30 Nov 2012 : Column 517W

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Written Answers to Questions

Friday 30 November 2012

Northern Ireland

Weapons

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) for what reason the inventories of weapons decommissioned by loyalist and republican paramilitaries under the Supervision of the Independent International Decommissioning Commission have been deposited at Boston college, USA; and if she will make a statement; [131038]

(2) on what date it was agreed that the inventories of weapons decommissioned by loyalist and republican paramilitaries under the supervision of the Independent International Decommissioning Commission should be transferred to the US State Department; who made that decision; and if she will make a statement; [131039]

(3) if she will publish the inventories of weapons decommissioned by loyalist and republican paramilitaries under the supervision of the Independent International Decommissioning Commission; and if she will make a statement. [131040]

Mike Penning: The Government do not hold the aforementioned inventory. The Independent International Commission on Decommissioning (IICD) was established through an agreement between the UK and Irish Governments in August 1997. Article 2 (1) of that Agreement made clear that

“The Commission shall be independent in the performance of its functions”.

As an independent body the IICD chose not to publish its inventory of arms decommissioned for reasons set out in its final report to the UK and Irish Governments published on 4 July 2011. Instead, it took the decision to deposit the inventory of weapons decommissioned by loyalist and republican paramilitaries with the United States Department of State for safe retention. The inventory was never held by Boston college.

Health

Arthritis

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate his Department has made of the number of rheumatoid arthritis specialist nurses working in the NHS; if he will take steps to increase that number; and if he will make a statement. [130741]

Dr Poulter: The current number of rheumatoid arthritis specialist nurses employed by the national health service is not collected centrally.

The Government has supported the development of a range of specialist roles within nursing. It is for local NHS organisations with their knowledge of the healthcare needs of their local population to invest in training for specialist skills and to deploy specialist nurses. In this

30 Nov 2012 : Column 518W

context, the Government recognises that more should be done by some local healthcare organisations to prioritise preventative care and to provide better support for patients in their own homes and communities. Specialist nurses can play a role in the delivery of community base care, which can both save the NHS. money and, more importantly, provide better care for patients.

We do hold information on the number of qualified nursing, midwifery and health-visiting staff employed by the NHS, which is available from the Health and Social Care Information Centre annual work force census, however the speciality requested is not collected separately.

Cancer

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 14 September 2012, Official Report, column 426W, on cancer, when the NHS Commissioning Board intends to publish the Commissioning Outcomes Framework 2013-14. [129373]

Anna Soubry: It is for the NHS Commissioning Board to make decisions on how it will hold Clinical Commissioning Groups to account for their performance and they will be publishing details in due course.

Diabetes

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the written answer to the hon. Member for Torbay (Mr Sanders) of 31 October 2011, Official Report, column 451W, on diabetes research, if he will publish the most recent data on National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) spending in the Health Research Clarification System (HRCS) health categories; if he will request that NIHR publishes a statement of research funding allocated to (a) Type one diabetes and (b) Type two diabetes; if he will assess the adequacy of research funding for Type one diabetes; and if he will make a statement. [130540]

Dr Poulter: Spend on research funded directly by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) in 2010-11 and 2011-12 in the Health Research Classification System health categories is shown in the table. These figures do not take account of NIHR expenditure on research infrastructure and systems where spend cannot be attributed to health categories.

£
Health category2010-112011-12

Blood

6,602,922

8,609,175

Cancer

100,901,252

104,103,633

Cardiovascular

30,991,469

34,117,061

Congenital Disorders

4,352,476

4,252,761

Ear

1,780,089

2,426,689

Eye

7,139,225

7,851,304

Generic Health Relevance

144,696,774

155,436,178

Infection

21,079,768

20,883,877

Inflammatory and Immune System

13,083,522

13,036,068

Injuries and Accidents

4,192,377

5,446,326

Mental Health

49,848,487

53,217,726

Metabolic and Endocrine

25,683,345

26,627,825

30 Nov 2012 : Column 519W

Musculoskeletal

15,639,508

17,571,806

N/A

7,845,355

455,682

Neurological

29,915,858

32,470,138

Oral and Gastrointestinal

18,368,344

20,538,836

Other

2,040,003

2,745,076

Renal and Urogenital

8,744,089

10,154,953

Reproductive Health and Childbirth

18,942,012

22,152,169

Respiratory

18,192,188

20,234,850

Skin

4,682,027

5,459,494

Stroke

20,877,869

20,420,144

Expenditure by the NIHR through research programmes, research centres and units, and research training awards on research on type 1 and type 2 diabetes is shown in the following table.

2011-12£ million

Type 1 diabetes

1.8

Type 2 diabetes

3.4

Total spend by the NIHR on research on type one and type two diabetes is higher than this because expenditure by the NIHR Clinical Research Network (CRN) on these topics cannot be disaggregated from total CRN expenditure.

The Department has no plans to assess the adequacy of research funding for type 1 diabetes.

General Practitioners: Pay

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information his Department holds on the pay within clinical commissioning groups of GPs who have taken on management roles; and if he will make a statement. [131019]

30 Nov 2012 : Column 520W

Anna Soubry: Information on remuneration for general practitioners working for emerging clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) is not held centrally.

Once established, the governing body of a CCG will have the responsibility to determine remuneration, fees and allowances payable to employees of the CCG and to those that provide services to the CCG.

Each CCG will have a limit on administrative spending placed upon it by the NHS Commissioning Board and it is up to each CCG to determine how much of that envelope it spends on pay.

Health Services: East of England

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much each primary care trust in the East of England spent on salaries, pension contributions and other remuneration for (a) general and senior managers, (b) nurses and midwives and (c) administrative and clerical staff in each of the last three financial years. [130938]

Dr Poulter: The following figures are unvalidated estimates of the sum of total earnings, employer's pension contributions and employer's national insurance contributions recorded on the electronic staff record (ESR) data warehouse for each stated staff group and year. The data warehouse is a monthly snap shot of the live ESR system, which is the human resources and payroll system that covers all national health service employees other than those working in general practice, two non-participating foundation trusts, and some NHS staff who have transferred to social enterprises, etc. ESR was fully rolled out across the NHS in April 2008.

Staff groups are defined by the occupational code attached to each staff record.

The nurses and midwives category is made up of qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff. The reduction in the cost of employing nurses and midwives reflects the transfer of responsibility for providing community services from primary care trusts as a result of “Transforming Community Services.”

