9 Nov 2012 : Column 815W

Arts

Ms Harman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what plans her Department has to support the arts and the creative industries in areas outside London. [127515]

Mr Vaizey: Government funding for the arts is distributed through Arts Council England (ACE), the development agency for the arts in England. After extensive consultation, ACE has determined a 10 year strategy—Achieving Great Art for Everyone— setting out how it intends to support the arts, including how this will be achieved outside London. As just one example, ACE is investing £37 million in the Creative People and Places programme which focuses on parts of the country where peoples involvement in the arts is significantly below the national average.

Government support for the creative industries is primarily channelled through the Creative Industries Council, which was established as a joint forum between the creative industries and Government to address areas where there are barriers facing the sector. Jointly chaired by the Secretaries of State for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, and Nicola Mendelsohn, Chair of the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising, the Council focuses on finding practical solutions to issues across the sector including access to finance, skills and growth across the UK’s creative industries. In the English regions Creative England was established in October 2011 with the core purpose of supporting the sustainable growth of independent creative businesses in every part of England outside London.

In addition, in Budget 2012, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced the introduction of three new tax reliefs for high end TV, video games and animation, building on the success of the film tax relief.

Arts Council England

Ms Harman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how much her Department provided to Arts Council England in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12; and how much is planned to be provided in (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15. [127516]

Mr Vaizey: The information requested can be found in the following table:

 Arts Council England funding (£000)

2009-10

452,964

2010-11

438,523

2011-12

393,602

2012-13

473,753

2013-14

472,851

2014-15

458,870

Arts: English Baccalaureate

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Education on the mechanism by which creative subjects will be assessed within the English Baccalaureate. [127814]

9 Nov 2012 : Column 816W

Mr Vaizey: The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport and Minister for Women and Equalities, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), has had no discussions with the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), on the mechanism by which creative subjects will be assessed within the English Baccalaureate. However, our two Departments work closely together on cultural education policy. As you are aware, the subjects we have chosen for the proposed new English Baccalaureate certificates on which the Department is currently consulting, are the core academic subjects: English, mathematics, the sciences, history, geography and languages. We intend to replace the current GCSEs with these new qualifications. Other subjects—such as creative subjects—will remain valuable and pupils will continue to study them alongside that academic core, as part of a broad curriculum.

Broadband

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what recent progress has been made towards the goal of providing superfast broadband to at least 90 per cent of premises in the UK and to provide universal access to standard broadband with a speed of at least 2Mbps in each region. [126924]

Mr Vaizey: In my capacity as Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries, I can confirm that with respect to BDUK county and devolved Administration broadband projects, five have signed supplier contracts; 12 are in procurement and 26 are in pre-procurement. Provided the projects keep to the timetable, they should all complete procurement by summer 2013.

Broadband Delivery UK

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what the cost to the public purse was of the Broadband Delivery UK process to date. [127031]

Mr Vaizey: The administration budget for Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) in 2010-11 was £1 million and in 2011-12 it was £5.85 million. The administration spend from 1 April to 30 September 2012 was approximately £4.15 million.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 170W, on Broadband Delivery UK, what the total cost of the 70 external consultants has been to date. [127032]

Mr Vaizey: The total cost of external consultants (approximately 70, including interims) employed at some stage on either a full time or part time basis by Broadband Delivery UK since May 2010 and up to 30 September 2012 is approximately £9.8 million.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 170W, on Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK), what the average annual cost of each consultant employed by BDUK is. [127033]

9 Nov 2012 : Column 817W

Mr Vaizey: The average day rate for external consultants (including interims) currently employed by Broadband Delivery UK is approximately £834. External consultants are employed on a range of terms including full and part-time employment over a variable number of days per year.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 170W, on Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK), what the highest and lowest pro rata salaries paid to consultants working for BDUK have been. [127034]

Mr Vaizey: This information is not held in the manner requested. The only information held by Broadband Delivery UK relates to the rates paid to the consultants' employers (in the case of consultancies) or to agencies (in the case of interims), the average daily rate for which is £834. External advisers are employed on a range of terms, including full or part-time employment over a variable number of days per year.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 170W, on Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK), how many full or half days staff of (a) her Department and (b) BDUK spent at local authorities. [127036]

Mr Vaizey: Staff from BDUK spend approximately 20 days per week at local authorities. The Department does not hold data on the number of days spent at local authorities by staff within the rest of the Department.

Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press Inquiry

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 5 November 2012, Official Report, column 482W, on Leveson inquiry, whether the information provided was provided under section 21(2) of the Inquiries Act 2005. [127649]

Maria Miller: Any requests made to my predecessor, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), by the Leveson inquiry were made specifically to him and I am therefore unable to comment further. The inquiry does not disclose this information.

Dance

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport (1) whether she has made an assessment of the popularity of (a) morris and (b) maypole dancing; and if she will make a statement; [126964]

(2) whether her Department has taken steps to encourage participation in (a) morris and (b) maypole dancing; and if she will make a statement. [126965]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has made no specific assessment of the popularity of morris and maypole dancing. DCMS

9 Nov 2012 : Column 818W

records attendance and participation in dance via its Taking Part Survey. The most recent version of which can be found at the following link:

http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/research_and_statistics/4828.aspx

Government funding for the arts is distributed through Arts Council England (ACE), the development agency for the arts in England. The Arts Council looks to support dance in England in all its forms, and use Exchequer and Lottery funding to support organisations that promote and encourage morris and maypole dancing.

In the period 2012-15 ACE will support the English Folk Dance and Song Society (EFDSS) with a grant of up to £921,779. The EFDSS acts as an advocate and lobbyist for the indigenous folk arts of England as well as an education, training and development agency providing classes and workshops for people of all ages and all abilities. They work with schools, colleges, community groups and professional artists.

The Big Dance biennial dance celebration this year included a number of events inspired by traditional English Dance, including 'Morris and Maypole', initiated by the English National Ballet, and partner Historic Royal Palaces, this project encompassed a series of dance workshops and choreography sessions within a variety of community settings and schools.

ACE has also provided funding through their Grants for the arts scheme to projects that have sought to encourage participation and performance of morris and traditional English dancing. These include the 'Ballroom of Joys and Sorrows', a large scale traditional English folk song and dance performance project.

Health Lottery

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what assessment she has made of the effect of the health lottery on the national lottery. [127816]

Mr Vaizey: The Government have been monitoring the impact of the health lottery on the national lottery and considering the effect this sort of scheme has, and may have, on returns for the existing national lottery good causes. We will publish the findings once we have concluded our initial assessment.

Local Broadcasting: Television

Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what weighting she plans to give to considerations of plurality in awarding the new local television public service broadcaster franchises, except in cases where there is no other commercially viable option. [127520]

Mr Vaizey: As Ofcom—under the terms of the Local Digital Television Programme Services Order (2012)—is responsible for the award of local TV licences, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), has no involvement in the decision process leading to the award of those licences.

9 Nov 2012 : Column 819W

Mobile Phones

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what recent discussions she has had with (a) Ofcom, (b) consumer organisations and (c) mobile telephone network operators on steps to promote consumer switching in the mobile telephone market. [127446]

Mr Vaizey: The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), has not had any recent discussions on this specific issue, although she held a general introductory meeting with Ofcom on 7 November 2012. It is important that consumers are able to switch mobile service providers more easily, and the process must seek to promote competition and improve consumer benefits. Ofcom is currently considering responses to its consultation on switching in relation to landlines and broadband, which is a complex area, and following completion Ofcom will also carefully consider whether switching reform is necessary in this area.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport’s communications review underlined the Government's desire to ensure that customers can switch easily between providers across all platforms for communications services. The Department is considering whether additional action is needed in this area.

Music: Young People

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many young people are participating in music hubs (a) nationally and (b) in each region. [127815]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) holds no such data. Music Education Hubs are run by Arts Council England (ACE) on behalf of DCMS and the Department for Education. ACE has advised that the first official data return from music hubs is not due until October 2013. The hubs started operating in September 2012, and data will be captured retrospectively.

Ofcom

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport when Ofcom made its last annual report to her as required under the Office of Communications Act 2002. [126736]

Mr Vaizey: The Ofcom annual report and accounts 2011-12 were published on 10 July 2012. The report can be found using the following link:

www.ofcom.org.uk/about/annual-reports-and-plans/annual-reports/annual-report-2011-12/

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of Ofcom's accountability to Parliament. [126737]

Mr Vaizey: The Office of Communications (Ofcom) is required under the Office of Communications Act 2002, to submit to the Secretary of State, an annual report and accounts that have been approved by the

9 Nov 2012 : Column 820W

National Audit Office. These are subsequently laid before Parliament and may be scrutinised by the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee. The chair of Ofcom was last called to appear before the Select Committee in May 2011. While no recent assessment has been undertaken of the adequacy of these arrangements, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), is satisfied that this statutory accountability is appropriate.

