e-Borders

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the likely total expenditure on the e-Borders programme. [123307]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency is not currently able to confirm the detailed spend on the e-Borders programme, but will be able to do this once the binding arbitration following the termination of the contract with Raytheon Systems Ltd is complete.

Cannabis

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment her Department has made of the effect on (a) dealing and (b) use of cannabis since it was reclassified as a Class B drug. [125583]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Government have made no formal assessment of the effect on the ‘dealing’ and use of cannabis since it was reclassified as a Class B drug under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 in January 2009. The likely effects of the reclassification of cannabis were evaluated in the regulatory impact assessment (IA), produced to accompany the legislative Order. The IA is available at:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2008/3130/pdfs/uksiem_20083130_en.pdf

Drugs: Crime

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many raids were conducted during the Metropolitan police's Operation Hawk; how many arrests were made; and how many prosecutions resulted from that operation; [125575]

31 Oct 2012 : Column 241W

(2) what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Metropolitan police's Operation Hawk; and if she will make a statement. [125576]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Operation Hawk is the Metropolitan Police’s, London wide initiative to tackle drug-related crime at the local level. It is an ongoing programme across all 32 Metropolitan police boroughs to address community concerns about drug related crime. On 20 September 2012 an Operation Hawk ‘day of action' resulted in more than 460 warrants with over 350 arrests being made. In the four week period from 21 September to 21 October 2012 police across the 32 boroughs executed an additional 883 drugs warrants as result of the ongoing Operation Hawk activity. Data on the number of prosecutions resulting from the ‘day of action' are not collated centrally by the Metropolitan police.

The Home Office has not commissioned or evaluated research on the effectiveness of the Metropolitan police's Operation Hawk.

Drugs: Misuse

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many temporary class drug orders have been issued since the inception of that order; and in relation to what drugs they were issued. [125580]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Government placed methoxetamine under a temporary class drug order in the UK on 5 April 2012, following consultation with the Advisory Council on the misuse of drugs. Methoxetamine is the first and only temporary class drug in the UK so far.

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent comparative assessment she has made of the UK's drugs policy and those of other countries. [125591]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Direct comparative assessments have not been made between the UK's drugs policy and the drugs policies of other countries. Such comparison is difficult, as data gathering methods vary and drug misuse patterns are affected by national characteristics. The Government do, however, continue to monitor evidence on what works in other countries, as we committed to do in the 2010 UK Drug Strategy.

Drugs: Sentencing

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent representations she has received on the length of sentences given to convicted Class A drug dealers; and if she will make a statement. [125592]

Jeremy Wright: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Justice.

We have received no recent representations on the length of sentences given to convicted Class A drug dealers.

Class A drug dealing offences all carry a maximum penalty of a life sentence. There is also a mandatory minimum sentence of seven years' imprisonment for a

31 Oct 2012 : Column 242W

third Class A drug trafficking offence. Within these limits, sentencing is entirely a matter for the courts taking account of all the circumstances of each case. The independent Sentencing Council issued a sentencing guideline on drug offences earlier this year, following full public consultation. The courts have a duty to follow the guideline when sentencing drug offenders but may depart from it in a particular case if it would be in the interests of justice to do so.

Dungavel House Immigration Removal Centre

Dr Whiteford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made on ending the detention of children in Dungavel Immigration Removal Centre. [125886]

Mr Harper: The detention of families overnight in Dungavel ceased in May 2010.

Female Genital Mutilation

David Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the powers available to tackle the practice of female genital mutilation. [125785]

Mr Jeremy Browne: This Government are satisfied that there are a number of powers to tackle the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). In February 2011, we launched multi-agency practice guidelines which clearly set out the range of powers available to the police and other agencies. This is available at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/crime/FGM?view=Binary

Jim McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many complaints of female genital mutilation have been recorded by the police in the UK over the last 10 years; how many such complaints resulted in criminal investigation; and how many such investigations led to prosecutions. [125799]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Information on the number of complaints recorded by the police and the number of complaints resulting in criminal investigations in to female genital mutilation (FGM) is not held centrally.

There have been no prosecutions of cases of FGM under the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003.

Hormone Treatments: Exports

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for export licences for human growth hormone have been refused in each of the last three years; and if she will make a statement. [125791]

Mr Jeremy Browne: A total of 24 export licences for human growth hormone (HGH) have been cancelled in the last three years. In 2010, the Home Office did not hold records for the number of export licences cancelled for HGH. In 2011, one export licence for HGH was cancelled. In 2012 to date, 23 export licences for HGH were cancelled. All licences were cancelled in accordance with drugs legislation.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 243W

Human Trafficking

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many decisions on trafficking made under the National Referral Mechanism by (a) the UK Border Agency Competent Authority and (b) the UK Human Trafficking Centre Competent Authority have been taken to Judicial Review in each year since April 2009; and how many such reviews have resulted in a decision being reversed. [125960]

Mr Harper: The information requested is as follows:

(a) The Judicial Review of UK Border Agency Competent Authority decisions under the National Referral Mechanism can be broken down as follows:

 Cases referred to the NRMDecisions challenged at Judicial ReviewDecisions reversed as a result of Judicial Review

2009(1)

706

4

1

2010

710

2

0

2011

946

6

2

2012

(2)530

(3)5

(3)1

Total to date

2,892

17

4

(1) 1 April 2009 to 31 December 2009 only. (2) Published data (1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012). (3) Year to date (1 January 2012 to 29 October 2012).

