26 Oct 2012 : Column 1061W

Written Answers to Questions

Friday 26 October 2012

Justice

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many victims of crime had their award under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme reduced because of failure to co-operate with police in bringing an assailant to justice in each year since 2009-10. [125194]

Mrs Grant: The relevant figures are as follows:

 Number of reduced awards

2009-10

207

2010-11

210

2011-12

143

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many victims of crime had their award under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme reduced because of failure to report to the police or other appropriate body or person in each year since 2009-10. [125195]

Mrs Grant: The relevant figures are as follows:

 Number of reduced awards

2009-10

1

2010-11

1

2011-12

0

Such awards are so rare because there is unlikely to be any independent evidence about the incident giving rise to a claim if the applicant did not report it to anyone. These two cases therefore represent very unusual circumstances.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many witnesses of crime received compensation under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme in each year since 2009-10. [125196]

Mrs Grant: The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority only holds information at that level of detail within individual files, not in their main database. The information requested could be obtained only by a member of staff manually sifting through around 100,000 files at a disproportionate cost.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many dependants of fatally injured victims received a payment as compensation for loss of parental services in each year since 2009-10. [125197]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1062W

Mrs Grant: The relevant figures are as follows:

 Number of awards for loss of parental services

2009-10

254

2010-11

260

2011-12

209

Prisons: Repairs and Maintenance

Ian Lavery: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the estimated repair and maintenance cost is for each publicly operated prison in the latest period for which figures are available. [121708]

Jeremy Wright: The capital and resource maintenance expenditure for public sector prisons in 2011-12 funded by the Ministry of Justice centrally and by the National Offender Management Service Agency at regional and local level is set out in the following table. Some of the regional expenditure data cannot be disaggregated to each individual prison without incurring disproportionate cost.

Costs include expenditure on building, plant and equipment maintenance and materials, hire of plant and machinery, related fees and professional services (such as consultancy fees, escort costs) and value added tax, where applicable.

Capital and resource maintenance expenditure for public sector prisons in 2011-12
PrisonTotal

Askham Grange

50,055

Aylesbury

2,037,050

Bedford

165,281

Belmarsh

3,002,164

Birmingham

11,309

Blantyre House

20,454

Blundeston

1,939,363

Brinsford

68,710

Bristol

2,527,029

Brixton

3,744,732

Buckley Hall

558,112

Bullingdon

127,095

Bullwood Hall

32,362

Bure

282,978

Canterbury

48,034

Cardiff

2,963,267

Channings Wood

523,032

Chelmsford

120,044

Coldingley

1,075,156

Cookham Wood

154,811

Dartmoor

399,258

Deerbolt

389,611

Dorchester

233,955

Downview

979,164

Drake Hall

37,076

Durham

1,202,412

East Sutton Park

1,312,033

Eastwood Park

261,352

Erlestoke

4,096,390

Everthorpe

172,510

Exeter

352,059

Featherstone

2,168,780

Feltham

2,885,774

Ford

9,375,963

Foston Hall

20,507

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1063W

Frankland

1,777,341

Full Sutton

5,739,681

Garth

511,229

Gartree

39,791

Glen Parva

7,950

Gloucester

250,923

Grendon/Springhill

261,703

Guys Marsh

2,313,257

Haverigg

599,477

Hewell

43,914

High Down

1,695,753

Highpoint

971,429

Hindley

1,520,980

Hollesley Bay

652,192

Holloway

447,436

Holme House

925,850

Hull

191,771

Huntercombe

40,579

Isis

1,203,351

Isle of Wight

4,020,905

Kennet

264,608

Kingston

464,171

Kirkham

375,799

Kirklevington Grange

92,838

Lancaster

297,807

Latchmere House

79,938

Leeds

10,369,094

Leicester

35,234

Lewes

5,523,650

Leyhill

803,311

Lincoln

3,436,643

Lindholme

521,440

Littlehey

1,023,923

Liverpool

5,319,304

Long Lartin

1,686,170

Low Newton

427,345

Maidstone

1,438,313

Manchester

3,991,528

Moorland/Hatfield

2,828,133

Morton Hall(1)

128,304

Mount (The)

69,258

New Hall

197,880

North Sea Camp

337,605

Northallerton

58,004

Northumberland

5,869,757

Norwich

306,604

Nottingham

97,195

Onley

403,281

Pentonville

6,961,229

Portland

1,058,560

Preston

511,534

Ranby

137,447

Reading

252,344

Risley

462,739

Rochester

1,195,498

Send

314,867

Sheppey Clustered Services

4,433,734

Shrewsbury

666,666

Stafford

2,612,429

Stocken

9,355,117

Stoke Heath

177,784

Styal

277,113

Sudbury

11,168

Swansea

42,555

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1064W

Swinfen Hall

42,719

Thorn Cross

188,562

Usk/Prescoed

902,414

Verne

1,405,706

Wakefield

5,615,783

Wandsworth

2,203,023

Warren Hill

554,597

Wayland

12,997

Wealstun

262,736

Wellingborough

21,565

Werrington

338,082

Wetherby

562,033

Whatton

15,122

Whitemoor

1,005,998

Winchester

266,742

Woodhill

646,033

Wormwood Scrubs

4,981,926

Wymott

506,223

Regional level(2)

23,151,744

Total(3)

184,155,324

(1 )Reopened as an immigration removal centre in June 2011. (2) Some individual prison expenditure has been clustered at a regional level and could be disaggregated only at disproportionate cost. (3) As with any large scale recording system, it is possible that errors in data entry and processing may have been made at account code level.

Social Security Benefits: Appeals

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of time was for the Tribunals Service to administer a first-tier tribunal social security and child support appeal in respect of (a) disability living allowance, (b) employment and support allowance, (c) income support, (d) jobseeker's allowance and (e) tax credits in Coventry in each of the last four quarters. [125171]

Mrs Grant: Appeals against decisions made by the Department for Work and Pensions on an individual's entitlement to social security and child support are heard by the first-tier tribunal—Social Security and Child Support, administered by Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS).

The following table shows the average time taken from receipt of an appeal to disposal by the tribunal in respect of (a) disability living allowance, (b)employment and support allowance, (c) income support, (d) jobseeker's allowance and (e) tax credits in the Coventry hearing venue for each of the last four quarters to June 2012 (the latest period for which figures are available).

Appeal times (in weeks from receipt to disposal in Coventry)
 July to September 2011October to December 2011January to March 2012April to June 2012

Disability living allowance

41.4

54.7

49.7

41.8

Employment and support allowance

36.3

39.7

46.8

37.8

Income support

32.9

25.3

19

(1)35.1

Jobseeker's allowance

10.1

25

17.6

11

Tax credits

18.7

22

21.3

26.3

(1) The low volume of income support appeals (31) meant that a single case outside the normal waiting time influenced the overall figure. Note: The data are taken from management information.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1065W

HMCTS has continued to respond strongly to the significant increase in the number of appeals received by the SSCS tribunal. Two additional hearing rooms in Leamington Spa and Nuneaton will be used from November 2012 to hear certain appeals which would currently be heard at the Coventry venue. This will reduce the number of appeals waiting to be heard al Coventry and, therefore, help bring down the average waiting time for an appeal hearing. Other work to increase the tribunal's capacity is also under way. This includes identifying further suitable hearing venues in Coventry, the recruitment of additional fee-paid judges and medical members, increased administrative resource, and work to reallocate hearings to alternative nearby venues to ensure appeals are dealt with as quickly as possible.