Public Appointments

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many appointments made to the boards of public bodies overseen by her Department have been (a) male and (b) female since May 2010. [126167]

Maria Miller: The number of new ministerial appointments and reappointments made to arm's length bodies overseen by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) since May 2010 are as follows:

New appointments
Reporting yearMalePercentageFemalePercentage

2010-11

31

61

20

39

2011-12

36

69

16

31

Reappointments
Reporting yearMalePercentageFemalePercentage

2010-11

30

57

19

43

2011-12

33

65

18

35

Further details of DCMS appointments are available on the DCMS website:

http://www.culture.gOv.uk/about_us/public_appointments/1006.aspx

Appointments and reappointments in 2009-10 were as follows:

 MalePercentageFemalePercentage

New appointments

38

60

25

40

Reappointments

33

68

11

32

Recordings: Equipment

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how much her Department has spent on the hire of recording equipment in the last year. [121906]

Hugh Robertson [holding answer 17 October 2012]: The Department has not spent anything on the hire of recording equipment in the last year.

Remembrance Day

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what her policy is on humanist representation at the National Remembrance ceremony at the Cenotaph. [127345]

9 Nov 2012 : Column 821W

Hugh Robertson: The wreath laid by Her Majesty the Queen at the Remembrance Sunday service is presented on behalf of the nation, and is dedicated to all those who have suffered and died in war. The ceremony is organised in such a way as to represent the feelings of all those wishing to pay their respects and recognise those who fought and died for their country.

Sickness Absence

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport on how many days on average staff of her Department in each pay grade were absent from work as a result of ill health in each of the last 12 months. [125678]

Maria Miller: This information is not held in the manner requested. However, the following table shows the proportion of days, on average, staff in each pay grade were absent as a result of ill health in 2011-12.

For 2011-12, the civil service-wide sickness rate was 7.6 average working days lost.

Civil service pay gradeAverage working days lost

SCS

1.2

A(U)

1.3

A

3.7

B

4.0

C

6.1

D

11.2

Total

4.2

This Department is committed to the health and welfare of its staff, helping staff to stay healthy and reducing the need for sick leave. Support is provided to staff returning from long-term sick leave, referring them to Occupational Health to advise on how best to facilitate a return to work and offering access to an Employee Assistance Programme for independent advice and support.

Departmental Staff

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many members of staff of her Department are based in (a) London and (b) each region of England. [127466]

Mr Vaizey: All 457 full-time equivalent staff of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport are based in London.

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many full-time members of staff her Department employed in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012; and how many are expected to be employed in (i) 2013, (ii) 2014 and (iii) 2015. [127511]

Mr Vaizey: The number of full-time staff equivalents (FTEs) employed within this Department at 31March 2010, 31 March 2011 and 31 October 2012, are shown in the following table:

 Full-time equivalent staff

2010

423

9 Nov 2012 : Column 822W

2011

440

2012

457

In the last three years, the Department has recruited additional employees on fixed-term contracts, inward loans and secondments from other Departments, to work on the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Their contracts ended on 31 October 2012.

In 2010, the Department implemented a change programme, with the aims of:

Reducing the Department's administration budget by 50% over the spending review period

Delivering a talented, diverse and motivated work force

Enabling the Department to prioritise its critical deliverables

Following a restructure of senior civil service employees, three voluntary redundancy schemes between January 2011 and September 2012, and a drive to reduce non-pay costs, the Department will meet the 50% reduction committed to in 2010. This means that the Department will operate with approximately 330 FTE employees, between 1 April 2013 and 2015.

Telephone Services: Unsolicited Goods and Services

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what guidance her Department offers to people receiving marketing telephone calls despite being (a) ex-directory and (b) registered with the Telephone Preference Service. [126756]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport provides guidance stating that complaints of this nature should be reported to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO). This is because under the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (PECR) 2003 the ICO has responsibility for considering complaints relating to the Telephone Preference Service (TPS). The ICO can take formal action against those in breach of the regulations, and can issue a fine of up to £500,000. Complaints can be registered with the ICO at:

https://www.snapsurveys.com/swh/surveylogin.asp?k= 134674895144

Training

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport what media or public speaking training Ministers in her Department have received since May 2010. [122109]

Hugh Robertson: No Ministers have had media or public speaking training since May 2010 at cost to the Department or the public purse.

