Morecambe and Lunesdale: Funding

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what funding his Department has allocated to Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency since 2010. [121964]

Dr Poulter: Allocations for NHS services are currently made to primary care trusts (PCTs), and not to constituencies. Morecambe and Lunesdale constituency is in North Lancashire Teaching PCT.

The revenue allocations provided to North Lancashire Teaching PCT for the years 2010-11 to 2012-13 are in the following table:

North Lancashire Teaching PCT
 Total PCT revenue allocation (£000)

2010-11

560,770

2011-12

577,453

2012-13

593,728

Note: Total revenue allocations include PCT recurrent allocations and non-recurrent allocations for primary dental care, pharmaceutical services, general ophthalmic services and support for joint working between health and social care.

NHS: Pay

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 10 September 2012, Official Report, column 112W, on NHS: pay, if he will request that the Government Actuary's Department estimate the highest paid position in the NHS based on pension contributions. [122104]

Dr Poulter: The Government Actuary's Department does not hold data on individual member contributions.

Its best estimate for the highest paid post in the national health service based on pension contributions is that of a consultant on pensionable pay of £294,530 per annum. The estimate was based on the latest available pension scheme valuation costs for (2009-10) and was provided by the NHS Business Services Authority.

NHS: Standards

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what role National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence quality standards will play in the assessment of NHS performance. [122021]

Norman Lamb: Quality standards provide a clear definition of what high-quality health and social care looks like for a range of conditions and diseases, so that organisations can improve quality and achieve excellence. They should support local benchmarking of current performance against evidence-based measures of best practice to identify priorities for improvement. Although Quality standards set out aspirational but achievable care, they are not a mandatory requirement. In the new care system, the Secretary of State and the NHS Commissioning Board must have regard to them in planning and delivering services, as part of a general duty to secure continuous improvement in quality. Additionally, Quality standards will play a key role in the development of the Commissioning Outcomes Framework, which will measure the health outcomes and quality of care achieved by clinical commissioning groups.

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients attended North West London Hospitals NHS Trust to have hernia surgery in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; what the average waiting time was in each year; and if he will make a statement. [121894]

Anna Soubry: The information is not available in the format requested. The number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs) and mean and median time waited (days) for North West London Hospitals NHS Trust for hernia repair procedures during 2010-11 is shown in the following table. Data for 2011-12 are not yet available and will be published in due course.

 Number

Total FAEs

790

Mean time waited (days)

71.7

15 Oct 2012 : Column 165W

Median time waited (days)

70

Notes: 1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient; care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Time waited (days) statistics from hospital episode statistics (HES) are not the same as published referral to treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

15 Oct 2012 : Column 166W

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients attended North West London Hospitals NHS Trust to have gallstones removed in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; what the average waiting time was in each year; and if he will make a statement. [121896]

Anna Soubry: The number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs) and mean and median time waited (days) for cholecystectomy procedures during 2010-11 at North West London Hospitals NHS Trust is shown in the following table. Data for 2011-12 are not yet available and will be published in due course.

ProcedureProviderTotal FAEsMean time waitedMedian time waited

Cholecystectomy procedure

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

327

79.8

77

Notes: 1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted, against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Time waited (days) statistics from hospital episode statistics (HES) are not the same as published referral to treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients attended North West London Hospitals NHS Trust to have (a) a new hip (b) a hysterectomy and (c) cataracts removed in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; what the average waiting time was in each case; and if he will make a statement. [121897]

Anna Soubry: The number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs) and mean and median time waited (days) for hip replacement, hysterectomy and cataract removal procedures during 2010-11 at North West London Hospitals NHS trust is shown in the following table. Data for 2011-12 are not yet available and will be published in due course.

ProcedureProviderTotal FAEsMean time waitedMedian time waited

Hip replacement

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

390

95.6

88

Hysterectomy

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

183

83.2

80

Cataract removal

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

870

39.9

41

Notes: 1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. 2. Time waited (days) statistics from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are not the same as published referral to treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients, between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Ministerial Visits: Nottinghamshire

Mr Spencer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what ministerial visits to (a) the City of Nottingham and (b) Nottinghamshire have taken place since May 2010. [121762]

Dr Poulter: The Secretary of State for Health and other Ministers in the Department, have undertaken the following visits and speaking engagement to the city of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire since May 2010, as shown in the following table:

 MinisterLocation

1 July 2010

Simon Burns

Newark Hospital, Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

15 Oct 2012 : Column 167W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 168W

9 December 2010

Earl Howe

Bassetlaw Commissioning Organisation, Nottinghamshire

9 February 2011

Anne Milton

Speech, Public Health White Paper Consultation Event, Nottingham

7 March 2011

Andrew Lansley

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Queen's Medical Centre

12 May 2011

Andrew Lansley

Meeting with GP consortia at Nottingham Conference Centre

23 June 2011

Andrew Lansley

Rampton Secure Hospital, Nottinghamshire

1 May 2012

Simon Burns

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust—Nottingham City Hospital, Queens Medical Centre and Nottingham West Clinical Commissioning Group

Nurses: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) continence advisers and bladder and bowel specialist nurses and (b) multiple sclerosis specialist nurses in (i) Harrow Primary Care Trust, (ii) Hillingdon Primary Care Trust and (iii) Barnet Primary Care Trust were employed in (A) 2010-11 and (B) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [121695]

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Older People: Health Services

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the findings of the report by the British Geriatrics Society on rehabilitation services for the elderly. [121585]

Norman Lamb: On 12 September 2012, the National Audit of Intermediate Care was published. This national audit makes an invaluable contribution to understanding developments in intermediate care services. It will support local social care services, clinical commissioning groups and health and well-being boards in preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and supporting timely and safe discharge from hospital.