HMCTS is also working hard at a national level to increase the capacity of the SSCS tribunal and reduce waiting times. It has implemented a range of measures which include recruiting more judges and medical panel members; increasing administrative resources and streamlining processes; securing additional hearing venues across the country; increasing the number of cases listed in each tribunal session; running double shifts in its largest processing centre; running Saturday sittings in some of the busiest venues; and establishing a customer contact centre to deal with telephone inquiries.

All of this is having a positive effect. The total number of disposals has increased significantly from 279,000 in 2009-10 to 380,000 in 2010-11, and 433,600 appeals in 2011-12, with the capacity for half a million disposals in 2012-13. The tribunal disposed of more appeals than it received in every month between January 2011 and February 2012 (14 consecutive months) and the outstanding caseload within the tribunals fell by 25% in 2011-12 to reach 145,000 on 31 March 2012. The average waiting time has stabilised nationally, and has fallen across many venues.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Apprentices: Hastings

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will estimate the number of people who have (a) taken up apprenticeships and (b) successfully completed apprenticeships in (i) Hastings and (ii) Hastings and Rye constituency in each year since May 2010. [124776]

Matthew Hancock: Table 1 shows the number of apprenticeship programme starts and achievements in Hastings and Rye constituency, East Sussex local education authority, and England. The academic year 2010/11 (August 2010 to July 2011) is based on final data; 2011/12 (August 2011 to July 2012) is based on provisional data.

Provisional data for the 2011/12 academic year provide an early view of performance and will change as further data returns are received from further education colleges and providers. It is therefore not possible to directly compare them with final-year data from previous years. Figures for 2011/12 will be finalised in January 2013.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1066W

We publish apprenticeship starts and achievements at regional, local education authority and parliamentary constituency levels of geography.

Table 1: Apprenticeship programme starts and achievements by geography, 2010/11 to 2011/12(1)
 StartsAchievements
 2010/112011/122010/112011/12

Hastings and Rye constituency

980

840

310

450

East Sussex local education authority

3,910

3,770

1,510

1,900

England total

457,200

502,500

200,300

233,700

(1 )Provisional. Notes: 1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10 except England totals, which are rounded to the nearest 100. 2. Geographic breakdowns are based upon the home postcode of the learner. 3. Figures are based on the geographic boundaries as of May 2010. Source: Individualised Learner Record.

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by geography is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 11 October 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statistical firstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary _tables/

Basic Skills

Caroline Dinenage: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what his Department has spent on reducing adult (a) illiteracy and (b) innumeracy in each of the last five years. [124599]

Matthew Hancock: Further education colleges and providers have a single Adult Skills Budget providing them with the flexibility to respond to local learner and employer needs. There are no separate budgets for adult literacy or numeracy provision.

The following table shows the Skills Funding Agency's estimate of Government funding made available for adult literacy and numeracy provision (including provision delivered through apprenticeship frameworks, functional skills, GCSE and Adult Basic Skills provision) for learners aged 19+ in the 2007/08 to 2011/12 academic years. The figures are calculated using information submitted by providers via the Individualised Learning Record (ILR). Data for 2011/12 are based on provisional year end data so are subject to change.

Overall participation on English and maths courses has increased each year since 2009/10 (data for 2011/12 are provisional and subject to change).

Estimated expenditure on adult literacy and numeracy provision, 2007/08 to 2011/12 (provisional)
£ million
 2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12
 FinalFinalFinalFinalProvisional

Literacy

226

239

227

176

190

Numeracy

152

192

183

165

180

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest £1 million. Source: Skills Funding Agency estimates based on Individualised Learner Record

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1067W

Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if his Department will offer assistance to firms engaged in the manufacturing and production of replica furniture if they suffer economic disadvantage as a result of the proposed changes to section 52 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. [124739]

Jo Swinson [holding answer 25 October 2012]: There are no such plans.

Mature Students: Parents

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what financial support his Department provides for mature university students with children. [125135]

Mr Willetts: Mature students attending full-time first degree courses are eligible for the same financial support as other students for their tuition and living costs including a non-means tested tuition fee loan. Students attending full-time courses can also apply for maintenance grants and loans for living costs. Extra financial support through child care grants and parents learning allowance is available to full-time HE students with children. These grants are paid in addition to the standard support package. These grants are income assessed and do not have to be repaid.

Motor Sports

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he is taking to promote energy efficient motorsport. [124943]

Michael Fallon: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) is taking no specific steps to promote energy efficient motorsport. However, various motorsport companies are involved in research and development (R and D) projects supported through the Technology Strategy Board's Low Carbon Vehicle Innovation Platform (LCVIP). BIS, with the TSB and the Office for Low Emission Vehicles, has invested over £150 million in more than 100 major automotive R and D and validation projects under the LCVIP. On 5 September, I announced five new projects under the Niche Vehicle R and D Programme, which includes one on light weighting that may have applications to motorsport.

Post Offices: Scotland

Mark Lazarowicz: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the provision of Scottish Government services at post offices in Scotland; [122405]

(2) whether he plans to expand the range of Government services available at post offices in Scotland; [122406]

(3) what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the provision of local government services at post offices in Scotland. [122420]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1068W

Jo Swinson: The hon. Member will be interested to note that during 2011/12, Post Office Ltd's revenue from Government services grew for the first time in many years. This shows that Post Office Ltd, which operates commercially at arm's length from Government, is making progress in realising its ambition to provide more services for central and local Government nationally, including in Scotland.

The Government supports Post Office Ltd in this ambition. It is ultimately a decision for the Scottish Government, its agencies, and Scottish local authorities to determine how particular services will be delivered. Post Office Ltd is currently engaging with a range of public bodies in Scotland with a view to broadening the range of services it offers on their behalf.

My predecessor held discussions with the Scottish Government Minister for Energy, Enterprise and Tourism, representatives from the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities, the Secretary of State for Scotland, and senior representatives from Post Office Ltd and the National Federation of Sub Postmasters earlier this year.

Cabinet Office

Charities

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many faith-based organisations have had their charitable status revoked by reason of the removal of presumption of public benefit by the Charities Act 2006. [124743]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the Charity Commission. I have asked the Commission's chief executive to reply.

Letter from Sam Younger, dated 23 October 2012:

I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question on how many faith-based organisations have had their charitable status revoked due to the removal of presumption of public benefit under the Charities Act 2006 [124743].

No faith-based organisations have had their charitable status revoked by reason of the removal of presumption of public benefit by the Charities Act 2006.

The Charity Commission is the regulator and registrar of charities in England and Wales. Charities in Northern Ireland and Scotland are regulated by the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland and the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator respectively.

Civil Servants: Scotland

Margaret Curran: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many civil servants are employed by UK Government Departments and their agencies in Scotland. [125065]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated October 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question concerning how many Civil Servants are employed by UK Government departments and their agencies in Scotland. (125065)

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1069W

Data are collected on the number of Civil Servants on an annual basis, with 31 March as the reference date. The workplace postcode area is used to derive the geographical information.

