Police: Overseas Workers

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what her policy is on deploying UK police forces to provide assistance to countries where the death penalty remains in place. [121973]

Damian Green: All requests to provide police assistance overseas are carefully considered and include an assessment, where the death penalty applies, of the risk that it may be enforced as a consequence of the assistance provided. In cases where the risk of the death penalty being imposed are significant, assurances are sought that a person found guilty would not face the death penalty before the assistance is agreed. The Home Secretary would decide, on a case-by-case basis, whether or not to authorise assistance under the provisions of section 26 of the Police Act 1996.

Public Order Act 1986

Craig Whittaker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the results of the consultation on reforming section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986, which ended on 13 January 2012, will be published. [121496]

Damian Green [holding answer 18 September 2012]: I refer my hon. Friend to the reply given to the hon. Member for Hyndburn (Graham Jones) on 17 September 2012, Official Report, column 510W.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 107W

Sri Lanka

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make representations to the Government of Sri Lanka about claims on the website of its Ministry of Defence that the UK torture rehabilitation centre Freedom from Torture is a proxy terror front group. [121599]

Alistair Burt: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The British Government, through our high commission in Colombo, raised this claim with the Sri Lankan Ministry of Foreign Affairs shortly after it appeared on the Sri Lankan Ministry of Defence website in February. As we made clear at the time, Freedom from Torture is a respected non-governmental organisation. The use of such labels, without a clear evidential basis, for organisations that are pursuing legitimate human rights issues is counterproductive to reconciliation between the various communities in Sri Lanka.

Training

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what media or public speaking training Ministers in her Department have received since May 2010. [122071]

James Brokenshire: The former Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Equalities and Criminal Information, the hon. Member for Hornsey and Wood Green (Lynne Featherstone), attended a half-day media and presentation training session.

The former Minister of State for Crime Prevention and Anti-Social Behaviour Reduction, my noble Friend Lord Henley, attended a two hour media training session.

No other Home Office Minister has received media or public speaking training since May 2012.

UK Border Agency

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether disciplinary action was taken against (a) the Director of Criminality and Detention at the UK Border Agency, (b) the Deputy Director of UK Border Agency's Detention Services and (c) any other UK Border Agency personnel as result of the judgements handed down by the High Court in the cases of (i) R (S) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2011] EWHC 2120 (5 August 2011), (ii) R (BA) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2011] EWHC 2748 (26 October 2011) and (iii) R (HA) v Secretary of State for the Home Department [2011] EWHC 979 (17 April 2012). [119512]

Mr Harper [holding answer 7 September 2012]: UK Border Agency records show that no disciplinary action has been recorded against any members of staff in the cases listed above.

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many former UK Border Agency staff have been re-employed within a year of receiving a redundancy payment since 2010. [121864]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 108W

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency has not re-employed any staff who were previously made redundant. Some staff who have left under voluntary exit terms have been given short fixed-term contracts more than six months after departure to enable the transfer of skills, and to provide support on the Primary Controls leading up to, during and after the Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Vetting

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information her Department currently holds on the number of Criminal Records Bureau checks awaiting processing by the Metropolitan police. [122055]

Mr Jeremy Browne: As at 19 September 2012, there are 12,639 Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks awaiting processing by the Metropolitan police. The average turnaround time for these CRB checks is 13.82 days.

Vetting: Young People

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what documents are required by the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) to prove the identity of a 16 or 17-year-old who wishes to enrol on a further education course which requires a CRB certificate; what consultation her Department or the CRB conducted on the question of whether 16 and 17-year-olds would be able to provide such identity documents; and how identity will be proved if a young person is unable to provide the required documents. [122028]

Mr Jeremy Browne: All applicants for Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) certificates must provide evidence of their identity irrespective of their age in accordance with the ‘CRB identity checking process guidance' which is available on the Home Office website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/agencies-public-bodies/crb/

The CRB introduced enhancements to the identity (ID) checking guidelines to strengthen the process used by registered bodies for validating applicants in order to improve public protection on 1 September 2012.

This guidance also includes the steps that can be taken where people are unable to provide the required identity documents.

Exceptions have been made for 16 to 19-year-olds in full-time education. Additionally, they can use a letter confirming their identity from their Head Teacher or Principal as part of the range of required documents. Again, this information is available on the website.

The CRB undertook an initial impact assessment with 20 registered bodies about the proposed changes and the potential impact on the registered bodies and applicants for disclosure (17 registered bodies from their top 50 users and three smaller registered bodies, together representing 23% of CRB's total annual applicant flow). This has been complemented by communication throughout the implementation period through emails and the usual CRB publications. The new process will be kept under review.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 109W

Witnesses

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make it her policy that witnesses should be able to retain a copy of their witness statement at the point at which they complete such a statement. [121673]

Damian Green: The Government have no plans to amend current practice in relation to witness statements.

Justice

Arson: Schools

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prosecutions there were for arson on school premises in each of the last five years. [121725]

Jeremy Wright: Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the Court Proceedings Database does not contain information about the circumstances behind each case, beyond the description provided in the statute under which proceedings are brought. It is not possible to identify from this centrally held information the specific location of arson offences.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 110W

Assaults On Police

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether he plans to take steps to increase sentences for those who assault police officers. [121580]

Jeremy Wright: The Government believe that the assault of any police officer is a serious matter and those who commit the offence should be punished appropriately. In 2011, the Sentencing Council issued guidelines for assault on a police constable in execution of his duty, which apply to cases sentenced on or after 13 June 2011. Assault of a police officer is a specific offence appropriate to cases where no injury or significant injury is caused. The guideline for assault of a constable has higher ranges than common assault to reflect the aggravated nature of targeting a police officer. More severe injuries committed against a police officer are likely to attract charges of actual bodily harm or grievous bodily harm for which substantial custodial sentences are available and where the guidelines direct the courts to take account of the fact that the assault was against a person working in the public sector.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many assaults on police officers resulted in (a) custodial and (b) non-custodial sentences in (i) 2010 and (ii) 2011. [121698]

Jeremy Wright: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for assault on a constable, by sentence breakdown, in England and Wales in 2010 and 2011 can be viewed in the table.

Number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts, for assault on a constable, by sentence breakdown, England and Wales, 2010 and 2011(1, 2)
 Proceeded againstFound guiltySentenced(3)Absolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity sentenceSuspended sentenceImmediate custodyOtherwise dealt with(4)

2010

10,351

8,695

8,729

22

814

1,253

4,209

768

1,368

295

2011

10,845

9,224

9,241

31

799

1,782

4,318

737

1,255

319

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (4) The category Otherwise dealt with includes: one day in police cells; disqualification order; restraining order; confiscation order; travel restriction order; disqualification from driving; and other miscellaneous disposals. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Belmarsh Prison: Fire Prevention

George Freeman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will take steps to review all fire protection units (a) already installed and (b) scheduled to be installed at HMP Belmarsh to ensure that they are not in breach of patents filed by Watermist Ltd. [119091]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice has arranged for the registered patent holder to inspect fire protection units which have been installed at HMP Belmarsh. Consideration of future fire protection installation will be reviewed once the inspection has taken place.

Burglary

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people convicted of household burglary received (a) custodial and (b) non-custodial sentences in 2011; [121974]

(2) of those receiving custodial sentences for household burglary in each of the last five years, how many received a sentence of (a) up to (and including) one month, (b) over one month but less than six months, (c) over six months but less than a year, (d) between one and two years, (e) between two and five years and (f) over five years. [121976]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 111W

Jeremy Wright: The number of persons found guilty and sentence given, at all courts for burglary in a dwelling, in England and Wales in 2011 can be viewed in table 1.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 112W

The number of persons sentenced to immediate custody at all courts, for burglary in a dwelling, by sentence length, in England and Wales, from 2007-11 can be viewed in table 2.