The Department looks forward to working with the authors on future iterations of the audit—continuing in the spirit of co-production.

Out-patients: Attendance

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of hospital appointments have been missed in (a) Dartford constituency, (b) Kent and (c) the UK; and what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse in each of the last five years. [121992]

Anna Soubry: The available information is shown in the following table.

No estimates have been made centrally of the cost to the national health service of missed out-patient appointments.

Out-patient appointments and missed appointments (DNA), Consultant led, All specialties. 2007-08 to 2011-12—provider based
 First attendances seenFirst attendances DNAFirst appointments% first appointments DNASubsequent attendances seenSubsequent appointments DNASubsequent appointments% subsequent appointments DNA

Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust

        

2007-08

43,608

3,401

47,009

7.2

76,682

6,975

83,657

8.3

2008-09

46,009

2,660

48,669

5.5

79,184

7,437

86,621

8.6

2009-10

46,821

3,407

50,228

6.8

77,561

6,781

84,342

8.0

2010-11

48,104

3,545

51,649

6.9

86,063

6,707

92,770

7.2

2011-12

55,259

4,055

59,314

6.8

92,355

6,627

98,982

6.7

         

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust

        

2007-08

155,917

14,840

170,757

8.7

321,609

32,104

353,713

9.1

2008-09

166,401

14,119

180,520

7.8

320,503

31,804

352,307

9.0

2009-10

181,842

16,038

197,880

8.1

318,135

34,559

352,694

9.8

2010-11

203,340

17,714

221,054

8.0

356,106

35,612

391,718

9.1

2011-12

164,350

14,083

178,433

7.9

300,708

26,433

327,141

8.1

         

Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust

        

2007-08

85,203

7,060

92,263

7.7

152,058

16,713

168,771

9.9

15 Oct 2012 : Column 169W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 170W

2008-09

99,062

8,022

107,084

7.5

167,908

18,574

186,482

10.0

2009-10

103,818

7,688

111,506

6.9

155,875

18,029

173,904

10.4

2010-11

99,837

7,729

107,566

7.2

181,030

18,539

199,569

9.3

2011-12

119,989

9,102

129,091

7.1

221,354

21,226

242,580

8.8

         

Medway NHS Foundation Trust

        

2007-08

74,490

7,227

81,717

8.8

146,791

19,299

166,090

11.6

2008-09

80,482

7,063

87,545

8.1

146,735

19,319

166,054

11.6

2009-10

88,015

8,011

96,026

8.3

148,428

18,987

167,415

11.3

2010-11

92,836

8,599

101,435

8.5

176,388

18,941

195,329

9.7

2011-12

92,836

7,790

100,626

7.7

186,906

18,302

205,208

8.9

         

England

        

2007-08

14,287,787

1,380,798

15,668,585

8.8

31,511,555

4,043,078

35,554,633

11.4

2008-09

15,592,337

1,513,370

17,105,707

8.8

33,243,858

4,301,529

37,545,387

11.5

2009-10

16,518,527

1,595,287

18,113,814

8.8

34,462,456

4,283,656

38,746,112

11.1

2010-11

16,953,024

1,607,283

18,560,307

8.7

35,442,802

4,163,416

39,606,218

10.5

2011-12

17,009,687

1,550,188

18,559,875

8.4

36,216,061

3,934,584

40,150,645

9.8

 Total attendances seenTotal attendances DNATotal appointmentsTotal appointments DNA

Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust

    

2007-08

120,290

10,376

130,666

7.9

2008-09

125,193

10,097

135,290

7.5

2009-10

124,382

10,188

134,570

7.6

2010-11

134,167

10,252

144,419

7.1

2011-12

147,614

10,682

158,296

6.7

     

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust

    

2007-08

477,526

46,944

524,470

9.0

2008-09

486,904

45,923

532,827

8.6

2009-10

499,977

50,597

550,574

9.2

2010-11

559,446

53,326

612,772

8.7

2011-12

465,058

40,516

505,574

8.0

     

Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust

    

2007-08

237,261

23,773

261,034

9.1

2008-09

266,970

26,596

293,566

9.1

2009-10

259,693

25,717

285,410

9.0

2010-11

280,867

26,268

307,135

8.6

2011-12

341,343

30,328

371,671

8.2

     

Medway NHS Foundation Trust

    

2007-08

221,281

26,526

247,807

10.7

2008-09

227,217

26,382

253,599

10.4

2009-10

236,443

26,998

263,441

10.2

2010-11

269,224

27,540

296,764

9.3

2011-12

279,742

26,092

305,834

8.5

     

England

    

2007-08

45,799,342

5,423,876

51,223,218

10.6

2008-09

48,836,195

5,814,899

54,651,094

10.6

2009-10

50,980,983

5,878,943

56,859,926

10.3

2010-11

52,395,826

5,770,699

58,166,525

9.9

2011-12

53,225,748

5,484,772

58,710,520

9.3

15 Oct 2012 : Column 171W

Patients

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will review the procedures for track and trigger scoring system for acutely ill patients. [121225]

Anna Soubry: The Royal College of Physicians has recently published a report proposing a new system for recording and assessing the severity of illness of acutely ill patients. The system involves measuring six physiological parameters and combining and weighting them to produce a single overall score, which can then be used to guide the further clinical response such as emergency assessment by a critical care team. The report has been endorsed by the NHS Medical Director and widely disseminated to relevant professional staff.

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what remedies a patient can seek when he or she has not been treated in accordance with clinical guidelines to his or her detriment. [121971]

Dr Poulter: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence clinical guidelines represent best practice, and are based on the best available evidence. We expect commissioners and clinicians to take them into account in their decision making but they are not mandatory.

