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Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 20 November 2012

Communities and Local Government

Affordable Housing

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he is taking to encourage the building of affordable housing. [128213]

Mr Prisk: Through the Homes and Communities Agency's Affordable Homes Programme we expect to provide up to 170,000 new affordable homes by 2014-15 with investment of nearly £4.5 billion. The total investment including funding from providers is some £19.5 billion. Nearly 55,000 affordable homes have been delivered against our ambition of 170,000 over the four years 2011-15. This represents some 32% of the overall target.

In September we also announced a package to increase private investment in the sector with the support of debt guarantees of up to £10 billion for the delivery of both new market rented housing and affordable housing. We will also invest another £300 million to supply new affordable homes and bring empty homes back into use.

Architects Registration Board

Neil Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what assessment he has made of the Architects Registration Board as established by the Architects Act 1997; and if he will make a statement. [128997]

Mr Foster: The Architects Registration Board was reviewed as part of the Cross Government Arms Length Body Review in 2010. Like all arm’s length bodies, Architects Registration Board is subject to the triennial review process.

Council Housing

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many of the people who live in council housing have a combined household income over £100,000 per annum. [128329]

Mr Prisk: We set out an estimate of the number of social tenants earning over £100,000 per annum in our recent “Pay to Stay” consultation, available at:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/documents/housing/pdf/2160581.pdf

That estimate was for up to 6,000 households.

The estimate was based on the incomes of the household reference person and partner, and used data from the Family Resources Survey 2008-09, and the English Housing Survey 2008-09 and 2009-10.

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Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate his Department has made of the number of former local authority homes that are now available for private rent. [128557]

Mr Prisk: This information is not available centrally.

Fire Services

Richard Harrington: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how his Department assesses the effect of reductions in funding on fire and rescue services. [128590]

Brandon Lewis: It is for each fire and rescue authority to determine the operational activities of its fire and rescue service through its integrated risk management plan, which is subject to consultation with the local community. Fire and rescue authorities should be making sensible savings without impacting on the quality or breadth of services offered to their communities.

Housing

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he is taking to increase the quality of housing stock. [128226]

Mr Prisk: Over the current spending review the Government has allocated £1.6 billion in Decent Homes funding to help refurbish council homes.

We are providing incentives for landlords to improve the energy efficiency of their properties. From next year, the Green Deal will enable all consumers to install energy efficiency measures at no upfront cost. Householders (whether owners or tenants) will repay the cost of the measures through their energy bill savings.

As we made clear in the housing strategy, published last November, the Government is committed to improving the quality of new homes. The National Planning Policy Framework, published in March, also emphasises the importance of well-designed new homes and neighbourhoods and of working with communities early in the development process to achieve that.

In addition, the Building Regulations already set national minimum standards to ensure our buildings do not have an adverse impact on the health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in them. They also address wider sustainability issues, not least in setting minimum energy and water efficiency standards in new homes. The Government committed earlier in the year to further improvements in those energy efficiency standards.

Where affordable housing is funded by the Homes and Community Agency, new affordable homes are required to be built to Code Level 3 of the Code for Sustainable Homes. The Code for Sustainable Homes is the national standard for the sustainable design and construction of new homes.

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Housing: Construction

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Sheffield, Heeley of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 627W, onhousing: construction, what estimate he has made of the number of dwellings with planning permission where development had yet to start on 30 June (a) 2011, (b) 2010, (c) 2009 and (d) 2005; what the total estimated value was; and if he will make a statement. [128750]

Nick Boles [holding answer 19 November 2012]: The number of large residential sites (those with more than 10 dwellings) and associated units with detailed planning consent that had not started on site is estimated as follows:

Number
As at June each yearSitesUnits

2010

3,657

240,882

2011

4,200

238,012

2012

4,155

225,797

This information is based on Glenigan data provided to the Homes and Communities Agency. The data provided do not include information relating to the total estimated value, and coverage is available only from 2010.