(b) There have been no Judicial Reviews of UK Human Trafficking Centre Competent Authority decisions under the National Referral Mechanism.

These data are based on regionally held management information and as such have not been quality assured as part of the production of National Statistics outputs. They are provisional and subject to change.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 244W

Immigration: EU Nationals

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of non-UK EU nationals who have entered the UK and who have a criminal conviction. [123472]

Mr Harper: The Home Office does not routinely receive or record details of non-UK EU nationals who have a criminal conviction outside the UK.

Members: Correspondence

Amber Rudd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she expects to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Hastings and Rye (Amber Rudd) dated 5 July 2012, ref: AR/EOR/0731. [125930]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency's chief executive, Rob Whiteman, wrote on behalf of the Secretary of State for the Home Department to my hon. Friend on 1 August 2012.

Police

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost to the public purse was of (a) policing and (b) each constabulary in 2011-12. [125933]

Damian Green: The amount allocated in 2011-12 by central Government (including the Neighbourhood Policing Fund) to police authorities in England and Wales to cover the cost of policing is shown in the following table:

ConstabularyHome Office and DCLG/WAG fundingNeighbourhood Policing FundTotalCouncil Tax Police PreceptTotal(1)

Avon and Somerset

185,272,685

7,355,989

192,628,674

94,775,890

287,404,564

Bedfordshire

73,181,063

2,763,192

75,944,255

30,037,585

105,981,840

Cambridgeshire

83,445,360

3,655,935

87,101,295

46,900,161

134,001,456

Cheshire

122,745,898

4,848,634

127,594,532

54,455,791

182,050,323

Cleveland

97,619,318

2,965,280

100,584,598

31,999,196

132,583,794

Cumbria

69,181,836

2,348,850

71,530,686

34,312,476

105,843,162

Derbyshire

115,995,773

3,680,120

119,675,893

54,160,377

173,836,270

Devon and Cornwall

191,219,760

7,529,509

198,749,269

95,693,883

294,443,152

Dorset

66,893,751

3,264,888

70,158,639

53,220,720

123,379,359

Durham

92,160,141

3,335,802

95,495,943

29,119,342

124,615,285

Essex

183,300,810

7,213,790

190,514,600

85,319,256

275,833,856

Gloucestershire

61,408,478

3,202,314

,64,610,792

44,670,110

109,280,902

Hampshire

212,255,615

7,609,223

219,864,838

100,797,779

320,662,617

Hertfordshire

124,000,170

5,334,630

129,334,800

66,411,823

195,746,623

Humberside

130,333,323

4,761,195

135,094,518

47,977,845

183,072,363

Kent

199,503,999

8,052,821

207,556,820

88,139,695

295,696,515

Lancashire

207,086,286

8,211,441

215,297,727

68,563,531

283,861,258

Leicestershire

120,410,517

4,722,769

125,133,286

53,980,012

179,113,298

Lincolnshire

67,477,183

2,867,472

70,344,655

42,320,494

112,665,149

Norfolk

90,786,266

3,956,364

94,742,630

57,115,802

151,858,432

Northamptonshire

77,373,534

3,421,706

80,795,240

45,260,925

126,056,165

North Yorkshire

78,952,809

3,049,678

82,002,487

61,288,570

143,291,057

Nottinghamshire

143,875,317

5,487,199

149,362,516

53,283,944

202,646,460

Staffordshire

123,101,875

4,477,838

127,579,713

63,793,986

191,373,699

31 Oct 2012 : Column 245W

31 Oct 2012 : Column 246W

Suffolk

73,168,884

3,071,927

76,240,811

41,211,916

117,452,727

Surrey

105,291,969

4,445,487

109,737,456

98,413,086

208,150,542

Sussex

174,829,220

7,231,326

182,060,546

87,020,559

269,081,105

Thames Valley

247,551,698

9,178,280

256,729,978

134,896,712

391,626,690

Warwickshire

55,285,838

2,772,394

58,058,232

35,063,478

93,121,710

West Mercia

126,203,606

5,355,921

131,559,527

79,027,416

210,586,943

Wiltshire

66,967,404

2,821,207

69,788,611

39,622,160

109,410,771

Greater Manchester

468,502,936

17,396,374

485,899,310

115,998,309

601,897,619

Merseyside

271,248,259

9,883,808

281,132,067

61,503,600

342,635,667

Northumbria

250,982,853

8,976,290

259,959,143

36,477,334

296,436,477

South Yorkshire

205,289,845

6,598,165

211,888,010

50,757,659

262,645,669

West Midlands

497,784,836

15,998,410

513,783,246

79,650,309

593,433,555

West Yorkshire

343,535,303

14,340,485

357,875,788

89,034,903

446,910,691

Metropolitan

2,025,579,644

101,869,119

2,127,448,763

687,420,356

2,814,869,119

City of London

61,583,731

1,268,712

62,852,443

(2)

(2)

Dyfed-Powys

57,922,860

1,646,340

59,569,200

39,413,816

98,983,016

Gwent

83,215,423

2,962,697

86,178,120

38,492,870

124,670,990

North Wales

83,100,718

3,337,809

86,438,527

58,435,804

144,874,331

South Wales

182,504,941

6,728,610

189,233,551

74,842,145

264,075,696

Total

8,298,131,735

340,000,000

8,638,131,735

3,250,881,625

11,826,160,917

(1) Funding does not include counter-terrorism funding, funding for private finance initiatives, the 2011 council tax freeze grant and additional contingency funding. (2) The City of London is not included as it is a joint police and education authority.