In relation to national health service funded care, the NHS complaints arrangements enable a complaint to be made about any service provided or commissioned by the NHS in England.

Patients are able to make a formal complaint to the relevant regulatory body if they have specific concerns regarding the conduct of a regulated health care professional.

Where a patient has been harmed and they believe the harm was caused by negligence, they are able to seek legal advice to see if they may be able to recover any losses that have arisen, or may arise, as a result of the harm.

Pay

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the highest paid position is in (a) his Department and (b) his Department's agencies. [121622]

Dr Poulter: The highest paid position in the Department is Permanent Secretary in the pay range £141,800 to £277,300. Details of the three posts at that level in the Department are available at:

http://data.gov.uk/dataset/staff-organograms-and-pay-department-of-health

The highest paid position in the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is that of Chief Executive in the pay range of £101,500 to £208,100. Detailed information is available on the MHRA website at:

http://www.mhra.gov.uk/Publications/Corporate/index.htm

Psychiatry

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on recovered memory therapy of the outcome of the Carol Felstead case. [121738]

15 Oct 2012 : Column 172W

Norman Lamb: The Department does not recommend the use of recovered memory therapy and it is not a National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence recommended treatment. No new assessment has been made as a result of this case.

Research

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on research and development in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12; and how much he plans to spend in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15. [121881]

Dr Poulter: The Department's expenditure from central research and development revenue budgets from 2008-09 to 2011-12, and planned spend during the remainder of the spending review period is shown in the following table:

 £ million

2008-09

825

2009-10

885

2010-11

960

2011-12

952

2012-13

(1)1,030

2013-14

(1)1,059

2014-15

(1)1,089

(1) Planned

Secondment

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff in his Department are on secondment from an external organisation; and in respect of each such member of staff, what the name is of the organisation and the planned duration of the secondment. [122010]

Dr Poulter: There are currently 43 staff on secondment to the Department from external organisations. Details of the seconding organisations and the timings are not given as this could potentially identify individuals undertaking secondments.

The following table shows the types of external organisations from which existing staff are seconded:

External organisations seconding staff in to the Department of Health
 Number

Universities

2

National health service

34

Private companies

2

Non-ministerial offices

2

Charities

1

Local authorities

2

Total

43

The following table shows the duration of these secondments:

Duration of secondmentsNumber

5 months

1

6 months

7

8 months

3

9 months

4

15 Oct 2012 : Column 173W

10 months

2

11 months

3

12 months

20

14 months

2

24 months

1

Total

43

Smoking: Health Education

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much the NHS Stoptober campaign will cost. [121581]

Anna Soubry: The Stoptober campaign launched on 8 September 2012 and continues until the end of October 2012. The projected final cost is estimated to be £5.7 million. This includes advertising, printing, distribution, events and all production costs which include support packs, digital assets, follow-up communication, face-to-face events, materials for partners and creative development for television, radio and press adverts.

Social Workers: Voluntary Work

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will estimate the number of social work volunteer placements offered by local authorities in the latest period for which figures are available; [121989]

(2) what assessment he has made of the (a) length and (b) quality of social work volunteer placements with local authorities; [121990]

(3) what steps his Department is taking to encourage local authorities to offer volunteer placements for social work. [121991]

Norman Lamb: The Department recognises that by drawing on the expertise and skills of volunteers, the health and care sector has the potential to deliver responsive personalised services, particularly to some of the most vulnerable people and communities in our society. In October 2011 the Department published ‘Social action for health and well-being: building co-operative communities’, a strategic vision for volunteering, which aims to encourage leaders and decision-makers in the health and social care sector to work together, and to consider where and how volunteering can help to meet local priorities and improve the quality of services and support. A copy of the document has already been placed in the Library.

The use of trainee social workers on practice placements can also help local authorities to deliver more responsive services. However, the use of these trainees, like other volunteers, is a local decision to be based on local needs, priorities and circumstances. The Department has no role in assessing or monitoring the volume, length or quality of the placements, and does not hold this information centrally. To qualify as a social worker and register with the Health and Care Professions Council, trainees must undertake practice placement days; the College of Social Work has published guidance on the criteria to be used by higher education institutions in arranging practice placements for students.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 174W

Streptococcus

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department is taking to ensure the widest possible engagement from stakeholders during the National Screening Committee consultation on offering screening for Group B streptococcus to all pregnant women; [121719]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to assess the statistical significance of the increase in Group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies between 2003 and 2010. [121720]

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what recent discussions his Department has had with other EU member states on the prevention of Group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies; [121842]

(2) what comparative assessment his Department has undertaken of the cost benefit of the UK's risk-based strategy for preventing a Group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies with screening approaches used in other western countries; and what the results were of any such assessment; [121843]

(3) what steps he has taken to publicise the UK National Screening Committee's public consultation on screening all pregnant women for Group B streptococcus and its closure on 23 October 2012; [121844]

(4) what steps he is taking to ensure that all submissions made directly to the UK National Screening Committee during public consultations on screening for Group B streptococcus are considered by his Department and that those submissions and the responses to them are made public; and if he will make a statement. [121845]

Dr Poulter: The Department has not had any discussions with any EU member states on the prevention of Group B streptococcus (GBS) infection in newborn babies. However, practice in Europe varies and the United Kingdom rate of early onset GBS infection appears to be comparable with that in other European countries. A copy of the Lancet article, ‘Group B streptococcal disease in infants aged younger than 3 months: systematic review and meta-analysis’, has been placed in the Library.

The Department has not undertaken a comparative assessment of the cost benefit of the UK's risk-based strategy for preventing GBS infection in newborn babies with screening approaches used in other western countries. However, a National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment study, published in 2009, suggested that assessments of screening's cost-effectiveness in relation to current practice were subject to a great deal of uncertainty and were dependent on changes to clinical practice.

The UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) advises Ministers and the national health service in all four countries about all aspects of screening policy and supports implementation. Using research evidence, pilot programmes and economic evaluation, it assesses the evidence for programmes against a set of internationally recognised criteria.

In response to representations made to the Department on GBS infection in newborn babies, during the UK NSC's consultation period, the Department has taken opportunities, for example through correspondence,

15 Oct 2012 : Column 175W

to publicise that the UK NSC's review of screening for GBS carriage in pregnancy is currently open in order to ensure the widest possible engagement from stakeholder organisations and individuals during the consultation period.

The UK NSC will consider all of the submissions made during the consultation at its 13 November 2012 meeting. All consultation replies will be available on the UK NSC's website apart from those where stakeholder organisations or individuals have requested that their response is not made public.

Regarding the increasing number of reports of GBS infection, data from the Health Protection Agency's laboratory surveillance scheme suggest that the rate of GBS bacteraemia in England, Wales and Northern Ireland combined was 0.37/1000 births in 2003 and in 2010 it was 0.41/1000. It appears that there has been fluctuation both up and down between these points.

Training

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what media or public speaking training Ministers in his Department have received since May 2010. [122078]

Dr Poulter: The Department has paid £500 on media training for one member of the ministerial team since the 12 May 2010.

Tranquillisers

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health following the delegation of responsibility for his Department's programme of work on addiction to medicines to the National Treatment Agency (NTA), what services will be provided for prescribed tranquilliser addiction; when the starting date will be for provision of such services; whether patients will be able to self-refer for treatment; whether stand-alone prescribed tranquilliser addiction will be treated or whether treatment will only be provided when such addiction occurs in association with other drug misuse; what separate funding has been allocated for the treatment of prescribed addiction; what method of withdrawal from tranquillisers service providers will use; what specialised training will be provided for those delivering tranquilliser withdrawal services; whether such training will be mandatory; whether his Department plans to make an announcement to notify patients that such services have become available; who will provide scientific and medical advice to the NTA on tranquilliser withdrawal; and what plans his Department has for future funding of the Bristol Tranquilliser Project and the Council for Information on Tranquillisers and Antidepressants and its national helpline. [121140]

Anna Soubry: The Action Plan for 2012-13 for the National Treatment Agency for Substance Misuse (NTA) requires it to continue to support the development and delivery of effective local recovery-orientated systems. Such services, which could include provision by the voluntary sector, are commissioned at a local level, and the information requested about them is not collected centrally. The NTA's activities are informed by professional advice from a wide range of sources.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 176W

Funding for the treatment of addiction to medicine is not separately identified in the money that the Department allocates to local areas for commissioning services. Clinicians treating addiction to medicine are expected to follow the United Kingdom guidelines on clinical management of drug misuse and dependence and other relevant guidance. Departmental officials have been working with the Royal College of General Practitioners to develop further training and guidance in preventing and treating addiction to medicine.

Voluntary organisations which wish to seek funding direct from the Department need to apply to the Innovation, Excellence and Strategic Development Fund. The deadline for registering an intention to apply for 2013-14 funding was 7 September.

Education

Academies

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what processes his Department has put in place to deal with failing academy schools. [121913]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department monitors the academic performance of academies and holds the sponsor to account for driving improvement in cases of underperformance. An academy is deemed to be underperforming if it is below the floor standard or in an Ofsted category of concern. The Office of the Schools Commissioner works with the sponsor to ensure robust action is taken to accelerate improvement.

The effect of the remedial action is assessed regularly and where an academy sponsor is unable to bring about improvement on its own, they may be required to work with an academy sponsor with a proven track-record.

In the event of serious and continuing failure formal intervention will be initiated aimed at removing the sponsor.

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many academy schools have closed in each of the last five years. [121914]

Elizabeth Truss: No academy has closed in the last five years.

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many academy schools are considered to be failing in (a) England and (b) the North West. [121915]

Elizabeth Truss: An academy is deemed to be underperforming if it is below the floor standard or in an Ofsted category of concern.

The latest performance figures available to the Department are for 2011 and these show:

(a) In England, 57 secondary academies and 12 primary academies were underperforming. The majority of these were previously underperforming maintained schools and since becoming academies are on an upward trajectory.

(b) In the North West, seven secondary academies and no primary academies are underperforming.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 177W

Adoption and Fostering

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his policy is on the advice available to people considering the adoption or fostering of children of a different race to their own. [118721]

Mr Timpson: We want to encourage people from all walks of life and all backgrounds to come forward to foster or adopt. Those who do should not be turned away because they do not share the same ethnicity, including racial origin, as the looked after children in need of an adoptive or foster family. When a prospective foster carer or adopter is willing to consider fostering or adopting a child of a different ethnicity they must be provided with all the advice, training and support they need to help them fully to meet the child's needs.

The Prime Minister announced in March that we will act to reduce the delay in placement of children for adoption because of a search for a perfect or partial ethnic match. We will shortly publish for scrutiny draft legislative proposals that are part of the reforms designed to achieve this.

Adoption: Grandparents

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what financial support is available

15 Oct 2012 : Column 178W

to grandparents who adopt their grandchildren; and if he will make a statement. [120187]

Mr Timpson: Grandparents who adopt their grandchildren have the same access to adoption support as all other adoptive parents. They have the same entitlements to child benefit and child tax credits as any parents. If they have adopted their grandchildren through an adoption agency (usually their local authority), they are also entitled to an assessment of their need for financial support. It is for the local authority to decide whether to provide this. In making their decision the local authority must take into account the individual circumstances of the case.