Table 1: Number of persons found guilty at all courts for burglary in a dwelling offences(1), by sentence breakdown, England and Wales, 2011(2, 3)
   Sentence breakdown
 Found guiltySentenced(4)Absolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity sentenceSuspended sentenceImmediate custodyOtherwise dealt with(5)

Number

14,450

14,362

9

103

36

4,128

1,568

8,261

257

(1) Includes offences under sections 9 and 10 of the Theft Act 1968: Burglary in a dwelling with intent to commit an offence; Burglary in a dwelling with violence or the threat of violence; Other burglary in a dwelling; Aggravated burglary in a dwelling (including attempts). (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (5) The category ‘otherwise dealt with’ includes: one day in police cells; disqualification order; restraining order; confiscation order; travel restriction order; disqualification from driving; recommendation for deportation; and other miscellaneous disposals. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services: Ministry of Justice.
Table 2: Number of persons sentenced to immediate custody at all courts, for burglary in a dwelling offences(1), by sentence length, England and Wales, 2007-11(2, 3)
 Immediate custodyOne month and underOver one month and up to six monthsSix monthsOver six months and up to one yearOne yearOver one year up to and including two yearsOver two years up to and including five yearsOver five years

2007

6,172

78

871

399

546

655

1,626

1,861

136

2008

6,696

69

809

444

640

661

1,669

2,231

173

2009

7,120

36

710

403

723

775

1,920

2,386

167

2010

7,574

39

746

369

718

869

2,074

2,557

202

2011

8,261

47

751

368

840

914

2,234

2,851

256

(1) Includes offences under sections 9 and 10 of the Theft Act 1968: Burglary in a dwelling with intent to commit an offence; Burglary in a dwelling with violence or the threat of violence; Other burglary in a dwelling; Aggravated burglary in a dwelling (including attempts). (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services: Ministry of Justice.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people convicted of household burglary in 2011 had been convicted of at least one previous offence. [121975]

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the number and percentage of offenders convicted of household burglary in 2011 who previously had been convicted of at least one previous offence.

Number and percentage of offenders convicted of household burglary offence in 2011 who previously had been convicted of at least one previous offence, England and Wales
Number and percentage
 Number of offenders(2)
OffenceTotalWith at least one previous convictionPercentage

Household burglary(1)

13,874

11,782

84.9

(1) Household burglary offence include: (a) Theft Act 1968, sec.9—Burglary in a dwelling with intent to commit or the commission of an offence triable only on indictment. (b) Theft Act 1968, sec.9—Burglary in a dwelling with violence or the threat of violence (c) Theft Act 1968, sec.9—Other burglary in a dwelling. (2) The figures presented here have been taken from the Police National Computer (PNC). They may be differ from the figures taken from the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) court proceedings database because the PNC is a live operational database and the number of records is subject to update when more information becomes available to police.

These figures are a further breakdown of Table A7.5 in ‘Criminal Justice Statistics Quarterly Update to December 2011’ which was published on 24 May 2012.

The full report can be found at the link:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/statistics/criminal-justice-stats/criminal-justice-stats-dec-2011.pdf

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject

15 Oct 2012 : Column 113W

to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the reoffending rates have been of people convicted of household burglary over the last five years. [121977]

Jeremy Wright: Table 1 shows the number of offenders in England and Wales who were convicted of household burglary and either released from custody or received a non-custodial conviction at court in each of the years 2005 to 2009 (the latest calendar year available). The re-offending rates for these offenders, i.e. the proportion that committed a proven reoffence within a one-year follow-up period is also shown. Reoffending rates for 2010 will be published on 25 October 2012.

Table l: Re-offending rate of offenders who were convicted of household burglary(1) and released from custody or received a non-custodial conviction at court in 2005-09
 Number of offendersProportion of offenders who re-offend (%)

2005

8,180

53.6

2006

7,847

53.1

2007

8,529

52.9

2008

8,750

54.5

2009

8,575

51.6

(1) Includes offences under sections 9 and 10 of the Theft Act 1968: Burglary in a dwelling with intent to commit an offence; Burglary in a dwelling with violence or the threat of violence; Other burglary in a dwelling; Aggravated burglary in a dwelling (including attempts).

Proven reoffending is defined as any offence committed in a one-year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand or warning in the one- year follow-up. Following this one-year period, a further six-month waiting period is allowed for cases to progress through the courts.

Charities

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what his policy is on the (a) grant to and (b) use by registered charities of funding from his Department for the purposes of advocacy, lobbying or campaigning; and if he will make a statement. [121409]

Mrs Grant: The Department makes payments to various third sector organisations, including voluntary and community groups and registered charities. Grant agreements contain standard terms and conditions which prohibit using the grant to fund certain activities. These include activities which may be party-political in intention, use or presentation or general lobbying on behalf of the recipient. Potential breaches are investigated and appropriate action taken where necessary.

Debt Collection

Bill Esterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has to regulate the actions of debt collection companies to ensure that innocent people are not incorrectly targeted as a result of poor or inaccurate information gathering. [121146]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 114W

Jo Swinson: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

Under the Consumer Credit Act 1974, businesses must hold a consumer credit licence if they wish to undertake consumer lending or related credit activities, including the collection of debts that have arisen under consumer credit agreements. The Office of Fair Trading (OFT) considers the fitness and competence of businesses that apply for a licence and continues to monitor licensees, taking action where businesses do not reach or maintain the relevant standard.

The OFT has issued guidance aimed at consumer credit licence holders involved in debt collection. The guidance makes clear the responsibility of licensees to ensure the quality and level of information they maintain and exchange with others. The guidance also sets out specific practices that the OFT would consider to be unfair and which would call into question the fitness of the business concerned, including practices relating to poor data accuracy resulting in the pursuit of debt that is not owed, or pursuit of the wrong debtor.

Driving Offences

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people have been banned from driving who were under the age of 17 at the time of the imposition of the ban in each of the last three years; [119682]

(2) how many people have been convicted of causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs under section 3A of the Road Traffic Act 1988 in the latest period for which figures are available. [119690]

Jeremy Wright: The number of disqualifications for all motoring offences at all courts, for offenders aged under 17, in England and Wales, from 2009 to 2011 can be viewed in table 1.

Young people who are convicted of driving offences will be subject to penalty points and disqualification even if they are not yet old enough to hold a driving licence. A disqualification of an offender aged under 17 means they cannot apply for or be issued with a driving licence until their disqualification period has passed. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority maintains a record of all disqualifications or penalty points awarded, including for offenders who do not currently hold a licence.

For some driving offences (including dangerous driving, death by dangerous driving and drink driving), disqualification is mandatory and therefore an offender would be disqualified whether or not they have a licence (be they over or under 17). Driving while disqualified is of itself a serious offence. For administrative reasons, a driving disqualification is in force from the time it is imposed by a court.