We are undertaking a series of initiatives to help kick-start development on stalled sites, including the £570 million Get Britain Building fund and our reforms to unlock economically unrealistic section 106 agreements.

These are part of our broader policies to support house building as outlined in the written ministerial statement of 6 September 2012, Official Report, columns 29-34WS, and November 2011's Housing Strategy.

Housing: Sustainable Development

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what recent discussions he has had with his European counterparts on sustainable housing; [128223]

(2) whether he has had discussions with his European counterparts on measures to increase affordable housing. [128227]

Mr Prisk: The Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), and his ministerial team routinely discuss a range of issues with European counterparts.

Internet

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the average number of hits is that his Department's website receives per day. [128220]

Brandon Lewis: In the period November 2011 to October 2012 the Department for Communities and Local Government website:

www.gov.uk/dclg

received an average of 54,489 page views per day. The average number of unique visitors per day was 14,175.

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Page views

Highest number of page views: 134,960 (Monday 21 November 2011).

Lowest number of page views: 447 (Tuesday 27 December 2011).

Unique visitors

Highest number of unique visitors: 37,250 (Monday 12 March 2012).

Lowest number of unique visitors: 156 (Tuesday 27 December 2011).

From 15 November the Department's content was published on the Inside Government section of GOV.UK and the DCLG website archived.

Mortgages: Government Assistance

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what support his Department offers to young people seeking their first mortgage; [128214]

(2) what steps he is taking to enable young people to step onto the housing ladder. [128218]

Mr Prisk: This Government is committed to supporting buyers get on to, and move up, the housing ladder. High deposit requirements are a barrier for people who want to own a home.

The FirstBuy equity loan scheme will help up to 27,000 aspiring home owners in England by March 2014 with joint investment from Government and house builders of over £900 million. House builders have found significant interest from first time buyers, reporting over 8,500 reservations by eligible applicants. Official statistics published by the Homes and Communities Agency in November show that there were 6,780 sales in the first 13 months of the scheme.

In March 2012, we launched the NewBuy Guarantee scheme, which enables first time buyers and others to purchase a new build property with only a 5% deposit. On 7 November the Home Builders Federation estimated that 2,000 reservations have been made in the scheme. Our reinvigorated Right to Buy programme with an enhanced discount of up to £75,000 also provides support to first time buyers.

In addition, shared ownership (part buy/ part rent) units will make up 20% of the Government's Affordable Homes Programme, which will deliver 170,000 homes by 2015.

We are also committed to a major increase in the supply of new homes. On 6 September 2012, we announced a range of housing and planning measures, which supports up to 70,000 new homes across a range of tenures.

Private Rented Housing

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will take steps to encourage people who can afford it to rent privately. [128224]

Mr Prisk: We are keen to support and champion home ownership and are doing so through the reinvigorated Right to Buy and the FirstBuy and NewBuy schemes for new build housing.

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We are also keen to support those who prefer to rent, which is why we are taking action to expand the choice of private rented housing on offer. In particular, we have recently set out our plans to increase the supply of private rented housing through a £200 million equity fund and up to £10 billion in debt guarantees.

Temporary Accommodation: Greater London

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many families were housed in temporary accommodation in each London borough in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012 to date; and whether the location of that accommodation was (i) in that borough, (ii) in another London borough and (C) outside London. [129021]

Mr Prisk: A table has been placed in the Library of the House, which shows the number of homeless households with dependant children and/or pregnant woman with no other dependants from each London borough and the City of London placed in temporary accommodation at 30 June in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012.

Across London as a whole, the number of statutory homeless households in temporary accommodation is lower than under the last Administration, with 37,190 households in Q2 2012, compared with 45,740 at the same point in 2009, 53,870 in 2008, 59,130 in 2007, 62,020 in 2006 and 62,640 in 2005.

The Department does not collect information, on the location of such families. Although it collects figures for the total numbers of households placed in temporary accommodation within another borough, separate figures are not collected for the number of families in such circumstances.