The sum of total earnings, employer's pension contributions and employer's national insurance contributions recorded on the electronic staff record data warehouse for each stated staff group and year
£ million
Ocs code:Trust name2009-102010-112011-12

(a) General and senior mangers:

    

5GC

Luton PCT

2.79

3.58

3.75

5P1

South East Essex PCT

7.20

7.61

7.41

5P2

Bedfordshire PCT

6.66

6.65

6.12

5PN

Peterborough PCT

2.09

1.45

1.00

5PP

Cambridgeshire PCT

4.67

5.65

5.72

5PQ

Norfolk PCT

6.85

6.92

5.97

5PR

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

2.76

3.07

3.44

5PT

Suffolk PCT

7.41

8.59

7.26

5PV

West Essex PCT

5.12

4.79

3.89

5PW

North East Essex PCT

5.27

4.46

3.23

5PX

Mid Essex PCT

4.49

4.54

4.36

5PY

South West Essex PCT

9.10

10.57

8.44

5QV

Hertfordshire PCT

9.87

10.03

9.72

(b) Nurses and midwives:

    

5GC

Luton PCT

2.83

1.99

0.67

5P1

South East Essex PCT

2.42

1.47

0.70

5P2

Bedfordshire PCT

4.22

3.23

1.41

5PN

Peterborough PCT

4.28

3.95

1.15

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30 Nov 2012 : Column 522W

5PP

Cambridgeshire PCT

2.96

1.04

0.92

5PQ

Norfolk PCT

7.85

4.66

1.27

5PR

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

2.18

1.61

0.85

5PT

Suffolk PCT

20.40

21.39

15.34

5PV

West Essex PCT

2.83

2.48

1.09

5PW

North East Essex PCT

15.20

9.25

1.13

5PX

Mid Essex PCT

3.42

2.26

1.15

5PY

South West Essex PCT

4.64

3.22

1.39

5QV

Hertfordshire PCT

7.51

3.72

0.90

(c) Administrative and clerical staff:

    

5GC

Luton PCT

2.61

2.42

1.99

5P1

South East Essex PCT

2.61

3.27

2.45

5P2

Bedfordshire PCT

4.51

4.77

3.95

5PN

Peterborough PCT

7.33

6.84

5.01

5PP

Cambridgeshire PCT

6.58

5.63

5.74

5PQ

Norfolk PCT

5.87

5.67

5.15

5PR

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

2.06

2.48

2.12

5PT

Suffolk PCT

8.48

8.55

7.46

5PV

West Essex PCT

4.37

6.15

5.10

5PW

North East Essex PCT

8.94

7.99

3.32

5PX

Mid Essex PCT

3.44

3.25

2.38

5PY

South West Essex PCT

6.28

5.37

2.60

5QV

Hertfordshire PCT

7.61

7.61

7.61

NHS: Redundancy

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what information his Department holds on the number of staff that have been made redundant by Hull Teaching Primary Care Trust since April 2010; what the average cost per staff member was of such redundancies; what the total cost was of such redundancies; how many such redundancies involved an individual redundancy payment of over £40,000; and what the cost to the public purse was of such redundancies since April 2010; [130957]

(2) what information his Department holds on the number of staff that have been made redundant by Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust since April 2010; what the average cost per staff member was of such redundancies; what the total cost was of such redundancies; how many such redundancies involved an individual redundancy payment of over £40,000; and what the cost to the public purse was of such redundancies since April 2010. [130958]

Dr Poulter: Information on redundancy numbers and costs is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is in the following tables:

2010-11 exit packages table
OrganisationTotal number of exit packagesTotal cost of exit packages (£000)Average cost of packages (£000)Total number of exit packages over £40,000Total cost of exit packages over £40,000 (£000)

Hull Primary Care Trust(PCT)

79

3,795

48

35

3,127

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

0

0

0

0

0

2011-12 exit packages table
OrganisationTotal number exit of packagesTotal cost of exit packages (£000)Average cost of packages (£000)Total number of exit packages over £25,000Total cost of exit packages over £25,000 (£000)

Hull PCT

6

403

67

4

373

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

1

24

24

0

0

Notes: 1. Exit packages includes compulsory redundancies and other departures. The latter includes the cost of early retirements (except those due to ill health), voluntary redundancies, Mutually Agreed Resignation Scheme, pay in lieu of notice etc. However, it is not possible to separately identify the value of compulsory and voluntary redundancies from these costs from the data collected. Therefore, an overall figure for redundancies is not separately identifiable. 2. The expense associated with these departures may have been recognised in part or in full in a previous period. Source: 2010-11 and 2011-12 PCT and NHS Trusts Audited Summarisation Schedules

In the 2011-12 data collection, the cost bandings in the exit packages disclosure in the accounts were revised in line with the HM Treasury Financial Reporting Manual (FReM). As such, for 2011-12 we have provided

30 Nov 2012 : Column 523W

figures for exit packages over £25,000 as this is the closest match to the information requested. It is not possible, due to the bandings collected, to disaggregate the cost of exit packages over £40,000 from the 2011-12 data.

The data are taken from the audited summarisation schedules of PCT and NHS Trusts, from which the NHS elements of the Department's Annual report and Accounts are prepared. The disclosure in the accounts reports the number and value of exit packages taken by staff leaving in the year.

NHS: Staff

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) pursuant to the answer of 20 November 2012, Official Report, column 470-1W, on NHS: staff, what information his Department holds on the ethnic diversity of the very senior management tier within (a) his Department, (b) the NHS Commissioning Board, (c) Health Education England, (d) Public Health England, (e) the NHS Trust Development Agency, (f) Monitor and (g) the Care Quality Commission; [131016]

(2) what information his Department holds on the equality monitoring of appointments within (a) the NHS Commissioning Board, (b) Health Education England, (c) Public Health England, (d) the NHS Trust Development Agency, (e) Monitor and (f) the Care Quality Commission; [131018]

(3) pursuant to the answer of 20 November 2012, OfficialReport, columns 470-1W, on NHS: staff, what information his Department holds on the gender composition of the very senior management tier within (a) his Department, (b) the NHS Commissioning Board, (c) Health Education England, (d) Public Heath England, (e) the NHS Trust Development Agency, (f) Monitor and (g) the Care Quality Commission. [131034]

Dr Poulter: Information on the gender composition and ethnic diversity of the very senior management tier within the Department can be found at the following link:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/01/workforce/

Information about the NHS Commissioning Board, Health Education England, Public Health England, the NHS Trust Development Authority, Monitor and the Care Quality Commission is not collected centrally.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will instruct clinical commissioning groups and commissioning support units to have a moratorium on employing staff from outside the NHS until all existing NHS staff at risk of redundancy in primary care trusts and strategic health authorities within their areas have been redeployed. [131017]

Dr Poulter: There will not be a moratorium on employing staff from outside the national health service. The policy and guidance for employing staff from outside the NHS within Clinical Commissioning Groups and Commissioning Support Units, and the redeployment of NHS staff within the new system, were set out in the answer given by the Under-Secretary of State for Health, my hon. Friend the Member for Broxtowe (Anna Soubry), of 20 November 2012, Official Report, columns 470-72W.