Adoption: Harrogate

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children were in foster care awaiting adoption in Harrogate and Knaresborough constituency in each of the last three years. [120577]

Mr Timpson: The information requested is not available at constituency level. Information for North Yorkshire local authority is shown in the following table.

Looked after children awaiting adoption at 31 March(1). Years ending 31 March 2009 to 2011. Coverage: North Yorkshire
 As at 31 March 2009As at 31 March 2010As at 31 March 2011

Number of children in foster care for whom the decision has been made that they should be placed for adoption, but who have not yet been placed

5

25

20

Number of children who have been placed for adoption, but who have not yet been adopted(2)

5

10

15

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. (2) Only children looked after in a foster care placement when the decision was made that they should be placed for adoption have been counted. Note: It is possible for a child to be awaiting adoption in more than one year.

The decision that a looked after child should be placed for adoption is made by their local authority but a child cannot be placed for adoption without either a placement order from the court or parental consent (depending on the individual circumstances of the case).

Children in a foster placement waiting to be placed for adoption may be waiting for a placement order to be made by the court or may be in the process of being matched with prospective adopters. Once children are placed for adoption, they are no longer in foster care, but they are still awaiting adoption because an adoption order is not yet in place. It is for the prospective adopters to decide when to apply to the court for an adoption order.

Information about the decision that a child should be placed for adoption has been collected for all looked after children, for whom a decision was made, since 2009. Any children for whom the adoption decision was made prior to 2009 would be excluded from the table above.

Information on adopted children can be found in the Statistical First Release “Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2011”, which is available on the Department's website via the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001026/index.shtml

Apprentices: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what estimate he has made of the number of apprenticeships created in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber since 2009. [121310]

Matthew Hancock [holding answer 17 September 2012]: Table 1 shows the number of apprenticeship programme starts in Brigg and Goole parliamentary constituency and the Yorkshire and the Humber region between 2008/09 and 2010/11 academic years. 2010/11 is the latest year for which final data are available.

Table 1: Apprenticeship programme starts by geography, 2008/09 to 2010/11
 2008/092009/102010/11

Brigg and Goole parliamentary constituency

440

460

810

Yorkshire and the Humber region

32,170

36,530

55,800

Notes 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Geographic breakdowns are based upon the home postcode of the learner. 3. Figures are based on the geographic boundaries as of May 2010. Source: Individualised Learner Record.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 179W

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by geography is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly statistical first release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 28 June 2012, available at:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary_tables/

Building Schools for the Future Programme

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the (a) mean cost, (b) acquisition cost, (c) average refurbishment or rebuild cost and (d) average pupil capacity is of schools built under his Building Schools for the Future programme. [121825]

Mr Laws: The Building Schools for the Future programme is not mine or the coalition Government's; it was a programme started under the previous Administration. The mean cost of all new build schools under the Building Schools for the Future programme is £18.6 million pre-election and £16.3 million post-election. The acquisition cost of schools or sites is not held centrally; local authorities will hold this information on individual projects. The average refurbishment cost of schools under the Building Schools for the Future programme is £3.9 million. The average capacity of new build schools under the Building Schools for the Future programme is 1,080 pupils.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 180W

CAFCASS

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the trial workload weighting system currently being used by the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service. [121369]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 18 September 2012]: The Secretary of State for Education has made no such assessment as the deployment of staff is a matter for the CAFCASS chief executive. Anthony Douglas, the chief executive, has written to the hon. Member on this issue and a copy of his letter has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 18 September 2012:

I am writing to you in order to provide an answer to the Parliamentary Question that you tabled recently.

Since summer 2010, Cafcass and its trade unions representing front line staff (NAPO and Unison) have worked closely together to identify and address issues in relation to the workloads of our Family Court Advisers. A workload weighting tool, which was trialled in 2011, was revised in June 2012 and this revised tool is now in the process of being implemented. It incorporates a number of adjustments, intended more accurately to reflect the actual 'weight' of the various types of work that are undertaken by Cafcass practitioners. It also reflects the proportionate working expectations set out in the Cafcass Operating Framework, which was published in April 2012.

Please see the following table which indicates the proportion of Family Court Advisers assigned to a workload weighting band in each Cafcass region.

Data for August 2012
TeamHeadcount: Employed and agency FCAs% low red (less than 21.6)% low amber (21.6 to 36)% green (36.1 to 52)% high amber (52.1 to 59)% high red (more than 59)

A1: Tyneside, Northumbria and Cumbria

51

5.90

17.60

45.10

17.60

13.70

A2: Durham, Teeside and North Yorkshire

49

10.20

12.20

18.40

26.50

32.70

A3: Greater Manchester

82

13.40

11.00

51.20

19.50

4.90

A4: South Yorkshire and Humberside

56

17.90

14.30

55.40

12.50

0.00

A5: West Yorkshire

69

23.20

20.30

44.90

10.10

1.40

A6: Hampshire and the Isle of Wight

29

10.30

20.70

62.10

3.40

3.40

A7: Avon, Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Thames Valley

64

14.10

18.80

37.50

10.90

18.80

A8: Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Dorset

60

11.70

15.00

61.70

6.70

5.00

A9: Cheshire, Merseyside and Lancashire

101

16.80

14.90

52.50

11.90

4.00

A10: Shropshire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire

42

14.30

7.10

45.20

19.00

14.30

A11: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire

98

13.30

20.40

44.90

16.30

5.10

A12: Birmingham and Black Country

67

20.90

7.50

22.40

13.40

35.80

A13: National Business Centre, Coventry and Northampton

28

17.90

3.60

25.00

25.00

28.60

A14: Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire

95

23.20

18.90

32.60

6.30

18.90

A15: Greater London

157

10.20

14.60

29.30

21.70

24.20

A16: Surrey and Sussex

38

2.60

13.20

39.50

26.30

18.40

A17: Kent

31

6.50

19.40

16.10

12.90

45.20

15 Oct 2012 : Column 181W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 182W

National

1,117

14.30

15.10

40.30

15.20

15.00

Notes: 1. The numbers in the column headings in columns 3 to 7 above relate to the average number of points held by CAFCASS practitioners in each service area as at 3 September 2012. 2. Points are allocated for different types of work according to the time and work effort they take. 3. The bands were defined as follows based on the snapshot of workload scores taken on 1 June 2012: low red—15% staff; low amber—15% staff; green—40% staff; high amber—15% staff; high red—15% staff. 4. FCA = Family Court Advisor.

