Midwives: Foreign Workers

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many midwives from countries other than the UK were recruited to work in the NHS in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [126369]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 582W

Dr Poulter: The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the regulatory body for nurses and midwives. Registration with the NMC is an essential requirement for working as a midwife in the United Kingdom. However, not all midwives registering with the NMC may go on to work in the national health service.

The NMC collects data on the number of admissions to the NMC register by overseas country. The following table shows the number of midwives admitted to the register from outside the UK by the country of their initial training.

Country of training2011-122010-112009-10

Italy

58

49

25

Poland

23

16

17

Eire

20

21

5

Bulgaria

13

13

18

Greece

10

4

6

Germany

7

14

9

France

7

14

14

Denmark

7

9

4

Lithuania

6

6

1

Belgium

4

11

4

Czech Republic

3

5

5

Estonia

2

4

1

Slovakia

1

0

0

Austria

1

0

2

Latvia

0

2

0

Netherlands

0

4

0

Malta

0

2

2

Switzerland

0

1

0

Iceland

0

0

1

Other

0

0

1

Total

162

175

115

Source: NMC register 2009-12

Midwives: Training

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many students were enrolled on midwifery courses in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012. [126393]

Dr Poulter: Enrolment figures are not collected by the Department. However we do collect information on numbers of training places commissioned each year.

Strategic health authorities are responsible for commissioning midwifery training places. The actual number of training places commissioned in 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 are in the following table. The planned number of commissions for 2012-13 is also included in the table.

Midwifery training commissions 2009-12
 Midwifery commissions

2009-10

2,482

2010-11

2,488

2011-12

2,484

2012-13 (plan)

2,578

Note: The figures include both degree and 18-month diploma courses. Source: Multi professional education and training quarterly monitoring returns.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions were held with (a) Ministers and (b) officials in the Scottish Government on midwifery student intakes since May 2010. [126395]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 583W

Dr Poulter: There have been no ministerial or official discussions with the Scottish Government on matters relating to midwifery student intakes since May 2010.

NHS: Drugs

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the total NHS expenditure on (a) cardiac drugs and (b) cancer drugs was in each of the last three years. [126378]

Norman Lamb: The cost to the national health service of medicines termed as “cardiac drugs” and “cancer drugs” over the period 2009 to 2011 is provided as follows. This is separated into the cost of prescriptions issued for primary care and the cost of medicines used in secondary medical care, due to differences in the way that the data are collected and recorded.

Primary care: Net ingredient cost of prescription items written in the United Kingdom and dispensed, in the community, in England
£ million
 British National Formulary (BNF) chapter 2, Cardiovascular System(1)BNF chapter 8, Malignant disease and immunosuppression (2, 3)

2009

1,627.3

342.3

2010

1,513.0

339.4

2011

1,351.3

315.9

(1) The term “cardiac drugs” is interpreted as medicines classified by BNF chapter 2, Cardiovascular System. This includes drugs for hypertension and anticoagulation and other areas which might or might not be regarded as “cardiac.” (2) The term “cancer drugs” is interpreted as medicines classified by BNF chapter 8, Malignant disease and immunosuppression. There may be medicines classified elsewhere in the BNF also having an application in cancer treatment. (3) Includes medicines funded through the Cancer Drugs Fund. Source: Prescription Cost Analysis (PCA) system supplied by the NHS Information Centre.
Secondary care: Estimated cost of medicines supplied by hospital pharmacies in England(1, 2)
£ million
 WHO ATC Group C—Cardiovascular systemWHO ATC Group L—Antineoplastic and immunomodulating agents(3)

2009

63.2

1,245.1

2010

61.6

1,424.7

2011

60.7

1,630.2

(1) Data cover pharmacies in 97% of hospitals in English with acute beds. These figures include some care commissioned from homecare companies that deliver the medicines to patients in their own homes. However, some spend may be missed. (2) The medicine classification used is the World Health Organisation's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (WHO ATC) classification system. As with primary care, the classification groups may not be fully comprehensive of all medicines used to treat cardiovascular conditions and cancer. (3) Includes medicines funded through the Cancer Drugs Fund. Source: IMS HEALTH: Hospital Pharmacy Audit supplied by the NHS Information Centre.

Mr Barron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many times the Medicines Supply Chain Group has met since 15 May 2012; and on how many such occasions it has discussed medicines shortages. [126388]

Norman Lamb: The Department's Medicines Supply Chain Group has met twice since 15 May 2012. Medicines shortages were discussed at both these meetings.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 584W

NHS: Lobbying

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the employment by the NHS of lobbyists and public relations companies, that are also employed by pharmaceutical companies to promote their products to the NHS. [126290]

Dr Poulter: National health service bodies are responsible and accountable for decisions on the employment of their medical staff, non-medical staff and contractors. Model standing financial instructions and standing orders issued by the Department for use by NHS bodies place a duty to ensure that there are no conflicts of interest in regard to any services commissioned or procured.

NHS: Redundancy

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost of redundancy of staff in the NHS has been since May 2010. [126653]

Dr Poulter: Information on redundancy costs is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is in the following table:

Compulsory redundancies and other departures for primary care trusts (PCTs), strategic health authorities (SHAs) and national health service trusts for the financial years 2010-11 and 2011-12
£000
Category2010-112011-12

Compulsory redundancies

87,747

83,106

Other departures

131,898

91,589

Notes: 1. “Other departures” include early retirements (except those due to ill health), voluntary redundancies, Mutually Agreed Resignation scheme, pay in lieu of notice etc. 2. Voluntary redundancies are not separately identifiable from other departures; therefore, an overall figure for redundancies is not available.

The figures reported in the accounts are for a full financial year (that is, between 1 April and 31 March). As such, we are unable to provide a breakdown of the cost associated with exit packages solely since May 2010.

The data are taken from the audited summarisation schedules of PCTs, SHAs and NHS trusts, which are used to prepare the NHS elements of the Department's annual report and accounts. The figures reported represent the total resource cost of compulsory redundancies and other departures for staff leaving their organisation during the year. The expense associated with these departures may have been recognised in part or in full in a previous period.