Police Negotiating Board

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what (a) discussions and (b) correspondence she had with (i) Scottish Government Ministers and (ii) the Scottish Police Federation prior to the announcement of the closure of the Police Negotiating Board. [125900]

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she had with the Northern Ireland Justice Minister prior to her decision to abolish the Police Negotiating Board. [125838]

Damian Green [holding answer 30 October 2012]:Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Police: Cumbria

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many front-line police officers were employed in Cumbria in each of the last five years. [125331]

Damian Green: HM Inspectorate of Constabulary defined the front line in its 2010 Demanding Times report as comprising those who are in everyday contact with the public and who directly intervene to keep people safe and enforce the law. Applying this definition to Home Office policing functions data for police officers employed in Cumbria for each of the last five years, figures are provided within the table.

Despite the reduction in officer numbers crime in Cumbria fell by 3% during 2011-12.

This demonstrates police reform is working and crime is falling.

Number of front-line police officers employed in Cumbria, 2007-08 to 2011-12(1,2,3)
 Number of front-line police officers

2011-12

962

2010-11

1,009

2009-10

1,060

2008-09

1,092

2007-08

1,017

(1) This table contain full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (2) Definition of frontline policing are based on the HMIC definition for 2011 within the Demanding Times and Adapting to Austerity report. Data for previous years have reflected any changes to function categories and these functions have been reconciled with the 2011 definition. (3) Source: Home Office using data received from police forces via the Annual Data Requirement (ADR 601), HMIC—2010 Demanding Times report.

Police: Early Retirement

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers have taken early retirement in each of the last five years. [125889]

Damian Green: Figures on the number of police officers who have taken early retirement in each of the last five years are not collected centrally.

Police: Pensions

Ben Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many serving members of the police are exempt from the Police Pension Scheme

31 Oct 2012 : Column 247W

cut-off at 10 years to retirement owing to their decision to become part-time during the course of their service; and if she will estimate the potential cost to the public purse of cancelling that exemption. [125760]

Damian Green: No police officers are exempt from transitional protection as a result of part-time service. The arrangements for transitional protection apply regardless of whether pensionable service has been accrued through full-time or part-time working.

Ben Gummer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many serving members of the police, who joined as police cadets, would be eligible for the transitional pension arrangements had they joined as full officers. [125761]

Damian Green: This information is not collected centrally.

Metal Theft

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the proportion of scrap metal dealers who engage in illegal activity concerning stolen scrap metal. [125792]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Home Office has not made an assessment but the Association of Chief Police Officers believes that scrap metal dealers provide the principal outlet for stolen metal in the UK which is estimated to cost the UK between £220 million (Deloitte, 2011) and £770 million (the Association of Chief Police Officers, 2010) per annum.

The British Transport police are undertaking, through the work of the National Metal Theft Taskforce, a risk assessment for every scrap metal dealer in the UK. This will consider a number of factors including previous evidence of criminal handling and disposal of stolen metals, previous offending history, as well as intelligence and compliance with Scrap Metal Dealers and Environmental Protection Acts. The National Metal Theft Taskforce aims to assess 90% of all scrap metal dealers across the UK by the end of this financial year which will contribute to the prioritisation of future compliance and enforcement action.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the metal theft taskforce in reducing the incidence of metal theft. [125883]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Home Office receives monthly progress reports from the British Transport police on the National Metal Theft Taskforce. Police forces are reporting significant reductions in recorded metal thefts this year with British Transport police recording metal thefts down by 51% in the period between April and August 2012 compared with the same period last year. This will be down to a number of factors including the success of Operation Tornado which voluntarily requires scrap metal dealers to request and record proof of the sellers' identity. With the introduction of cashless trading in December, and wider regulatory reforms proposed in the Scrap Metal Dealers Bill, including on identification and record keeping, metal theft offences and the damage they cause should continue to reduce.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 248W

UK Border Agency

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps she has taken to ensure that UK Border Agency officers receive specific training in processing cases of women seeking asylum who have experienced domestic violence in their home country; and if she will make a statement. [125790]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency has recently implemented a programme of mandatory training for all asylum decision makers and their managers dealing with gender issues in the asylum claim. The training has been designed in conjunction with Asylum Aid and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. It focuses on improving the quality of interviewing and decision making in respect of asylum claims being made by women, taking into account issues such as domestic violence and related trauma. All relevant staff should have received this training by the end of 2012.

The agency has also recently delivered gender sensitivity training to staff in the Asylum Screening Unit.

