunity sentenceOf which: Community orderFineOther sentences(4)

4.6 Causing Death by Careless Driving when under the influence of Drink or Drugs

41

41

40

6

1

4.8 Causing Death by careless or inconsiderate driving(3)

238

236

45

12

56

122

121

6

7

4.4 Causing Death by Dangerous Driving

154

158

140

26

11

4

3

1

2

2011
Offence descriptionFound guiltyTotal sentenced(5)Immediate custodyOf which: YOISuspended sentencesCommunity sentenceOf which: Community orderFineOther sentences(4)

4.6 Causing Death by Careless Driving when under the influence of Drink or Drugs

35

35

35

5

4.8 Causing Death by careless or inconsiderate driving(3)

234

231

46

3

60

109

108

11

5

4.4 Causing Death by Dangerous Driving

114

115

110

24

4

1

1

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Road Traffic Act 1988 added by Road Safety Act 2006, S.2B—Came in to force in August 2008 (4) Includes: Absolute and Conditional Discharge and Otherwise dealt with. (5 )The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Fines

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many fines levied by HM Courts and Tribunals Service have been paid in full or in part by an unpaid work order since 1 September 2004. [119520]

Mrs Grant: Although schedule 6 of the Courts Act 2003 sets provisions for the use of unpaid work orders as a sanction for fine defaulters, this sanction is not actually used as a method of fine enforcement. The sanction was initially piloted in some local justice areas but due to difficulties in administering the scheme it was not implemented. It is not possible to identify the number of fines where these orders were imposed without carrying out a manual search of all the fine accounts in the pilot areas which would incur disproportionate costs.

Fraud

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many convictions there were for (a) credit card fraud and (b) mortgage fraud in each of the last 10 years. [119486]

Damian Green: Information held centrally on the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database does not include the circumstances behind each case beyond the description provided in the statute. It is not possible to separately identify from this centrally held information those specific offences related to credit card and mortgage fraud from other offences of fraud and theft.

Proceedings for offences of credit card fraud may be initiated under the Fraud Act 2006. However, credit card fraud may be included as part of a more serious crime such as, for example, money laundering. Mortgage fraud includes offences that involve deceiving a lender about an aspect of a secured property loan in order to obtain that loan and may be initiated under the Fraud Act 2006 or if the proceedings predate January 2007 under section 15 of the Theft Act 1968.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts under the Fraud Act 2006 and Theft Act 1968 Section 15 in England and Wales from 2002 to 2011 can be viewed in the tables.

Charging data are not collated centrally by the Ministry of Justice.

11 Sep 2012 : Column 189W

11 Sep 2012 : Column 190W

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts under the Fraud Act 2006 and Theft Act 1968 Section 15, England and Wales, 2002 to 2011(1,2)
 20022003200420052006
 Proceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guilty

Fraud Act 2006(4)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Theft Act 1968, Section 15(6)

12,770

9,354

11,497

8,457

9,824

7,519

8,196

6,472

6,311

5,080

Total

12,770

9,354

11,497

8,457

9,824

7,519

8,196

6,472

6,311

5,080

 20072008(3)200920102011
 Proceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guiltyProceeded againstFound guilty

Fraud Act 2006(4)

4,033

3,150

7,074

5,620

10,434

8,133

11,588

9,030

11,156

8,975

Theft Act 1968, Section 15(6)

3,300

2,470

749

678

333

234

284

200

180

114

Total

7,333

5,620

7,823

6,298

10,767

8,367

11,872

9,230

11,336

9,089

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. (4) Came into force in January 2007. (5) Not applicable. (6) Includes offences of obtaining, attempting to obtain, and conspiring to obtain, property by deception. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Fraud: Social Security Benefits

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many non-UK nationals from each country have been successfully prosecuted for benefit fraud in each of the last five years. [120279]

Damian Green: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. These centrally held court proceedings data do not includes a defendant's nationality.

Human Trafficking

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were convicted in relation to people trafficking in the last two years. [120313]

Damian Green: The number of defendants found guilty at all courts, on a principal-offence basis, for human trafficking offences, in England and Wales in 2010 and 2011 can be viewed in the following table.

Number of defendants found guilty at all courts for human trafficking offences(1), England and Wales, 2010 and 2011(2, 3)
 Number of defendants

2010

16

2011

8

(1 )Includes offences under: Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants etc) Act 2004: Sexual offences Act 2003. (2 )The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.
(3 )Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Juries: Illegal Immigrants

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps his Department has taken to ensure those selected for jury service are not in the UK illegally. [119464]

Mrs Grant: Jurors are randomly selected from electoral registers compiled by local government.