The latest available data are for March 2012, and shows employment of 46,260 in UK Government departments and their agencies in Scotland. Of this, 16,270 are in the Scottish Government.

Drugs: Crime

Amber Rudd: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many drug-related offences there were in (a) Hastings and Rye constituency, (b) East Sussex and (c) the UK in 2011. [124777]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated October 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking for estimates on the number of drug related offences in (a) Hastings and Rye constituency; (b) East Sussex and (c) the UK in 2011. (124777)

Figures for drug related offences are available based on the number of crimes recorded by the police in the drug offences category. The Crime Survey for England and Wales does not provide estimates of drug-related offences.

Police recorded crime data are not available at parliamentary constituency level so figures for Hastings local authority area are given in place of Hastings and Rye constituency. Crime statistics produced by the ONS cover England and Wales only. Crime figures for Scotland are published at

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice

and data for Northern Ireland are published at

http://www.psni.police.uk/index/updates/updates_statistics/update_crime_statistics.htm

In Hastings local authority area there were 430 drug offences recorded by the police during 2011. In East Sussex there were 1,436 drug offences recorded by the police during 2011, and in England and Wales there were 232,834 drug offences recorded by the police during 2011.

Local authority figures can be found on

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/crime-stats/crime-statistics/year-ending-december-2011/stb-crime-stats-dec-2011.html

Internet: Devon

Anne Marie Morris: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will estimate the number of (a) people and (b) households in (i) Devon and (ii) Newton Abbot constituency who do not use the internet. [125360]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated October 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question concerning what estimate has been made of the number of (a) people and (b) households in (i) Devon and (ii) Newton Abbot Constituency who do not use the Internet (125360).

Estimates of Internet use by adults aged 16 years and over are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics and are available on the Office for National Statistics website. These estimates are derived from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and have coverage of the United Kingdom (UK). The latest available estimate (in respect of 2012 Q2) of the number of adults who

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1070W

have never used the Internet in Devon is 137,000. The estimate for Devon County Council is 89,000. Estimates at parliamentary constituency level are not available.

Estimates of household Internet access are published on an annual basis by the Office for National Statistics and are also available on the Office for National Statistics website. These estimates are derived from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey. Estimates are available by region, but for Great Britain only. The latest available estimate (in respect of 2012) of the number of households in the South West without Internet Access is 462,000. It is not possible, from this survey, to produce accurate estimates of household Internet access at a lower level of geographical detail than region.

Older Workers: Devon

Anne Marie Morris: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate he has made of the number of people over 65 in (a) Devon and (b) Newton Abbot constituency in the working population in each of the last 15 years. [125151]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated October 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking what recent estimate he has made of the number of people over 65 in (a) Devon and (b) Newton Abbot constituency in the working population in each of the last 15 years.(125151).

The ONS compiles local area labour market statistics from the Annual Population Survey (APS) and its predecessor the Annual Local Area Labour Force Survey (ALALFS), following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions.

However, due to small sample sizes, estimates for the number of people aged 65 and over in employment in Newton Abbot Constituency, are not available.

The table shows the number of people aged 65 and over resident in Devon who were employed at the time of interview during:

the 12 month period ending February, from 1998 to 2004 from the ALALFS; and

the 12 month period ending December, for 2004 to 2011 from the APS; and

the latest available period

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates is given in the table.

These figures along with a wide range of other labour market data for parliamentary constituencies and local authorities are also published on the Office for National Statistics' Nomis website:

www.nomisweb.co.uk

Number of people aged 65 and over in employment in Devon(1)
12 months ending:Number (thousand)

February 1998

5

February 1999

6

February 2000

9

February 2001

11

February 2002

9

February 2003

8

February 2004

10

December 2004

13

December 2005

10

December 2006

11

December 2007

11

December 2008

11

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1071W

December 2009

12

December 2010

15

December 2011

20

June 2012(2)

***19

(1) Devon is defined as the administrative county: E10000008 Devon. (2) Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality following. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: * 0 ≤ CV<5%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered precise ** 5 ≤ CV <10%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered reasonably precise *** 10 ≤ CV <20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered acceptable **** CV ≥ 20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes CV = Coefficient of Variation Source: Annual Population Survey; Annual Local Area Labour Force Survey

Energy and Climate Change

Utilities: Tenants

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what rules govern the ending of a broker contract with utility companies when a tenant who signed the contract with them vacates the premises. [125133]

Gregory Barker: The terms and conditions agreed in a supply contract are a matter between the customer and the supplier. Domestic and micro business customers may pursue a breach of contractual obligations through the energy ombudsman. Larger business customers can pursue the matter through the courts.

Warm Home Discount Scheme: Coventry

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households in (a) Coventry and (b) Coventry North East constituency have received assistance from the Warm Home Discount Scheme. [124971]

Gregory Barker: The Warm Home Discount Scheme was launched on 1 April 2011 and covers Great Britain. It runs from April 2011 to end March 2015.

Regional or constituency breakdowns for the data are not available; however, across Great Britain, in 2011-12, a total of £237.5 million of direct and indirect support was provided by the participating energy supply companies to over 2.1 million people.

A breakdown of how this was allocated across the different elements of the scheme can be found in the 2011-12 Annual Report published by Ofgem. This is available at:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/WHDS/Documents1/WHD_AR_08_Oct_2012.pdf

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1072W

Culture, Media and Sport

Cleaning Services

Dan Rogerson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport if she will make it her policy to require all cleaning contracts held with her Department to stipulate that the cleaning products used and their ingredients should not have been tested on animals. [124716]

Hugh Robertson: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) does not hold any direct cleaning contracts. However, our facilities management provider does have an ethical and environmental policy, which addresses the types and nature of cleaning products to be used on DCMS sites.

Entertainments: Tickets

Christopher Pincher: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what steps she is taking to (a) regulate the concert ticket resale market and (b) restrict concert ticket resale. [125373]

Hugh Robertson: The Government have no plans to regulate the ticketing market. We will, however, continue to monitor this area, and if new evidence comes forward of severe market failures that need addressing we will review this position.

Olympic Games 2012

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the effect of the Olympic legacy on suppliers to the London 2012 Olympic Games; and if she will make a statement. [124966]

Hugh Robertson: £8 billion of games-related contracts have been awarded to UK companies—£7 billion from the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) and £l billion from the London 2012 Organising Committee (LOCOG). More than 2,000 companies have won direct contracts as a result, with nearly a third of contracts being won by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

The report “London 2012—a global showcase for UK PLC”, produced by Sir John Armitt for the Department, in advance of the games in July 2012, examined the impact of the games on firms who worked on contracts for both the ODA and LOCOG. The research shows some positive results in relation to the potential role of the games in supporting the longer-term competitiveness of UK businesses. The key findings of the research, which were based on a survey of 276 companies, are as follows:

68% of companies said working on London 2012 has enhanced their reputation, rising to 77% for larger companies;

almost a third of companies have already secured further work as a result of their experience with London 2012;

almost three-quarters of companies anticipated future business opportunities as a result of their involvement in the games.