The Department does not collect data from NHS foundation trusts. Where an NHS trust obtains foundation trust status part way through any year, the data provided are only for the part of the year the organisation operated as an NHS trust.

NHS: Training

Mr Bellingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what training he requires NHS staff to undertake to ensure they behave in a courteous, considerate and respectful manner to patients at all times. [126661]

Dr Poulter: Every national health service service provider has an obligation to their patients as part of their Care Quality Commission registration requirements to ensure

6 Nov 2012 : Column 585W

people should be cared for by staff on who are properly qualified and able to do their job.

All NHS organisations should adhere to the NHS Values outlined in the NHS constitution. The constitution states that organisations should provide the highest standards of excellence and professionalism in the provision of high-quality care that is safe, effective and focused on patient experience and in the people it employs and the education, training and development they receive.

Prescription Drugs

Andy Burnham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients in England have been prescribed (a) benzodiazepines and (b) z-drugs for four months or longer in each of the last five years. [126938]

Norman Lamb: Information is not held centrally on the number of people prescribed particular medicines or the duration of treatment.

School Milk

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to ensure that it will remain possible for milk to be delivered to early years settings after the review of the nursery milk scheme; and whether the cost of delivery is included in the price paid for milk by his Department. [125936]

Dr Poulter: The Department's consultation on “The Next Steps for Nursery Milk” ended on 23 October.

Our intention is to continue the scheme as a universal benefit. None of the proposals in the consultation involve a change in the amount of milk provided, or to the age or number of children eligible to receive it.

The nursery milk scheme will continue to reimburse child-care providers for the full cost of purchasing milk they provide, free of charge, to eligible children in their care.

Social Workers

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many social workers were registered with the General Social Care Council in (a) January 2012, (b) February 2012, (c) March 2012, (d) April 2012, (e) May 2012, (f) June 2012 and (g) July 2012. [125573]

Norman Lamb: The Department does not hold data on social workers registered each month.

The General Social Care Council's Annual Report 2011-12 stated that the total number of registered social workers in that financial year was 87,246.

The total number of social workers registered from April to July 2012 will be given in the General Social Care Council's Annual Report and Accounts 2012-13, to be laid before Parliament by 31 March 2013.

Specialised Healthcare Alliance

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many NHS committees and advisory groups the Specialist Healthcare Alliance (SHA) has

6 Nov 2012 : Column 586W

representation on; and who represents the SHA on those committees and groups; [126291]

(2) how many meetings his officials have had with the Specialist Healthcare Alliance (SHA) in the last 12 months; and who represented the SHA at those meetings; [126292]

(3) pursuant to the answer of 12 July 2011, Official Report, columns 305-6W, to the hon. Member for Wells (Tessa Munt), on the Specialised Services Patient and Public Engagement Steering Group, for what reasons the Specialised Healthcare Alliance was chosen to represent patients; what the name is of each representative of the Specialist Healthcare Alliance who sits on the Specialised Services Patient and Public Engagement Steering Group; and which organisation each such person represents. [126382]

Anna Soubry: No information is available centrally on the national health service committees and advisory groups which have representatives of the Specialised Healthcare Alliance (SHCA).

In the last 12 months from October 2011 to October 2012 there have been two meetings between departmental officials within the policy team for specialised services and the SHCA. These meetings have been part of normal departmental business in engaging with a key stakeholder in the field of rare diseases. On both occasions the SHCA was represented by John Murray. He was accompanied by Andrew Wilkinson to one of the meetings.

The SHCA was chosen to represent patients on the Specialised Services Patient and Public Engagement Steering Group because it represents more than 80 patient-related organisations to which it is accountable. John Murray was the representative of the SHCA.

Energy and Climate Change

Billing

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the average cost to his Department was of processing the payment of an invoice in the latest period for which figures are available; and what proportion of invoices settled in that period his Department paid (a) electronically and (b) by cheque. [125689]

Gregory Barker: The average cost of processing an invoice is calculated to be £3.56 inclusive of indirect costs.

In the period July to September 2012, of 1,934 invoices paid, (a) 1,911 (98.81%) were by electronic bank transfer and (b) the remaining 23 (1.19%) by cheque.

Fossil Fuels: Scotland

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will place in the Library a copy of any representations he has received from the Scottish Government on the decommissioning of oil and gas fields in the event of Scottish separation. [126814]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 587W

Mr Hayes: No direct representations have been received by DECC from the Scottish Government on the decommissioning of oil and gas fields in the event of Scottish separation.

Nuclear Power

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish the membership of the Nuclear Industry Council. [127087]

Mr Hayes: The membership of the Nuclear Industry Council will be published with any agendas and minutes of Council meetings

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change who will meet any costs associated with the Nuclear Industry Council. [127090]

Mr Hayes: Officials from DECC and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) supported by the Nuclear Industry Association will provide administrative and secretariat support and the cost associated for providing meeting venues. Any particular workstreams or working group activities or issues the Council will want to explore in more detail will be resourced by companies or organisations represented on the Nuclear Industry Council.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to his departmental press release 2012/135 of 30 October 2012 on the purchase of Horizon Nuclear Power by Hitachi Ltd, what assessment he has made of the ability of the Office for Nuclear Regulation and the Environment Agency respectively to conduct a rigorous generic design assessment (GDA) of the Hitachi Advanced Boiling Water Reactor in respect of its suitability to be operated in the UK; and whether the regulators will be able to apply full cost recovery to the owner of the reactor design for such GDA work done. [126908]

Mr Hayes: I will be asking the independent nuclear regulators to conduct a Generic Design Assessment of the Hitachi Advanced Boiling Waste Reactor, and am confident that they will do so rigorously, as they are doing for other designs proposed for construction in the UK. As with other such assessments, the full cost of GDA will be charged to the requesting party which submits the design for assessment.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what information he has received from the Office for Nuclear Regulation on its review of the strategic oversight of nuclear safety and security-related research, and its arrangements for commissioning and managing research and specialist technical support. [126910]

Mr Hayes: The Office for Nuclear Regulation's (ONR) review, and the development of its research and technical support strategy, has been taking place alongside (and has informed) the development of the Government's own long-term strategy for civil nuclear power and an associated nuclear R and D capabilities programme.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 588W

The ONR is working to establish a Chief Inspector's Independent Advisory Group, whose role will include advising HM Chief Nuclear Inspector on the adequacy and balance of ONR's research strategy and programme, as well as further developing the regulatory Nuclear Research Index (NRI), which represents ONR's view of what research is needed to support existing nuclear facilities.