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many written parliamentary questions to her Department received a substantive answer (a) within five working days, (b) between six and 10 working days and (c) after more than 10 working days in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [127261]

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Hugh Robertson: The Department aims to give all House of Commons ordinary written PQs a substantive reply within five working days, all House of Lords ordinary written PQs a substantive reply within 10 working days, and all named day PQs a substantive reply on the specific named day. The following tables provide the Department's performance to these targets during 30 September 2011 to 30 September 2012.

House of Commons
 Ordinary written PQsNamed day PQs

Answered within 5 working days

710

Between 6 and 10 working days

115

Over 10 working days

161

   

Answered by specified named day

529

Up to 5 working days late

46

Over 5 working days late

13

House of Lords
 Ordinary written PQs

Answered within 10 working days

123

Over 10 working days

22

The Government have committed to providing the Procedure Committee with information relating to written parliamentary question performance on a sessional basis and will provide full information to the Committee at the end of the current Session. Statistics relating to

9 Nov 2012 : Column 824W

performance for the 2010-12 parliamentary Session are available on the Parliament website as follows:

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/procedure/P35_Memorandum_Leader_of_the_House_ Monitoring_PQs.pdf

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport how many and what proportion of written parliamentary questions to her Department received holding responses in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [127262]

Maria Miller: Between November 2011 and October 2012, 623 named day written parliamentary questions were received by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Holding responses (which can be issued only in respect of named day questions) were sent on 67 occasions, which represents approximately 10.8%.

Justice

Communications Act 2003

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many convictions there were in each region under section 127 of the Digital Communications Act 2003 in each of the last five years. [122982]

Jeremy Wright: The number of convictions made in each region under section 127 of the Communications Act 2003 in each of the last five years can be viewed in the following table.

Defendants found guilty at all courts under the Communications Act 2003 offences, by region, England and Wales, 2007-11(1,2)
Total guilty
StatuteOffence descriptionRegion20072008200920102011

Communications Act 2003, s 127

Sending or causing sending of grossly offensive/indecent/obscene/menacing or false message/matter by electronic communications network

London

37

63

83

122

132

  

North West

67

74

119

175

194

  

North East

29

28

46

75

84

  

Yorkshire and Humberside

25

45

63

99

86

  

East Midlands

29

68

52

67

88

  

West Midlands

65

80

80

101

112

  

East of England

58

83

122

136

156

  

South East

96

127

154

212

227

  

South West

57

79

85

124

112

  

Wales

35

46

69

75

95

  

Total

498

693

873

1,186

1,286

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Courts: Interpreters

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 681W, on courts: interpreters, whether the figure for complaints includes those requests which were not completed by Advanced Language Solutions due to an interpreter not being available to attend the court or other venue at the required time; [126144]

(2) what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of disruption of court functions due to unfilled bookings. [126244]

9 Nov 2012 : Column 825W

Mrs Grant: The published statistics relate to completed requests between 30 January and 31 August 2012, and include requests where ALS was not able to send an interpreter or where an interpreter did not attend. The complaints figures relate to completed requests, where a complaint was recorded. Not every instance of a failure to supply to an interpreter results in a complaint, and this is reflected in the published statistics.

The estimated cost for all agencies of an ineffective trial in the magistrates court is around £650 and the Crown court is £1,500 for all agencies. Comparing the number of ineffective trials in the criminal courts due to the availability of an interpreter the first quarter of 2011 to the same period in 2012, the additional costs have been estimated to be approximately £60,000. It is not possible to quantify costs for the disruption of non-trial hearings (e.g. case management hearings) due to interpreter availability.

Prisoners' Incentives and Earned Privileges Scheme

Guy Opperman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what plans he has to review prisoners' entitlement to privileges. [126364]

Jeremy Wright: I want to ensure that the public have confidence in the prison system. It is crucial that they are assured that any privileges earned in prison are gained through hard work and appropriate behaviour. In light of this, I have asked officials to conduct a review of the policy around the incentives and earned privileges scheme for prisoners. There maybe important operational reasons for aspects of this policy but I want to be clear that these incentives are pitched at the right level and that they have credibility with the public.