Work Permits: Shipping

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 17 July 2012, Official Report, columns 670-1W, on work permits, which section of the points-based immigration system would apply to a non-EEA seafarer travelling to the UK to take up a job skilled below NQF 6 level aboard a vessel flying a flag of convenience working between a UK port and the Channel Islands. [125861]

Mr Harper: Work permits are not required by non-European economic area crew members of vessels working routes between UK ports and Channel Island ports, irrespective of the flags under which the vessels are operating. Such seamen, therefore, will not need to apply for entry clearance or leave to remain under the points-based system.

Deputy Prime Minister

Candidates: Disability

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to assist people with disabilities to become Members of Parliament. [125493]

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government launched the Access to Elected Office Strategy on 9 July to provide practical support for disabled people who. want to become an elected representative.

As part of this strategy, we have set up a new fund to help individual candidates with disability related costs; provided new training and development opportunities for people who are interested in a political career, including launching an introductory online training course and paid internships on the Speaker's Parliamentary Placement scheme; and produced new online guidance on reasonable adjustments to help political parties meet their legal obligations under the Equality Act 2010.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 249W

The £2.6 million fund will be open for applications until the end of March 2014 and will help potential candidates overcome disability related barriers, such as difficulties in using public transport or paying for sign language interpreters. The strategy has been designed to level the playing field for potential disabled candidates and tackle the currently low levels of disabled people in public life.

Trident

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister when the Chief Secretary to the Treasury expects to conclude the Trident Alternatives Review; and if he will make a statement. [124299]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Secretary of State for Defence, the right hon. Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), to the right hon. Member for Warley (Mr Spellar) on 15 October 2012, Official Report, column 35W. The Trident Alternatives Review is currently expected to report to the Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister at the end of the year.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister (1) whether the Chief Secretary to the Treasury will place in the public domain a summary of the Trident Alternatives Review; [124300]

(2) pursuant to the answer of the Secretary of State for Defence of 15 October 2012, Official Report, column 36W, on Trident, whether the Chief Secretary to the Treasury plans to publish the Trident Alternatives Review in full to assist Liberal Democrats in assessing the case for any alternative systems to Trident; [124302]

(3) whether he plans to publish the Trident Alternatives Review in full to assist Liberal Democrats in assessing the case for any alternative systems to Trident. [124303]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

The Government's position remains, as previously announced, that there are no plans to publish either the report itself or the information it draws upon due to its highly classified nature. It is too early to speculate about what it might be possible to say publicly about the conclusions when the review has been completed.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister how many staff, and from which Departments, are working on the Trident Alternatives Review; and how many of those staff worked on the 2006 White Paper entitled The Future of the United Kingdom's Nuclear Deterrent. [124301]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

The review is being led by a senior civil servant in the Cabinet Office, with two dedicated staff working on the review full-time. They are drawing on expertise held in other Government Departments, primarily the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, on an as-required basis.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 250W

None of the dedicated Cabinet Office team leading the review worked on the 2006 White Paper ‘The Future of the United Kingdom's Nuclear Deterrent’. Some of the subject matter experts from the Ministry of Defence were involved in aspects of the analysis that informed the White Paper.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what external assistance and technical consultancy his Department has commissioned for the Trident Alternatives Review; and how much it has spent on each piece of work commissioned to date. [124969]

Danny Alexander: I have been asked to reply as the Minister responsible for the Trident Alternatives Review.

None.

The review draws upon technical advice from subject matter experts within Her Majesty's Government on an as-required basis

Health

Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to reduce the rate of alcohol-specific hospital admissions for under 18 year olds in Redditch. [125992]

Anna Soubry: The Government's Alcohol Strategy, published on 23 March, brings together the Government's approach to reducing the incidence of alcohol-related disease and crime.

This included a commitment to introduce a minimum unit price for alcohol and actions to ensure local licensing authorities have the powers they need to prevent harm in their communities. Evidence shows that these actions should reduce harm to young people.

The strategy announced that the Government will ensure that young people know the risks associated with alcohol by making it a key feature of a new youth marketing programme aimed to drive further reductions in drinking for those aged between 11 and 19.

The Change4Life campaign, provides advice and guidance to adults on lower-risk drinking.

The Department will work with practitioners, the Royal Colleges and the Association of Directors of Children's Services to develop a model that ensures young people who attend accident and emergency departments due to alcohol receive proper follow-up and care.

The chief medical officer's alcohol guidelines for young people were published in 2009, and the guidelines say that young people under 15 should not drink alcohol at all.

Ambulance Services

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many emergency ambulance call-outs were made in (a) Birmingham and (b) England in each of the last three years. [125376]

31 Oct 2012 : Column 251W

Anna Soubry: The numbers (in thousands) of emergency calls and emergency incidents (calls resulting in a response arriving at the scene of the incident) for the west midlands and England for each of the last three years are displayed in the following table:

Number (thousand)
 2009-102010-112011-12

Emergency calls

   

West midlands

844.1

863.8

883.9

England

7,867.9

8,077.5

8,493.0

    

Emergency incidents(1)

   

West midlands

708.8

730.4

745.7

England

6,415.2

6,606.5

6,710.6

(1) Calls resulting in response arriving at the scene of the incident. Data source: KA34

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to the public purse was of each ambulance trust in England and Wales in 2011-12. [125935]

Anna Soubry: The Department collects data on total income, total expenditure and surplus/(deficit) of each ambulance trust in England for the 2011-12. This information is displayed in the following table. The Department does not collect data from Welsh NHS bodies.