The outputs from the Government's Nuclear R and D capabilities programme are expected around the end of the year.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what activities have been undertaken by the G8 Nuclear Safety and Security Group over the last three years; whether reports of its activities are published; and if he will publish its agreed future work programme. [126911]

Mr Hayes: The G8 Nuclear Safety and Security Group (NSSG) was established at the 2002 Kananaskis G8 summit and is responsible to G8 leaders for providing technically informed strategic policy advice on issues that could impact safety and security in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. However, the focus of the NSSG is very clearly on nuclear safety rather than security.

In 2012, G8 leaders reaffirmed their commitment to the objective of achieving the highest levels of safety and a culture of continuous improvement to nuclear safety. This approach was also adopted by the US presidency, who made G8 influence on delivering the International Atomic Energy Agency’s action plan on nuclear safety a key priority.

It is for G8 presidency states to set the objectives during their presidency, therefore there is no formal forward work plan. However, successive states have sought to ensure the delivery of the IAEA action plan rather than undertake new parallel activities. Under the UK presidency in 2013, the NSSG will have three main objectives:

(i) To continue the work of delivering the IAEA action plan with a focus on the commitment to seeking continuous improvement to nuclear safety standards.

(ii) To deliver agreement across G8 members on improving their co-ordination in the planning for and response to a nuclear emergency,

(iii) To co-ordinate the G8 position on the outcome of an August 2012 extra-ordinary meeting of the Convention on nuclear safety in August 2012 which focused on amending the Convention and/or its rules and procedures.

Each G8 presidency state produces a summary document of the action G8 states are committed to taking that forms part of the official documentation of the presidency. The following links are to the documentation produced by the French and US presidencies:

http://www.g20-g8.com/g8-g20/g8/english/the-2011-summit/declarations-and-reports/appendices/report-of-the-nuclear-safety-and-security-group.1355.html

http://geneva.usmission.gov/2012/05/21/g8-nuclear-safety-and-security/

Planning

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many chartered town planners are employed by his Department. [125805]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 589W

Gregory Barker: None. The Department employs a number of staff with many years’ experience in infrastructure planning, some of whom are working towards Chartered Town Planner.

Public Appointments

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many appointments made to the boards of public bodies overseen by his Department have been (a) male and (b) female since May 2010. [126165]

Gregory Barker: Since May 2010 there have been:

(a) 14 male; and

(b) One female appointments to the boards of public bodies within the Department's remit.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Adult Education

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the results of the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education's annual survey of adult participation in learning in 2012. [126773]

Matthew Hancock [holding answer 5 November 2012]: We welcome the National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (NIACE) survey report and we recognise the patterns of adult learning which are similar to our own analysis. We recognise that some groups of people are less likely to learn than others, so we are pleased to have NIACE supporting our new Community Learning Trust pilots which give providers the freedom, flexibility and support to engage more people in learning, especially those groups we know are less likely to learn.

We agree with NIACE that the first step into adult learning is often the hardest, especially for those who did not flourish at school. We have maintained the Community Learning budget and provision for Basic Skills which funds the courses that are often the first step on the ladder for disadvantaged groups; getting them into learning, helping them support their children and preparing them for work. Alongside our policies to support individuals, we acknowledge that employers are a vital source of training for many people. We are supporting employers to train their work force through apprenticeships and these continue to increase at a record rate. We are also supporting employers through Employer Ownership pilots. The pilots will enable employers to test different ways of undertaking the training they need to improve productivity, and increase the level of employer investment in training.

Arms Trade: Exports

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether his Department makes an assessment of whether weaponry is likely to be used in Kashmir before issuing a defence export licence. [126896]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 590W

Michael Fallon: All export licences for military goods are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria. An export licence will not be issued if the decision is not consistent with the criteria. Assessments of export licence applications for military goods to India and Pakistan will take account of the continuing tensions over Kashmir.

The following criteria are relevant:

Criterion 2

The respect of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the country of final destination. A licence will not be issued if there is a clear risk that the proposed export might be used for internal repression;

Criterion 3

The internal situation in the country of final destination, as a function of the existence of tensions or armed conflicts. The Government will not issue export licences for exports which would provoke or prolong armed conflicts or aggravate existing tensions or conflicts in the country of final destination;

Criterion 4

Preservation of regional peace, security and stability. The Government will not issue an export licence if there is a clear risk that the intended recipient would use the proposed export aggressively against another country, or to assert by force a territorial claim.

Billing

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days. [127001]

Jo Swinson: In the period from April to September 2012 the Department paid 90.5% of invoices within five working days. For information, details of the departmental monthly prompt performance are published at:

http://www.bis.gov.uk/about/procurement/prompt-payment/bis-payment-performance

I have asked chief executives of the Executive agencies to respond directly to the hon. Member.

Letter from Tim Moss, dated 2 November 2012:

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 1 November 2012, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, UIN 127001.

The proportion of undisputed invoices Companies House pays within five working days is 99.6%.

Letter from Dr Richard Judge, dated 2 November 2012:

The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has asked me to reply to your question what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and his agencies pay within five days.

The Insolvency Service, an executive agency of The Department for Business Innovation and Skills, has paid 71% of undisputed invoices within 5 days between April and September 2012. 76% of undisputed invoices were paid within 5 days in the financial year 2011/12.

Overall prompt payment performance is published in our Annual Report and Accounts which is reproduced here together with performance between April and September 2012.

Percentage
 Financial year
 2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/122012/13(1)

30 days

99

99

99

99

99

98

8 days

88

90

90

90

90

88

(1 )To September.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 591W

Letter from Sean Dennehey, dated 5 November 2012:

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled 1 November 2012, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Intellectual Property Office, an executive agency of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills has paid 91% of undisputed invoices between April and September 2012.