Some caution needs to be exercised over the interpretation of this data, as it is possible not all data has been added to the Cafcass Case Management System. However, we are confident the dataset is becoming progressively more accurate. As has been the case since the launch of the trial version of the workload weighting tool in March 2011, all information has been made available to our trade unions both through full access to the system and through regular reports.

The use of the bands is intended to enable practitioners and their managers to have a sound, transparent basis on which to monitor the 'weight' of the work being undertaken and to ensure that when practitioners are carrying workloads that lie outside the 'expected' (green) band, attention is paid to the issue within supervision and through management oversight of the work of the local team as a whole.

In addition, we have used the workload weighting system as a basis for allocating additional resources to hard-pressed teams, where many of the practitioners were in the higher bands over a sustained period.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of family court advisers employed by the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (CAFCASS) are working a high red or high amber workload weight in each CAFCASS region; and what steps he is taking to reduce high red or high amber workload weights. [121371]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 18 September 2012]: CAFCASS is an independent body with its own procedures. Operational issues, including staff workloads, are the responsibility of the chief executive. Anthony Douglas, the chief executive, has written to the hon. Member and a copy of his response has been placed in the Libraries of the House.

Letter from Anthony Douglas, dated 18 September 2012:

I am writing to you in order to provide an answer to the Parliamentary Question that you tabled recently.

Since summer 2010, Cafcass and its trade unions representing front line staff (NAPO and Unison) have worked closely together to identify and address issues in relation to the workloads of our Family Court Advisers. A workload weighting tool, which was trialled in 2011, was revised in June 2012 and this revised tool is now in the process of being implemented. It incorporates a number of adjustments, intended more accurately to reflect the actual 'weight' of the various types of work that are undertaken by Cafcass practitioners. It also reflects the proportionate working expectations set out in the Cafcass Operating Framework, which was published in April 2012.

Please see the following table which indicates the proportion of Family Court Advisers assigned to a workload weighting band in each Cafcass region.

Data for August 2012
TeamHeadcount: Employed and agency FCAs% low red (less than 21.6)% low amber (21.6 to 36)% green (36.1 to 52)% high amber (52.1 to 59)% high red (more than 59)

A1: Tyneside, Northumbria and Cumbria

51

5.90

17.60

45.10

17.60

13.70

A2: Durham, Teeside and North Yorkshire

49

10.20

12.20

18.40

26.50

32.70

A3: Greater Manchester

82

13.40

11.00

51.20

19.50

4.90

A4: South Yorkshire and Humberside

56

17.90

14.30

55.40

12.50

0.00

A5: West Yorkshire

69

23.20

20.30

44.90

10.10

1.40

A6: Hampshire and the Isle of Wight

29

10.30

20.70

62.10

3.40

3.40

A7: Avon, Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Thames Valley

64

14.10

18.80

37.50

10.90

18.80

A8: Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Dorset

60

11.70

15.00

61.70

6.70

5.00

A9: Cheshire, Merseyside and Lancashire

101

16.80

14.90

52.50

11.90

4.00

A10: Shropshire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire

42

14.30

7.10

45.20

19.00

14.30

A11: Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire and Cambridgeshire

98

13.30

20.40

44.90

16.30

5.10

A12: Birmingham and Black Country

67

20.90

7.50

22.40

13.40

35.80

A13: National Business Centre, Coventry and Northampton

28

17.90

3.60

25.00

25.00

28.60

A14: Essex, Suffolk, Norfolk, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire

95

23.20

18.90

32.60

6.30

18.90

15 Oct 2012 : Column 183W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 184W

A15: Greater London

157

10.20

14.60

29.30

21.70

24.20

A16: Surrey and Sussex

38

2.60

13.20

39.50

26.30

18.40

A17: Kent

31

6.50

19.40

16.10

12.90

45.20

National

1,117

14.30

15.10

40.30

15.20

15.00

Notes: 1. The numbers in the column headings in columns 3 to 7 above relate to the average number of points held by CAFCASS practitioners in each service area as at 3 September 2012. 2. Points are allocated for different types of work according to the time and work effort they take. 3. The bands were defined as follows based on the snapshot of workload scores taken on 1 June 2012: low red—15% staff; low amber—15% staff; green—40% staff; high amber—15% staff; high red—15% staff. 4. FCA = Family Court Advisor.

Some caution needs to be exercised over the interpretation of this data, as it is possible not all data has been added to the Cafcass Case Management System. However, we are confident the dataset is becoming progressively more accurate. As has been the case since the launch of the trial version of the workload weighting tool in March 2011, all information has been made available to our trade unions both through full access to the system and through regular reports.

The use of the bands is intended to enable practitioners and their managers to have a sound, transparent basis on which to monitor the 'weight' of the work being undertaken and to ensure that when practitioners are carrying workloads that lie outside the 'expected' (green) band, attention is paid to the issue within supervision and through management oversight of the work of the local team as a whole.

In addition, we have used the workload weighting system as a basis for allocating additional resources to hard-pressed teams, where many of the practitioners were in the higher bands over a sustained period.