The number of persons found guilty at all courts for causing death by careless driving while under the influence of drink and drugs under section 3A of the Road Traffic Act 1988, in England and Wales for 2011, can be viewed in table 2.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 115W

Table 1: Number of disqualifications for all motoring offences at all courts, for offenders aged under 17 years, England and Wales, 2009-11(1)
Number
 200920102011

Total number of disqualifications

1,791

1,227

1,021

(1) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.
Table 2: Number of persons found guilty at all courts for causing death by careless driving while under the influence of drink and drugs, England and Wales, 2011(1, 2)
StatuteNumber

Section 3A of the Road Traffic Act 1988

35

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Electronic Surveillance: Admissibility of Evidence

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many trials have been abandoned in each of the last 10 years due to the inadmissibility of intercept evidence under sections 17 and 18 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. [122025]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice holds statistical information in relation to defendants whose proceedings are abandoned in the magistrates courts or Crown court. However, the central administrative databases for courts do not store information on trials abandoned due to the inadmissibility of intercept evidence under sections 17 and 18 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. As such, the information requested can be obtained only through the manual inspection of individual case files held by the courts and at disproportionate cost.

EU Justice and Home Affairs

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what representations he has received on Protocol 36 of the Treaties of the European Union regarding the UK's ability to opt out in the field of Justice and Home Affairs; and if he will make a statement. [120759]

Mrs Grant: The Government are considering carefully all the implications of what is a very complex issue. We welcome the views of interested parties ahead of making a final decision by 31 May 2014.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 116W

We have taken note of the interests of the European and Departmental Select Committees. We are committed to a vote in Parliament and we will consult with the Committees on the arrangements for that vote.

Fines: Surcharges

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of (a) the effect of inflation on and (b) the costs of collection of the new victim surcharge penalty. [121567]

Mrs Grant: At the moment the surcharge can be ordered only on fines. We allowed for the effects of inflation when increasing the minimum level of surcharge on fines from £15 to £20. The surcharge to be imposed for the first time on other in-court disposals has been set according to the seriousness of the sentence.

The costs of enforcing the surcharge will depend on the scale of non-compliance. They will be met from existing budgets.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice in what circumstances and on what basis a victim surcharge penalty can be imposed on an offender receiving a custodial sentence. [122041]

Mrs Grant: The effect of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (Surcharge) Order 2012 is that, for offences committed on or after 1 October 2012, the victim surcharge will be payable when an offender is sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence imposed in the Crown court.

Freedom of Information

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment he has made of the scope and effectiveness of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. [121115]

Jeremy Wright: The Freedom of Information Act has been subject to post-legislative scrutiny by the Justice Select Committee to see how it is working in practice. The Committee published its recommendations on 26 July, and we intend to respond to them this autumn. The Government submitted a memorandum and other research to inform the Committee's deliberations. This is available at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/publications/policy/moj/post-legislative-assessment-of-the-foi-act.pdf

and

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/research-and-analysis/moj/investigative-study-to-inform-the-freedom-of-information-act-post-legislative-review

Imprisonment: Statistics

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) with reference to the answer of 26 March 2012, Official Report, column 954W, on social benefit fraud, which courts did not send the defendants listed for (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010 to prison; [121511]

(2) pursuant to the answer of 21 May 2012, Official Report, column 418W, on theft convictions, which courts did not send defendants listed for (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010 to prison; [121535]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 117W

(3) with reference to the answer of 14 November 2011, Official Report, column 551W, on offensive weapons: offences, which courts did not send the defendants listed for (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010 to prison; [121512]

(4) with reference to the answer of 11 January 2011, Official Report, column 280W, on prison sentences: re-offenders, which courts did not send the defendants listed for (a) 2008, (b) 2009 and (c) 2010 to prison. [121536]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 118W

Jeremy Wright: The table shows the court location where the defendants listed in the selected previous answers were sentenced between 2008 and 2010.

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large-scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Courts where the judge or magistrates did not send the defendant, who committed an offence and had the highest number of previous cautions/convictions for the same offence at the point of sentence, to prison, England and Wales, 2008-10
PQ NumberAsked the Secretary of State for Justice:200820092010

121511

Court where the judge or magistrates did not send the defendant, who committed a social benefit fraud offence and had the highest number of previous cautions/convictions for the same offence at the point of sentence, to prison

Selby Magistrates Court (Adult)

Woodspring Magistrates Court (Adult)

Stockport Magistrates Court (Adult)

121535

Court where the judge or magistrates did not send the defendant, who committed a theft and handling stolen goods offence and had the highest number of previous cautions/convictions for the same offence at the point of sentence, to prison

Manchester Magistrates Court (Adult)

Blackburn, Darwen and Ribble Valley Magistrates Court (Adult)

Bolton Magistrates Court (Adult)

121512

Court where the judge or magistrates did not send the defendant, who committed a possession of offensive weapon offence and had the highest number of previous cautions/convictions for the same offence at the point of sentence, to prison

Great Yarmouth Magistrates Court (Adult)

Luton and South Bedfordshire Magistrates Court (Adult)

Norwich Magistrates Court (Adult)

121536

Court where the judge or magistrates did not send the defendant, who had the highest number of previous cautions/convictions at the point of sentence(1) to prison

Huntingdonshire Magistrates Court (Adult)

York Magistrates Court (Adult)

Lancaster Magistrates Court (Adult)

(1) The defendant with the highest number of previous cautions/convictions at the point of sentence in 2008 was convicted for shoplifting; the defendant with the highest number of previous cautions/convictions at the point of sentence in 2009 was convicted for shoplifting; and the defendant with the highest number of previous cautions/convictions at the point of sentence in 2010 was convicted for an identity fraud offence.

Licensing

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what permits and licences his Department and its public bodies issued to businesses in the last 12 months. [118814]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice and its public bodies issue licences to:

exhume human remains; enable contractors access to building sites;

reproduce guidelines for the assessment of general damages in personal injury cases;

publish Crown court, County court and Employment Tribunal lists;

enable online publishers to provide images of historical records; and

enable access to documents pertaining to case management systems.

Morecambe and Lunesdale: Funding

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what funding his Department has allocated to Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency since 2010. [121968]

Mrs Grant: The Department do not allocate funding directly to specific parliamentary constituencies.

Ministerial Visits: Nottinghamshire

Mr Spencer: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what ministerial visits to (a) the City of Nottingham and (b) Nottinghamshire have taken place since May 2010. [121766]

Mrs Grant: The following ministerial visits have taken place since May 2010:

Place visitedDateMinister

Visit to Nottinghamshire Criminal Justice Board

9 July 2011

right hon. Kenneth Clarke

Nottinghamshire Probation Trust

7 March 2011

right hon. Kenneth Clarke

Visit to the Changes Project at the Nottingham Women's Centre

6 May 2011

right hon. Kenneth Clarke

Visit to HMP Nottingham

9 July 2012

right hon. Kenneth Clarke

Nottinghamshire Magistrates Court

4 November 2011

Crispin Blunt, Nick Herbert and Lord McNally

HMP Nottingham and the Office for the Public Guardian

4 November 2011

Crispin Blunt

Nottinghamshire Police Force

4 November 2011

Nick Herbert

Legal Services Commission

4 November 2011

Lord McNally

HMP Nottingham

1 February 2011

Crispin Blunt

Legal Services Commission and Nottingham Crown and County Court

18 June 2012

Jonathan Djanogly

15 Oct 2012 : Column 119W

Child Care

Owen Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many child care places his Department provides on its estate; what the cost is of providing such places; how many such places his Department provided in 2010; what the cost was of providing such places in 2010; what plans he has for changes in the provision of such child care places; and what the number of places will be once any such changes have been implemented. [121273]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice does not currently provide any child care places across its estate.

Until it closed in March 2012, a maximum of 22 child care places were available at Askham Grange prison nursery. This facility was used by children of prisoners as well as, subject to availability, children from the community (including children of staff). The total cost of the nursery in 2010 was £180,569. Information relating to the number of staff whose children used the facility during this time is not held.