Through the London 2012 Business Network and CompeteFor, thousands of UK businesses have been helped to apply for games-related contracts, and as a result are now able to compete for public sector procurement opportunities. In addition, suppliers are already winning

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1073W

work on future Olympic and Paralympic Games, other sporting events and regeneration projects. UK Trade and Investment are working to showcase UK expertise in delivering the Olympic project to other hosting nations where there are significant opportunities in their supply chains.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) what assessment she has made of the economic effect that the No Marketing Rights Protocol had on small and medium-sized enterprises who were involved in supplying the London 2012 Olympic Games; and if she will make a statement; [124967]

(2) if she will ask the (a) London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games and (b) British Olympic Association to lift the No Marketing Rights Protocol from the British businesses who helped to supply and produce the London 2012 Olympic Games; and if she will make a statement. [124968]

Hugh Robertson: Suppliers to London 2012 have been paid the full commercial rate for their goods and services. £8 billion of games-related contracts have been awarded to UK companies by the Olympic Delivery Authority and the London 2012 Organising Committee (LOCOG), with nearly a third of contracts being won by small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The responsibility to enforce the current marketing restrictions and protect the rights of games sponsors rests with LOCOG. This will transfer to the British Olympic Association (BOA) and British Paralympic Association in January 2013.

On 1 May, I tabled a parliamentary written statement setting out what businesses could do now to promote their association with London 2012, which can be found at:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201212/cmhansrd/cm120501/wmstext/120501m0001. htm#12050147000058

Government are continuing to work with the BOA and the International Olympic Committee to develop a framework that would allow suppliers freedom to promote the work they undertook, balanced with the ability for sponsors to protect their rights of association with the games. I will continue to monitor this to ensure British businesses can benefit as much as possible from their involvement in the games.

Defence

Armed Forces: Sexual Offences

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what steps his Department is taking to raise awareness amongst armed forces personnel of the need to report incidents of rape or sexual assault; and if he will make a statement; [122502]

(2) how much his Department has spent on posters, leaflets and advertisements and other information campaigns to alert serving members of the armed forces on how to report sexual assault and rape in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. [122616]

Mr Francois: Although the Ministry of Defence has not specifically taken action to raise awareness of the need to report an incident of rape or sexual assault, each of the single services has their own service code.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1074W

All of these codes set out the values and standards expected from service personnel and both the Army and the RAF codes specifically mention sexual harassment.

Although as far as the victim is concerned, a decision on whether to report such an incident is a choice for the individual to make, there is a general duty on service personnel to report incidents where they suspect another service person of committing an offence. All allegations of rape and sexual assault made by members of the armed forces will be thoroughly investigated by either the civil or service police, depending upon who has jurisdiction.

There are no posters, leaflets, advertisements or information campaigns which advise serving members of the armed forces on how to report a rape or sexual assault. However, both the Navy and the Army launched relevant poster campaigns in 2012. The Navy campaign raises awareness among naval personnel about placing themselves at risk of rape or sexual assault. The Army campaign focuses on making Army personnel aware of how certain actions could be seen as a form of sexual assault. The total cost of these campaigns has not been recorded.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has commissioned any monitoring of rape and sexual assault in the armed forces since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [122504]

Mr Francois: All of the service police forces conduct annual analyses of crimes and incidents. In addition, the Service Police Crime Bureau became the Violent and Sex Offenders Register (VISOR) focal point in 2006, and is responsible for monitoring the very small number of sex offenders who, post conviction, are subject to notification requirements and are currently serving overseas. Responsibility for monitoring such personnel when they are based in the UK rests with the civilian police.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what support he makes available to historic victims of sexual abuse in the armed forces in order that their allegation can be investigated; [123765]

(2) what steps he is taking to identify historic incidences of rape and sexual abuse within the armed forces. [123766]

Mr Francois: Support to victims of crime, including rape and sexual assault, are outlined in Joint Service Publication 839 Code of Practice on services to be provided by the armed forces to victims of crime. A victim who has left the armed forces can still report the allegation to the military police, but, the jurisdiction for investigating it will depend on whether the alleged offender is serving or a civilian. If they are serving, jurisdiction would normally fall to the military police. Where the alleged offender is a civilian, jurisdiction would normally fall to the civil police because the offender is outside the remit of service law.

There is no specific action taken to track historic cases. The armed forces track and monitor all allegations of sexual offences including rape and sexual assault where the offender is alleged to be serving. Involvement is maintained even if the alleged offender has left the armed forces by the time the case concludes. The military

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1075W

police do not however track cases where the victim is serving in the armed forces but the alleged offender is a civilian.

Service Prosecuting Authority

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has conducted an evaluation of the performance of the Service Prosecuting Authority in relation to the investigation and prosecution in cases of rape or sexual assault; and if he will make a statement. [122505]

Mr Francois: The Service Prosecuting Authority (SPA) and its Director are under the jurisdiction of the Attorney-General and operate independently of the Ministry of Defence.

The SPA was subject to an independent report by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of the Crown Prosecution Service in December 2010. That report details the achievements of SPA and also made a number of recommendations. All of these recommendations have now been addressed and recent cases have demonstrated considerable success in terms of the prosecution. The SPA will continue to give particular attention to these types of cases.

A copy of the report will be placed in the Library of the House.

Scotland

Armed Forces

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will discuss with the Secretary of State for Defence the provision of healthcare and housing for members of the armed forces based in Scotland who are returning from active service overseas. [125075]

David Mundell: I am due to meet with the Minister of State responsible for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans, my right hon. Friend the Member for Rayleigh and Wickford (Mr Francois), next week, along with the Scottish Government Veterans Minister.

While Defence is a reserved matter the devolved Administrations have an important role to play in the provision of healthcare and housing for members of the armed forces. The UK Government is clear that both the UK and Scottish Governments must work together to implement the Armed Forces Covenant and support members of the armed forces based in Scotland.

Electoral Register: Young People

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what estimate he has made of the number of 16 and 17-year-olds registered to vote in (a) Glasgow North West constituency, (b) Glasgow and (c) Scotland. [124721]

David Mundell: As at 1 December 2011, the number of 16 and 17-year-olds on the parliamentary electoral register for the Glasgow North West constituency was 586. The figures for Glasgow and Scotland were 4,126 and 43,940 respectively.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1076W

Information on the electoral register, including the number of attainers (16 and 17-year-olds), is published on the General Register Office for Scotland's website in late February each year. The information for the 2012 register, which was published on 1 December 2011, can be found using the following link:

www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/theme/electoral-stats/index.html

House of Commons Commission

Cleaning Services

Dan Rogerson: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, if the House of Commons Commission will make it its policy to require all cleaning contracts held with the House of Commons stipulate that the cleaning products used and their ingredients should not have been tested on animals. [125026]

John Thurso: Our current cleaning contractor reports that suppliers of the cleaning products used on the Estate have policies under which they either avoid animal testing completely or encourage the use of non-animal testing where alternatives are available. Our current cleaning contractor is discussing proposals for the use of some British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV) approved products on the Estate.

So far as a broader House of Commons policy on cleaning products being tested on animals is concerned, the Department of Facilities will develop proposals which will be brought to Member Committees.

If my hon. Friend has concerns, the Director of Accommodation and Logistics would be happy to discuss them with him.