30 Nov 2012 : Column 524W

Palliative Care

Mr Leigh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that end-of-life care given in the NHS is determined by evidence-based medicine and not age or finance; and if he will make a statement. [131020]

Norman Lamb: The Department has consistently made clear that care provision, including for people at the end of life, should be based on need.

The Quality Standard for end of life care for adults, published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in 2011, also makes clear that people should have access to the best quality care based on need, regardless of their individual circumstances. The Quality Standard can be found at:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/QS13

In June 2012, the Department announced its intention to implement a ban on age discrimination in health and social care with no exceptions. This took effect in October, and will enable people who feel they have been treated badly because of their age to take an organisation or individual to court.

The first principle of the NHS Constitution also states that the NHS provides a comprehensive service, available to all irrespective of age, disability, gender, sexual orientation, religion and belief. We have also proposed a new staff responsibility making clear that staff should contribute towards providing fair and equitable services to all, helping to reduce inequalities between differing groups and sections of society.

A number of local financial incentives are in place in the NHS, such as through the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation framework, to support improved care for people at the end of life. These do have a place in encouraging staff to deliver the best care and improving the patient experience. However, the review currently under way around the use of the Liverpool Care Pathway, taken forward by the National End of Life Care Programme, Dying Matters and the Association of Palliative Medicine, will look at whether use of locally set incentives are always achieving improvements in care.

Mr Leigh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of recent complaints from families about the Liverpool Care Pathway; if his Department will collate complaints from families affected by the Liverpool Care Pathway; and if he will make a statement. [131021]

Norman Lamb: I held a roundtable meeting on 26 November to discuss the Liverpool Care Pathway. That meeting included representatives of patients and families. I have announced a review of use and experience of the Liverpool Care Pathway. One strand of that work, led by the Dying Matters national coalition, centres on patient experience. We will appoint an independent chairman to oversee the review, which will report in the spring.

Spinal Injuries

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether there has been any underspend on the budget for spinal cord injury centres in the last two years. [131076]

30 Nov 2012 : Column 525W

Dr Poulter: The Department does not hold the information requested centrally. Specialised Commissioning Groups, on behalf of primary care trusts (PCTs), currently commission spinal cord injury services. PCTs provide the funding and are accountable for this expenditure.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Aerospace Industry

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many projects have been awarded funds as part of his Department's Building UK Leadership in Aerodynamics scheme in the latest period for which figures are available; what the value was of each such award; and how many such projects have (a) started and (b) been completed. [131031]

Michael Fallon: As part of our commitment to the joint Government/industry Aerospace Growth Partnership, we announced £60 million of funding in the budget to create a new UK Aerodynamics Centre. The first award under this scheme consisted of £28.3 million Government funding, augmented by £22.2 million from industry for six collaborative research projects involving a range of industry and academic partners and delivered through the Technology Strategy Board. Formal offer letters covering these projects have been signed by all participants and work is under way.

The second award is for just over £15 million, matched by equal funding from industry for a portfolio of seven industry-led collaborative projects in aerodynamics following a new open competition for innovative projects in aerodynamics, (announced by the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills at Farnborough International Airshow in July). Conditional offer letters have been issued and final contract negotiations are under way.

No projects have yet been completed.

London Taxis International

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) whether he plans to provide finance to safeguard future manufacturing at London Taxi International; [130961]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership on the safeguarding of jobs at London Taxi International; [130962]

(3) what recent discussions he has had with administrators PricewaterhouseCoopers on future manufacturing at London Taxi International. [130963]

Michael Fallon: London Taxi International Ltd (LTI) (as well as Manganese Bronze Holdings plc, Manganese Bronze Services Ltd and Manganese Bronze Property Services Ltd) is currently in administration. This is a commercial matter for the administrators and the Government cannot intervene directly in this process. BIS (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) officials are being kept abreast of developments, including through contact with the administrators, and we stand ready to engage when possible, if a way forward for manufacturing in the UK is identified.

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BIS officials are working with local partners including Job Centre Plus, the National Careers Service and local training providers to ensure that those who have been made redundant are aware of the full range of support available to them. BIS Officials are also in regular contact with the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) about its plans to drive future growth and prosperity. The Government have invited the LEP, along with the Leaders of Coventry and Warwickshire local authorities, to submit an expression of interest for a city deal which would include innovative and transformative ideas to boost local growth.

Manufacturing Industries

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills with reference to his Department's initial announcement of the Advanced Manufacturing Supply Chain Initiative on 6 November 2011 and subsequent announcement on 26 November 2012, how much of the £125 million announced has been (a) allocated and (b) spent; and whether he has any plans for any underspend of the initiative. [131013]

Michael Fallon: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills announced the successful bids from Round 1 of the Advanced Manufacturing Initiative on 26 November 2012. The successful bids are projected to create or safeguard over 2,160 jobs supported by approximately £80 million of joint public and private sector investment. We will announce the winners from Round 2 of the initiative in spring next year. Full details of the awards to individual companies will be disclosed in due course once the due diligence process has progressed further.

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many companies have been awarded funds as part of the Advanced Manufacturing Supply Chain Initiative in the latest period for which figures are available; what the value was of each such award; and how many such companies have received the full amount awarded. [131030]

Michael Fallon: I refer the hon. Member to the press notice issued by the Department on 26 November 2012:

http://news.bis.gov.uk/Press-Releases/Multi-million-pound-boost-for-UK-manufacturing-supply-chains-683f5.aspx

Full details of the awards to individual companies will be disclosed in due course once the due diligence process has progressed further.

Regional Growth Fund: Ashfield

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many applications were received from Ashfield constituency for funding from the Regional Growth Fund in the latest period for which figures are available. [131024]

Michael Fallon: We do not disclose data at the scale of parliamentary constituency.

1,370 applications were received for the three bidding rounds of the Regional Growth Fund: of these, 195 were for projects or programmes located within the East Midlands. However, bids can be tendered by businesses

30 Nov 2012 : Column 527W

located in different areas to the location of the activity and by consortia of multiple private and public organisations. We do not hold complete location information on all parties involved in a bid.

While the impact of successful Regional Growth Fund projects is rarely limited to one constituency, four applications that described some or all of their activity in the Ashfield area were received. However, there were several applications that predicted that they would have employment impacts on the Ashfield constituency. There are several programme bids, for example submitted by Local Enterprise Partnerships, that could potentially generate activity in Ashfield.