The Crown court carries out checks on all jurors on their first day of service at the court to ensure that the person attending is the person that was summonsed. For European Economic Area Nationals a full EEA passport or National Identity Card needs to be produced. For other nationals a full passport or a Home Office document confirming the individual's UK immigration status must be produced.

Mesothelioma: Compensation

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the timescale is for the introduction of the procedure to compensate mesothelioma sufferers set out in the publication of the detailed support scheme on 25 July 2012. [120249]

Mr Hoban: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Work and Pensions.

11 Sep 2012 : Column 191W

We propose to bring forward legislation enabling a payment scheme to be established for people diagnosed with diffuse mesothelioma as a result of their negligent exposure to asbestos at work, and who are unable to trace their liable employer or insurer to claim against, as soon as parliamentary time allows.

In recognition of the time taken to introduce new legislation, we intend that eligible claimants diagnosed with diffuse mesothelioma on or after 25 July 2012 should be able to claim once the scheme becomes operational.

Olympic Games 2012: Touting

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people were convicted for illegally reselling tickets for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games in each month of 2012; and what the average fine levied was for such convictions; [120060]

(2) how many applications for convictions have been made for people suspected of illegally reselling tickets for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games outside the UK; [120062]

(3) how many people have been convicted of illegally reselling tickets for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games outside the UK; [120063]

(4) how many convictions for illegally reselling tickets for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games were subjected to an application for further fines under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002; and what the (a) average and (b) total amount collected was. [120061]

Damian Green: On 28 August 2012 the Ministry of Justice published “Provisional management information on Olympic related criminal proceedings”.

This publication provides provisional management information for all Olympic related criminal proceedings currently going through criminal courts and the number of proceedings which have been fast tracked. The report is available on the ministry's website at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/statistics/ad-hoc/provisional-olympic-stats.pdf.

To enable timely reporting of information on offences related to the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics a limited amount of data have been collated.

It is therefore not possible to provide the additional information requested.

Regarding the information requested concerning the illegal resale of tickets for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games outside the United Kingdom, the Ministry of Justice holds statistical data relating to those prosecuted in courts in England and Wales, however information is not collated centrally on the particulars of an offence other than where specified in statute. This information could be obtained only by manually inspecting each court file for the particulars of the case at disproportionate cost.

Therefore, we are unable to provide this information.

11 Sep 2012 : Column 192W

Perjury

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been convicted for providing false information under section 20 of the Juries Act 1974 in the last five years. [119704]

Damian Green: Persons proceeded against and convicted for offences under the Juries Act 1974 cannot be separately identified on the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database as they form part of a miscellaneous group which cannot be separately analysed.

Prison Accommodation

James Wharton: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what change there has been in the number of (a) vacant and (b) occupied prison places since May 2010; [119433]

(2) what estimate he has made of the likely change in the total number of prison places by May 2015; [119434]

(3) how many (a) complete prisons and (b) prisons under construction there were (i) in May 2010 and (ii) on 31 August 2012; and how many prisons in each such category he estimates there will be in May 2015. [119435]

Jeremy Wright: Information on the number of vacant and occupied prison places is set out in the following table. This information is published on the MOJ website via the following weblink.

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/prisons-and-probation/prison-population-figures/index.htm

 Published useable operational capacityPublished occupied prison places (total prison population)Vacant places (useable operational capacity less total prison population)

28 May 2010

87.757

85.147

2.610

31 August 2012

90.897

86.708

4.189

Difference

+3.140

+1.561

+1.579

Note: These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible error with data entry and processing.

In May 2010 the Prison Estate was a total of 136 prisons including NOMS Operated Immigration Removal Centres. Two further prisons (HMP Oakwood and HMP Thameside were under construction. In August 2012 the Prison Estate was 134 prisons including NOMS Operated Immigration Removal Centres. There were no additional prisons under construction.

Decisions on the future size and configuration of the prison estate will relied the current and projected prison population, including an assessment of the necessary margin to manage population fluctuations.

Prisoners

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (a) how many mobile telephones and (b) what quantity of drugs were seized from prisoners in each prison in each of the last two years. [119697]

11 Sep 2012 : Column 193W

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the number of finds of mobile phones or SIM cards found on prisoners and young offenders in each prison in each of the last two years. One find could constitute a phone only, a SIM card only, or a mobile phone with one SIM card or a media stick/memory card.