Attorney-General

Bovine Tuberculosis

Richard Drax: To ask the Attorney-General how many prosecutions have been brought against people who have threatened farmers in the proposed badger cull areas since those areas were announced. [125029]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service centrally held records identify the number of offences of threatening behaviour, but do not show the occupations of victims. The information requested is therefore not recorded centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Transport

A30

Dan Rogerson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will meet with representatives of Cornwall council's Transport Department and members of the Dual the A30 action group to discuss the A30 road between Temple and Higher Carblake in North Cornwall. [125074]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1077W

Stephen Hammond: The Department and the Highways Agency have worked closely with Cornwall county council on the case for improvements to the A30 in this location, and the Department is currently assessing the details of the business case submitted by Cornwall county council.

I would be happy to meet with the hon. Member for North Cornwall and his colleagues to discuss the proposals.

London Midland

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what (a) representations he has received and (b) discussions he has had with London Midland on the cancellation of London Midland train services due to a shortage of drivers. [125031]

Norman Baker: As of Wednesday 24 October, the Department has received one letter from a Member of Parliament, and three from members of the public on this issue.

I initiated a telephone call with London Midland's Managing Director on Tuesday 23 October to discuss this matter, and officials are engaging with London Midland's management team on a daily basis to monitor progress towards a solution.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Subsidies

Jacob Rees-Mogg: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the scope of the Rural Payments Agency to exercise discretion when imposing penalties for breach of cross-compliance. [124542]

Mr Heath: The scope of the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) to exercise discretion in imposing penalties for breaches of cross-compliance is defined by EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) legislation. This allows the RPA to make decisions based on a number of factors, such as severity and permanence of a breach. Following the assessment made by the Macdonald Task Force, the right hon. Member for South East Cambridgeshire (Sir James Paice) agreed to explore how the system of penalties for breaches might be made more proportionate to the outcomes of the breach. Exploring whether there is scope for further discretion now forms part of negotiations relating to cross-compliance within the overall reform of the CAP currently under way.

Animals: Tuberculosis

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what international comparisons his Department has undertaken which have found examples of successful programmes for the eradication of tuberculosis in wildlife without a cull of wildlife being involved. [124929]

Mr Heath: We are not aware of any country in the world which has successfully controlled TB in cattle without addressing its presence in the wildlife population.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1078W

Bovine Tuberculosis: Disease Control

Richard Drax: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many farmers in the proposed badger cull areas have reported being threatened by animal extremist groups since the proposed cull was announced. [125027]

Mr Heath: I am aware of reports that some farmers have been threatened but we do not have information on numbers. Any threat will be taken seriously and should be reported to the police.

Richard Drax: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his policy is on continuation of the proposed cull of badgers. [125028]

Mr Heath: I remain committed to taking forward this evidence-based policy, as part of a wider programme for eradication of bovine TB in England. The Government and NFU will now continue to plan so that the pilots can go ahead in summer 2013.

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much has been lodged by his Department with Natural England for contingency purposes in (a) Gloucestershire and (b) Somerset. [125064]

Mr Heath: DEFRA has not lodged any sums with Natural England for contingency purposes.

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what the full contingency costs are for the planned badger cull which he has lodged with Natural England; [124763]


(2) whether his Department will pay for the badger cull if farmers do not complete it; [124764]

(3) what plans Ministers in his Department have put in place to ensure that the badger cull in pilot areas goes ahead for the full four planned years. [124765]

Mr Heath: Licensees and all participating farmers are required to enter into agreements which set out their obligations once a licence is granted and, if necessary and as a last resort, allow Government to intervene, access all participating land, take over responsibility for a culling operation, and recover the costs from the licensee and/or participants. It is for licence applicants to put in place arrangements to deposit sufficient funds in a reputable bank to cover the total cost of a four-year cull, plus a contingency sum of 25%. The funds must be managed in line with the requirements set out in the Badger Control Agreement, including the requirement to ensure that at all times the amount remaining in the account is sufficient to ensure that culling is carried out in accordance with the licence and the Badger Control Agreement.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to his Department's publication, The Government's policy on Bovine TB and badger control in England, (1) whether the anticipated 12 to 16 per cent reduction in cases of bovine tuberculosis in badger cull areas is (a) an absolute

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1079W

reduction in the incidence of bovine tuberculosis cases or

(b)

a reduction relative to the projected increase in bovine tuberculosis; [124921]

(2) against what baseline the Government expect to achieve a 12 to 16 per cent reduction in the incidence of bovine tuberculosis in those areas which are subject to badger culling. [124922]

Mr Heath: The results of the Randomised Badger Culling Trial (based on an average of five years' culling plus a four-year post-cull period) can be used to estimate the effect of culling over an area of 150 km(2) and in the 2 km ring of unculled land surrounding it relative to a similar unculled area. This estimate depends on a range of factors, including the baseline incidence of TB in cattle inside the culled area and 2 km ring.

The estimated average net benefit of 12.4% assumes a baseline incidence of 0.10 confirmed new incidents per km per annum inside and outside the culled area.

The estimate of 16.0% assumes a baseline incidence of 0.15 confirmed new incidents per km per annum inside the culled area and 0.1 confirmed new incidents per km per annum outside the culled area in the 2 km surrounding ring.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs by what rate his Department estimates (a) bovine tuberculosis incidence in cattle has risen in the most recent period for which figures are available, (b) is currently rising and (c) is expected to rise in the next five years for the purpose of assessing the effectiveness of bovine tuberculosis control measures. [124923]

Mr Heath: Official national statistics on the incidence of TB in cattle are published by DEFRA on a monthly basis. Detailed GB, regional and county statistics of Bovine tuberculosis, along with various other TB statistics are also available at:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/statistics/foodfarm/landuselivestock/cattletb/

The incidence rate is currently calculated as the number of herds where official TB free status has been withdrawn (OTFW), as a percentage of the number of tests on officially TB free (OTF) herds.

The long-term trend shows a gradual increase in incidence over the past 16 years as shown in the statistics, although there is variation throughout this period.

The latest statistics show a provisional incidence rate of 4.1% in Great Britain between January and July 2012. This compares to an incidence rate of around 2% during the mid to late 1990's.

No estimates have been made of future incidence rates.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department plans to measure the anticipated reduction in the incidence of bovine tuberculosis in cattle in badger culling areas against present or anticipated bovine tuberculosis levels (a) in that area or (b) in neighbouring areas. [124924]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1080W

Mr Heath: The badger control policy is being piloted to test our assumptions about the effectiveness, humaneness and safety of controlled shooting.

We have strong evidence of the benefit from badger culling from the Randomised Badger Culling Trial and these policy pilots are not a repeat scientific study. However we are funding a separate research project that will monitor cattle TB incidence in these areas, and look for any trends.

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the recent report by Dr Andrew Conlan funded by his Department on the prevalence and spread of bovine tuberculosis in UK cattle herds. [124926]

Mr Heath: DEFRA funded this research because many cattle herds repeatedly suffer from outbreaks of bovine TB, and by continually developing our understanding of how the disease spreads within cattle herds, we can continue to improve measures to tackle this disease.

The research shows that even if cattle tests could identify all infected cattle it would not stop herds repeatedly suffering from bovine TB in high incidence areas because of the high probability of re-infection from badgers and cattle movements. We need to tackle the spread of TB from all sources whether from badgers, cattle, or any hidden infection that remains in herds.