Work and Pensions

BAE Systems

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps will be taken by the Office for Nuclear Regulation to ensure that quality assurance concerns will be investigated and addressed during construction of Astute class submarines by BAE Systems. [129970]

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Mr Hoban: BAE Systems is the licensee for the Nuclear Licensed site at Barrow, which is regulated by the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). ONR does not have responsibility for the regulation of submarine construction. This is the responsibility of the Ministry of Defence, which has its own Defence Nuclear Safety Regulator (DSNR). DSNR leads on the regulation of the reactor plant.

Epilepsy

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people with epilepsy as their primary medical condition have received (a) employment and support allowance and (b) disability living allowance in (i) Vauxhall constituency and (ii) England and Wales since May 2010. [130078]

Esther McVey: In the following table is a breakdown of employment support allowance (ESA), incapacity benefit/severe disablement allowance (IB/SDA) and disability living allowance (DLA) claimants, with a primary medical condition of epilepsy in (i) Vauxhall constituency and (ii) England and Wales since May 2010:

 BenefitEnglandWalesVauxhall parliamentary constituency

May 2010

ESA

4,910

360

1.0

 

IB/SDA

39,820

3,660

80

 

DLA

57,480

4,790

100

     

May 2011

ESA

6,920

500

20

 

IB/SDA

37,730

3,480

80

 

DLA

58,370

4,830

90

     

February 2012

ESA

12,510

880

30

 

IB/SDA

32,090

3,050

70

 

DLA

59,070

4,810

100

Notes: 1. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment support allowance (ESA) from October 2008. 2. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10, some additional disclosure control has been applied. 3. Caseload for DLA show the number of people in receipt of an allowance, and exclude people with entitlement where the payment has been suspended, for example if they are in hospital. 4. Constituencies used are for the Westminster Parliament of May 2010. 5. IB/SDA ‘Claimants' include people in receipt of benefit and also those who fail the contributions conditions but receive a national insurance credit, i.e. ‘credits only cases'. 6. To qualify for incapacity benefit (IB), claimants have to undertake a medical assessment of incapacity for work called a Personal Capability Assessment. Under the employment support allowance regime, new claimants have to undergo the Work Capability assessment. From April 2011 incapacity benefit recipients will begin also to undertake this assessment. The medical condition recorded on the claim form does not itself confer entitlement to incapacity benefit or employment support allowance. So, for example, a decision on entitlement for a customer claiming IB or ESA on the basis of mental and behavioural disorders would be based on their ability to carry out the range of activities assessed by the Personal/Work Capability Assessment. Source: DWP Information Directorate 100% WPLS

Psychologists

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people have been referred to a work psychologist by his Department in (a) Vauxhall constituency and (b) England and Wales since May 2010. [130077]

Mr Hoban: The information requested is not readily available and it could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Social Security Benefits: Havering

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in Havering receive over £30,000 per annum in benefits. [130394]

Mr Hoban: The information requested is not readily available, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Unemployment Benefits: Ayrshire

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency and (b) East

30 Nov 2012 : Column 529W

Ayrshire local authority area have been in receipt of out-of-work benefits for (i) one year, (ii) two years, (iii) three years, (iv) four years, (v) five years and (vi) 10 years at the most recent date for which figures are available. [130162]

30 Nov 2012 : Column 530W

Mr Hoban: The following table shows the numbers of people in (a) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency and (b) East Ayrshire local authority area who have been in receipt of out-of-work benefits:

 AllUp to one yearOne to two yearsTwo to three yearsThree to four yearsFour to five yearsFive years and up to 10 years10 years and over

East Ayrshire Local Authority

13,800

5,960

1,940

700

560

440

1,550

2,650

Jobseekers Allowance

4,840

3,650

1,010

130

40

*

10

10

Incapacity Benefits

7,060

1,730

600

340

360

320

1,270

2,450

Lone Parents

1,320

420

240

180

130

80

180

90

Carers

440

90

80

40

40

30

70

90

Other Income Related Benefits

140

90

10

*

*

*

10

20

         

Kilmarnock and Loudoun Parliamentary Constituency

10,440

4,580

1,490

550

410

340

1,190

1,870

Jobseekers Allowance

3,750

2,820

770

110

30

*

10

10

Incapacity Benefits

5,200

1,300

460

260

250

240

960

1,720

Lone Parents

1,050

330

190

140

100

70

150

70

Carers

320

60

60

30

30

20

60

60

Other Income Related Benefits

110

70

10

*

*

*

10

20

“*” Denotes nil or negligible. Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and totals may not sum due to rounding. 2. Statistical Group is a hierarchical variable. A person who fits into more than one category will only appear in the top-most one for which they are eligible. 3. Out of work benefits which are included in this analysis are: Jobseekers Allowance Employment and Support Allowance Incapacity Benefit and Severe Disablement Allowance Income Support 4. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment and support allowance (ESA) for new claims from October 2008. 5. Durations shown are the longest claim duration of the benefits of interest. 6. The duration of claim reflects the longest out-of-work benefit claim for each person: For the jobseekers statistical group this will be the length of the JSA claim. For the lone parent, carer, and others on income related benefit statistical groups this will be the length of the IS claim. For the ESA and incapacity benefits claim this will be the length of the IB/SDA or ESA claim if the person is only claiming that benefit, or the oldest of either the IB/SDA/ESA and IS claim if the person is claiming a combination of these benefits. Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study

Work Capability Assessment

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of the appeals process following work capability assessments in the latest period for which figures are available. [129045]

Mr Hoban: The costs to the public purse for the appeals process span costs to DWP as well as Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS).

DWP is responsible for paying HMCTS for any additional appeals over the baseline set in 2007 when the tribunals service transferred from DWP to Ministry of Justice. DWP and HMCTS currently negotiate and agree additional funding annually to cover any forecast increase in appeals.

The estimate for the first half of 2012-13 financial year for the cost of appeals is £11.3 million for DWP in respect of staff costs of employment and support allowance and incapacity benefit reassessment appeals, plus a payment of £14.85 million to HMCTS.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) if he will consider collecting the medical evidence of people completing work capability assessments for use by Atos in order to improve the accuracy of the decision making process with a view to reducing the number of appeals; [129046]

(2) what plans he has to improve the use of medical evidence in work capability assessments with a view to reducing the costs and number of appeals following such assessments. [129047]

Mr Hoban: All people claiming ESA are invited to submit medical evidence, Atos healthcare professionals have guidance to request further medical evidence where it is appropriate and where further medical evidence is required to reach a decision on benefit entitlement, it can be requested by the Department.

All available evidence has to be considered by the Department's decision maker before making a determination on benefit entitlement and it is in the claimant's interest to submit additional medical evidence to ensure their claim is correctly determined and unnecessary appeals avoided.