Statistical releases on Statutory Homelessness are available both in the Library of the House and via the DCLG website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-communities-and-local-government/series/homelessness-statistics#publications

From 9 November, local authorities have had new powers under the Localism Act to end the main homelessness duty by arranging an offer of suitable accommodation in the private rented sector, without requiring the applicant's agreement. This will mean shorter waiting times for homeless households and less time spent in expensive temporary accommodation.

Justice

Alternatives to Prison

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many women were sentenced to a community order or a suspended sentence with a structured supervision for women requirement in the last year; and how many such women have been found to be in breach of that requirement. [128344]

Jeremy Wright: The tables show the number of female offenders starting community orders and suspended sentence orders with a specific 'supervision' requirement attached between July 2011 and June 2012 (the latest date for which this data has been published).

From the data held centrally, it is not possible to identify separately all those offenders who breached

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supervision, but the proportions of court order terminations shown in the table for 'failure to comply with requirements' and 'conviction of an offence' will include those offenders who breached their orders and eventually had them terminated for these reasons.

Female offenders starting probation supervision between July 2011 and June 2012 with a specific supervision requirement attached to the order, England and Wales
 Number

Community order

9,921

Suspended sentence order

4,529

Court orders given to females with a specific supervision requirement attached which terminated for negative reasons between July 2011 and June 2012, England and Wales
Percentage/Number
Reason for terminationCommunity orderSuspended sentence order

Failure to comply with requirements (percentage)

12

10

Conviction of an offence (percentage)

10

13

   

Total number of terminations

10,773

4,428

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Bill of Rights Commission

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what recent assessment he has made of the work of the Commission on a Bill of Rights. [128862]

Damian Green: In line with its terms of reference, the Commission on a Bill of Rights is expected to report by the end of 2012. Recent work includes publication of its second consultation in 11 July 2012; this closed on 30 September 2012 and the responses will feed in to the final report.

Burglary

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of (a) men and (b) women were found guilty of burglary in the last year for which figures are available; and what proportion of such people were sent to prison. [127709]

Jeremy Wright: The conviction ratio for burglary offences by gender in England and Wales in 2011 can be viewed in Table 1.

The conviction ratio is calculated based on findings of guilty at all courts as a proportion of all proceedings at magistrates courts in a given year for selected offences.

Sentencing is entirely a matter for the courts, and they will take account of all the circumstances of the offence and the offender in determining the appropriate sentence in each case.

The custody rate for burglary offences by gender in England and Wales in 2011 can be viewed in Table 2.

The custody rate is calculated based on persons receiving a custodial sentence as a proportion of all persons sentenced at all courts in a given year for selected offences.

20 Nov 2012 : Column 419W

Table 1: Conviction ratio and custody rate for burglary offences by gender, England and Wales, 2011(1, 2)
Percentage
OutcomeMalesFemales

Conviction ratio(3)

76.9

68.4

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The conviction ratio is calculated based on findings of guilty at all courts as a proportion of all proceedings at magistrates courts in a given year for selected offences. Source: Ministry of Justice, Justice Statistics Analytical Services.
Table 2: Proportion of offenders sentenced who receive custody and further sentence outcomes for burglary offences by gender, England and Wales, 2011(1, 2)
Percentage
OutcomeMalesFemales

Custody(3)

48.9

35.8

   

Community sentence

34.5

43.4

Suspended sentence

10.9

14.8

Fine

1.6

0.8

Other(4)

4.2

5.3

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The custody rate is calculated based on persons receiving a custodial sentence as a proportion of all persons sentenced at all courts in a given year for selected offences. (4) 'Other' includes absolute and conditional discharge, one day in police cells; disqualification order; restraining order; confiscation order; travel restriction order; disqualification from driving; recommendation for deportation; and other miscellaneous disposals. Source: Ministry of Justice, Justice Statistics Analytical Services.