The last full year in 2011/12 had a performance of 87% and we continue to monitor and improve our performance.

Letter from Peter Mason, dated 5 November 2012:

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 1 November 2012, asking the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days.

The NMO pays undisputed invoices twice a week. In the financial year of 2011-12, 58.6% of undisputed invoices were paid within five days of receipt of invoice. In 2010-11, the corresponding figure was 58.9%. These figures are calculated from the date that NMO receives the invoice from the supplier until the date that the money is paid into the supplier's bank account.

Letter from Kim Thorneywork, dated 6 November 2012:

Thank you for your question in asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days.

Please be advised The Skills Funding Agency paid 74.9% of its 12,194 invoices, including disputed invoices, within five days during the year April 2011 to March 2012. These are the most recent audited figures. The Skills Funding Agency does not hold separate information for undisputed invoices.

Letter from Dr Vanessa Lawrence CB, dated 5 November 2012:

As Director General and Chief Executive of Ordnance Survey, I have been asked to reply to you in response to your Parliamentary Question asking The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills “what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days.”

Ordnance Survey, as the national mapping agency of Great Britain, is a Department in its own right with Executive Agency Status operating as a government Trading Fund. It reports to Parliament through the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

Information held on recent payment timescales indicates that since the start of Financial Year 2012-12 Ordnance Survey's monthly record of payment of undisputed invoices within five days has varied between 32% and 75% of such invoices. The monthly average figure year to date for 2012-13 is 56%.

The equivalent average figure for the three months from August to October 2012 is 70.33%.

I hope this information is of use.

Letter from David Williams, dated 2 November 2012:

Thank you for your question addressed to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days. (127001).

Current data shows that the UK Space Agency has paid 95% of undisputed invoices within 5 days.

Letter from John Hirst, dated 5 November 2012:

I am replying on behalf of the Met Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 1 November 2012, UIN 127001 to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

During 2011-12, the Met Office paid 81.7% of undisputed invoices received from UK suppliers within five working days.

I hope this helps.

Letter from Heather Foster:

I write on behalf of Land Registry in response to Parliamentary Question 127001 tabled on 1 Nov 2012 which asked the following:

6 Nov 2012 : Column 592W

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what proportion of undisputed invoices his Department and its agencies pay within five days.

Our Finance Group have a KPI target to pay 80% of undisputed invoices within five days. Our most recent figures (YTD August 2012) show that we have achieved a figure of 95.3%.

I hope this information is useful

Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will meet representatives of the Expired Copyright Homewares Organisation to discuss the potential effect on furniture retailers of the repeal of section 52 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. [125921]

Jo Swinson [holding answer 1 November 2012]: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, my right hon. Friend the Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), has asked his officials to make themselves available to meet all interested parties.

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the Regulatory Policy Committee's report on the impact assessment of the proposed repeal of section 52 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988; and if he will make a statement. [126242]

Jo Swinson: I refer the hon. Member to the answer that I gave him on 11 September 2012, Official Report, columns 210-11W.

Mike Weatherley: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he plans to take to investigate the risk of any legal challenge to the proposed repeal of section 52 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. [126243]

Jo Swinson: All relevant legal risks have been considered.

European Space Council

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what assessment he has made of the potential return on public investment agreed at the European Space Agency's Ministerial Council on 20 and 21 November 2012. [126895]

Mr Willetts: In preparation for the European Space Agency's Ministerial Council meeting the Department has prepared a full business case assessing the potential return on public investment of a UK investment in European Space Agency (ESA) programmes at the November 2012 ESA Council at ministerial level. This analysis covers the science, economic and public good benefits. A final decision has not yet been made on the level of investment the UK will be making at the meeting.

Exports

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what targets (a) he and (b) his Department's officials have set as part of the Government's aim to increase the number of businesses exporting by 2020. [127003]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 593W

Michael Fallon: The Chancellor of the Exchequer announced, in his March 2012 Budget, a target for the UK to increase the value of its exports to £1 trillion per year by 2020.

In support of this the Government have also announced, as part of a National Export Challenge, an ambition to get 100,000 companies exporting each year by 2020. This significant shift will bring the percentage of UK companies exporting in line with the EU average.

UK Trade and Investment (UKTI), the Government Department that helps UK-based companies succeed in the global economy and assists overseas companies to bring their high-quality investment to the UK, is committed to doubling to 50,000 the number of UK businesses that it supports each year, by 2015.

But the Government cannot drive this alone. More needs to be done within the business support community; hence UKTI is undertaking significant work with business support organisations such as, the chambers of commerce and business intermediaries, and other partners, such as professional groups (e.g. law firms, accountants and banks) which, through their close association with UK firms, can play an important part in encouraging these firms to pursue growth through exports.

Exports: South East Asia

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what targets (a) he or (b) his Department's officials have set in relation to the Headstart Initiative six month pilot launched on 18 October 2012. [127002]

Michael Fallon: The Headstart initiative will provide practical on-the-ground support for SMEs wishing to do business in Singapore, Bangkok and Jakarta via the British Chambers of Commerce in those markets. After six months, following completion of the evaluation of the Headstart service, UK Trade & Investment, the UK-ASEAN Business Council and the British Chambers of Commerce will recommend the future approach to promoting and delivering the Headstart initiative. This initiative is in line with our intention to work with private sector parties in support of our overall target of helping 50,000 companies a year by 2015.

Ford Motor Company

Mr Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what the purpose was of the European Investment Bank facility loans to Ford in 2008, supported by the UK Government; and what conditions were attached; [126786]

(2) what the value was of the European Investment Bank loan facility to Ford agreed in 2008; and what sum has been drawn down to date. [126803]

Michael Fallon: The purpose of the European Investment Bank (EIB) loan was to finance the development of next generation engines and vehicles and engine production. The conditions applied are commercially confidential.