Currently the Ministry of Justice offers a ‘salary sacrifice scheme’ that allows staff to receive part of their salary as child care vouchers and use these to purchase child care from an approved provider at a discounted rate. Staff can also apply for child care places at a small number of approved holiday play schemes, also at a discounted rate.

Offenders

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the answer of 30 April 2012, Official Report, columns 1161-2W, on offenders, how many offenders had (a) one conviction, (b) two convictions and (c) three or more convictions for (i) a knife-related offence, (ii) a firearms-related offence and (iii) rape in the most recent period for which figures are available. [122081]

Jeremy Wright: Of the offenders in the top 10 for previous convictions; four had one previous conviction

15 Oct 2012 : Column 120W

and one had three or more previous convictions for knife offences; and one offender had a previous conviction for firearms offences. None of the offenders in the top 10 for previous convictions have ever been convicted of rape.

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large-scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Offenders: Foreign Nationals

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign nationals convicted of (a) rape, (b) sexual offences against children, (c) other sexual offences and (d) a violent offence were released from prison after serving custodial sentences of (i) less than one year, (ii) between one and two years, (iii) between two and three years, (iv) between three and four years, (v) between four and five years, (vi) between five and six years, (vii) between six and seven years, (viii) between seven and eight years, (ix) between eight and nine years, (x) between nine and 10 years, (xi) between 10 and 11 years, (xii) between 11 and 12 years, (xiii) between 12 and 15 years, (xiv) between 15 and 20 years and (xv) over 20 years in 2011. [122082]

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the number of foreign national prisoners released from determinate sentences for (a) rape, (b) other sexual offences, and (c) violence against the person offences, by detailed sentence length band in 2011. From the data held centrally, it is not possible to separately identify those offenders convicted of sexual offences against children; they are included with other sexual offences.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Foreign national prisoners discharged from determinate sentences, rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person, England and Wales 2011
 RapeOther sexual offencesViolence against the person

Total

101

138

1,172

Less than one year

0

58

818

1 years to less than 2 years

2

30

145

2 years to less than 3 years

2

14

67

3 years to less than 4 years

7

9

41

4 years to less than 5 years

10

9

35

5 years to less than 6 years

13

8

18

6 years to less than 7 years

11

5

15

7 years to less than 8 years

13

0

10

8 years to less than 9 years

9

3

7

9 years to less than 10 years

10

1

5

10 years to less than 11 years

10

0

2

11 years to less than 12 years

3

1

4

12 years to less than 15 years

10

0

4

15 years to less than 20 years

1

0

1

20 years to less than life

0

0

0

15 Oct 2012 : Column 121W

Offenders: Rehabilitation

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed a Low Intensity Alcohol programme in the community in the latest year for which figures are available; [121686]


(2) how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed a Community Drink Violence programme in the latest year for which figures are available; [121687]


(3) how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed an Offender Substance Abuse programme in the community in the latest year for which figures are available; [121688]


(4) how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed an Addressing Substance Related Offending programme in the community in the latest year for which figures are available; [121689]

(5) how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed a Women's Programme (Acquisitive Crime) in the community in the latest year for which figures are available. [121690]

Jeremy Wright: The information requested is set out in the following table:

Community Accredited Programme Delivery by Programme 2011-12
ProgrammeCommencementsCompletions

Low Intensity Alcohol Programme (LIAP)

441

364

Control of Violence for Angry and Impulsive Drinkers (COVAID)

316

239

Offender Substance Abuse Programme (OSAP)

325

185

Addressing Substance Related Offending (ASRO)

470

329

The Women's Programme

162

89

The figures in the table should not be used to estimate a completion rate for an individual programme: many offenders commencing during 2011-12 may actually complete in the following financial year. Likewise, a number of those completing during 2011-12 would have commenced in the previous financial year.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Olympic Games 2012

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether (a) Ministers and (b) officials from his Department used the Olympic Route Network for travel for official purposes during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. [121007]

Mrs Grant: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport will publish details of Government use of tickets and hospitality in the autumn; this will include use of transport services which operated on the Olympic or Paralympic Route Networks.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 122W

Pay

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the highest paid position is in (a) his Department and (b) his Department's agencies. [121619]

Jeremy Wright: The highest salary paid position in the Ministry of Justice is the permanent secretary of the Ministry of Justice. In the Department's agencies, the chief executive officer of the National Offender Management Service is the highest paid position in the National Offender Management Service, and the chief executive of Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service is the highest paid position in Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service. The Public Guardian and chief executive of the Office of the Public Guardian is the highest paid position in the Office of the Public Guardian.

Prison Sentences

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice in what circumstances and on what basis the practice of remission of fines following a term of imprisonment is allowed. [122016]

Jeremy Wright: Courts have the discretion to remit fines following a term of imprisonment under Section 85 of the Magistrates' Court Act 1980. Under the provisions of the Act, a court has the power to remit a fine if it thinks it just to do so, having regard to a change in the offender's circumstances since the date of conviction. This includes where the offender is serving a term of imprisonment or where remission may be more practical than lodging concurrent warrants of imprisonment. If the Crown court imposed a fine, a magistrates court may remit the fine in whole or in part, but only if it first obtains the consent of the Crown court.

Prison Service

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many Prison Service principal officers (a) signed up to and (b) passed the Developing Prison Service Managers course in the last five years. [121705]

Jeremy Wright: A total of 669 Prison Service principal officers joined the Developing Prison Service Managers programme between its inception in 2009 and its conclusion in 2012. Of these, 88 completed the programme and gained accreditation as operational managers.

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many Prison Service principal officers who signed up to the Developing Prison Service Managers programme, but who withdrew from that programme on 31 March 2012, have since been temporarily promoted to manager. [121706]

Jeremy Wright: Of the 330 Prison Service principal officers who withdrew from the Developing Prison Service Managers programme in March 2012, 61 are currently in receipt of cover payments, (data accurate as at 31 July 2012).

15 Oct 2012 : Column 123W

Cover payments are made to staff that are temporarily undertaking the duties of a higher grade. Operational manager vacancies are currently being advertised and recruited for internally as part of an organisational restructuring programme.

Prisoners' Release

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the answer of 15 June 2011, Official Report, columns 844-50W, on prisoners' release, how many prisoners were discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offence and violence against the person in 2011; how many prisoners were discharged from determinate sentences on licence for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person in 2011; what proportion of a sentence was served, including time on remand, on average in prison by prisoners discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person in 2011; and how many offenders were recalled to custody for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person in 2011. [122128]

Jeremy Wright: The requested information is included in the following tables.

The first table shows the number of prisoners discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person offences in 2011.

The second table shows the number of prisoners discharged from determinate sentences on license for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person offences in 2011.

The third table shows the percentage of time served (including remand) in prison by prisoners discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person offences in 2011.

The fourth table shows the number of offenders recalled to custody in 2011 who had originally been convicted of rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person offences. The number of recalls in a given year should not be compared with the number of discharges in that year, because offenders will not necessarily be released and recalled in the same year.