Sexual Offences: Sentencing

Mr Bellingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the evidential basis was for his statement that changing a second 10 year sentence for a serious sexual offence to a life sentence would act as a deterrent to potential offenders. [126659]

Jeremy Wright: We will monitor the impacts of these provisions once they have been implemented. These provisions, and the other provisions in the LASPO Act relating to dangerous offenders, will increase the availability of life sentences for the most serious sexual and violent offenders, and ensure that other serious offenders spend long periods in custody and serve long licence periods. The primary purpose of these provisions is to effectively manage risk and uphold public protection arrangements.

Sickness Absence

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice for how many and what proportion of days, on average, staff of his Department at each pay grade were absent from work as a result of ill health in each of the last five years. [127175]

Jeremy Wright: During September 2012, a technical error was identified in the Ministry of Justice sick absence report. As a result, the quarterly sick absence data from June 2011 onwards are being reworked. The data are currently being finalised and validated.

9 Nov 2012 : Column 826W

I expect the revised data to be available by 23 November 2012. I shall then write to the hon. Member with the information and place a copy of the letter in the House of Commons Library.

Trespass

Guy Opperman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent progress he has made in introducing greater protection for householders from intruders. [126365]

Damian Green: The Secretary of State recently outlined plans to bring forward changes to the law to give householders greater protection when they defend themselves against intruders.

The current law recognises that the circumstances in which force is used in self-defence should be taken into account, but it also makes clear that even in extreme circumstances it will always be unlawful to use force that was disproportionate in the circumstances.

We intend to change this position so that it can be reasonable for householders to use disproportionate force to defend themselves and others. Force which is grossly disproportionate will still not be permitted. We will bring forward legislation as soon as parliamentary time allows.

A new offence of squatting in a residential building came into force on 1 September 2012 and applies throughout England and Wales. The offence was created by section 144 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. We introduced the new squatting offence in response to public concern about the harm squatters can cause when they occupy other peoples' property.

Victim Support Schemes

Charlotte Leslie: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the financial and emotional support available to victims of crime; and if he will make a statement. [127120]

Mrs Grant: The Government are committed to providing the best possible support for victims of crime both to overcome the consequences of crime and to participate fully in the criminal justice process.

Compensation is available are victims of violent crime through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme. This is a demand-led scheme which costs the Government over £200 million each year. A revised scheme is currently being considered by Parliament.

The voluntary sector plays a key role in the provision of emotional support for victims and witnesses of crime. Annual funding by central Government to the voluntary sector for victims’ services currently stands at around £66 million. Victim Support has been awarded core funding of around £38 million a year since 2007-08. Funding is also distributed to support a range of specialist services including rape support centres, services for adult victims of human trafficking and homicide support.

On 2 July the Government announced in their response to the consultation ‘Getting it Right for Victims and Witnesses’ that it would move to a model of national and local commissioning with police and crime commissioners (PCCs) responsible for commissioning the bulk of victims' services in their local area.

9 Nov 2012 : Column 827W

Young Offenders

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many young people have (a) entered the youth justice system, (b) left custody and (c) been resettled following a custodial sentence in the last year. [127131]

Jeremy Wright: The number of young people (aged 10 to 17) sentenced at court in 2011-12 was 59,335 (Criminal Justice Statistics):

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/criminal-justice/criminal-justice-statistics

In 2010-11, 8,051 custodial episodes (this includes custodial remand and sentenced episodes) ended for young people aged 10 to 17. These are the latest figures available.

The Youth Justice Board (YJB) counts the number of individual custodial episodes and not the number of individual young people leaving custody. An episode refers to a period a young person has spent in custody and it is possible that one young person can start more than one custodial episode at different points of each

9 Nov 2012 : Column 828W

year for different offences or for a change in the legal basis for detention, such as remand to sentence.

All young people leaving custody should receive resettlement support from youth offending teams (YOTs) according to their individual resettlement needs.

These data are from the YJB's secure accommodation clearing house system (SACHS) database and refer to secure training centres (STCs), secure children's homes (SCHs), and under-18 young offender institutions (YOIs).

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and may be subject to change over time.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average length of sentence is for young people who entered the youth justice system in each of the last four years. [127132]

Jeremy Wright: Average custodial sentence length in months given at all courts to juveniles (those aged 10 to 17) for all offences, in England and Wales, from 2008 to 2011, can be viewed in the following table.