The Department has already undertaken a series of improvements to the work capability assessment (WCA) process to ensure that we obtain the best available evidence. As part of this we have made changes to the self assessment questionnaire (ESA50) to make it clearer to claimants that they should submit relevant evidence

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to support their claim. We have also introduced improvements to the WCA process including decision makers contacting claimants as part of the decision making process where a negative decision is proposed, to ensure that they have all available evidence and then reconsidering that decision where additional information is provided.

We will continue to review and refine all aspects of the WCA to ensure that it is more effective; fairer for all claimants and as a result fairer for the taxpayer.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he plans to take to reduce the cost and number of appeals following work capability assessments. [129048]

Mr Hoban: We are introducing a number of measures to help reduce both the cost and the number of appeals. These include:

A ‘mandatory reconsideration' process so that when a claimant disagrees with a DWP decision, they will be given a thorough explanation and helped to identify any additional evidence that could review the decision and enable DWP to ensure that all claimants receive the benefits which they are entitled to at the earliest opportunity.

Direct Lodgement of appeals with Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS)—which will mean that claimants wishing to appeal a DWP decision following a mandatory reconsideration will be required to submit their appeal directly to HMCTS.

Professor Harrington made a number of recommendations to support the ‘right first time' approach to decision making. From the 9 July 2012 we have introduced a new scheme for tribunals to provide feedback to DWP on the standards of decision making in respect of cases where the tribunal overturns a DWP decision. This will enable the Department to assess areas that may require further improvement and help improve standards of decision making.

In June 2010 DWP appointed Professor Malcolm Harrington a highly respected occupational physician to undertake independent reviews of the work capability assessment (WCA). He has completed three reviews, the third of which was published on the 20 November 2012.

The improvements we are making to the WCA following these Harrington reviews will:

ensure that we increase the number of decisions that are right first time; and

improve communications to claimants.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will consider moving the responsibility from individuals to service providers in collecting medical evidence for work capability assessments. [129374]

Mr Hoban: Processes are already in place, for both Atos Healthcare and departmental decision makers to collect further medical evidence. Additionally, as part of his third independent review of the work capability assessment, Professor Harrington recommended that departmental decision makers should actively consider the need to seek further documentary evidence in every claimant's case or justify their final decision if further evidence has not been sought. The Department has provisionally accepted this recommendation subject to ongoing work to assess the implications and feasibility of implementation.

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Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will consider changing the start date of the reassessment period for work capability assessments to begin on the date of the appeal decision. [129375]

Mr Hoban: As part of the work capability assessment (WCA), a healthcare professional will give advice on when an individual should be re-assessed. This advice is based on the likely improvement in each individual's condition over a three to 18 month period. Individuals with more serious conditions, where a return to work is unlikely, will be re-assessed at a later date—usually within two years. When making the decision on the claimant's ESA claim, the DWP Decision Maker takes account of all of the available evidence, so can accept or amend the healthcare professional's advice on the re-assessment period.

We are aware that some claimants are referred for a subsequent WCA shortly after receiving the outcome of an appeal. Judges do have discretion to include on the Tribunal's Decision Notice a recommendation of when the next WCA should take place. DWP's internal guidance does advise Decision Makers that, when deciding a WCA re-referral date, they should consider various factors—including whether the Tribunal has suggested a re-referral date. The final decision does rest with the Decision Maker.

We have no plans to amend the WCA re-assessment date to align with the date of the Tribunal's decision in every case.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps his Department is taking to increase the accuracy of decision-making during the initial assessment phase of the work capability assessment. [130960]

Mr Hoban: In June 2010 DWP appointed Professor Malcolm Harrington a highly respected occupational physician who has undertaken three independent reviews of the work capability assessment (WCA). The Government's response to his latest review which was published on 20 November can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/wca-review-2012-response.pdf

Over the course of the reviews Professor Harrington has made a number of recommendations to support the ‘right first time' approach to decision making. Professor Harrington's recommendations included making the process more empathetic and less mechanistic by:

improving the way Jobcentre Plus communicates with claimants;

introducing mental, cognitive and intellectual ‘champions' into assessment centres to improve the assessment of these functions;

empowering and improving training for decision makers; and

improving the transparency of the process.

As a result we have:

changed the way we communicate with claimants, including enhanced communications to explain the process more clearly;

put decision makers at the heart of the process and introduced the Quality Assessment Framework to improve the quality of decisions made; and

introduced the personalised summary statement and regional mental function champions to improve the quality of face to face assessments.

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Work Programme

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he plans to take to shift the market shares of work programme providers in each contract package area following the publication of initial job outcome data; and if he will make a statement. [131041]

Mr Hoban: In line with the rules for moving referrals to better-performing providers as defined under Work programme contracts, the Department will review market shares on 31 June 2013, based on performance delivered during the 12 months ending 31 March 2013.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he has any plans to assess the financial viability of providers on the Work programme following the publication of initial job outcome data. [131042]

Mr Hoban: As part of the Department's supplier management policy, DWP has an existing process to monitor the financial viability and risk of key suppliers post contract award.

This is undertaken on a basis of material and critical criteria and involves the review of a several sources of financial and commercial information. Suppliers are assessed and rated according to perceived risk which determines the nature of any follow up action required.

All Work programme suppliers are included in this monitoring process and are prioritised due to their critical status. As a minimum, each Work programme supplier is reviewed on an annual basis. Publication of Work programme statistics does not alter the process and continuous monitoring will remain in place.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions for what reasons the work programme performance data published by his Department on 27 November 2012 shows performance at 3 per cent of referrals, on the key performance measure set out in the invitation to tender, compared with non-intervention performance at 5 per cent and minimum performance standard at 5.5 per cent; and if he will make a statement. [131043]

Mr Hoban: Performance has built up more slowly than our initial assumptions suggested. This is because participants are building towards job outcomes through multiple periods of shorter term employment. Providers are also taking longer than expected to track and claim outcomes. Our aspiration for the total levels of outcomes to be achieved by providers remain the same.

Written Questions: Government Responses

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the (a) shortest and (b) longest time taken by his Department to answer a written parliamentary question was in (i) 2012 to date, (ii) 2011 and (iii) 2010. [130063]

Mr Hoban: The (a) shortest time taken by the Department to answer a written PQ in (i) 2012 to date (ii) 2011 and (iii) 2010 was one working day. The (b) longest time taken to answer a written PQ in (i) 2012 to date was 86 working days in (ii) 2011 was 104 working days and in (iii) 2010 was 43 working days.

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Transport

Driving Tests: Southend on Sea

James Duddridge: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether he has considered making the driving test centre pilot scheme in Southend permanent; [130944]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the driving test centre pilot scheme in Southend. [130945]

Stephen Hammond: A driving test centre was opened at Tickford, in Southend-on-Sea, in May 2012 to provide additional local testing capacity.