Table 1: Prisoners discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person, England and Wales, 2011
 All discharges

Rape

767

Other sexual offence

1,640

Violence against the person

18,126

Note: Data sources and quality—These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.
Table 2: Prisoners discharged from determinate sentences on licence for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person, England and Wales, 2011
 Licence discharges

Rape

764

Other sexual offence

1,418

Violence against the person

10,213

Note: Data sources and quality These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 124W

Table 3: Percentage of time served (including remand) in prison by prisoners discharged from determinate sentences for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person, England and Wales, 2011
 RapeOther sexual offenceViolence against the person

Total

745

1.589

17.211

Less than 50%(1)

92

176

6.990

50% to less than 2/3

498

1.164

8.225

2/3 or more(2)

155

249

1.996

(1) This includes cases where prisoners were deported or where the prisoner was discharged on the Friday before a weekend release date. (2 )All those serving two-thirds or more of their sentence have been grouped together because their time served may include time on recall. Notes: 1. The totals in this table do not match those in table 1 because this table excludes a small proportion of cases where information on the time served is not held centrally. 2. Data sources and quality: These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Table 4: Number of offenders recalled to custody in 2011 for rape, other sexual offences and violence against the person.
 Recalled to custody

Rape

210

Other sexual offences

558

Violence against the person

3,134

Note: Date sources and quality—These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prisoners: Literacy

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the number of criminals who have learnt to read whilst serving a non-custodial sentence in the latest period for which figures are available. [122103]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice/National Offender Management Service does not hold the information requested.

Offenders in the community are generally able to access the range of mainstream learning and skills services but are not separately identified for statistical purposes.

Probation trusts have a long history of involvement in employment, training and education (ETE) work with offenders. Some ETE services are provided in-house, but most are delivered in partnership with Jobcentre Plus, the Skills Funding Agency and their providers.

Prisons and Probation Ombudsman

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many complaints were made about the Office of the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. [118620]

Jeremy Wright: Since 1 April 2012, the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman has received two complaints about the professional conduct of members of his staff. Figures for previous years were not recorded centrally. Figures for complaints raised about the outcomes of

15 Oct 2012 : Column 125W

the Ombudsman's investigations are also not recorded centrally. These could be provided only at disproportionate expense.

Prisons: Television

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many televisions were removed from prisoners' cells (a) temporarily and (b) permanently in each of the last two years. [121582]

Jeremy Wright: The information requested is neither collated centrally, nor required to be recorded locally, and could be obtained only by manual checking with individual establishments, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Televisions in cells are available as a privilege under the Incentives and Earned Privileges Scheme and prisoners are charged for their use. They are a forfeitable privilege and can be withdrawn for a variety of reasons.

Probation

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what plans he has for the future of the Probation Service in England and Wales; [121707]

(2) whether he has identified tasks and functions of the Probation Service which will not be the subject of competitive tendering. [121710]

Jeremy Wright: On 27 March 2012 the Government published ‘Punishment and Reform: Effective Probation Services’, setting out a vision for the future of probation services. This consultation document articulated our aim to introduce effective and efficient probation services that make the best use of the innovation, capacity and diversity that can be brought by different providers.

The consultation closed on 22 June and we received over 280 responses to our proposals. We are currently considering our approach, taking into account the wide range of views expressed. This will include the question of which probation services will not be subject to competitive tendering.

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what he considers to be the core tasks of the Probation Service. [121709]

Jeremy Wright: “The probation purposes” are listed in section 1(1) of the Offender Management Act 2007. They provide for:

(a) courts to be given assistance in determining the appropriate sentences to pass, and making other decisions, in respect of persons charged with or convicted of offences;

(b) authorised persons to be given assistance in determining whether conditional cautions should be given and which conditions to attach to conditional cautions;

(c) the supervision and rehabilitation of persons charged with or convicted of offences;

(d) the giving of assistance to persons remanded on bail;

(e) the supervision and rehabilitation of persons to whom conditional cautions are given;

(f) the giving of information to victims of persons charged with or convicted of offences.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 126W

Research

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on research and development in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12; and how much he plans to spend in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15. [121878]

Mrs Grant: The Department undertakes research to enhance policy development and programme evaluations. Information on expenditure on research and development (R&D) is published in the Department's annual report and accounts. The link to our website is:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/corporate-reports/moj

R&D expenditure for the periods 2008-09 and 2009-10 are available on pages 97 and 98 of the 2009/10 annual report. R&D expenditure for the periods 2010/11 and 2011/12 are available on pages 107 and 108 of the 2011/12 annual report.

For the current financial year, the estimated budget is £2.9 million. We have not yet finalised our spending plans for 2013-14 and 2014-15.

Sexual Offences: Rehabilitation

Teresa Pearce: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people (a) commenced and (b) completed a community sex offenders programme in the last year for which figures are available. [121612]

Jeremy Wright: In 2011-12 there were 2,125 recorded starts of Sex Offender Treatment Programmes in the community and 1,596 completions.

The figure for starts given above may understate the total number of starts, as Cheshire and Greater Manchester probation trusts began using the national information system to record programmes data during quarter one of 2011-12.

The above figures should not be used to estimate a completion rate for these programmes: many offenders commencing during 2011-12 may actually complete in a subsequent year; likewise, a number of those completing during 2011-12 would have commenced in a previous financial year.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Social Security Benefits: Appeals

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many cases are on the waiting list for tribunal hearings for (a) disability living allowance and (b) employment and support allowance. [122051]

Mrs Grant: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions decisions on entitlement to disability living allowance (DLA) and employment and support allowance (ESA).

There are always a number of ‘live’ appeals at the various stages of processing before being listed for a tribunal hearing.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 127W

As at 30 June 2012 (the most recent period for which statistics have been published) there were a total of 34,000 ‘live’ DLA appeals and 83,500 ‘live’ ESA appeals (these data are taken from management information).

Tim Larkin

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether Tim Larkin has been found guilty of a criminal offence or been the subject of a civil judgement in the latest period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [121113]

Mrs Grant: Criminal records held by the police are only accessible to the data-subjects themselves, and under specific legal and administrative arrangements which enable certain organisations to have access.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service can consider requests for court information where specific details are provided, such as the court location and the dates of any hearings. Any such request would be considered in light of relevant rules and legislation such as the Criminal or Civil Procedure Rules, the Data Protection Act 1998 and the Freedom of Information Act 2000.

Training

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what media or public speaking training Ministers in his Department have received since May 2010. [122075]

Mrs Grant: Since May 2010, three Ministers have received media training from an external provider and three have received in-house training. The training was designed to assist them in clearly communicating the work of the Ministry of Justice to the public. No Minister has received public speaking training.

Young Offenders

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners aged 18 or over were held in the secure youth estate on 1 August (a) 2012, (b) 2011, (c) 2010 and (d) 2009. [122129]

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the number of offenders aged 18 years or older who were held in custody with the youth secure estate (secure children's homes, secure training centres or under-18 young offender institutions) in August 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012.

These data have been provided by the Youth Justice Board (YJB) and are based upon monthly snapshot data. The YJB receives data on the number of young people aged 18 or over from the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) weekly on Fridays only. Therefore the figures given in the following table refer to the information given to the YJB the Friday before 1 August for each year.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 128W

Table 1: Number of people aged 18 and over held in the secure youth estate on the Friday before 1 August: 2009-12
 Number

2009

267

2010

186

2011

178

2012

185

Energy and Climate Change

Carbon Emissions

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when he expects to announce his decision on including aviation and shipping in carbon budgets. [121940]

Gregory Barker: Emissions from domestic aviation and shipping are already included within the UK's carbon budgets. International aviation and shipping emissions are not yet included within this framework. The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey) is taking into account the advice provided by the Committee on Climate Change and will respond by end 2012 as required by Section 30 of the Climate Change Act 2008.

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will include international aviation and shipping in carbon budgets. [121941]

Gregory Barker: The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey) is taking into account the advice provided by the Committee on Climate Change and will respond by end 2012 as required by Section 30 of the Climate Change Act 2008.