Average custodial sentence length (months)(1) given at all courts to juveniles for all offences, England and Wales, 2008-11(2,3)
 20072008(4)200920102011

Juveniles (10 to 17-year-olds)

10.3

11.4

11.1

11.5

12.0

(1) Excludes life and indeterminate sentences. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Youth Offending Teams

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many full-time equivalent posts there were in each youth offending team in (a) May 2010, (b) May 2011 and (c) the latest date for which figures are available. [127133]

Jeremy Wright: Figures on the number of people recorded as working for Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) in some capacity are collected centrally for the month of June each year. The table shows the breakdown by staff type and YOT as at 30 June 2010. These figures include part-time workers, sessional staff, trainees, and volunteers. Measures of full-time equivalent staff are not collected centrally. Total YOT workforce figures for 30 June 2011 will be available in the 2011-12 Youth Justice Statistics, which will be published on 31 January 2013.

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/youth-justice/statistics

Figures are taken from YOT data submitted to the Youth Justice Board's (YJB) Youth Justice Management Information System (YJMIS) as at 30 June for the relevant year.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Staff type by Youth Offending Team as at 30 June 2010
 Full time workersPart time workersSessional staffTraineesVolunteers

Barking and Dagenham

41

1

8

1

14

Barnet

26

4

0

0

20

Barnsley

47

12

18

1

19

Bath and North East Somerset

22

11

5

0

32

Bedfordshire

57

7

29

2

19

Bexley

17

9

0

0

26

Birmingham

231

53

72

0

195

Blackburn with Darwen

29

6

8

0

10

Blackpool

33

3

12

0

41

Blaenau, Gwent and Caerphilly

47

8

0

0

93

Bolton

35

6

0

0

0

Bournemouth and Poole

23

9

12

0

16

9 Nov 2012 : Column 829W

9 Nov 2012 : Column 830W

Bracknell Forest

12

4

3

0

27

Bradford

64

13

0

0

103

Brent

44

4

21

1

43

Bridgend

29

2

11

0

16

Brighton and Hove

23

16

4

0

30

Bristol

74

23

30

0

63

Bromley

32

5

12

1

33

Buckinghamshire

35

13

11

0

15

Bury

32

9

11

0

35

Calderdale

43

12

13

0

60

Cambridgeshire

43

13

23

0

36

Camden

49

3

0

2

43

Cardiff

57

13

8

0

0

Carmarthenshire

19

18

0

0

62

Ceredigion

17

8

7

0

8

Cheshire

66

23

0

1

61

Conwy and Denbighshire

38

0

5

0

13

Cornwall

37

7

21

0

73

Coventry

70

16

22

1

54

Croydon

61

14

38

0

47

Cumbria

57

21

6

4

71

Darlington

29

8

1

0

26

Derby

40

11

16

0

0

Derbyshire

74

24

31

1

125

Devon

58

36

3

0

109

Doncaster

66

9

2

0

49

Dorset

50

26

20

0

28

Dudley

62

9

15

0

27

Durham

119

29

0

0

58

Ealing

39

4

7

0

19

East Riding of Yorkshire

32

6

13

2

20

East Sussex

60

14

3

0

74

Enfield

52

7

1

0

49

Essex

110

34

1

0

82

Flintshire

26

2

15

2

23

Gateshead

64

14

2

0

26

Gloucestershire

76

21

4

0

74

Greenwich

28

13

0

0

0

Gwynedd Mon

29

5

15

1

18

Hackney

104

7

0

2

0

Halton and Warrington

37

15

1

0

33

Hammersmith and Fulham

39

1

0

2

31

Haringey

67

9

0

3

41

Harrow

27

13

2

0

56

Hartlepool

35

0

6

1

15

Havering

22

10

6

0

21

Hertfordshire

79

28

29

2

30

Hillingdon

32

1

15

0

17

Hounslow

29

16

19

0

19

Islington

51

7

1

2

0

Kensington and Chelsea

28

3

0

2

18

Kent

150

22