£000
OrganisationTotal operating expensesTotal incomeSurplus/(deficit)

East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust

167,170

169,565

2,395

East of England Ambulance Services NHS Trust

223,811

226,949

3,138

Great Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust

91,034

89,745

(1,289)

London Ambulance Service NHS Trust

278,770

282,012

3,242

North East Ambulance Service NHS Trust

59,225

61,462

2,237

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust

258,569

259,244

675

South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust

126,066

126,590

524

West Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust

196,644

197,366

722

Yorkshire Ambulance Service NHS Trust

200,456

200,363

(93)

Ambulance Services: Pay

Alan Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff in the ambulance services received salaries of over £60,000 in (a) 2006-07 and (b) 2011-12. [125370]

31 Oct 2012 : Column 252W

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not available in the format requested.

An estimated 550 staff employed by ambulance trusts received total earnings of over £60,000 in 2011-12.

This estimate is based on unvalidated data held on the Electronic Staff Record Data Warehouse. It relates to the number of staff for whom the sum of payments made between April 2011 and March 2012 is in excess of £60,000. Information on the earnings staff are contracted to earn is not held centrally.

Billing

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average time taken by his Department to settle invoices to external suppliers or contractors was in each of the last three financial years. [125317]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not specifically monitor the average time taken to make payments to commercial suppliers as this is not a target that has been set. The Department operates standard contractual payment terms of 30 days.

However, the Department has signed up to the Government's Prompt Payment policy under which the target is to pay all valid supplier invoices that are received at the nominated address within five days of receipt (this replaced the 10 day target in January 2010). Performance against this target is expected to be published on the Department's website within six days of the previous month.

The percentages of payments to commercial suppliers made within five, 10 and 30 days in the last three financial years are as follows.

Percentage
 Within five daysWithin 10 daysWithin 30 days

2009-10

n/a

90.20

97.79

2010-11

71.11

86.72

97.65

2011-12

73.60

86.42

95.56

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average cost to his Department was of processing the payment of an invoice in the latest period for which figures are available; and what proportion of invoices settled in that period his Department paid (a) electronically and (b) by cheque. [125719]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not currently collect data on the cost of processing invoices for payment.

Since August 2006 all invoices from suppliers are paid electronically. The Department does not make any cheque payments.

Care Quality Commission

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the arrangements in place to follow up and where necessary to enforce inspections made by the Care Quality Commission; and if he will make a statement. [125985]

31 Oct 2012 : Column 253W

Norman Lamb: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care providers in England. It is responsible for assessing whether providers are meeting registration requirements. The CQC may use unannounced inspection visits in coming to their judgments. The timing of re-inspections may be based on the level of risk to people identified by previous work.

The CQC has a wide range of enforcement powers it can use. Failure to comply with these registration requirements is an offence and the CQC is able to take independent statutory enforcement action, including, issuing a warning notice; imposing, varying and removing conditions of registration; issuing a monetary penalty notice for prescribed offences; prosecuting for offences; suspending registration; and cancelling registration.

The Department undertook a Performance and Capability Review of the CQC to provide robust assurance to the public, the Department and Parliament that CQC is improving its performance and that action will be taken to build and sustain its capability for the future. The report was published on 23 February 2012 and made a number of recommendations around the development and delivery of the regulatory model. The CQC has welcomed the findings of the Performance and Capability Review and has published its formal response and action plan. A copy of “CQC Performance and Capability Review—Response and Action Plan” has already been placed in the Library.

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many inspections have been carried out by the Care Quality Commission in West Sussex in the last 18 months; and what the results of those inspections were. [125986]

Norman Lamb: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care providers in England and has a key responsibility in the overall assurance of essential levels of safety and quality of health and adult social care services. Under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 all providers of regulated activities, including NHS and independent providers, have to register with the CQC and meet a set of essential requirements of safety and quality.

The CQC has provided the following information:

The first table refers to number of inspections completed and published in the area of West Sussex local authority from 1 April 2011 to 29 October 2012 by sector. The second table gives the percentage of those services that were judged to be either compliant or non-compliant and the percentage that resulted in enforcement action.

SectorCompliantNon compliant with at least one outcomeTotal

Independent Healthcare Organisation

10

3

13

NHS Healthcare Organisation

15

1

16

Primary Dental Care

23

3

26

Social Care Organisation

306

140

446

Total

354

147

501

31 Oct 2012 : Column 254W

Percentage
SectorCompliantNon compliant with at least one outcomeInspections that resulted in enforcement action

Independent Healthcare Organisation

76.9

23.1

0

NHS Healthcare Organisation

93.8

6.3

0

Primary Dental Care

88.5

11.5

0

Social Care Organisation

68.6

31.4

(1)2.7

Total

70.7

29.3

(1) The CQC issued 12 warning notices to 12 separate social care locations in West Sussex local authority area since April 2011. This equates to 2.7% of the 446 inspections of social care services that took place during this period.