Carers: Young People

Andrew Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent estimate he has made of the number of carers under the age of 18 (a) nationally, (b) in North Yorkshire and (c) in Harrogate and Knaresborough constituency. [120578]

Mr Timpson: The 2001 National Census indicated that there were then around 175,000 carers under the age of 18 in the UK, of which 139,000 were in England. Figures for local areas are not collected centrally.

Charities

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his Department's policy is on the (a) grant to and (b) use by registered charities of funding from his Department for the purposes of advocacy, lobbying or campaigning; and if he will make a statement. [121407]

Mr Timpson: Grants issued by the Department are issued for the achievement of the objectives as agreed and voted for by Parliament. Our policy is that grant funding may not be used, and is not granted for, the purposes of funding advocacy, lobbying or campaigning. Grant documentation also specifies the purposes for which funding can be used and the legislative basis under which it is paid.

Child Abandonment

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children under the age of five years old have been found abandoned by their parents in each of the last five years. [121128]

Mr Timpson: Information on the number of children abandoned by their parents is not collected by the Department.

The Department does collect information on the reason why a child starts to be looked after. The reasons why a child may be provided with such a service include absent parenting. A table showing the number of children by age group who started to be looked after due to absent parenting is as follows. This covers the latest five years for which data are available (2007 to 2011) and covers England only.

Children can be classed as needing services due to absent parenting for a number of reasons. This category will include:

children whose parents have died or are lost

children whose parents have sent them away for 'good' motives, this will include children whose parents decide it is in the best interests of the child to be adopted

children who have become separated from their parents due to civil or natural disaster, or due to political events

children who are Unaccompanied Asylum Seekers (UASC)

children who have been left by their parents

The category could also include children whose parent has been imprisoned where the reason for imprisonment bears no relation to the child being looked after.

Children who started to be looked after due to absent parenting aged under five when starting care(1,2,3,4,5), years ending 31 March 2007 to 2011, coverage: England
Age on starting20072008200920102011

Under one

220

220

210

140

160

One to four

160

160

150

120

120

Total aged under five

380

370

350

250

280

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10, therefore, numbers may not sum to totals. (2) Only the first occasion on which a child started to be looked after in the year has been counted. (3) Historical data may differ from older publications. This is mainly due to the implementation of amendments and corrections sent by some local authorities after the publication date of previous materials. (4) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short term placements. (5) The most applicable category of the eight “Need Codes” at the time the child started to be looked after rather than necessarily the entire reason, figures show children where the most applicable code was absent parenting at the time of the child starting to be looked after. Source: SSDA 903

15 Oct 2012 : Column 185W

The Home Office also publishes statistics for the offence of abandoning a child under the age of two years as part of the publication, “Recorded Crime Statistics for England and Wales 2002/03—2011/12”. This can be found at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/historical-crime-data/rec-crime-2003-2012

Child Care

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the potential effect on local authorities' ability to provide the two-year-old offer of the removal of requirements for Sure Start children's centres to provide full day care in disadvantaged areas; [120014]

(2) what estimate he has made of the effect of changes to the early intervention grant on the support local authorities give to childcare providers to increase the availability of highly-qualified foundation years staff; [120015]

(3) what recent representations he has received on the need for capital funding to deliver the two-year-old offer; [120016]

(4) how he plans to measure the quality of childcare providers delivering free childcare for disadvantaged two-year-olds; [120017]

(5) what training materials he has commissioned for dissemination to providers of free childcare for disadvantaged two-year-olds; [120018]

(6) what guidance he has issued to local authorities on the provision of Early Years Area special educational needs co-ordinators to support childcare providers delivering free childcare for disadvantaged two-year-olds. [120019]

Elizabeth Truss: The Government are providing funding, rising each year to £760 million in 2014-15, for free early education for around 260,000 two-year-olds.

The Department has made no assessment of the number of places likely to be delivered by particular types of early years providers such as Sure Start children's centres. This will vary from area to area. The early years market is dynamic and diverse, and the Government anticipate that it will respond positively to the increase in demand and the significant new investment. Maintained, private and voluntary sector providers and childminders already deliver places to disadvantaged two-year-olds, and the new entitlement creates opportunities for them to expand.

The local authority and school funding settlement provides for the ongoing support and development of the children's work force through the early intervention grant.(EIG) paid to local authorities. From 2013-14, local authorities will receive their EIG through the new Business Rates Retention Scheme, within which it will be separately identified.

The Department has received many representations on how to deliver the free entitlement for two-year-olds.

It is important that places for two-year-olds are of high quality, so that the benefits for children's development are maximised. The quality of early years provision is assessed by Ofsted.

15 Oct 2012 : Column 186W

A range of training materials is available to providers of early education to two-year-olds should they choose to take it up. This includes support developed through the Department's voluntary and community sector grant programme and the Early Language Development programme, commissioned by the Department, to increase awareness and knowledge of early years speech, language and communication development among early years practitioners, health and education professionals, parents and carers.

The Department has issued no guidance to local authorities specifically on the provision of early years special educational needs co-ordinators to support delivery of the free entitlement for two-year-olds. All providers are required to comply with the Early Years Foundation Stage, this includes a requirement to consider whether a child may have special educational needs and where this is the case, how they can be supported. Under statutory guidance local authorities are required to report annually on how they are supporting the child care needs of children with disabilities.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the notional funding is within the Early Intervention Grant for the provision of free childcare for disadvantaged two-year-olds in each local authority in the current financial year. [120247]

Elizabeth Truss: The Early Intervention Grant (EIG) is unringfenced and does not contain any notional allocations for different policy areas.

Since funding decisions on the use of the EIG are devolved to local authorities, it is not possible to provide a local authority level breakdown of funding allocations for the provision of free early education for disadvantaged two-year-olds.