46

0

98

Kingston-upon-Hull

58

10

5

0

11

Kingston-upon-Thames

14

4

6

0

17

Kirklees

79

12

23

2

104

Knowsley

42

14

11

0

25

Lambeth

64

3

0

1

28

Lancashire

127

30

22

17

44

Leeds

117

35

2

4

104

Leicester City

84

9

13

2

95

Leicestershire

91

54

0

0

235

Lewisham

59

5

6

0

41

Lincolnshire

62

15

14

0

50

Liverpool

127

9

32

1

21

Luton

49

27

7

1

36

9 Nov 2012 : Column 831W

9 Nov 2012 : Column 832W

Manchester

113

8

0

0

102

Medway

27

16

0

0

28

Merthyr Tydfil

23

2

0

0

21

Merton

26

10

13

1

37

Milton Keynes

32

16

3

0

24

Monmouthshire and Torfaen

27

12

43

0

20

Neath Port Talbot

33

2

4

2

48

Newcastle-upon-Tyne

80

12

17

0

43

Newham

63

1

0

1

26

Newport

36

6

8

0

27

Norfolk

102

15

5

0

58

North East Lincolnshire

36

2

0

0

0

North Lincolnshire

24

7

0

2

0

North Somerset

32

7

4

0

38

North Tyneside

24

6

10

0

27

North Yorkshire

73

41

12

0

80

Northamptonshire

91

29

15

2

79

Northumberland

59

17

2

1

54

Nottingham

69

11

4

3

18

Nottinghamshire

131

31

30

1

54

Oldham

35

1

0

0

0

Oxfordshire

78

30

26

1

48

Pembrokeshire

19

7

3

0

34

Peterborough

35

14

8

0

54

Plymouth

55

4

0

0

73

Powys

18

21

0

1

18

Reading

21

6

0

1

32

Redbridge

44

11

16

0

92

Rhondda Cynon Taff

62

9

4

0

40

Richmond-upon-Thames

11

8

0

0

24

Rochdale

59

7

14

0

21

Rotherham

46

11

0

0

21

Salford

52

4

0

0

49

Sandwell

96

10

13

1

23

Sefton

39

17

10

0

38

Sheffield

120

26

18

3

127

Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin

53

11

2

0

65

Slough

29

1

2

0

0

Solihull

29

6

1

1

25

Somerset

37

26

4

0

125

South Gloucestershire

22

0

4

0

43

South Tees

76

9

9

0

22

South Tyneside

35

5

17

0

44

Southend-on-Sea

51

10

0

0

46

Southwark

105

9

2

0

123

St. Helens

42

8

23

0

21

Staffordshire

100

32

0

1

63

Stockport

42

9

24

0

13

Stockton-on-Tees

31

7

9

0

29

Stoke-on-Trent

68

14

5

0

121

Suffolk

80

21

4

0

66

Sunderland

80

11

76

1

32

Surrey

70

22

47

12

71

Sutton

21

10

2

0

34

Swansea

57

15

3

13

31

Swindon

24

12

0

1

68

Tameside

30

11

7

2

30

Thurrock

19

4

5

0

34

Torbay

22

10

1

2

42

Tower Hamlets and City of London

62

7

7

1

79

Trafford

65

16

21

1

41

Vale of Glamorgan

23

6

19

0

29

Wakefield

55

10

0

0

52

Walsall

50

4

12

0

28

Waltham Forest

43

2

4

0

0

9 Nov 2012 : Column 833W

9 Nov 2012 : Column 834W

Wandsworth

31

15

8

2

35

Warwickshire

60

6

26

2

42

Wessex

197

48

0

0

170

West Berkshire

13

11

0

0

32

West Sussex

62

26

31

1

100

Westminster

27

6

0

0

0

Wigan

61

14

12

0

0

Wiltshire

41

22

4

2

112

Windsor and Maidenhead

9

4

0

0

35

Wirral

64

4

15

0

57

Wokingham

12

7

0

0

13

Wolverhampton

61

8

3

0

10

Worcestershire and Herefordshire

69

32

42

0

43

Wrexham

27

2

3

1

39

York

18

14

8

0

35

Total

8,261

1,961

1,569

125

6,953

Notes: 1. Figures provided are taken from YOT data submitted to the Youth Justice Board’s (YJB) Youth Justice Management Information System (YJMIS). 2. The data refers to staffing levels as at 30 June 2010. 3. These figures include part-time workers, sessional staff, trainees, and volunteers and are not measures of the full-time equivalent workforce. 4. There were 157 YOTs as at 30 June 2010. 5. These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.