Food: Contamination

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the permissible levels of (a) lead and (b) cadmium in food contact materials; and if he will make a statement. [125409]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) lead on this issue. We are advised that the European Commission has recently proposed revision of the existing limits set out in European Union legislation for the release of lead and cadmium from ceramic-ware intended to come into contact with foodstuffs. This was prompted by the publication of two European Food Safety Authority opinions published in 2009 (cadmium) and 2010 (lead) that suggested there is a need to reduce exposure to cadmium and lead at the population level. The FSA supports these opinions with a view to safeguarding consumers' health in relation to food and drink.

The FSA has issued an informal consultation to all relevant stakeholders to further understand the implications of these proposals. UK industry is in the process of collating data on the release of lead and cadmium into food and the appropriateness of current test methods. The FSA will consider these data in developing the UK's negotiating lines in Europe.

Food: Labelling

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) within what timescale he expects compulsory front-of-pack food labelling to be introduced; [125484]

(2) whether his Department has given consideration to introducing compulsory health warnings on food products with higher than 50 per cent of guideline daily amounts in a portion. [125485]

Anna Soubry: Under the EU Regulation 1169/2011 on the provision of food information to consumers, front of pack nutrition labelling by businesses is voluntary. On 24 October, the United Kingdom Governments announced a proposed approach to front of pack nutrition labelling based on percentage guideline daily amount and colour coding. Colours clearly indicate foods that

31 Oct 2012 : Column 255W

are high in salt fat and sugars and percentage guideline daily amounts give further information on the amount a given portion contributes to the diet.

The UK Governments will continue to work with partner organisations on the detail of the scheme to build as wide a consensus as possible across the food industry.

General Practitioners

Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 14 September 2012, Official Report, columns 428-9W, on general practitioners, what assessment the NHS Commissioning Board has made of the suitability of applicants. [125416]

Anna Soubry: As the authorisation process for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) is still under way, during which the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) will make an assessment of viability of the CCGs' leadership, we are unable to confirm how many individual leaders the NHS CB has deemed suitable.

Food Containers

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his Department's advice is to jam makers regarding the re-use of jam jars. [125292]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) lead on this issue. We are advised there is European Union legislation in place, that applies to food businesses that are designed to protect consumers from the migration of materials that may be used in the manufacture of containers used to store food.

The FSA has stated that it is not aware of any evidence that the re-use of jars by charities and individuals for making and selling jams and preserves presents a food safety concern for consumers in terms of materials which may migrate from jam jars into food. Obviously, good hygiene needs to be observed in cleaning jars and food preparation.

Local authorities are responsible for enforcing these rules but the FSA is not aware of any prosecutions for non-compliance with this legislation when reusing glass jars for jam making since the legislation was introduced in 2004.

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which glass products currently commercially available are suitable for re-use for the sale of jam. [125407]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) lead on this issue.

We are advised that, in accordance with European Union legislation, new jars and jars produced from the outset for reuse will have appropriate assurances from suppliers as to the jars’ suitability for food contact. The FSA is not aware of any evidence that reusing jam jars presents a food safety concern for consumers in terms of materials which may migrate from jam jars into food.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 256W

Maternity Services

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which free-standing birth centres in the UK (a) opened in the last 12 months, (b) are planned to open in the next 12 months, (c) closed in the last 12 months and (d) are planned to close in the next 12 months. [125403]

Dr Poulter: This information is not collected centrally.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost per birth in each hospital in the UK is. [125404]

Dr Poulter: The Department is responsible for healthcare in England.

The following table sets out the average unit cost of maternity deliveries to national health service trusts and foundation trusts in England in 2010-11.

Organisation nameAverage unit cost (£)

Airedale NHS Foundation Trust

2,050

Ashford and St Peter's Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,680

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

2,545

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

1,955

Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,775

Barts and The London NHS Trust

1,840

Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,310

Basingstoke and North Hampshire NHS Foundation Trust

1,595

Bedford Hospital NHS Trust

1,580

Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust

2,170

Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,480

Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,550

Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,485

Buckinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust

1,740

Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,510

Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust

1,430

Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,615

Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,945

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

3,195

Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,645

City Hospitals Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust

1,840

Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust

1,190

Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,710

County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust

2,125

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

1,895

Dartford and Gravesham NHS Trust

1,975

31 Oct 2012 : Column 257W

Derby Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,070

Doncaster and Bassetlaw Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,165

Dorset County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,470

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

2,805

East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust

1,810

East Cheshire NHS Trust

2,070

East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust

2,095

East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust

1,695

East Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust

1,965

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

2,030

Frimley Park Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,715

Gateshead Health NHS Foundation Trust

2,520

George Eliot Hospital NHS Trust

2,255

Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,710

Gloucestershire Primary Care Trust

640

Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,820

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

2,460

Harrogate and District NHS Foundation Trust

2,670

Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust

2,105

Heatherwood and Wexham Park Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,780