Drugs: Sentencing

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many individuals convicted of the unlawful importation of (a) Class A, (b) Class B and (c) Class C drugs received (i) an absolute discharge, (ii) a conditional discharge, (iii) a fine, (iv) a community rehabilitation order, (v) a supervision order, (vi) an attendance centre order, (vii) a curfew order, (viii) a

20 Nov 2012 : Column 420W

reparation order, (ix) a community order, (x) a youth rehabilitation order, (xi) a suspended sentence and (xii) immediate custody in each of the last five years; [125577]

(2) how many individuals convicted of the unlawful exportation of (a) Class A, (b) Class B and (c) Class C drugs received (i) an absolute discharge, (ii) a conditional discharge, (iii) a fine, (iv) a community rehabilitation order, (v) a supervision order, (vi) an attendance centre order, (vii) a curfew order, (viii) a reparation order, (ix) a community order, (x) a youth rehabilitation order, (xi) a suspended sentence and (xii) immediate custody in each of the last five years; [125578]

(3) how many individuals have been convicted for dealing drugs covered by a temporary class drug order since the inception of that order; [125579]

(4) how many individuals convicted of the possession of controlled (a) Class A, (b) Class B and (c) Class C drugs with intent to supply received (i) an absolute discharge, (ii) a conditional discharge, (iii) a fine, (iv) a community rehabilitation order, (v) a supervision order, (vi) an attendance centre order, (vii) a curfew order, (viii) a reparation order, (ix) a community order, (x) a youth rehabilitation order, (xi) a suspended sentence and (xii) immediate custody in each of the last five years; [125581]

(5) how many individuals convicted of the possession of controlled (a) Class A, (b) Class B and (c) Class C drugs received (i) an absolute discharge, (ii) a conditional discharge, (iii) a fine, (iv) a community rehabilitation order, (v) a supervision order, (vi) an attendance centre order, (vii) a curfew order, (viii) a reparation order, (ix) a community order, (x) a youth rehabilitation order, (xi) a suspended sentence and (xii) immediate custody in each of the last five years; [125582]

(6) how many individuals were convicted of the importation of (a) Class A, (b) Class B and (c) Class C drugs in each of the last five years. [125766]

Jeremy Wright: Data for the requested convictions and sentencing disposals for unlawful importation of, unlawful exportation of, possession of and possession of with intent to supply Class A, B and C drugs can be viewed in the tables, which has been broken down into annual summaries of offence and disposal types, for England and Wales, for 2007 to 2011.

The Youth Rehabilitation Order came into force on 30 November 2009. The first temporary class drug order took effect on 5 April 2012. As such no proceedings would have taken place until 2012. Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in spring 2013.

Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts for selected drug offences, with selected sentencing disposals, in England and Wales, 2007(1, 2, 3)
   Of which:
Offence descriptionTotal found guiltyTotal sentencedAbsolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity rehabilitation orderSupervision order

Unlawful importation - Class A

483

528

__

3

7

__

__

Unlawful importation - Class B

38

23

__

3

2

1

__

Unlawful importation - Class C

216

247

__

3

6

__

__

Unlawful exportation - Class A

26

24

__

1

2

__

1

Unlawful exportation - Class B

1

1

__

__

__

__

__

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20 Nov 2012 : Column 422W

Unlawful exportation - Class C

5

6

__

1

1

__

__

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

13,383

13,280

41

2,767

4,939

32

58

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

3,234

3,208

27

897

1,327

7

23

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

14,994

14,971

295

3,600

7,141

43

207

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

3,500

3,473

5

21

39

13

25

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

308

302

__

8

6

__

__

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

1,645

1,671

1

25

56

12

14

 Of which:
Offence descriptionAttendance centre orderCurfew orderReparation orderCommunity orderSuspended sentenceImmediate custody