Miriam Maes

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) if he will publish copies of his Department's standard terms and conditions of contract and the required code of conduct which were sent to applicants expressing an interest in his Department's invitation to quote for the provision of consultant support for the public sector low carbon programme; [121293]


(2) which companies were invited to submit quotations for the provision of consultant support for public sector low carbon programme; [121294]


(3) what input the Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change had into his Department's decision in response to the Freedom of Information request in respect of copies of all correspondence or emails between Ministers or officials and Miriam Maes since May 2010, departmental reference 11/1477. [121295]

Mr Davey [holding answer 17 September 2012]: Miriam Maes was contracted by DECC for the period September 2010 to May 2011, following a competitive tender process. The competition was run by inviting four candidates considered to be energy efficiency experts to submit tenders. Miriam Maes and one other candidate were

15 Oct 2012 : Column 129W

interviewed by civil servants. The names of the unsuccessful candidates are confidential. Civil servants made a recommendation to the Minister for Climate Change that the Department appoint Miriam Maes, which the Minister agreed. This contract was extended once on the recommendation of civil servants, with the approval of the Permanent Secretary. It is not normal procedure to ask Ministers to approve an extension of this size. Miriam Maes was provided with business cards. Business cards are used to help identify DECC members of staff and, where appropriate, contractors to the Department, and record contact details.

Ms Maes was subsequently contracted, following a competitively tendered process for the period July 2011 to March 2012. This competition was advertised on Contracts Finder in June 2011:

www.contractsfinder.co.uk

Civil servants conducted the interview process, no Minister was asked to sign off the appointment. Miriam Maes has been paid £49,000 (+VAT) and has claimed £338.40 in expenses under the above contracts. Miriam attended some meetings at DECC outside of her contracted periods.

Consultants are expected to comply with their contractual terms. A copy of Ms Maes' contract has been placed in the Library, redacted as necessary. Ms Maes notified the Department of her clients at Foresee and it is not departmental policy to publish such declarations for reasons of confidentiality.

Miriam Maes had a departmental pass that was valid between 23 September 2010 and 31 May 2011, but was not provided with a departmental email account. The Department does not hold a central record of the occasions on which Miriam Maes was contacted by email. The Department did not contribute to the cost of Miriam Maes' mobile telephone, nor her attendance at the Conservative party conference in 2010.

Ministers from time to time will meet external stakeholders for informal discussions. Officials did not attend the meeting on 15 February. Ministers' meetings with external organisations are published on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

A record of all departmental spend above £500 is available on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/expenditure/expenditure.aspx

The Department has released a number of emails between Miriam Maes and the Department, and these are available on the Department's website. The Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change was informed of progress in responding to the freedom of information request and shown the material for release pre-publication. He did not make the decision in relation to this request. Some further information in this area has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and my Department is considering the request in accordance with the requirements of that Act. Information relating to internal discussions and advice, including that from the Permanent Secretary to Ministers on matters such as this, is not normally disclosed.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 130W

Combined Heat and Power

Phil Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans he has to use a feed-in tariff scheme to support investment in industrial combined heat and power technology once levy exemption certificates are removed in 2013. [121953]

Gregory Barker: The Department has no plans at present to use a feed-in tariff to support investment in fossil fuel fired industrial combined heat and power (CHP). Such schemes will remain exempt from climate change levy costs on input fuel and on electricity consumed on-site after the withdrawal of levy exemption certificates. We are examining whether there is a case for further support for larger natural gas fired CHP and considering a range of potential mechanisms.

Renewable CHP will be eligible for support via feed-in tariff contracts for difference.

Phil Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he plans to take to increase the use of combined heat and power; and what comparative assessment he has made of levels of industrial combined heat and power use in the UK and other EU member states. [121954]

Gregory Barker: The Government support increased deployment of renewable combined heat and power (CHP) via the renewables obligation and we are currently consulting on expanding the non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme, including a specific tariff for heat from renewable CHP.

Fossil fuel fired CHP benefits from exemption from the climate change levy on input fuel and output electricity consumed on-site. Smaller fossil fuel CHP schemes will benefit from the proposed changes to the carbon reduction commitment and the exemption from carbon price support costs for CHP below 2 MW. As indicated in my response to question 121953, we are examining the case for further forms of support.

We have examined deployment of, and support regimes for, fossil fuel fired CHP in other EU member states, in particular drawing on the EU Code project and IEA Country Scorecards. On average, across the EU, CHP contributes 11% to electrical generating capacity, compared to 7% in the UK. We are currently updating our estimates of UK potential CHP capacity.

Commercial Director

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what role the Minister for Climate Change had in the appointment of his Department’s commercial director. [121855]

Mr Davey: DECC Ministers did not have a role in the appointment of the commercial director.

Electricity: Meters

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on the national roll-out of home automation systems as part of a UK smart grid. [121579]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 131W

Mr Hayes: There is no specific policy objective for a national roll-out of home automation systems. However, the Smart Meter Programme will help support home automation systems by facilitating the uptake of a range of devices, including smart appliances and advanced heating controls, while we are exploring how other Government delivery programmes including Green Deal could provide further support.

Energy Company Obligation

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he plans to take to ensure that households receiving assistance through the Affordable Warmth element of the Energy Company Obligation benefit from the most appropriate package of heating and insulation measures for their circumstances. [R] [121639]

Gregory Barker: The Affordable Warmth element of the Energy Company Obligation has been designed to ensure that suppliers will deliver cost-effective measures to help reduce heating costs to low income and vulnerable households.

Our analysis, set out in the impact assessment published alongside the response to the Green Deal and ECO consultation, indicates that obligated suppliers will focus on delivery of heating systems and basic insulation. Such measures will make the largest improvement in the ability of low income households to heat their homes effectively. The Affordable Warmth scoring mechanism recognises the impact of measures over their lifetime.

In addition, we are working to provide a referrals mechanism from the Energy Saving Advice Service to help eligible customers access assistance from suppliers.

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what plans he has to introduce procedures or mechanisms to (a) enable third-party referrals of eligible households to the Affordable Warmth scheme and (b) ensure that any such referrals meet with a positive and proportionate response; and if he will publish, in the first year of the energy company obligation, information on third-party referrals to the Affordable Warmth programme, including data on measures subsequently installed. [R] [121642]

Gregory Barker: The Government are working to provide a referrals mechanism of eligible households from the Energy Saving Advice Service to participating energy suppliers to help improve access to the assistance available under the Affordable Warmth element of the energy company obligation. Households will need to give their consent for this referral to take place, but the call to ESAS could be initiated by a third party. The proposal for a referrals mechanism was included in the green deal and ECO consultation and was welcomed by the majority of respondents on that issue.

As part of this mechanism, the Government are seeking an agreement with energy suppliers over how the referrals will be handled to ensure a high level of customer service.

Information on the measures installed under ECO will be collected by Ofgem.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 132W

Procurement

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) when and where each of the contracts his Department awarded to Foresee Ltd were advertised; [121658]

(2) who (a) applied and (b) was interviewed for each of the contracts his Department awarded to Foresee Ltd; [121659]

(3) whether Miriam Maes was formally interviewed for each of the two contracts she secured with his Department; [121660]

(4) how much was claimed in expenses by Miriam Maes during her time as a consultant to his Department; [121853]

(5) pursuant to the answer of 13 September 2012, Official Report, column 316W, on procurement, which Minister in his Department signed off the contract with Foresee Ltd. [122095]

Mr Davey: Miriam Maes was contracted by DECC for the period September 2010 to May 2011, following a competitive tender process. The competition was run by inviting four candidates considered to be energy efficiency experts to submit tenders. Miriam Maes and one other candidate were interviewed by civil servants. The names of the unsuccessful candidates are confidential. Civil servants made a recommendation to the Minister for Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Bexhill and Battle (Gregory Barker), that the Department appoint Miriam Maes, which the Minister agreed to. This contract was extended once on the recommendation of civil servants, with the approval of the permanent secretary. It is not normal procedure to ask Ministers to approve an extension of this size. Miriam Maes was provided with business cards. Business cards are used to help identify DECC members of staff and, where appropriate, contractors to the Department, and record contact details.