The value of the EIB loan facility is £450 million. This has been drawn down in full.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 594W

Further Education: West Midlands

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many further education colleges have received funding for new buildings from his Department in (a) Birmingham and (b) the West Midlands in each financial year since 2006; and what such funding he plans to provide in each financial year up to 2015-16. [126394]

Matthew Hancock: It is not possible to separate out funding for new buildings as many further education college projects include a mix of new build and refurbishment.

Maternity Leave

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps he has taken to encourage women on maternity leave to return to work. [126565]

Jo Swinson: This Government are committed to being the most family-friendly ever. We support the right of women to choose when they feel ready to return to work after maternity leave. We are creating an environment where women and families have greater choice in how they manage their work and family commitments during the first year, which is why we continued with the introduction of additional paternity leave in April 2011, and consulted on introducing flexible parental leave in May 2011.

These changes give families more choice over how they manage the childcare and enable women to return to work when they feel it is appropriate to do so. According to the Maternity and Paternity Rights and Women Returners Survey 2009/10, 76% of women now return to work following maternity leave.

We also consulted on extending the right to request flexible working to all employees in order to give all employees, including mothers, the ability to vary their working patterns to accommodate both work and family responsibilities.

The Government will publish their report to the Modern Workplaces consultation shortly.

National Skills Academy for Nuclear

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Barrow and Furness of 30 October 2012, Official Report, columns 188-9W, on nuclear power, what monies from the Growth and Innovation Fund have been provided to date in support of the National Skills Academy for Nuclear (NSAN) backing for the National Nuclear Gateway; and what plans he has to provide additional financial support to NSAN from the public purse. [126905]

Michael Fallon: The National Skills Academy for Nuclear (NSAN) has received funding for two major projects through the Growth and Innovation Fund.

In 2011 the Growth and Innovation Fund provided a £0.9 million investment to extend the remit of the NSAN to deliver a specific skills training system for manufacturing within the nuclear sector, particularly focused on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and the supply chain.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 595W

In 2012 the Commission for Employment and Skills agreed a £2 million investment to help develop the National Nuclear Gateway. The commission's investment will be matched by £1.7 million of employer contribution.

In addition, a Growth and Innovation Fund investment of £1.07 million has supported Cogent, the sector skills body with responsibility for nuclear to take forward key strands of activity to include the development of a workforce planning model (WPM); to extend training frameworks to the nuclear supply chain; and to create a nuclear-specific work experience programme.

“Skills for Sustainable Growth” set out the Government's ambition for a demand-led skills system. The Growth and Innovation Fund, and more recently the Employer Ownership of Skills pilot programme were established as contestable funds able to help employers overcome barriers to raising skills in sectors. We expect the NSAN, in line with Sector Skills Councils and other employer groups, to bid into the available funds when they are able to develop specific projects able to make a key difference to the nuclear skills challenge.

Overseas Trade

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the level of (a) imports from and (b) exports to Georgia has been in each of the last five years. [126867]

Michael Fallon: UK trade in goods figures are collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC) and are publically available on the UK Trade Info website:

www.uktradeinfo.com

£ million
 (a) UK imports of goods from Georgia(b) UK exports of goods to Georgia

2011

216

48

2010

190

38

2009

158

26

2008

101

38

2007

144

34

Source: HMRC Overseas Trade Statistics

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the level of (a) imports from and (b) exports to The Gambia has been in each of the last five years. [126868]

Michael Fallon: UK trade in goods figures are collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC) and are publically available on the UK Trade Info website:

www.uktradeinfo.com

£ million
 (a) UK imports of goods from the Gambia(b) UK exports of goods to the Gambia

2011

5

18

2010

9

16

2009

3

16

2008

2

16

2007

2

14

Source: HMRC Overseas Trade Statistics

6 Nov 2012 : Column 596W

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what the level of (a) imports from and (b) exports to Mali was in each of the last five years. [126869]

Michael Fallon: UK trade in goods figures are collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC) and are publically available on the UK Trade Info website:

www.uktradeinfo.com

£ million
 (a) UK imports of goods from Mali(b) UK exports of goods to Mali

2011

1

8

2010

3

6

2009

2

6

2008

1

7

2007

1

4

Source: HMRC Overseas Trade Statistics

Procurement

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days. [127000]

Jo Swinson: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) does not hold individual details of the payment performance to any subcontractors by each direct supplier to BIS. To gather all of this information from all suppliers would incur disproportionate cost.

However, as part of the standard departmental terms and conditions, a requirement is placed on any direct contractor to include in the relevant subcontract a provision which requires the contractor to pay for those goods or services within 30 days of the contractor receiving a correct invoice from the subcontractor.

In addition, BIS also encourages contractors to sign up to the Prompt Payment Code. This allows any potential subcontractors to view the commitments made by the contractor to pay within the agreed terms between the contractor and subcontractor.

I have asked chief executives of the Executive agencies to respond directly to the hon. Member.

Letter from Tim Moss, dated 2 November 2012:

I am replying on behalf of Companies House to your Parliamentary Question tabled 1 November 2012, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, UIN 127000.

Companies House does not have any information regarding the proportion of its suppliers who currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days.

Letter from Dr Richard Judge, dated 2 November 2012:

The Minister for Employment Relations and Consumer Affairs has asked me to reply to your question what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days.

The Insolvency Service, an executive agency of The Department for Business Innovation and Skills, does not hold such information relating to the processes operated by its third party suppliers.

Letter from Sean Dennehey, dated 5 November 2012:

I am responding in respect of the Intellectual Property Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled 01 November 2012, to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 597W

The Intellectual Property Office, an executive agency of the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills has a requirement in its standard terms and conditions that “if the Contractor shall include in the relevant sub contract a provision which requires those goods or services within 30 days of the Contractor receiving a correct invoice from the sub-contractor.”

Letter from Peter Mason, dated 5 November 2012:

I am responding in respect of the National Measurement Office (NMO) to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 1 November 2012, asking the Secretary of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within thirty days.

The NMO does not hold individual details of the payment performance to any sub-contractors by each direct supplier to NMO. To gather all of this information from all suppliers would incur disproportionate cost.