Unlawful importation - Class A

__

__

__

7

7

503

Unlawful importation - Class B

__

__

__

3

3

11

Unlawful importation - Class C

__

__

__

5

15

218

Unlawful exportation - Class A

__

__

1

1

__

16

Unlawful exportation - Class B

__

__

__

__

__

1

Unlawful exportation - Class C

__

__

__

__

3

1

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

27

74

12

3,516

413

902

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

5

11

10

540

65

127

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

148

105

130

1,298

106

196

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

__

16

__

304

473

2,469

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

__

__

__

44

101

139

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

1

12

2

372

516

520

“—“ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice
Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts for selected drug offences, with selected sentencing disposals, in England and Wales, 2008(1, 2, 3)
   Of which:
Offence descriptionTotal found guiltyTotal sentencedAbsolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity rehabilitation orderSupervision order

Unlawful importation - Class A

432

532

3

1

Unlawful importation - Class B

24

23

2

Unlawful importation - Class C

168

197

3

5

Unlawful exportation - Class A

18

19

1

1

Unlawful exportation - Class B(4)

Unlawful exportation - Class C

6

6

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

14,599

14,516

33

2,470

5,739

26

53

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

3,310

3,320

13

834

1,375

3

20

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

20,157

20,157

324

4,361

9,739

67

229

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

4,010

3,972

5

20

18

13

38

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

389

407

1

8

3

1

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

1,998

1,984

25

57

11

31

 Of which:
Offence descriptionAttendance centre orderCurfew orderReparation orderCommunity orderSuspended sentenceImmediate custody

Unlawful importation - Class A

2

525

Unlawful importation - Class B

1

1

19

Unlawful importation - Class C

1

6

13

169

Unlawful exportation - Class A

2

14

Unlawful exportation - Class B(4)

Unlawful exportation - Class C

6

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

16

59

8

3,794

401

985

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

8

14

9

589

59

114

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20 Nov 2012 : Column 424W

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

190

165

182

1,910

148

316

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

29

273

488

2,913

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

1

74

117

190

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

2

21

2

509

648

552

“—“ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice
Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts for selected drug offences, with selected sentencing disposals, in England and Wales, 2009(1, 2, 3)
   Of which:
Offence descriptionTotal found guiltyTotal sentencedAbsolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity rehabilitation orderSupervision order

Unlawful importation - Class A

497

539

3

1

Unlawful importation - Class B

97

92

2

3

Unlawful importation - Class C

86

93

Unlawful exportation - Class A

18

28

1

Unlawful exportation - Class B

4

5

1

Unlawful exportation - Class C

4

4

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

13,730

13,659

28

1,848

5,886

15

44

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B(5)

21,766

21,589

241

3,833

11,174

44

268

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

5,794

5,796

76

1,136

2,863

22

53

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

3,675

3,696

1

10

14

6

19

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

1,184

1,182

2

14

71

6

12

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

1,437

1,456

12

45

3

7

 Of which:
Offence descriptionAttendance centre orderCurfew orderReparation orderCommunity orderSuspended sentenceImmediate custody

Unlawful importation - Class A

2

4

528

Unlawful importation - Class B

6

7

74

Unlawful importation - Class C

4

7

82

Unlawful exportation - Class A

1

1

25

Unlawful exportation - Class B

4

Unlawful exportation - Class C

4

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

11

49

8

3,837

364

775

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B(5)

169

164

135

2,547

171

371

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

32

48

30

745

84

127

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

29

250

456

2,835

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

2

13

290

306

368

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

8

369

503

451

“—“ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (4) The Youth Rehabilitation Order came into force on 30 November 2009. Figures prior to 2010 are recorded as Community Orders. (5) Cannabis was re-classified as a Class B drug on 26 January 2009 Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice
Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts for selected drug offences, with selected sentencing disposals, in England and Wales, 2010(1, 2, 3)
   Of which:
Offence descriptionTotal found guiltyTotal sentencedAbsolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity rehabilitation orderSupervision order

Unlawful importation - Class A

394

406

1

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Unlawful importation - Class B

124

121

2

1

Unlawful importation - Class C

23

26

Unlawful exportation - Class A

14

14

Unlawful exportation - Class B

6

7

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

12,254

12,175

30

1,781

5,423

9

4

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

29,450

29,251

369

5,681

15,724

10

25

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

1,687

1,708

21

471

797

1

2

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

3,753

3,687

1

9

12

5

6

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

3,104

3,069

41

96

5

9

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

446

457

14

19

1

Offence descriptionAttendance centre orderCurfew orderReparation orderCommunity order