Ms Maes was subsequently contracted, following a competitively tendered process for the period July 2011 to March 2012. This competition was advertised on Contracts Finder in June 2011 at:

www.contractsfinder.co.uk

Civil servants conducted the interview process and no Minister was asked to sign off the appointment. Miriam Maes has been paid £49,000 (+VAT) and has claimed £338.40 in expenses under the above contracts. Miriam attended some meetings at DECC outside of her contracted periods.

Consultants are expected to comply with their contractual terms. A copy of Ms Maes’ contract has been placed in the Library, redacted as necessary. Ms Maes notified the Department of her clients at Foresee and it is not departmental policy to publish such declarations for reasons of confidentiality.

Miriam Maes had a departmental pass that was valid between 23 September 2010 and 31 May 2011 but was not provided with a departmental e-mail account. The Department does not hold a central record of the occasions on which Miriam Maes was contacted by e-mail. The Department did not contribute to the cost of Miriam Maes’ mobile telephone, nor her attendance at the Conservative party conference in 2010.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 133W

Ministers from time to time will meet external stakeholders for informal discussions. Officials did not attend the meeting on 15 February. Ministers’ meetings with external organisations are published on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

A record of all departmental spend above £500 is available on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/expenditure/expenditure.aspx

The Department has released a number of e-mails between Miriam Maes and the Department, and these are available on the Department’s website. The Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change was informed of progress in responding to the freedom of information request and shown the material for release pre-publication. He did not make the decision in relation to this request. Some further information in this area has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and my Department is considering the request in accordance with the requirements of that Act. Information relating to internal discussions and advice, including that from the permanent secretary to Ministers on matters such as this, is not normally disclosed.

Fuel Poverty

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the number of households taken out of fuel poverty as a result of heating and insulation measures installed under the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target. [R] [121640]

Gregory Barker: The Government estimated that the impact of the Carbon Emission Reduction Target (CERT) would be to sustainably remove around 163,000 households from fuel poverty from 2008 to 2011; and that, under the CERT extension to the end of 2012, around 185,000 households would receive measures to provide a long-term solution to fuel poverty. These estimates were published in the following reports:

CERT

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/about-us/Science/3149-estimating-effect-cert.pdf

CERT extension

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/meeting-energy-demand/international-energy/2289-uk-report-eu-enduse-esd.pdf

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the performance of (a) the Priority Group and (b) the Super Priority Group elements of the carbon emissions reduction target in reducing fuel poverty; and what proportion of households receiving assistance through the Priority Group element were required to make a financial contribution towards the cost of the work. [R] [121641]

Gregory Barker: The Government estimated that the impact of the carbon emission reduction target (CERT) would be to sustainably remove around 163,000 households from fuel poverty from 2008 to 2011; and that, under the CERT extension to the end of 2012 which introduced

15 Oct 2012 : Column 134W

the CERT Super Priority Group, around 185,000 households would receive measures to provide a long-term solution to fuel poverty.

These estimates were published in the following reports:

CERT:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/about-us/Science/3149-estimating-effect-cert.pdf

CERT Extension:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/meeting-energy-demand/international-energy/2289-uk-report-eu-enduse-esd.pdf

Energy suppliers are not required to submit information on the cost of the work they carry out under CERT and therefore we are not able to provide an estimate of the proportion of households receiving assistance through the Priority Group element who were required to make a financial contribution towards the cost of the work. The Government have taken powers to require energy suppliers to report on the cost of measures under the forthcoming energy company obligation.

Green Deal Scheme

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether councils that do not register as Green Deal providers will be able to access the ECO brokerage mechanism. [121655]

Gregory Barker: We are currently considering whether access to sell ECO delivery on the ECO brokerage system should be limited to Green Deal providers or opened to some other parties, provided sufficient accreditation requirements and other protections can be put in place.

Councils will be able to access ECO funding by contracting directly with obligated energy suppliers, or by contracting with a registered Green Deal provider who has such a contract.

Infrastructure

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, with reference to the National Infrastructure Plan 2011, whether community benefit will be available to communities that are affected by a new nuclear development hosted by a neighbouring authority. [122084]

Mr Hayes: The Department is currently considering proposals for a community benefit package for communities hosting new nuclear. Details of any decisions will be made available by the end of 2012.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, with reference to the National Infrastructure Plan 2011, what plans are in place for achieving community benefit for communities affected by Hinkley Point C. [122085]

Mr Hayes: Plans for a community benefit package for sites that host new nuclear power stations are currently under consideration. The National Infrastructure Plan committed Government to bring forward proposals by the end of 2012.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 135W

Miriam Maes

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) how much Miriam Maes has been paid by his Department since May 2010; [121328]

(2) when Miriam Maes' departmental staff pass (a) was issued and (b) expired; [121329]

(3) when Miriam Maes' contract with his Department (a) started and (b) ended; [121330]

(4) which Minister approved the extension of Miriam Maes' contract; [121331]

(5) if he will place in the Library copies of all correspondence and emails between (a) Ministers, (b) officials and (c) special advisers and Miriam Maes since 3 November 2011; [121332]

(6) whether (a) Ministers, (b) officials and (c) special advisers in his Department were notified of Miriam Maes' clients at Foresee; [121334]


(7) whether Miriam Maes was (a) invited or (b) attended meetings with (i) Ministers, (ii) officials and (iii) special advisers prior to her engagement by his Department; [121335]


(8) if he will place in the Library a copy of Miriam Maes' contract with his Department; [121336]

(9) if he will place a copy of Miriam Maes' weekly update emails to his Department between (a) September 2010 and May 2011 and (b) July 2011 and March 2012 in the Library; [121337]

(10) whether Miriam Maes was employed by his Department in any capacity since May 2011; [121342]

(11) whether the post of Delivery Adviser to his Department on energy efficiency was advertised prior to the appointment of Miriam Maes. [121343]

Mr Davey: Miriam Maes was contracted by DECC for the period September 2010 to May 2011, following a competitive tender process. The competition was run by inviting four candidates considered to be energy efficiency experts to submit tenders. Miriam Maes and one other candidate were interviewed by civil servants. The names of the unsuccessful candidates are confidential. Civil servants made a recommendation to the Minister of State, Department of Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Bexhill and Battle (Gregory Barker), that the Department appoint Miriam Maes, which the Minister agreed to. This contract was extended once on the recommendation of civil servants, with the approval of the Permanent Secretary. It is not normal procedure to ask Ministers to approve an extension of this size. Miriam Maes was provided with business cards. Business cards are used to help identify DECC members of staff and, where appropriate, contractors to the Department, and record contact details.

Ms Maes was subsequently contracted, following a competitively tendered process, for the period July 2011 to March 2012. This competition was advertised on Contracts Finder in June 2011

www.contractsfinder.co.uk

Civil servants conducted the interview process and no Minister was asked to sign off the appointment. Miriam Maes has been paid £49,000 (+VAT) and has claimed

15 Oct 2012 : Column 136W

£338.40 in expenses under the above contracts. Miriam attended some meetings at DECC outside of her contracted periods.