However, as part of the standard Departmental terms and conditions that NMO uses, a requirement is placed on any direct contractor to include in the relevant sub-contract a provision which requires the contractor to pay for those goods or services within 30 days of the contractor receiving a correct invoice from the sub-contractor.

Letter from Kim Thorneywork, dated 6 November 2012:

Thank you for your question in asking the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days.

Please be advised The Skills Funding Agency distinguishes between its suppliers and its providers. Suppliers provide the Agency with goods and services necessary for the running of the Agency and providers receive funding to conduct education and training among other things.

The Agency holds no information about the speed with which suppliers pay their subcontractors or by which providers pay their subcontractors.

However, it does specify in its contracts with providers that their sub-contracts must refer to payment of a subcontractor's valid invoices within 30 days and this, like other aspects of the contract, may be subject to audit.

Letter from Dr Vanessa Lawrence, dated 5 November 2012:

As Director General and Chief Executive of Ordnance Survey, I have been asked to reply to you in response to your Parliamentary Question asking The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills “what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days.”

Ordnance Survey, as the national mapping agency of Great Britain, is a Department in its own right with Executive Agency Status operating as a government Trading Fund. It reports to Parliament through the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

At the pre-selection stage of the tender process for larger contracts. Ordnance Survey seeks information on the ways in which potential suppliers select and manage their sub-contractors. However Ordnance Survey does not acquire or hold information on the on-going commercial business relationships between its contractors and their sub-contractors.

I hope this information is of use.

Letter from David Williams, dated 2 November 2012:

Thank you for your question addressed to Secretary of State for Business, innovation and Skills, what proportion of suppliers to his Department and its agencies currently pay their subcontractors within 30 days. (127000).

The UK Space Agency does not have designated procurement expertise in-house. The Agency is supported by BIS and SSC procurement and as a default uses the preferred suppliers recommended. We therefore do not have access to this information, however by assimilation we expect the relevant details to be recorded within the overall BIS report.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 598W

Letter from John Hirst, dated 5 November 2012:

I am replying on behalf of the Met Office to your Parliamentary Question tabled on 1 November 2012, UIN 127000 to the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.

The Met Office does not maintain or have access to information regarding the payment performance of suppliers to their subcontractors.

I hope this helps.

Letter from Heather Foster:

I write on behalf of Land Registry in response to Parliamentary Question 127000 tabled on 1 Nov 2012.

All our supplier contracts have as a standard term the requirement to pay their subcontractors in 30 days.

In addition, where the contractor enters into a sub-contract with a supplier or contractor for the purpose of performing its obligations under the contract, we also ensure that a provision is included in such a sub-contract which requires payment to be made of all sums due by the contractor to the sub-contractor within a specified period not exceeding 30 days from the receipt of a valid invoice.

To obtain the information from all of our contractors and sub-contractors would lead to a disproportionate cost response, however, I can state that as an example, in August, one of our main contractors paid 154 of their 178 invoices to subcontractors within the 30-day term (87%). We work closely with all sub-contractors to try to ensure that targets are exceeded.

Many of our suppliers come via Central Government Contracts (Banner, Redfern Travel, William Lee printing), which will be monitored by central Government procurement teams and not by Land Registry.

I hope this information is useful.

International Development

Bangladesh

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 719W, on Bangladesh, what the methodological changes were; what the common approach is to attributing results of her Department's projects; and whether new data have emerged since the original Operational Plan which changes the baseline on which targets were based. [126385]

Mr Duncan: The methodological change was to adopt a common approach to attributing results to DFID spending, across all DFID country offices. The approach takes a share of each programme's results based on DFID's financial share of the programme's total budget. This enables DFID to aggregate its results across countries.

New data have emerged since the original Operational Plan was published which change the baseline for the governance and security targets. Full details of the changes and the reasons for them are published in the Operational Plan for DFID Bangladesh.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 729W, on Bangladesh, whether her Department has any mid-project outcomes; whether it engages in the auditing process or advises on how to audit; through which Bangladeshi Government Department the project is being implemented; and what criteria her Department has used to measure how successful the programme has been. [126386]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 599W

Mr Duncan: Starting in October 2009, the Strengthening Public Expenditure ManagementProgramme (SPEMP) in Bangladesh is made up of three main components. The largest component, on budgeting and accounting, works with the Finance Division in the Ministry of Finance. A second component on audit works with the Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General (OCAG). The final component works with the Parliament Secretariat, in support of three parliamentary committees responsible for oversight of the budget and expenditure. Funds are channelled through a World Bank trust fund.

The Office of the Comptroller and Auditor General (OCAG) conducts independent audits of the public accounts. Technical support to OCAG is being provided by the firm PKF (Europe), working with the UK National Audit Office (NAO) and the UK accounting institute CIPFA (Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy). NAO will work with OCAG to carry out up to 20 pilot audits to show OCAG personnel how to apply improved approaches to the audit of Government expenditure.

The criteria used to assess the progress of the project are contained in a results framework agreed with the Bangladesh Government, the World Bank and other donors. Detailed indicators measure:

Improvements in strategic policy and budget management, in particular the adoption of medium term budgeting by line ministries;

Improvements to IT systems for accounting and financial reporting;

Numbers of officials receiving technical training, and the development of improved training facilities within the Government of Bangladesh;

Improved quality of audit reports, and a more timely response to them by line ministries;

More systematic and timely scrutiny of audit reports by the Public Accounts Committee and two other committees, and improved reporting by these Committees to Parliament and the public.

Progress to date includes rolling out a medium-term budget framework (MTBF) in all 57 target line Ministries and Departments, better documentation of the strategy underlying Ministries' budgets, and improvements to an integrated budget and accounting system (IT) to enable the production of more timely and accurate financial reports. The project will help the Public Accounts Committee to further reduce the backlog of audit reports awaiting review. In the last year the Committee has reviewed 350 reports and settled 5,550 objections, some dating back 10 years or more.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 721W, on Bangladesh, what the breakdown was of the project's costs; how many interactive TV and radio sessions were held; how many Bangladeshi citizens asked decision-makers questions; and whether there was any screening of Bangladeshis calling into shows to ensure political balance. [126460]

Mr Duncan: The Sanglap II project ran from November 2006 to January 2010. Its total cost was £4,971,000. Of this, approximately 48% was spent on the programmes, 11% on producing and testing a pilot mobile phone application, 8% on marketing and audience recruitment, 4% on public broadcasting activities, 10% on training and office costs, 5% on monitoring and evaluation and 14% on management costs.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 600W

Over the three years, 138 Bangladesh Sanglap TV programmes were recorded, 138 follow-up radio phone-ins were held, and 10 pilots of ‘This Week in Parliament’ were prepared.