PrisonNumber of finds

September 2010 to August 2011

 

Acklington

29

Albany

2

Altcourse

265

Ashwell

2

Aylesbury

103

Bedford

30

Belmarsh

S

Birmingham

91

Blantyre House

1

Blundeston

7

Brinsford

6

Bristol

22

Brixton

57

Bronzefield

8

Buckley Hall

15

Bullingdon

19

Bullwood Hall

3

Camp Hill

81

Canterbury

11

Cardiff

14

Castington

4

Channings Wood

65

Chelmsford

21

Coldingley

44

Cookham Wood

2

Dartmoor

14

Deerbolt

6

Doncaster

5

Dorchester

15

Dovegate

9

Dover

25

Downview

2

Drake Hall

1

Durham

7

East Sutton Park

6

Eastwood Park

3

Edmunds Hill

19

Elmley

46

Erlestoke

75

Everthorpe

32

Exeter

23

Featherstone

33

Feltham

63

Ford

31

Forest Bank

45

Frankland

5

Full Sutton

3

Garth

30

Gartree

4

Glen Parva

2

Gloucester

2

Grendon and Spring Hill

2

Guys Marsh

90

Haverigg

43

11 Sep 2012 : Column 194W

Hewell

65

High Down

60

Highpoint

20

Hindley

2

Hollesley Bay

40

Holloway

8

Holme House

17

Hull

11

Huntercombe

26

Isis

20

Kennet

5

Kirkham

68

Kirklevington Grange

2

Lancaster Castle

5

Lancaster Farms

65

Latchmere House

10

Leeds

53

Leicester

26

Lewes

29

Leyhill

23

Lincoln

22

Lindholme

72

Littlehey

28

Liverpool

127

Long Lartin

3

Low Newton

1

Lowdham Grange

19

Maidstone

20

Manchester

41

Moorland

7

Moorlands

21

Morton Hall

1

Mount

89

North Sea Camp

22

Northallerton

2

Norwich

8

Nottingham

22

Onley

74

Parc

29

Parkhurst

4

Pentonville

231

Peterborough

96

Portland

4

Preston

10

Ranby

79

Reading

5

Risley

43

Rochester

2

Rye Hill

47

Send

1

Shepton Mallet

6

Springhill

1

Stafford

49

Standford Hill

47

Stocken

10

Styal

6

Sudbury

31

Swaleside

56

Swinfen Hall

44

Thorn Cross

46

Usk

1

Verne

57

11 Sep 2012 : Column 195W

Wandsworth

119

Warren Hill

4

Wayland

34

Wealstun

76

Wellingborough

131

Werrington House

4

Wetherby

2

Whitemoor

8

Winchester

21

Wolds

120

Woodhill

3

Wormwood Scrubs

100

Wymott

22

  

September 2011 to August 2012

 

Acklington

11

Albany

1

Altcourse

181

Ashfield

2

Ashwell

 

Askham Grange

t

Aylesbury

15

Bedford

26

Belmarsh

4

Birmingham

116

Blantyre House

4

Blundeston

7

Brinsford

50

Bristol

8

Brixton

2i

Bronzefield

3

Buckley Hall

32

Bullingdon

5

Bullwood Hall

5

Camp Hill

29

Canterbury

8

Cardiff

13

Castington

3

Channings Wood

15

Chelmsford

15

Coldingley

26

Cookham Wood

1

Dartmoor

5

Deerbolt

7

Doncaster

6

Dorchester

12

Dovegate

21

Dover

9

Drake Hall

1

Durham

52

East Sutton Park

2

Eastwood Park

2

Elmley

28

Erlestoke

117

Everthorpe

22

Exeter

5

Featherstone

51

Feltham

37

Ford

34

Forest Bank

40

Frankland

4

11 Sep 2012 : Column 196W

Full Sutton

8

Garth

10

Gartree

15

Glen Parva

S

Gloucester

3

Guys Marsh

116

Hatfield

5

Haverigg

52

Hewell

205

High Down

36

Highpoint

94

Hindley

2

Hollesley Bay

14

Holloway

6

Holme House

9

Hull

9

Huntercombe

9

Isis

43

Kennet

8

Kirkham

68

Kirklevington Grange

15

Lancaster Farms

19

Leeds

28

Leicester

9

Lewes

17

Leyhill

7

Lincoln

8

Lindholme

71

Littlehey

14

Liverpool

67

Long Lartin

2

Low Newton

2

Lowdham Grange

13

Maidstone

31

Manchester

14

Moorland

10

Moorlands

6

Morton Hall

7

Mount

87

North Sea Camp

34

Northallerton

2

Northumberland

100

Norwich

4

Nottingham

17

Onley

19

Parc

34

Parkhurst

6

Pentonville

95

Peterborough

49

Portland

3

Prescoed

1

Preston

13

Ranby

67

Reading

16

Risley

8

Rochester

5

Rye Hill

56

Send

1

Springhill

5

Stafford

17

Standford Hill

26

Stocken

19

11 Sep 2012 : Column 197W

Stoke Heath

27

Styal

7

Sudbury

47

Swaleside

55

Swinfen Hall

17

Thameside

I

Thorn Cross

44

Verne

93

Wakefield

2

Wandsworth

104

Warren Hill

2

Wayland

12

Wealstun

88

Wellingborough

60

Werrington House

3

Wetherby

2

Whitemoor

3

Winchester

3

Wolds

38

Woodhill

11

Wormwood Scrubs

73

Wymott

16

The following table shows the total number of drug and drug taking paraphernalia seizures made in each prison in each of the past two years. It includes seizures from prisoners and from other persons, and seizures which are not attributable to a person. This is because the number of drug seizures in prisons is recorded on a central database which does not record from whom the seizure was made or if the seizure was not attributable to a person. To establish which of the seizures were from prisoners would involve an investigation into each seizure which would incur disproportionate cost.