Consultants are expected to comply with their contractual terms. A copy of Ms Maes' contract has been placed in the Library, redacted as necessary. Ms Maes notified the Department of her clients at Foresee and it is not departmental policy to publish such declarations for reasons of confidentiality.

Miriam Maes had a departmental pass that was valid between 23 September 2010 and 31 May 2011 but was not provided with a departmental email account. The Department does not hold a central record of the occasions on which Miriam Maes was contacted by email. The Department did not contribute to the cost of Miriam Maes' mobile telephone, nor her attendance at the Conservative Party Conference in 2010.

Ministers from time to time will meet external stakeholders for informal discussions. Officials did not attend the meeting on 15 February 2012. Ministers' meetings with external organisations are published on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

A record of all departmental spend above £500 is available on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/expenditure/expenditure.aspx

The Department has released a number of emails between Miriam Maes and the Department, and these are available on the Department's website. The Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change was informed of progress in responding to the freedom of information request and shown the material for release pre-publication. He did not make the decision in relation to this request. Some further information in this area has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and my Department is considering the request in accordance with the requirements of that Act. Information relating to internal discussions and advice, including that from the Permanent Secretary to Ministers on matters such as this, is not normally disclosed.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what the (a) terms of reference, (b) evidence examined, (c) length of time and (d) findings were of the examination by his Department's Permanent Secretary of Miriam Maes' employment; [121499]


(2) who attended the 6.00 pm meeting between Miriam Maes and the Minister of State for Climate Change on 15 February 2011 at the Royal Horse Guards Hotel; what the agenda was of the meeting; and which officials from his Department were present to minute the meeting; [121502]

(3) whether there have been any email exchanges between the Minister of State for Climate Change and Miriam Maes relating to departmental activities that were sent or received from non-departmental email addresses; and if he will publish any such correspondence. [121503]

Mr Davey: Miriam Maes was contracted by DECC for the period September 2010 to May 2011, following a competitive tender process. The competition was run by

15 Oct 2012 : Column 137W

inviting four candidates considered to be energy efficiency experts to submit tenders. Miriam Maes and one other candidate were interviewed by civil servants, The names of the unsuccessful candidates are confidential. Civil servants made a recommendation to the Minister for Climate Change that the Department appoint Miriam Maes, which the Minister agreed to. This contract was extended once on the recommendation of civil servants, with the approval of the Permanent Secretary. It is not normal procedure to ask Ministers to approve an extension of this size. Miriam Maes was provided with business cards. Business cards are used to help identify DECC members of staff and, where appropriate, contractors to the Department, and record contact details.

Ms Maes was subsequently contracted, following a competitively tendered process for the period July 2011 to March 2012. This competition was advertised on Contracts Finder in June 2011:

www.contractsfinder.co.uk

Civil servants conducted the interview process and no Minister was asked to sign off the appointment. Miriam Maes has been paid £49,000 (+VAT) and has claimed £338.40 in expenses under the above contracts. Miriam attended some meetings at DECC outside of her contracted periods.

Consultants are expected to comply with their contractual terms. A copy of Ms Maes' contract has been placed in the Library, redacted as necessary. Ms Maes notified the Department of her clients at Foresee and it is not departmental policy to publish such declarations for reasons of confidentiality.

Miriam Maes had a departmental pass that was valid between 23 September 2010 and 31 May 2011, but was not provided with a departmental email account. The Department does not hold a central record of the occasions on which Miriam Maes was contacted by email. The Department did not contribute to the cost of Miriam Maes' mobile telephone, nor her attendance at the Conservative party conference in 2010.

Ministers from time to time will meet external stakeholders for informal discussions. Officials did not attend the meeting on 15 February. Ministers' meetings with external organisations are published on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

A record of all departmental spend above £500 is available on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/expenditure/expenditure.aspx

The Department has released a number of emails between Miriam Maes and the Department, and these are available on the Department's website. The Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change was informed of progress in responding to the freedom of information request and shown the material for release pre-publication. He did not make the decision in relation to this request. Some further information in this area has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and my Department is considering the request in accordance with the requirements of that Act. Information relating to internal discussions and advice, including that from the Permanent Secretary to Ministers on matters such as this, is not normally disclosed.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 138W

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) whether his Department funded any part of the attendance of Miriam Maes at the Conservative party conference in 2010; [121861]

(2) what his Department's policy is on the use of business e-mail addresses on departmental business cards; [121862]

(3) on how many occasions Ministers in his Department contacted Miriam Maes via an e-mail account held by Foresee Ltd while she was a delivery adviser to his Department; [121867]

(4) whether his Department contributed to the cost of Miriam Maes' mobile telephone number ending 670, which appeared on her departmental business card and her Foresee Ltd business card; [121868]

(5) what funding Ministers in his Department have approved for any company which was a client of Miriam Maes or Foresee Ltd since May 2010; [121869]

(6) what meetings Ministers in his Department have had with any company which was a client of Miriam Maes or Foresee Ltd since May 2010. [121870]

Mr Davey: Miriam Maes was contracted by DECC for the period September 2010 to May 2011, following a competitive tender process. The competition was run by inviting four candidates considered to be energy efficiency experts to submit tenders. Miriam Maes and one other candidate were interviewed by civil servants. The names of the unsuccessful candidates are confidential. Civil servants made a recommendation to the Minister for Climate Change that the Department appoint Miriam Maes, which the Minister agreed. This contract was extended once on the recommendation of civil servants, with the approval of the permanent secretary.

It is not normal procedure to ask Ministers to approve an extension of this size. Miriam Maes was provided with business cards. Business cards are used to help identify DECC members of staff and, where appropriate, contractors to the Department, and record contact details.

Ms Maes was subsequently contracted, following a competitively tendered process for the period July 2011 to March 2012. This competition was advertised on Contracts Finder in June 2011

www.contractsfinder.co.uk

Civil servants conducted the interview process and no Minister was asked to sign off the appointment. Miriam Maes has been paid £49,000 (+VAT) and has claimed £338.40 in expenses under the above contracts. Miriam attended some meetings at DECC outside of her contracted periods.

Consultants are expected to comply with their contractual terms. A copy of Ms Maes' contract has been placed in the Library, redacted as necessary. Ms Maes notified the Department of her clients at Foresee and it is not departmental policy to publish such declarations for reasons of confidentiality.

Miriam Maes had a departmental pass that was valid between 23 September 2010 and 31 May 2011 but was not provided with a departmental e-mail account. The Department does not hold a central record of the occasions on which Miriam Maes was contacted by

15 Oct 2012 : Column 139W

e-mail. The Department did not contribute to the cost of Miriam Maes' mobile telephone, nor her attendance at the Conservative party conference in 2010.

Ministers from time to time will meet external stakeholders for informal discussions. Officials did not attend the meeting on 15 February. Ministers' meetings with external organisations are published on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/ministermtgs/ministermtgs.aspx

A record of all departmental spend above £500 is available on the DECC website at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/expenditure/expenditure.aspx

The Department has released a number of e-mails between Miriam Maes and the Department, and these are available on the Department's website. The Minister of State for Energy and Climate Change was informed of progress in responding to the freedom of information request and shown the material for release pre-publication. He did not make the decision in relation to this request. Some further information in this area has been requested under the Freedom of Information Act 2000, and my Department is considering the request in accordance with the requirements of that Act. Information relating to internal discussions and advice, including that from the permanent secretary to Ministers on matters such as this, is not normally disclosed.