Hinchingbrooke Health Care NHS Trust

1,985

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,520

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

1,865

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

2,055

Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust

1,430

Isle of Wight NHS Primary Care Trust

2,865

James Paget University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,400

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,645

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,540

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

2,415

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,720

Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust

1,135

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

2,375

Liverpool Women's NHS Foundation Trust

1,565

Luton and Dunstable Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,705

Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust

1,640

Medway NHS Foundation Trust

1,480

Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,480

Mid Essex Hospital Services NHS Trust

1,585

Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust

1,195

Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

1,545

Milton Keynes Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,375

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

1,770

Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,865

31 Oct 2012 : Column 258W

North Bristol NHS Trust

2,630

North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust

3,305

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

2,740

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust

1,885

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

2,235

Northampton General Hospital NHS Trust

3,060

Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust

1,260

Northern Lincolnshire and Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,930

Northumbria Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

2,900

Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,845

Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust

2,255

Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust

2,365

Peterborough And Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust"

1,940

Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

2,160

Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,950

Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

2,060

Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust

2,025

Royal Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,870

Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust

1,435

Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust

1,815

Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust

2,055

Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust

3,135

Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,080

Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust

2,030

Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust

1,250

Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

2,225

Scarborough and North East Yorkshire Health Care NHS Trust

1,550

Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,300

Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,435

Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust

1,280

South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

1,825

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

1,825

South Staffordshire Primary Care Trust

375

South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,405

South Tyneside NHS Foundation Trust

2,905

South Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust

1,980

Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,895

Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,835

Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust

1,855

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

3,440

St Helens and Knowsley Hospitals NHS Trust

2,375

Stockport NHS Foundation Trust

2,335

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare NHS Trust

2,110

Tameside Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,315

Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust

1,520

31 Oct 2012 : Column 259W

The Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,935

The Hillingdon Hospital NHS Trust

2,310

The Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,320

The Princess Alexandra Hospital NHS Trust

1,765

The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn. NHS Foundation Trust

1,090

The Rotherham NHS Foundation Trust

1,655

The Royal Bournemouth And Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,225

The Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust

1,895

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

2,730

Trafford Healthcare NHS Trust

80

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust

2,440

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,150

University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust

1,865

University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust

1,630

University. Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

1,030

University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust

1,670

University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust

1,980

University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust

1,265

University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

2,860

Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

2,965

Warrington and Halton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

2,495

West Hertfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust

2,040

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

2,055

West Suffolk Hospitals NHS Trust

2,230

Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Trust

2,555

Weston Area Health NHS Trust

1,260

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

2,245

Wiltshire Primary Care Trust

2,010

Winchester and Eastleigh Healthcare NHS Trust

2,200

Wirral University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,335

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust

2,215

Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust

1,775

Wye Valley NHS Trust

1,560

Yeovil District Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,030

31 Oct 2012 : Column 260W

York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1,865

Notes: 1. Data includes: (a) Department: Elective (inc day case), non-elective, out-patient procedure, Community Midwifery Services (b) Healthcare Resource Group: NZ11A, NZ11B, NZ11C, NZ11D, NZ11E, NZ11F, NZ11G, NZ12A, NZ12B, NZ12C, NZ12D, NZ12E, NZ12F, NZ12G, NZ13Z, NZ14Z and NZ15Z. 2. The average unit costs above are for maternity deliveries and not specifically births (and may include multiple births). 3. The costs include those for Community Midwifery Services which may not have taken place within a hospital setting. 4. The costs above have not been adjusted for the Market Forces Factor (MFF) and therefore will include location-specific costs. Therefore, care should be taken when directly comparing organisations. 5. The data does not include births in private hospitals. 6. All costs are rounded to nearest £5. 7. This trust list is based at those trusts as at 31 March 2011. Source: Reference Costs Collection, 2010-11

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of the tariff paid for births goes to maternity units in each hospital. [125405]

Dr Poulter: It is for individual trusts to determine how income is allocated to Departments within the trust.

Information on the allocation of income is not collected by the Department.

Midwives

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what proportion of midwifery students were (a) unemployed and (b) employed in a job other than as a midwife six months after graduation for each year since 2002 for which records are available; [125268]

(2) what proportion of midwifery graduates (a) sought and (b) secured a job as a midwife in the NHS within six months of graduation for each year since 2009 for which figures are available. [125269]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not collect this information. The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) is the official agency for the collection, analysis and dissemination of quantitative information about higher education.

The contact details for HESA can be viewed at:

http://www.hesa.ac.uk/content/view/2/52/

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the attrition rate for students on midwifery courses was in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [125270]

Dr Poulter: Attrition rates are quoted using figures for completed cohorts. Attrition rates were not collected in 2007-08, or 2008-09. The figures for the last three financial years are shown in the following table:

31 Oct 2012 : Column 261W

Midwifery attrition rates 2009-10 to 2011-12
Year in which cohort completedCourses started in:Midwifery attrition rate (percentage)

2009-10

2005-06

17.6

2010-11

2006-07

20.3

2011-12

2007-08

26.6

Note: 2011-12 attrition rates are based on returns from all 10 strategic health authorities (SHAs), 2010-11 data on nine SHAs and 2009-10 data on seven SHAs. Source: Multi Professional Education and Training Quarterly Monitoring Returns

National non-medical average attrition rates are traditionally reported using data from completed cohorts (ie the number of midwives graduating from training programmes). However, reporting attrition rates in this way does not show the successes that strategic health authorities (SHAs) have recently reported in reducing attrition in the early years of training. If these trends are maintained, it would lead to lower attrition rates for midwifery cohorts who have completed their training. SHAs have been working with education institutions to reduce attrition from training programmes by improving the quality of education and training for health professionals.