Unlawful importation - Class A

1

Unlawful importation - Class B

4

Unlawful importation - Class C

1

Unlawful exportation - Class A

Unlawful exportation - Class B

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

7

18

1

3,026

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

31

42

135

3,074

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

3

1

212

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

22

274

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

13

820

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

113

Offence descriptionYouth Rehabilitation Order(4)Suspended sentenceImmediate custody

Unlawful importation - Class A

7

397

Unlawful importation - Class B

7

107

Unlawful importation - Class C

5

20

Unlawful exportation - Class A

14

Unlawful exportation - Class B

1

6

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

82

338

779

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

584

302

500

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

7

33

60

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

47

419

2,779

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

52

992

907

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

5

173

121

“—“ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (4) The Youth Rehabilitation Order came into force on 30 November 2009. Figures prior to 2010 are recorded as Community Orders.
Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts for selected drug offences, with selected sentencing disposals, in England and Wales, 2011(1, 2, 3)
   Of which:
Offence descriptionTotal found guiltyTotal sentencedAbsolute dischargeConditional dischargeFineCommunity rehabilitation orderSupervision order

Unlawful importation - Class A

431

436

1

1

Unlawful importation - Class B

159

157

1

2

Unlawful importation - Class C

29

28

2

Unlawful exportation - Class A

15

15

Unlawful exportation - Class B

12

12

2

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

10,514

10,419

27

1,491

4,708

1

20 Nov 2012 : Column 427W

20 Nov 2012 : Column 428W

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

30,133

30,039

369

5,809

16,369

2

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

1,575

1,588

16

433

779

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

3,194

3,173

10

1

1

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

3,330

3,261

35

92

1

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

310

306

6

10

Offence descriptionAttendance centre orderCurfew orderReparation orderCommunity order

Unlawful importation - Class A

1

Unlawful importation - Class B

1

Unlawful importation - Class C

2

Unlawful exportation - Class A

Unlawful exportation - Class B

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

2

9

2,637

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

27

21

63

3,142

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

2

164

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

1

205

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

2

7

872

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

1

109

Offence descriptionYouth Rehabilitation Order(4)Suspended sentenceImmediate custody

Unlawful importation - Class A

7

426

Unlawful importation - Class B

13

137

Unlawful importation - Class C

7

17

Unlawful exportation - Class A

15

Unlawful exportation - Class B

1

9

Unlawful exportation - Class C

Possession of a controlled drug - Class A

95

286

602

Possession of a controlled drug - Class B

723

334

566

Possession of a controlled drug - Class C

18

28

77

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class A

77

311

2,489

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class B

68

1,089

993

Possession of drugs with intent to supply - Class C

4

99

74

“—“ = Nil (1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. (4) The Youth Rehabilitation Order came into force on 30 November 2009. Figures prior to 2010 are recorded as Community Orders.

Prison Accommodation

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people in each prison in England and Wales are accommodated in cells designed for (a) one person but occupied by two and (b) two people but occupied by three. [128251]

Jeremy Wright: The following table shows the average number of offenders held in a cell designed for one prisoner but occupied by two in each establishment in 2011-12, the most recent year for which figures have been published. This is known as 'doubling'. Alongside these the table shows for the same period the average number of prisoners held in a cell designed by two but occupied by more than two. This is known as 'trebling'.

The Government is committed to providing safe, decent and secure places for those in custody and continues to meet this commitment despite crowding.

Crowding occurs when cells are modified to hold more prisoners than they were originally designed for in order to manage the population. It is not a reflection of the quality of the accommodation. Accommodation that does not conform to published minimum standards will not be certified and cannot be used to accommodate prisoners.

There are two measures of estate capacity: certified normal accommodation is uncrowded capacity; and operational capacity is the maximum capacity based on published accommodation standards, as well as the provision and operation of appropriate regime facilities and the needs for order and control.