Cattle: Death

Jacob Rees-Mogg: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on the case for EU-level legislation to exclude bank holidays from the seven day requirement for notification of cattle deaths. [124543]

Mr Heath: There have been no EU-wide discussions to exclude bank holidays from the seven day requirement for notification of cattle deaths. The British Cattle Movement Service adopts a pragmatic approach to such matters.

Dogs: Breeding

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will bring forward new regulations to govern puppy farms. [125066]

Mr Heath: There are no proposals to introduce new measures governing the welfare of dogs in breeding establishments. The Government consider that the existing law on dog breeding and general animal welfare, coupled with the work of the Advisory Council on the Welfare Issues of Dog Breeding and representative bodies of the industry, provides appropriate protection for dogs in breeding establishments.

Hill Farming

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the average income of hill farmers was in each of the last three years; and if he will make a statement. [124413]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1081W

Mr Heath: The average income of hill farmers in each of the last three years is shown in the following table. This is based on data from farms in the Severely Disadvantaged Area, which is defined as land where agricultural production is severely restricted by soil, relief, aspect or climatic conditions.

Average farm business income(1), England
 All farm types (£/farm)

March to February

 

2009-10

34,200

2010-11

29,900

2011-12

37,100

(1 )Farm business income represents the financial return to all unpaid labour (farmers and spouses, non-principal partners and their spouses and family workers) and on all their capital invested in the farm business, including land and buildings. For corporate businesses it represents the financial return on the shareholders capital invested in the farm business. Source: Farm Business Survey

Sky Lanterns

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 15 October 2012, Official Report, column 55W, on sky lanterns, when his Department will commission an independent study to examine the risks and impacts associated with sky lanterns; and how much money his Department has allocated to facilitate such a study. [124866]

Mr Heath: DEFRA proposes to work alongside the Welsh Government on a short study to examine the risks and impacts associated with sky lanterns and helium balloons. The study is currently in the pre-procurement phase and is expected to be formally commissioned before the end of the year with completion by the end of March 2013.

The exact level of resources that will be allocated is not yet known, and will depend on the project proposals of the bidders who will make bids during the mini-procurement competition that we have to carry out.

Home Department

Drugs: Imports

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many import licences were granted to parallel import companies for the importation of oxycodeine between 1 December 2011 and 30 April 2012; on what criteria such licences were issued; how many such licences were granted to (a) those who had previously held licences and (b) new applicants; and how many such licences were cancelled or suspended during the same period. [123668]

Mr Jeremy Browne: There is not a known drug called oxycodeine; however oxycodone is an opoid analgesic. A total of 122 import authorisations were approved for shipments of oxycodone between 1 December 2011 and 30 April 2012. All licences were issued in accordance with published interim policy, including a proportion for ‘parallel import' purposes. Only companies previously granted licences for this purpose were issued further import authorisations during this period, and 37 licence applications were cancelled.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1082W

Drugs: Misuse

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent assessment she has made of the causes of recent trends in drug use; and if she will make a statement. [123591]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) contains a self-completion module on self-reported use of illicit drugs which is the main source for estimates of levels of and trends in drug use in the household population. These questions are only asked of adults aged 16 to 59 residing in households in England and Wales. Data are published annually in the Home Office publication ‘Drug Misuse Declared':

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/drugs-misuse-dec-1112/

The 2011-12 CSEW showed that the proportion of people taking any illicit drug in the last year was 8.9% down from a peak of 12.3% in the 2003-04 survey. This decrease is due in large part to a notable decline in cannabis use, from 10.8% in the 2003-04 survey to 6.9% in the 2011-12 survey.

An assessment of the underlying causes of the decline in the use of drugs has not been made by the Home Office. The Secretary of State for the Home Department will not be making a statement on this.

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the conclusions of the UK Drugs Policy Commission on (a) the cost-effectiveness of public expenditure on tackling drug problems, (b) the strength of the evidence base for policies on law enforcement and education and (c) any link between drug use, inequality and social exclusion; and if she will make a statement. [123592]

Mr Jeremy Browne: I welcome publication by the UK Drugs Policy Commission (UKDPC) of their report “A Fresh Approach to Drugs: the Final Report of the UK Drug Policy Commission”. This is a useful contribution to the debate on drugs and I have asked the UKDPC to present their conclusions to Ministers at a future meeting of the Inter-Ministerial Group on Drugs.

The Government remains committed to using the best available evidence. We seek advice from the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD), the ACMD's Recovery Committee and the Recovery Partnership to inform policy decisions. We will also be looking in more detail at the evidence base as part of the evaluation of the 2010 Drug Strategy.

Communities and Local Government

Council Tax Benefits

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will estimate the cost to each local authority of council tax benefit in 2013 on the basis of the latest figures made available by local authorities to the Department for Work and Pensions. [125131]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1083W

Brandon Lewis: The implementation of localised council tax support schemes in England in April 2013 will require local councils to design their own schemes to administer council tax support, working within a framework set out in legislation. The cost of council tax support in 2013-14 in individual authorities will depend on the choices which those authorities make about how they design their local scheme.

Forecasts of council tax benefit expenditure for England in 2013-14, which are published by the Department for Work and Pensions,

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/budget_2012_300712.xls

are shown as follows. However, these estimates do not take into account the changes introduced by the localisation of council tax support, nor the introduction of universal credit.

 £ million

Gross Council Tax Benefit Expenditure, England, 2013-14

3,806

Of which:

 

Funded by the Department for Work and Pensions

3,697

Of which:

 

Funded by other government departments or local authorities

108

The latest year for which council tax benefit expenditure by local authority is available is 2011-12 and this is published by the Department for Work and Pensions here:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/h_tables_budget_ 2012_300812.xls

These figures are based on subsidy claim returns from local authorities to the Department of Work and Pensions.

These reforms will give councils stronger incentives to support local firms, cut fraud, promote local enterprise and get people back into work. They will also contribute to the Government's deficit reduction programme. Welfare reform is vital to tackle the budget deficit we have inherited from the last Administration, under which council tax benefit expenditure doubled.

Emergencies

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 13 September 2012, Official Report, column 305W, on emergencies, what the cost of running the Resilience and Emergencies Division was in each of the last three years; and which Minister it answers to. [125122]

Brandon Lewis: I am the Minister for Fire and Resilience in the Department. Following the closure of the Government offices for the regions on 31 March 2011, the functions of the former regional resilience teams transferred to the Resilience and Emergencies Division in my Department. For the financial year 2011-12, the running costs (pay, and non-pay costs) of the division were £2,462,713.24. Office costs for the division, calculated on a pro-rata basis, were £133,584.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1084W

For 2012-13 it is not possible to give the running cost for the division as budgets are not allocated at divisional level, but we expect costs will be broadly similar to last year.

Housing

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will estimate the average cost of moving home in the latest period for which figures are available. [123490]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 18 October 2012]: We do not collect official information on the costs of moving home. However, while these vary, we estimate that the cost of a solicitor or conveyancer, if a purchaser appoints one, typically start at around £400. This includes the cost of local authority searches, which are typically between £120 and £200, and also Land Registry fees which range from £50 to £550, depending on the value of the property. Some purchasers may also commission a survey at a cost of between £250 and £1,500 depending on the kind of survey, and the type and value of the property.