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the provision of insurance for independent midwives; and if he will make a statement. [125364]

Dr Poulter: Independent research commissioned by the Nursing and Midwifery Council and Royal College of Midwives suggested that independent midwives would be able to obtain insurance as employees within a corporate structure. We know this model of maternity care delivery is viable because midwives operating such models have been able to purchase insurance for the whole of the midwifery care pathway and are delivering maternity services, both inside and outside the national health service.

Mobile Phones

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which companies supply (a) mobile telephones and (b) mobile data services to his Department. [125721]

Dr Poulter: The Department currently sources mobile telephony and mobile data services from Vodafone under a cross Government Framework Agreement.

Neurology

Naomi Long: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he and his predecessors have had with Ministers in Northern Ireland and Wales on public funding of research into Parkinson's Disease and other neurological conditions. [125202]

Dr Poulter: The Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), has had no such discussions. My right hon. Friend the Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), also had no such discussions as the former Secretary of State for Health.

31 Oct 2012 : Column 262W

NHS: Pay

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on which dates the National Pay Terms and Conditions Committee of the NHS Staff Council has met since May 2010. [125946]

Dr Poulter: The national NHS Staff Council has overall responsibility for the “Agenda for Change” pay system and has representatives from both employers and trade unions. The Department is not a member, but normally attends as an observer. The NHS Staff Council remit includes maintaining the “Agenda for Change” pay system and negotiating any changes in core conditions for staff on “Agenda for Change” and reflecting these in the NHS terms and conditions of service handbook. NHS Employers has provided the following list of meetings that have taken place since May 2010:

 Executive or Staff Council

2010

 

14 May

Executive

17 June

Executive

8 July

Staff Council

16 September

Executive

13 October

Executive

19 November

Staff Council

10 December

Executive

  

2011

 

18 January

Executive

25 February

Executive

10 March

Staff Council

13 May

Executive

17 June

Executive

8 July

Staff Council

9 September

Executive

21 October

Staff Council

8 December

Executive

  

2012

 

19 January

Executive

22 February

Executive

9 March

Staff Council

3 May

Executive

28 June

Staff Council

14 September

Executive

19 October

Executive

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made in negotiating national pay terms and conditions since May 2010. [125947]

Dr Poulter: NHS Employers is the organisation responsible for conducting negotiations with the trade unions on national pay, terms and conditions. Changes to national terms and conditions are discussed at the NHS Staff Council and at Joint Negotiating Committees with the British Medical Association. NHS Employers advise that, since May 2010, a number of amendments have been made to national terms and conditions for staff covered by “Agenda for Change”. A list has been

31 Oct 2012 : Column 263W

placed in the Library. The NHS Staff Council is currently engaged in discussions on national changes to “Agenda for Change”.

Nurses

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will estimate the proportion of nurses who qualified in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12 who are currently working in the NHS. [125891]

Dr Poulter: The information is not held centrally by the Department.

The information on first destination of newly registered nurses is held by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) is the official agency for the collection, analysis and dissemination of quantitative information about higher education. HESA collects information on the first destination of graduates.

Press: Subscriptions

Jonathan Ashworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Health to which magazines, journals and newspapers his Department subscribes. [125338]

31 Oct 2012 : Column 264W

Dr Poulter: The Department subscribes to 286 titles of magazines and journals and four newspaper titles in 2012. The list of the titles has been placed in the Library.

The Department's Knowledge Centre is responsible for central provision of Library services—including newspapers, periodicals and trade publications. The list does not include any items purchased for retention by individual divisions, responsibility for which was decentralised in April 2010. Details on these titles are not available.

Sickness Absence

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many days on average staff of his Department in each pay grade were absent from work as a result of ill health in each of the last 12 months. [125720]

Dr Poulter: The latest data available on the number of days staff absent due to ill health in the last 12 months are presented in the following table. This is based on disaggregation of the annual “Average Working Days Lost. (AWDL)” data collected by Cabinet Office and used as a standard measure across the civil service.

Average working days lost per full-time equivalent by month and grade
 Administrative officerExecutive officerHigher executive officerSenior executive officerGrade 7Grade 6Senior civil service

July 2011

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.2

0.0

0.1

August 2011

0.5

0.3

0.4

0.4

0.2

0.1

0.0

September 2011

0.7

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.2

0.1

October 2011

0.9

0.8

0.5

0.4

0.2

0.1

0.1

November 2012

0.8

0.7

0.6

0.4

0.3

0.1

0.1

December 2011

0.8

0.5

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.1

0.1

January 2012

0.9

0.4

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

February 2012

0.9

0.7

0.5

0.4

0.2

0.3

0.1

March 2012

0.9

0.7

0.4

0.3

.0.3

0.2

0.1

April 2012

0.7

0.4

0.4

0.2

0.3

0.2

0.1

May 2012

0.5

0.6

0.5

0.3

0.3

0.1

0.2

June 2012

1.1

0.8

0.7

0.3

0.3

0.0

0.1

The Department has one of the lowest rates across Whitehall for the average number of working days lost per year: 4.1 days.