No prisons are operating above their operational capacity across the prison estate.

20 Nov 2012 : Column 429W

Figures for the percentage of prisoners in overcrowded and doubled accommodation for 2012-13 will be published in the Prison Performance Digest on the Justice website in July 2013.

Average number of prisoners held, April 2011 to March 2012
Establishment nameTwo to a cell designed for oneThree to a cell designed for two

Albany

0

0

Altcourse

704

110

Ashfield

0

0

Askham Grange

0

0

Aylesbury

14

0

Bedford

276

19

Belmarsh

0

351

Birmingham

659

0

Blantyre House

0

0

Blundeston

28

74

Brinsford

0

0

Bristol

162

0

Brixton

250

0

Bronzefield

0

0

Buckley Hall

55

0

Bullingdon

416

0

Bullwood Hall

26

0

Bure

38

0

Camp Hill

292

0

Canterbury

203

0

Cardiff

508

0

Channings Wood

63

0

Chelmsford

310

0

Coldingley

2

0

Cookham Wood

0

0

Dartmoor

32

0

Deerbolt

0

0

Doncaster

707

0

Dorchester

161

0

Dovegate

178

0

Dover

0

0

Downview

0

0

Drake Hall

0

0

Durham

637

0

East Sutton Park

0

0

Eastwood Park

68

0

Elmley

356

274

Erlestoke

0

0

Everthorpe

143

0

Exeter

411

0

Featherstone

27

0

Feltham

0

0

Ford

0

0

Forest Bank

579

0

Foston Hall

6

0

Frankland

0

0

Full Sutton

0

0

Garth

34

0

Gartree

0

0

Glen Parva

429

0

Gloucester

170

0

Grendon and Spring Hill

0

0

Guys Marsh

92

0

Haslar

0

0

Haverigg

28

0

Hewell

313

0

High Down

186

0

Highpoint

45

1

Hindley

0

0

20 Nov 2012 : Column 430W

Hollesley Bay

0

0

Holloway

0

0

Holme House

308

0

Hull

468

0

Huntercombe

47

0

Isis

206

0

Kennet

332

0

Kingston

0

0

Kirkham

0

0

Kirklevington Grange

0

0

Lancaster Farms

87

0

Latchmere House

0

0

Leeds

499

0

Leicester

318

0

Lewes

79

0

Leyhill

0

0

Lincoln

463

0

Lindholme

83

0

Littlehey

116

0

Liverpool

351

0

Long Lartin

0

0

Low Newton

45

0

Lowdham Grange

64

0

Maidstone

60

0

Manchester

629

0

Moorland and Hatfield

52

0

Morton Hall

0

0

Mount

50

0

New Hall

45

0

North Sea Camp

74

0

Northallerton

140

0

Northumberland

0

0

Norwich

260

16

Nottingham

608

0

Onley

0

0

Parc

283

0

Parkhurst

92

0

Pentonville

654

0

Peterborough

226

0

Portland

0

0

Preston

685

0

Ranby

368

0

Reading

178

0

Risley

36

0

Rochester

0

0

Rye Hill

0

0

Send

0

0

Shepton Mallet

47

0

Shrewsbury

318

0

Stafford

0

0

Standford Hill

0

0

Stocken

118

0

Stoke Heath

92

0

Styal

18

0

Sudbury

0

0

Swaleside

0

0

Swansea

370

23

Swinfen Hall

68

0

Thameside

0

0

Thorn Cross

0

0

Usk and Prescoed

248

2

Verne

68

0

Wakefield

0

0

20 Nov 2012 : Column 431W

Wandsworth

957

0

Warren Hill

0

0

Wayland

108

0

Wealstun

37

0

Wellingborough

0

0

Werrington

0

0

Wetherby

0

0

Whatton

60

0

Whitemoor

0

0

Winchester

402

0

Wolds

108

0

Woodhill

366

0

Wormwood Scrubs

124

0

Wymott

134

0