A breakdown of each local authority's overall Early Intervention Grant allocation can be found on the Department's website:

http://www.education.gov.uk/childrenandyoungpeople/earlylearningandchildcare/delivery/funding/a0070357/eig-faqs

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) whether in determining its options for extending child care to two-year-olds his Department has included any estimate of savings to be made from expenditure on child care through the benefits and tax credits system; [121670]

(2) whether his Department considered an estimate of savings to be made from expenditure on child care through the benefits and tax credits system in determining the options for extending child care for two-year-olds. [121671]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department published an impact assessment in July 2012, to accompany the consultation on which children should be eligible when the entitlement to free early education is extended to 260,000 two-year-olds. It set out the factors which the Department considered when determining options for extending the entitlement. It is on the Department's website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation/consultations/a00211261/extending-free-early-education-two-year-olds

15 Oct 2012 : Column 187W

The impact assessment does not include an estimate of the level of potential savings through the benefits and tax credits system of the different options, as this information is not available. It notes that the aim of the entitlement is to improve the cognitive, social and behavioural development of eligible two-year-olds and thereby to narrow attainment gaps.

Children: Hearing Impairment

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effects on deaf children of reductions in local specialist services. [119283]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 5 September 2012]: It is for local authorities to assess the needs of deaf children in their area and to provide the appropriate special educational and social care services to meet those needs. Any reductions in local specialist services should be based on a clear understanding of those needs and the impact of such reductions.

The Department for Education provides funding for special educational needs (SEN) services through the Dedicated Schools Grant. We have protected this grant to ensure that, overall, it is at the same cash level per pupil as in 2010-11. We have also made clear that we will not seek to recover funding for SEN services from local authorities where schools have converted to Academy status. These actions should help to protect specialist services for deaf children.

Custody

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to improve access for fathers to their children where parents are divorced or separated. [114011]

Mr Timpson: The Government are currently taking forward several policy proposals resulting from the Family Justice Review which aim to support parents in resolving disputes and to put in place arrangements that are in the child's best interests.

In particular, the reforms include a proposed amendment to the Children Act 1989 to emphasise the importance of children having an ongoing relationship with both of their parents following family separation, where it is safe and in the child's best interests. The legislation will affect England and Wales.

The provision will not give parents a “right” to contact with their child nor will it prescribe how much time a child should spend with each parent. The intention of

15 Oct 2012 : Column 188W

the (proposed) amendments is to make explicit in law that parents remain jointly responsible for their children following divorce or separation. As now, the child's welfare will remain the courts' paramount consideration.

The Government's overall aim in private family law reform is to encourage and enable parents to resolve disputes outside of the court system, wherever possible, and to focus on the needs of their children. The development of a new parenting agreement, as well as improved information and targeted support, is intended to help them do so.

Foster Care

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidance his Department issues to departments of social services on keeping siblings together when placing them with foster carers; and if he will make a statement. [119662]

Mr Timpson: The Children Act 1989 states that a local authority must ensure that siblings who are looked after can live together, if in their opinion that is the most appropriate placement for them. Statutory guidance on care planning, placement and case review makes clear that being able to live with brothers and sisters who are also looked after is an important protective factor for looked after children. However the guidance is also clear that for some children this may not always be possible or appropriate. In these circumstances, the child's care plan should set out arrangements for them to maintain contact with their siblings, so far as this is consistent with the child's welfare. Any decision that is made must be consistent with the statutory duty on the local authority to safeguard and promote each child's welfare.

Free School Meals: Birmingham

Mr Godsiff: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in Birmingham, Hall Green constituency are registered for free school meals. [110939]

Mr Laws: Information on the number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals is shown in the following tables.

Information on the number of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals as at January 2011 is published in the statistical first release “Schools, Pupils and their Characteristics, January 2011” available at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001012/index.shtml

Maintained nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools, and pupil referral units(1, 2, 3, 4): number and percentage of pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals(5)(, 6, 7), January 2011, England
 Maintained nursery and state-funded primary schools(1, 2)State-funded secondary schools(1, 3)Special schools(4)
  Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals
 Number on roll(5, 6)Number(5, 6)PercentageNumber on roll(5, 6)Number(5, 6)PercentageNumber on roll(5, 6)Number(5, 6)Percentage

England

3,873,175

743,255

19.2

2,837,825

450,275

15.9

79,030

28,830

36.5

Birmingham

99,050

34,202

34.5

61,491

20,923

34.0

2,854

1,388

48.6

15 Oct 2012 : Column 189W

15 Oct 2012 : Column 190W

Birmingham, Hall Green constituency

12,530

3,869

30.9

4,299

1,268

29.5

164

62

37.8

 Pupil referral unitsTotal(7)
  Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals Pupils known to be eligible for and claiming free school meals
 Number on roll(5, 6)Number(5, 6)PercentageNumber on roll(5, 6)Number(5, 6)Percentage

England

13,725

4,745

34.6

6,803,755

1,227,110

18.0

Birmingham

324

185

57.1

163,719

56,698

34.6

Birmingham, Hall Green constituency

n/a

n/a

n/a

16,993

5,199

30.6

n/a = Not applicable. No schools of this type. (1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes primary academies. (3) Includes city technology colleges and secondary academies. (4) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools, excludes general hospital schools. (5) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. Includes boarders. In pupil referral units includes pupils registered with other providers and further education colleges. (6) Pupils who have full-time attendance and are aged 15 or under, or pupils who have part-time attendance and are aged between five and 15. (7) Includes maintained nursery, state-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools, and pupil referral units. Excludes pupils in alternative provision as full and part-time status is not collected. Note: National totals have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: School Census.