Bangladesh Sanglap was a local Bangla language version of "Question Time". On average, 120 people participated in each programme as the studio audience. Each weekly episode was followed by a radio phone-in programme, where on average 10 people were able to give their opinion. Altogether about 30 people had the chance to ask a question or give an opinion per episode, giving an approximate total of 4,140 people overall.

The audience of each programme was selected to ensure political balance, and a balance of men and women, different ages and socioeconomic groups. Each Sanglap panel had four members: one from the ruling party, one from the main opposition party, one from a third party and one from wider society. The questions from the audience were selected following BBC editorial guidelines. The TV programmes were broadcast in the period before and after Bangladesh's national elections in December 2008. The project ended in 2010.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 718W, on Bangladesh, where the children in hazardous work were withdrawn to; by what means the project ensures workers in the shrimp and garment industry get paid on time; by what means the project helps boys and girls obtain stipends; and what evaluation was made of the cost per child of obtaining such stipends. [126485]

Mr Duncan: The children withdrawn from hazardous work in Bangladesh were moved to both mainstream and non-formal education, and in some cases provided with vocational training. Families were given training to help them build alternative livelihoods that did not rely on household income generated by their children. This training was focused on generating an income from such activities as livestock-rearing, fisheries, poultry, weaving, and tailoring.

Those employed within the shrimp and garment industries are provided with training on how to form an organised group and bargain collectively with their employers so that they are paid on time. In addition, the Manusher Jonno Foundation and partner NGOs participate in organised discussions with factory management and the Ministry of Labour to help promote punctual salary payments. The Manusher Jonno Foundation is also engaged in the negotiation of a minimum wage for the shrimp and garments industry.

Stipends to encourage school attendance are provided by Government through schools. The NGOs, which partner with the Manusher Jonno Foundation, give parents information on their entitlement to stipends and how they can be accessed. The NGOs then follow this up by helping arrange for parents (especially mothers) and community leaders to ask members of school management committees and parent teachers associations, and Government primary education officers, when stipends will be paid, and to whom. The Manusher Jonno Foundation tracks the number of students who obtain stipends in this way. It does not, however, evaluate the cost per child of obtaining stipends.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 601W

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 718W, on Bangladesh, what the competitive process is through which funds are awarded; and whether her Department audits the funding stream as it passes through the different levels of organisations. [126486]

Mr Duncan: The funds which are awarded by the Manusher Jonno Foundation are given through an open and competitive process. Proposals are called for through the national daily newspapers and their websites. Proposals received are judged against criteria including relevance to programme objectives, results and benefits, innovation, scalability, financial management, sustainability and impact. Selection is done jointly by management and the governing board of the Manusher Jonno Foundation.

The funding stream is audited by a Bangladeshi independent chartered accounting firm (affiliated with Ernst and Young), directly reporting to the chairman of the board. This is verified by a qualified auditor during the annual review process led by DFID. DFID also audits a random selection of grant recipients annually. Around 20% of grant recipients are covered in the process.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 731W, on Bangladesh, what the fiduciary irregularities were that caused the programme to be cancelled; what evaluation there was of the work done before the programme was cancelled; whether any corruption was found to have taken place in the delivery of this project; and what subsequent actions were taken by the Bangladeshi Government and UK Government. [126487]

Mr Duncan: The programme, which terminated in 2009, was cancelled due to fiduciary irregularities including non-compliance with procurement procedures; contract management and quality control procedures. For example, some payments were made by the Bangladesh Roads and Highways Department for work which was not completed to the required specification.

DFID appointed Ernst and Young to carry out independent internal audits in December 2005 and site audits started in May 2006. DFID also commissioned an audit of the physical condition of the roads in 2005. In addition, a fiduciary risk assessment carried out by DFID in 2006 assessed the risks of budget support being misused as medium to high.

The response of the Bangladesh Roads and Highways Department did not improve the standard of work or address the range of irregularities significantly. DFID suspended further payments of budget support under the programme in April 2007. Following a further fiduciary risk assessment in September 2007, which further raised the risk rating, DFID Ministers cancelled the programme:

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answers of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 726-8W and 23 October 2012, Official Report, columns 784-6W, on Bangladesh, how many people's livelihoods the Economic Empowerment of the Poorest project is intended to improve. [126488]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 602W

Mr Duncan: The Economic Empowerment of the Poorest programme (2008-15) aims to enable 1 million people to lift themselves out of extreme poverty. The programme supports poor people in Bangladesh to increase their incomes through acquiring assets such as livestock, establishing small businesses, and receiving skills training.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 726-8W, on Bangladesh, what representations she has received on creating a central list of sub-contractors; and whether her Department compares the outcomes of (a) contractors and (b) sub-contractors. [126489]

Mr Duncan: As previously stated, DFID does not currently maintain a central database of sub-contractors or contractors. Since the primary responsibility for overall contract performance rests with the lead contractor there has not been a clear business requirement to create such a central record.