Some house purchasers may also need to cover costs associated with obtaining a mortgage and, depending on the value of the property, stamp duty land tax. These are matters for the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

This Government has cut the cost of moving home by abolishing the requirement to commission a Home Information Pack. The red tape increased the cost of selling a home, deterring sellers from putting their homes on the market, and the packs were not trusted by buyers, so duplicating costs.

Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012

Chris White: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps his Department has taken to prepare for the introduction of the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012. [122344]

Brandon Lewis: When it is brought into force in January 2013, the Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012 will require contracting authorities to consider the full social, environmental and economic value of public services procurements at the pre-procurement stage. Public procurers following best practice will already be considering these factors to ensure that their services are fit for purpose and represent value for money.

The Department is reviewing its processes to ensure they are in line with the Act.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government has been keen to encourage local government to improve its performance in relation to streamlining procurement practices and opening up procurement spend with small and medium sized enterprises, as well as voluntary and community groups. For example, local authorities can end the use of Pre-Qualification Questionnaires for contracts under the EU threshold of £173,000, and eliminate over-specification on equalities and health and safety.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1085W

Sleeping Rough

Jack Dromey: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the percentage increase in rough sleeping has been since the introduction of new counting estimates. [110405]

Mr Prisk: The last Government's methodology ignored the true scale of the problem of rough sleeping. So we acted decisively to introduce a more accurate assessment of rough sleeping levels. Figures can be found on my Department's website:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/roughsleepingautumn2011

Last year my Department also provided investment to roll out No Second Night Out—a new initiative which increases outreach, encourages greater reporting and public scrutiny, and ensures vulnerable rough sleepers get helped off the streets more quickly. And we recently funded the voluntary sector to launch StreetLink—a new website to enable members of the public to alert local agencies to rough sleepers in their area.

I would add that we have maintained funding for Homelessness Grant at 2010-11 levels with £400 million over four years to prevent homelessness and rough sleeping. We have also protected Supporting People funding—at £6.5 billion over the spending review period—to help the most vulnerable.

Temporary Accommodation

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 10 September 2012, Official Report, column 44W, on vulnerable adults, how many households were in temporary accommodation in other local authority district areas in the latest period for which figures are available; and what the top three locations are for each local authority. [122952]

Mr Prisk: As at 30 June, 8,080 households were in temporary accommodation within another local authority district, as shown in Live Table 775 at:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/housing/housingresearch/housingstatistics/housingstatisticsby/homelessnessstatistics/livetables/

The Department does not collect information on the particular local authority areas within which such households were housed.

The Localism Act 2011 will increase local authorities' ability to end the main homelessness duty by arranging an offer of suitable accommodation in the private rented sector. This will mean shorter waiting times for homeless households and less time spent in expensive temporary accommodation.

Health

Alcoholic Drinks: Nitrogen

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has received any reports of injuries caused by mixing liquid nitrogen in beverages; and if he will make a statement. [125132]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1086W

Anna Soubry: Data on this particular cause of injury are not collected in such a way as to be separately identified.

Food: Diabetes

Chris Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will encourage the labelling of food products that would outline the nutritional value of cooked food for the benefit of people who have type 1 diabetes. [124561]

Dr Poulter: The nutrients that can be declared on pre-packed food are defined in law. From 2016 all pre-packaged foods will be required to carry nutrition labelling on the back of the pack, including the energy value and the amounts of fat, saturates, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt.

The new EU Regulation 1169/2011 additionally allows that energy value only or energy value plus amounts of fat, saturates, sugars and salt may be voluntarily repeated on front of pack. We announced proposals for future United Kingdom arrangements on 24 October.

The regulation does allow nutrition information to be provided on an ‘as consumed’, i.e. cooked basis, as long as the manufacturer gives full instructions as to how the food is prepared. We will be considering our approach to this with industry and other partners in the coming months.

Health Services

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether a GP whose list is not closed may refuse to register a patient on the grounds that they are an overseas visitor; what annual fee is paid to GPs in respect of each such patient; and what steps the NHS takes to determine whether an overseas visitor has left the UK to ensure that he or she is removed from a GP's list; [R] [125173]

(2) whether a GP may refuse to register a patient on the grounds that they are an illegal immigrant; [R] [125174]

(3) what steps the NHS takes to ensure that those who are entitled only to primary care are not also accorded free hospital treatment; and what estimate he has made of the number of overseas visitors and illegal immigrants who will register with a GP in each of the next three financial years. [125176]

Dr Poulter: Anyone may approach a general practitioner (GP) practice and apply to join its list of national health service patients, normally by attending the practice premises. Under the terms of their contracts, GP practices have a measure of discretion in accepting or refusing applications to join their patient lists.

A GP practice cannot turn down an applicant on the grounds of race, gender, social class, age, religion, sexual orientation, appearance, disability or medical condition. Other than that, GP practices can turn down an application if the primary care trust (PCT) has agreed that they can close their list to new patients, that an applicant lives outside the practice's boundary area or if they have other reasonable grounds.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1087W

In applying to become a patient of a GP practice there is no formal requirement to prove identity or immigration status. However, there are practical reasons why a practice might need to be assured that someone is who they say they are. Consequently, it can help the process if a patient offers relevant documents. Many asylum seekers offer to show their Immigration Service issued ‘Application Registration Card’ (ARC) or official documents that confirm their status.

One of the factors which determine the level of funding GP practices receive under their NHS contractual arrangements is the number of registered patients on their lists. Their global sum payments in respect of patients who are from overseas will not differ from that of other patients. For General Medical Services practices the average payment per weighed patient is £64.67 in 2012-13.

Currently, the local PCT is responsible for establishing and maintaining an accurate list of NHS patients for the practices in its area. From April 2013, this responsibility for the whole of England will transfer to the NHS Commissioning Board.

NHS GPs and hospitals have a duty to identify and charge all visitors that are chargeable for NHS hospital treatment, including those registered with, or referred by a GP. Entitlement to free NHS hospital treatment is based on ordinary residence in the United Kingdom or exemption from charges under regulations. The Department strongly recommends that NHS hospitals use baseline questioning and pre-attendance forms to indicate ordinary residence or exemption from charges and most have an overseas visitors manager to oversee this process.

In recognition that the current rules are generous but also complex and therefore inconsistently applied by NHS staff, the Department has been undertaking a thorough review of charging overseas visitors for NHS care. This included how to establish more effective screening processes across the NHS to identify all of those who should be charged, so that charges are levied appropriately. The initial phase of the review has concluded and its findings are being considered.

The Department has not made nor would be able to make any estimates of the number of overseas visitors or illegal immigrants in this country who may register with GP practices in each of the next three financial years.

Health Services: Wales

Hywel Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with the Welsh Government on the likely effects of regional pay in the NHS in England on recruitment and retention of NHS staff in Wales. [125134]

Dr Poulter: No discussions have taken place.