It is important to note that many drugs are similar in appearance and in many cases finds of drugs are not categorically identified by scientific analysis. Some will have been identified using indicative reagent or Marquis tests. Many will have been identified by appearance only.

EstablishmentSeptember 2010 to August 2011September 2011 to August 2012

Acklington

47

19

Albany

0

0

Altcourse

301

213

Ashfield

1

2

Ashwell

1

0

Askham Grange

0

0

Aylesbury

15

6

Bedford

15

10

Belmarsh

12

10

Birmingham

2

25

Blantyre House

0

1

Blundeston

0

0

Brinsford

4

26

Bristol

30

29

Brixton

36

15

Bronzefield

37

31

Buckley Hall

57

136

Bullingdon

48

34

Bullwood Hall

0

2

11 Sep 2012 : Column 198W

Bure

2

0

Camp Hill

10

20

Canterbury

2

6

Cardiff

37

33

Castington

26

60

Channings Wood

32

31

Chelmsford

30

57

Coldingley

5

4

Cookham Wood

0

0

Dartmoor

11

8

Deerbolt

22

24

Doncaster

41

128

Dorchester

22

35

Dovegate

116

171

Dover Immigration

26

20

Downview

3

1

Drake Hall

7

6

Durham

76

123

East Sutton Park

0

0

Eastwood Park

0

2

Edmunds Hill

12

0

Elmley

62

70

Erlestoke

34

66

Everthorpe

43

32

Exeter

76

64

Featherstone

26

65

Feltham

9

18

Ford

144

165

Forest Bank

228

230

Foston Hall

0

2

Frankland

13

13

Full Sutton

9

9

Garth

46

68

Gartree

3

11

Glen Parva

13

17

Gloucester

15

14

Grendon

0

0

Guys Marsh

35

39

Haslar Immigration

1

2

Hatfield

2

0

Haverigg

47

73

Highdown

13

4

Highpoint

43

98

Hindley

8

4

Hewell

89

139

Hollesley Bay

0

1

Holloway

5

4

Holme House

79

77

Hull

3

11

Huntercombe

I

I

Isis

3

11

Kennet

10

16

Kingston

0

0

Kirkham

169

179

Kirklevington Grange

31

71

Lancaster Castle

3

0

Lancaster Farms

6

2

Latchmere House

3

0

Leeds

26

51

Leicester

73

33

11 Sep 2012 : Column 199W

Lewes

27

39

Leyhill

66

41

Lincoln

34

22

Lindholme

40

33

Littlehey

0

1

Liverpool

13

10

Long Lartin

2

2

Lowdham Grange

68

109

Low Newton

61

62

Maidstone

2

2

Manchester

95

$5

Moorland Closed

16

15

Morton Hall Immigration

4

30

New Hall

2

5

Northallerton

6

10

North Sea Camp

91

36

Northumberland

0

68

Norwich

1

20

Nottingham

68

83

Oakwood

0

3

Onley

72

67

Parc

53

72

Parkhurst

1

2

Pentonville

97

66

Peterborough Female

9

31

Peterborough

55

47

Portland

14

5

Prescoed

0

1

Preston

79

94

Ranby

11

16

Reading

1

0

Risley

42

44

Rochester

5

1

Rye Hill

44

49

Send

0

0

Shepton Mallett

4

1

Shrewsbury

1

0

Spring Hill

3

0

Stafford

38

49

Standford Hill

65

44

Stocken

28

6

Stoke Heath

4

16

Styal

2

5

Sudbury

199

235

Swaleside

83

32

Swansea

0

2

Swinfen Hall

8

7

Thameside

0

7

The Mount

69

56

The Verne

19

28

Thorn Cross

6

2

Usk

0

0

Wakefield

1

0

Wandsworth

8

7

Warren Hill

5

I

Wayland

15

12

Wealstun

4

4

Wellingborough

9

7

Werrington

0

0

11 Sep 2012 : Column 200W

Wetherby

33

10

Whatton

0

0

Whitemoor

1

2

Winchester

1

2

Wolds

72

51

Woodhill

1

0

Wormwood Scrubs

52

32

Wymott

12

13