There are no plans to stop the provision of driving tests from this centre. The Driving Standards Agency will continue to review all its driving test delivery service and test centre estate to deliver the most cost effective and efficient service to customers.

Liverpool Airport

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the airlines on the introduction of a (a) transatlantic and (b) trans-Asian route from Liverpool John Lennon Airport. [130955]

Mr Simon Burns: The Secretary of State for Transport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Derbyshire Dales (Mr McLoughlin), has held no discussions with airline representatives on the introduction of transatlantic or Asian routes from Liverpool John Lennon airport. It is a commercial decision for airlines as to what routes they operate.

Roads: North West

Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what provision was made in the North West Highways management contract for Area 10 for a review of the adequacy of the measures to be taken by the contractors in the event of a fuel spillage on the motorway; [131028]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to review the value for money of the North West Highways management contract for Area 10; and if he will make a statement; [131032]

(3) whether there is provision in the North West Highways management contract for Area 10 for the cleaning up of fuel spillages on the carriageway by contractors; and what steps contractors are permitted to take under such provisions. [131033]

Stephen Hammond: The new asset support contract for the geographical area known as Area 10 commenced on 4 November 2012. It was awarded, following a competitive tendering process, to the tenderer offering the best value for money.

The asset support contract includes a requirement to make the trunk road and motorway network safe, following all incidents. This includes cleaning up after fuel spills. The asset support contractor is required to attend incidents and reopen the lanes within a timescale specified in the contract.

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This is a performance measure used by the Highways Agency, which specifies mean monthly opening times based on the traffic levels and time of day on the trunk road or motorway.

The asset support contract gives the contractor flexibility to determine how best to deal with the spills and achieve the required outcomes.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts: Ethnic Groups

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent assessment she has made of the representation of ethnic minority employees in the creative industries for which her Department leads in providing support; and if she will make a statement. [130763]

Mr Vaizey [holding answer 29 November 2012]:Data from the 2011 Sector Skills Assessment for the Creative Industries (produced by Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills) suggest that BME representation in the creative industries is 7%, compared with 9% for the whole UK economy.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is committed to improving equality of access and opportunity to those working within its sectors, and works to promote a diverse creative industries sector that supports growth. Support for the sector is primarily channelled through the joint Government and industry forum, the Creative Industries Council, which addresses barriers and issues facing the sector. A report on skills produced by a council working group earlier this year highlighted the need to increase and enrich pathways into the sector, so that talent from all backgrounds can enter the creative industries and prosper. Government and industry are now working together to take forward action against recommendations in this report which include greater apprenticeship and internship provision.

Charitable Donations

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps her Department is taking to increase philanthropic giving. [131035]

Mr Vaizey: The Department for Culture, Media and Sport has made excellent progress on boosting philanthropy for culture. Together with Arts Council England and the Heritage Lottery Fund, we are investing over £100 million to incentivise philanthropy through the Catalyst programme. This programme will lever at least as much again in match funding from private donors. It will help cultural organisations diversify their income streams, strengthen their fundraising activity and unlock long-term funding from private sources, including through the development of endowments.

A reduced rate of inheritance tax, to help boost legacy giving, came into effect in April this year for those who leave more than 10% of their estate to a cultural body or charity. The Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport and Minister for Women and Equalities, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), has now received an independent report by the Chairman of Legacy10 which makes recommendations on how we can further strengthen legacy giving.

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The Department is also establishing the new Cultural Gifts Scheme, which will enhance acquisitions by museums across the country through the first scheme to use tax incentives to promote lifetime giving to public collections. The Department also continues to work closely with colleagues across Government to pursue the actions which were set out in our Giving White Paper last year.

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether her Department has set targets for philanthropic giving for the next five years. [131078]

Mr Vaizey: No targets have been set. The Department for Culture, Media and Sport believes there is considerable potential to increase levels of philanthropic giving over the next five years. However, the enormous range and complexity of factors which contribute to successful relationships between donors and the thousands of arts and heritage bodies across England make target-setting impractical.

Treasury

Economic Situation

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent assessment he has made of the need for a regional balance to the UK economy. [130706]

Sajid Javid: The Local Growth White Paper established the Government's approach to promoting local growth in England. Returning the UK economy to sustainable economic growth that is more balanced across the UK and sectors is a key priority. The Government are supporting growth in England's regions by allocating £2.4 billion of investment through the Regional Growth Fund; providing £730 million to endow an investment fund for all local enterprise partnerships through the Growing Places Fund; introducing 24 new enterprise zones; and devolving powers and funding through City Deals including a significant deal for Liverpool.

The Local Government Resource review creates an incentive for localities to grow their business rates base, and provides greater rewards to those areas with low tax bases compared to their communities’ current needs, thereby enhancing other policies that seek to rebalance growth in England.

High Speed 2 Railway Line

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what additional expenditure has been allocated to High Speed 2 (HS2) to enable it to deliver the recommendations in the Major Project Authority's report on HS2; and if he will make a statement. [130662]

Danny Alexander: The Government have allocated expenditure to HS2 Ltd during the current spending review period to design and develop plans for the proposed high speed route between London and Birmingham in support of the hybrid Bill.

All major projects are reviewed by the Major Projects Authority during their development with the aim of ensuring that they are delivered efficiently, on time and to budget.

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Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether additional expenditure has been allocated to enable HS2 Ltd to develop further mitigation proposals for the preferred line of route in this Parliament; and if he will make a statement. [130663]

Danny Alexander: The Government have allocated expenditure to HS2 Ltd during the current spending review period to design and develop plans for the proposed high speed route between London and Birmingham in support of the hybrid Bill.

The Government and HS2 Ltd will continue to place a high priority on mitigating the effects that building a new railway will bring and HS2 Ltd will carry out a full environmental impact assessment of the route.

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the current cost-benefit ratio is for High Speed 2; and if he will make a statement. [130664]

Danny Alexander: HS2 Ltd currently estimates the cost-benefit ratio for HS2 to be 2.5 including wider economic benefits.

More information can be found in the “Updated Economic Case for HS2” published on the HS2 Ltd website in August 2012:

http://www.hs2.org.uk/assets/x/93861

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether the Office for Budget Responsibility has plans to undertake a review of the economic effect of the High Speed 2 project; and if he will make a statement. [130666]

Danny Alexander: The Office for Budget Responsibility is an independent body, created in 2010 to provide independent and authoritative analysis of the UK's public finances. As set out in legislation, the OBR's independence gives it complete discretion to determine the work programme by which it may initiate research and produce additional analysis.