In terms of comparing the outcomes of each, this would be captured in the project logframe agreed between DFID and the primary contractor, to set output and outcome targets for the project as a whole, to which all sub-contractors contribute. It is the responsibility of the primary contractor to monitor the performance of their sub-contractors closely, and DFID holds them to account on this.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 15 October 2012, Official Report, column 718W, on Bangladesh, how many lawyers will receive payment from the Manusher Jonno Foundation over the course of the project; and how much will have been spent on lawyers in total by the Manusher Jonno Foundation over the course of the project. [126494]

Mr Duncan: Manusher Jonno Foundation assistance will end in March 2013. From 2008 to present, 360 lawyers have received payment, and a total of £120,000 over five years has been spent on lawyers. In addition 618 lawyers provided pro-bono services to grant recipients. The lawyers help the poor to pursue legal cases, a huge majority of which involve violence against women and girls, rights and entitlements of people from ethnic minority and indigenous groups, and issues around access to land.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether any of her Department's partners have been affected by the action of the Bangladeshi Government in revoking charity licences in the last three years. [126495]

Mr Duncan: The Government of Bangladesh revoked the charity licence of one partner of DFID namely Bangladesh Centre for Workers Solidarity (BCWS) in 2010 which received funding from the Manusher Jonno Foundation.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 730-1W, on Bangladesh, what criteria were used to decide who received the emergency cash transfers. [126506]

6 Nov 2012 : Column 603W

Mr Duncan: The transfers were provided to households that were displaced or left stranded by flood waters and with no access to food, but excluded those households that were receiving regular adequate income or assistance from another source.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 730-1W, on Bangladesh, how much was given to each recipient of an emergency cash transfer. [126507]

Mr Duncan: Each of the 30,000 households received 1,500 taka (approximately £11) for one month, shared amongst the family (average of five person families). This was designed to complement the response from the Government of Bangladesh and other partners, as well as the World Food Programme's own targeted nutrition support to pregnant and lactating women, and children aged 6-23 months.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 730-1W, on Bangladesh, how the emergency cash transfers were distributed. [126508]

Mr Duncan: All cash distributions were distributed in accordance with the World Food Programme's established cash transfer guidelines. The project implementers (Muslim Aid and Shushilan) shared information with beneficiaries to ensure they were fully aware of their entitlements. Each recipient (one per household) received a beneficiary ID card. These were presented and verified at the public distribution site and then the beneficiary received the cash transfer. Beneficiaries were required to sign or thumbprint the cash distribution register to confirm receipt of the full transfer. Local oversight committees of community representatives and Government officials provided additional monitoring presence at the sites during the distributions.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 730-1W, on Bangladesh, which organisation distributed the funds for emergency cash transfers. [126509]

Mr Duncan: The World Food Programme (WFP) managed the programme. WFP's partners on the ground, which distributed the funds, were Muslim Aid (in Jessore District) and Shushilan (in Satkhira District).

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, columns 730-1W, on Bangladesh, how much was delivered directly in emergency cash transfers; and what the administration costs were of delivering those payments. [126510]

Mr Duncan: 45 million taka (approximately £360,000) was delivered in cash directly to beneficiaries. The operational costs of delivering those payments were £48,000. This included some staff costs of Shushilan and Muslim Aid and the small World Food Programme team on the ground to manage the response, plus transport and local security.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 604W

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 720W, on Bangladesh, which Bangladeshi Government Departments the project is working with; how many Bangladeshi Government officials the project is training; and whether the project is delivering technical assistance. [126511]

Mr Duncan: The project is working with the Economic Relations Division of the Government of Bangladesh which is responsible for managing the processes for incoming foreign aid. The work extends to line ministries which are involved in and supported by foreign aid programmes.

The project is delivering technical assistance to build stronger aid management systems and greater capacity in Government to manage and target aid flows. Future training is included in the project in Bangladesh, to (a) build the skills of staff in line ministries to use the newly introduced aid information management system, and (b) build knowledge and skills on improved aid co-ordination

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 15 October 2012 to the hon. Member for Enfield North, Official Report, column 717W, on Bangladesh, how civil servants were identified and selected for training; and how much is being spent on average to train each civil servant. [126512]

Mr Duncan: The civil servants selected to participate in the Public Service Capacity Building Programme are at the top levels of the civil service below Permanent Secretary level. An inter-ministerial Standing Selection Committee of the Government of Bangladesh selects training participants on the basis of selection criteria and guidelines agreed with DFID, which include:

An upper age limit, to focus training on officials with at least seven years left before retirement.

Proficiency in the English Language, which is tested by the British Council in Dhaka.

Priority is given to eligible women officers, to encourage greater representation of women in the senior levels of the Bangladesh civil service.

The average cost for a participant is approximately £4,300 for the training programme. The programme has targeted around 1,700 senior civil servants over seven years, with the aim of covering 74% of senior officers who are expected to reach Permanent Secretary level.

Developing Countries: Schools

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether BRAC or any other partners were given any criteria on the un-adopted schools they can fund. [126457]

Mr Duncan: DFID funds three partners providing primary education in Bangladesh: the Government of Bangladesh, BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee) and UCEP (Under privileged Children's Educational programme). This approach is complimentary to the Government's mainstream education system. BRAC and UCEP only target those children who are omitted from that system.

6 Nov 2012 : Column 605W

There is no such official terminology as to ‘adopt’ schools in the Bangladesh education system. Rather, the Government categories of primary schooling include: Government primary schools, registered non-Government primary schools, experimental schools, community schools, non-registered non-Government primary schools, kindergarten, NGO schools, primary sections of secondary schools, Ebtedayee madrasahs, and primary sections of high madrasahs (dakhil, alim, fazil, kamil).

Gambia

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding her Department has given to the Gambia in each of the last five years. [126881]

Mr Duncan: DFID has provided the following funding from the bilateral programme in each of the last five years for which published figures are available:

 £

2006-07

7,723,000

2007-08

2,412,000

2008-09

2,467,000

6 Nov 2012 : Column 606W

2009-10

2,159,000

2010-11

1,044,000

Overseas Aid

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what estimate she has made of the change in corruption levels affecting nations and regions benefiting from the UK aid budget since the 2011 review of that budget. [127022]

Mr Duncan: Measuring the level of corruption in a country is inherently problematic in view of its secretive nature. DFID offices use information from a combination of sources including: the Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index, the Global Integrity Index, data from the World Bank and other institutions.

DFID programmes offer a wide array of assistance to strengthen the ability of countries to tackle both large scale and petty corruption. These include measures such as strengthening public procurement and audit, through to enabling civil society to hold its authorities to account.