Heart Diseases: Children

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether the Joint Committee for Primary Care Trusts has met to consider the submission from the Joint Health and Overview Scrutiny Committee for Yorkshire and the Humber to the Safe and Sustainable Review of Children's Heart Surgery Services; [125125]

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1088W


(2) if he will direct the Joint Committee for Primary Care Trusts to publish the minutes of its meeting on 14 December 2011; [125126]


(3) whether the Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts is subject to the Code of Practice on Openness in the NHS in respect of disclosure of documents material to the decision on the future of children's heart surgery services in England and Wales; [125128]

(4) what the scores were from each assessor for each assessment criterion for each children's heart surgery centre awarded by the Independent Expert Panel as part of the Safe and Sustainable Review. [125129]

Anna Soubry: My hon. Friend will be aware that the Safe and Sustainable review of children's congenital heart services is a clinically-led, national health service review, which is independent of Government. It is, therefore, for the Joint Committee for Primary Care Trusts (JCPCT) to decide what information to release regarding minutes of meetings held or details about the process of the review.

The NHS Code of Practice on Openness was superseded by the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act, which provided equivalent access to information but as a legal right rather than a voluntary code. The bodies that participated in the JCPCT are all public bodies subject to the FOI legislation. Any complaints about their compliance should be referred to the Information Commissioner, the statutory regulator for FOI and Data Protection legislation.

We understand that the JCPCT considered the submission from the Joint Health and Overview Scrutiny Committee for Yorkshire and the Humber at its meeting, held in public, on 4 July 2012. It considers that the points raised by the scrutiny committee are addressed in the Decision Making Business Case which has been published.

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP) review of the Safe and Sustainable Review of Children's Congenital Heart Services will be undertaken by a subgroup of the IRP; and what the membership will be of that subgroup. [125127]

Anna Soubry: This is a matter for the Independent Reconfiguration Panel (IRP). As my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health has asked the IRP to undertake a review of the Safe and Sustainable Review of Children's Congenital Heart Services, it is now for the IRP, as an independent body, to determine how it will undertake its review.

Medical Records: Hereditary Diseases

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what provisions are in place to allow the children of deceased adopted adults access to their biological grandparents' medical records in light of potentially genetic or hereditary conditions; and if he will make a statement. [R] [124965]

Dr Poulter: The Health and Social Care Information Centre provides the Hereditary Medical Conditions Service. This service is available to adopted persons or birth relatives of adopted persons. The service allows

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1089W

the confidential transfer of relevant medical information between general practitioners (GPs) of adopted persons and birth relatives.

Provided the sought person can be identified from the information available, and is living, medical information about hereditary conditions may be passed between the GPs of the individuals involved, with the patient's consent. The transfer of any information is also subject to the consent of both GPs involved and the individuals must be currently registered with a GP in England, Wales or the Isle of Man.

NHS: Per Capita Costs

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average cost of NHS primary care is for an adult patient. [125175]

Dr Poulter: The average cost of national health service primary care in England for 2011-12 was £394 per patient.

This figure was calculated by adding together the net costs spent on NHS primary medical care of £8,397 million, NHS dental care of £2,222 million, NHS pharmaceutical services including primary care drugs of £9,827 million and NHS eye care services of £491 million.

The sum of £20,937 million was then divided by the population for England, which was 53,107,200 in mid-2011 according to the Office for National Statistics.

It is not possible to provide the average cost for an adult patient, as it is not possible to disaggregate centrally the individual elements of primary care resources that have been consumed by adults and those consumed by children.

Palliative Care

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) whether he has asked the NHS Information Centre to develop an indicator relating to death in preferred place of care for inclusion in the Commissioning Outcomes Framework; [124612]

(2) what steps he plans to take to ensure the Commissioning Outcomes Framework incentivises Clinical Commissioning Groups to commission high-quality services which give people the choice to die in their preferred place of care. [124613]

Dr Poulter: It is for the NHS Commissioning, Board to decide on the content of the Commissioning Outcomes Framework. Recommendations to the NHS Commissioning Board for measures to consider for inclusion in the Commissioning Outcomes Framework were published by the National Institute for Heath and Clinical Excellence on 1 August 2012.

The NHS Outcomes Framework includes an indicator on the quality of end of life care as it is experienced by patients and carers. This is based on the VOICES survey of bereaved relatives which allows us to understand how care differs between different settings and geographies as well as by different conditions.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1090W

Sickle Cell Diseases

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of blood safety and sickle cell; and if he will make a statement. [125081]

Anna Soubry: Sickle cell disease is a group of genetic blood disorders caused by a mutation of the haemoglobin gene, the most common of which is sickle cell anaemia. In this country, approximately 12,000 people have sickle cell anaemia. Around 25% of patients with sickle cell anaemia will require regular transfusions as part of their treatment, and it is essential that they receive suitably matched blood.

The British Committee for Standards in Haematology’s (BCSH) “Guidelines for pre-transfusion compatibility procedures in blood transfusion laboratories” (2012) require more stringent procedures to ensure compatible blood is provided for sickle cell patients. NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT), which provides blood to hospitals in England and North Wales, has in place a number of measures to maximise the availability of suitably typed blood for sickle cell patients. NHSBT is also evaluating new methods of improving the match between blood donor and recipient from the start of treatment, which would help people who have regular transfusions, such as those with sickle cell anaemia.

The UK haemovigilance scheme SHOT (Serious Hazards of Transfusion) recorded 19 adverse events related to blood transfusion in 2011 for people with sickle cell disease, some of which might have been avoided by better communication of information, but some of which were unpredictable.

New guidelines for transfusion in sickle cell and other haemoglobinopathy patients are currently being prepared by BCSH.

NHSBT is working with the Sickle Cell Society, the patient organisation for sickle, on education and blood donor recruitment. An information leaflet on sickle cell covering screening, blood donation, patient support and receiving blood products is due to be ready for distribution by the end of 2012.

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans the Government has to raise awareness of sickle cell anaemia. [125082]

Anna Soubry: The Department has funded the National Health Service Sickle Cell and Thalassaemia Screening Programme since 2001 to develop and implement a linked antenatal and newborn screening programme. One of the aims of the programme is to raise awareness of the condition among the public and healthcare professionals. The profile of the condition continues to rise due to the success of the screening programme.

The programme has been rolled out to engage the public in areas with a high prevalence of sickle cell. The programme has also experienced working with the public to develop materials to specifically engage men in the screening journey.

26 Oct 2012 : Column 1091W

Smoking: Motor Vehicles

Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the level of public support for legislation to ban smoking in private vehicles when children are present. [124615]

Anna Soubry: The Department has received details of a 2012 poll conducted by YouGov on behalf of Action on Smoking and Health, which found that 80% of all adults and 65% of smokers support a ban on smoking in cars with children under 18.

Treasury

Banks: Pay

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether his Department has any plans to review the pay and bonuses of those working in publicly-owned banks; and if he will make a statement. [124555]

Sajid Javid: The Government's shareholdings in the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and Lloyds Banking Group (LBG) are managed on a commercial and arm's length basis by UK Financial Investment Ltd (UKFI).

UKFI's overarching objective is to protect and create value for the taxpayer as shareholder, paying due regard to financial stability and to acting in a way that promotes competition.

As an engaged shareholder, UKFI works closely with the banks' management to assure itself of the banks' approach to strategy and to hold management rigorously to account for performance. However, UKFI's role is to manage the investment, not to manage the bank; the bank retains its own independent board and management team for strategic and operational decision-making. Within this overarching shareholder framework, management decisions are for the bank itself without interference from shareholders, including UKFI.