Tax Allowances

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he plans to introduce transferable tax allowances. [130520]

Mr Gauke: The Government's commitment to bringing forward a proposal to recognise marriage through the tax and benefit system remains firm. We want to show we value commitment and will consider a range of options and bring proposals forward at the appropriate time.

Education

Children in Care

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what estimate he has made of the number of children in care whose parents were previously in care; [130634]

(2) how many children there were in each (a) lower layer super output area, (b) medium layer super output area and (c) ward in the most recent year for which figures are available broken down by the reason for entry into care. [130840]

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Mr Timpson: Data are not collected on the number of children in care whose parents were previously in care.

Data held centrally on looked after children do not go beneath local authority level, and to generate these geographies within these data would incur disproportionate costs. Information on the number of children looked after at 31 March 2012, by local authority, is provided in table LAA1 of the Statistical First Release ‘Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2012' which can be found on the Department's website via the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00213762/children-looked-after-las-england

Physical Education: Curriculum

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 20 November 2012, Official Report, column 447W, on physical education: curriculum, whether it is his policy to maintain the previous Government's aspirational target of a minimum amount of two hours each week to be spent on physical education. [130746]

Mr Timpson: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has clearly set out that he expects every school to want to maintain, as a minimum, the previous levels of provision for PE and sport each week for every pupil; and that he expects schools to continue to provide good-quality PE and competitive sport for every pupil.

Physical Education: Teachers

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of the initial teacher training syllabus for primary school teachers is devoted to physical education. [130263]

Mr Laws: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 6 November 2012, Official Report, column 553W.

The Secretary of State for Education, the right hon. Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), does not set the content of initial teacher training courses or require that training providers devote a proportion of the syllabus to physical education. It is for training providers to decide what trainees should be taught to enable them to achieve the Teachers' Standards. The Department does not mandate content of initial teacher training courses. Trainees must know and understand the relevant statutory and non-statutory curricula and frameworks, and other relevant information applicable to the age and ability range for which they are trained.

Private Education: Special Educational Needs

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of omission of provision for independent special schools from the children and families Bill on access to local specialist support for children with complex needs. [130841]

Mr Timpson: The draft special educational needs provisions of the proposed children and families legislation reflect the current position. Parents of children with

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statements of special educational needs can make representations for an independent school and the local authority has to consider those representations. The Government are currently exploring with independent schools catering specifically for children with special educational needs the possibility of including them within the provisions which give parents of children with Education, Health and Care Plans the right to express a preference for a particular state funded school. We are hopeful of resolving matters in time for the introduction of the legislation, which is currently in draft and undergoing pre-legislative scrutiny.

Pupils: Databases

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) with reference to his plans to widen access to the national pupil database, what steps he plans to take to ensure that the identity of individuals is fully protected; and what steps he will take in case there is a breach of that protection by (a) the media, (b) commercial organisations and (c) others; [130371]

(2) what discussions he has had with the Information Commissioner on his proposed changes to widen access to the national pupil database; [130373]

(3) what assessment he has made of including private schools in the national pupil database. [130337]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 27 November 2012]: The Department for Education is consulting on proposals to amend regulations to allow extracts of data from the national pupil database to be shared for a wider set of purposes. The aim is to increase beneficial uses of the data that promote the education or well-being of children.

All applications for extracts of data from the national pupil database are subject to a robust approvals process. Selected data would only be shared with approved organisations for specific purposes. Organisations must comply with strict terms and conditions on security, handling and use of the data, including processing it in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The data are typically shared in a format that allows users to analyse the information without the need for names or other identifiers, with sensitive data receded to make them much less sensitive.

The Department has the right to audit compliance with security requirements and terms and conditions. Any failure to comply with the terms and conditions would be considered a serious matter and a breach of contract with the Department for Education. Organisations could also be subject to prosecution under the Data Protection Act 1998, or the Information Commissioner could impose penalties of up to £500,000.

Officials have discussed proposals to widen access to extracts of data from the national pupil database under strict terms and conditions with representatives from the Information Commissioner's Office on a number of occasions over the last year. Information Commissioner Office representatives have said that they would support in principle the release of data under controlled access, as long as a proper system of governance is in place. The Department strengthened its process for requesting access to data from the national pupil database under terms and conditions, details of which are available on the Department's website. See following link:

www.education.gov.uk/npd

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The Department for Education does not hold detailed pupil level information relating to independent schools. The Department holds attainment data on all schools for public examinations taken at Key Stage 4 and Key Stage 5, which are provided by awarding organisations. Independent schools are not required to take part in national curriculum tests, but may choose to do so. Any other pupil level data held are provided voluntarily.

Special Educational Needs

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to his Department's announcement of 20 November 2012 that the trials of the proposals in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Green Paper will be extended by 18 months, whether he proposes that there should be a revised timetable for evaluation reports from the pathfinders. [130752]

Mr Timpson: In line with commitments made in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Green Paper, 20 pathfinders were set up in September 2011, representing 31 local authorities and their health partners.

An independent interim evaluation report of the pathfinder programme was published on 18 October 2012 and is available from the Department for Education's research website at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/research/researchpublications

Under existing contractual arrangements with SQW, the final evaluation report is due to be published in summer 2013.

On 6 November, I was pleased to be able to announce to the Education Select Committee an 18 month extension of the pathfinder programme, to September 2014. The independent evaluation will be extended by up to 24 months, subject to contract negotiations, allowing more time for the most effective pathfinder approaches to be fully evaluated and shared, particularly with non-pathfinder areas to support implementation of the Green Paper reform programme. The timing of further evaluation reports is being considered as part of the negotiations.

Justice

Community Orders: Young Offenders

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of applying community payback to people under 18 years of age. [130567]

Jeremy Wright: Community payback or unpaid work is available as a requirement of a Youth Rehabilitation Order for offenders of 16 or 17 years of age. It is a sentence which punishes young offenders by requiring them to do hard work which benefits the community. In 2011 unpaid work requirements of Youth Rehabilitation Orders comprised 3.5% of the total unpaid work requirements imposed. Approximately 75% of adults sentenced to community payback successfully complete their sentences by working all of the hours required. In 2011 the successful completion rate for sentences imposed as a requirement of a Youth Rehabilitation Order was less than 50%. Efforts are being made by the National Offender Management Service to increase the number of young offenders who successfully complete community payback sentences.

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Coroners: Tees Valley

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average time taken by the Teesside coroner to conduct inquests was in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011; what assessment he has made of the performance of the Teesside coroner in 2012 with regard to the time taken for inquests to be concluded; and what meetings he has had to discuss issues relating to the Teesside coroner. [130661]

Mrs Grant: The average time taken by the Teesside coroner to conduct inquests was 34 weeks in 2009, 43 weeks in 2010 and 44 weeks in 2011.

The Teesside coroner was the subject of an investigation by the Office for Judicial Complaints in 2011 concerning the increase in time taken to conclude inquests since 2008. The investigation was deferred in December 2011 pending the outcome of a separate investigation undertaken by Middlesbrough Council's Community Safety and Leisure Scrutiny Committee into the Teesside coroner. MOJ Ministers have not had any meetings to discuss issues relating to the Teesside coroner.

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many applications were received by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority on (a) 27 November 2011, (b) 26 November 2012 and (c) 27 November 2012. [131015]

Mrs Grant: As 27 November 2011 was a Sunday, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority's office was closed. They have given the figure for Friday 25 November 2011 instead.

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority considers applications to have been received once a consent form, allowing them to undertake investigations, has been signed and returned. Applicants who completed an online or telephone application on 26 or 27 November are unlikely to have returned that form. Therefore, in addition to the number of applications received with a returned consent, the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority has also provided the number of online/telephone applications completed.

 Applications received (consent form returned)Internet/telephone applications completed (consent form outstanding)

25 November 2011

177

26 November 2012

329

589

27 November 2012

1

143

Employment and Support Allowance: Appeals

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the (a) average and (b) maximum length of time was for the Tribunals Service to administer a First-tier Tribunal-Social Security and Child Support appeal in respect of employment and support allowance in Coventry in each quarter in (i) 2011 and (ii) 2012. [130959]

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Mrs Grant: Appeals against decisions made by the Department for Work and Pensions on an individual's entitlement to social security and child support are heard by the First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support (SSCS), administered by Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS).

(a) The following table shows the average time taken from receipt of an appeal to disposal by the tribunal in respect of employment and support allowance (ESA) in the Coventry hearing venues for (i) each quarter of the financial year 2011-12 and (ii) April to June 2012 (the latest period for which figures are available).

Appeal times (in weeks) from receipt to disposal in Coventry
Employment and support allowanceAppeal times (weeks)

April to June 2011

33.0

July to September 2011

36.3

October to December 2011

39.7

January to March 2012

46.8

April to June 2012

37.8

Note: The data are taken from management information

The appeal waiting time in weeks in Coventry for all appeal types is 30.8 weeks.

(b) The SSCS tribunal does not hold information on the single longest period an appellant has waited for a benefit appeal hearing. The information can be provided only at disproportionate cost by manually checking individual case files. However, during the period April to June 2012, 584 ESA appeals were disposed of in the Coventry venues. Of these 0.7% were more than two years old. Those appeals that take longer than two years to be disposed of are likely to be complex cases which may have more than one hearing, for example a first hearing may have been adjourned for further evidence to be gathered.

HMCTS has continued to respond strongly to the significant increase in the number of appeals received by the SSCS tribunal. Two additional venues are now in use to hear some appeals which would previously have been heard at the Coventry venue. These are in Leamington Spa and Nuneaton (in use from 13 and 15 November 2012 respectively). These additional venues provide the capacity for an additional 36 sessions in November and 40 sessions in December. This will reduce the number of appeals waiting to be heard at Coventry and, therefore, help bring down the average waiting time for an appeal hearing. Other work to increase the tribunal's capacity is also underway. This includes the recruitment of additional fee-paid judges and medical members, increased administrative resource, and work to reallocate hearings to alternative nearby venues to ensure appeals are dealt with as quickly as possible.

HMCTS is also working hard at a national level to increase the capacity of the SSCS Tribunal and reduce waiting times. It has implemented a range of measures which include recruiting more judges and medical panel members; increasing administrative resources and streamlining processes; securing additional hearing venues across the country; increasing the number of cases listed in each tribunal session; running double shifts in its largest processing centre; running Saturday sittings in some of the busiest venues; and establishing a customer contact centre to deal with telephone inquiries.

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All of this is having a positive effect. The total number of disposals has increased significantly from 279,000 in 2009-10 to 380,000 in 2010-11, and 433,600 appeals in 2011-12, with the capacity for half a million disposals in 2012-13.

The tribunal disposed of more appeals than it received in every month between January 2011 and February 2012 (14 consecutive months) and the outstanding caseload within the tribunals fell by 25% in 2011-12 to reach 145,000 on 31 March 2012. The average waiting time has stabilised nationally, and has fallen across many venues.

Judges: County Courts

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) which justices of the High Court in England and Wales were authorised to sit as county court judges after direction by the Lord Chancellor under section 5(3) of the County Courts Act 1984 since January 1989 to date; [131059]

(2) how many directions under section 5(3) of the County Courts Act 1984 have been made authorising justices of the High Court to sit as judges of the county court in (a) Caernarfon county court and (b) Cardiff county court between January 1989 and October 2012. [131060]

Mrs Grant: It is not possible to provide an accurate response on records dating back to 1989 as we do not hold information dating back this far. However, the breakdown as to the number of High Court judges authorised to sit under section 5(3) of the County Courts Act 1984 from 1 January 2007 to date is set out in the following table:

 Number and details of those approved

2007

One—Sir Nicholas Underhill

2008

One—Sir David Bean

2010

Nine—(of these eight were approved to sit in the Patents County Court jurisdiction)—Sir Kim Lewison, Dame Sonia Proudman, Sir Christopher Floyd, Sir Anthony Mann, Sir Nicholas Warren, Sir David Kitchin, Sir Paul Morgan, Sir Alastair Norris and Sir Richard Arnold

2012

One—Sir Michael Briggs

No authorisations have been made specifically for (a) Caernarfon county court or (b) Cardiff county court.

Magistrates Courts: Video Conferencing

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many magistrates courts were using video links with police stations on 1 November (a) 2008, (b) 2009, (c) 2010, (d) 2011 and (e) 2012. [131014]

Damian Green: Video links between magistrates courts and police stations are used for two purposes:

(1) To allow a defendant to appear in a magistrates court for a first hearing by means of a video link while still physically located in the police station and

(2) To allow police officers give evidence to the court while physically located in the police station.

First hearings allowing defendants to appear by video were first piloted in London (Camberwell Green magistrates court) since May 2009 and Kent (Medway magistrates court) since August 2009.

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Police officers giving evidence to magistrates court by video began using a link from South Norwood police station to Croydon magistrates court in March 2011.

The number of magistrates courts using video links with police stations for either defendants or police officer giving evidence are:

As at 1 November each yearNumber

2008

0

2009

2

2010

2

2011

5

2012

19

Offenders: EU Nationals

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign nationals from EU countries have been convicted of an offence in the UK since 5 December 2011. [130965]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. Information held centrally on this database does not include a defendant’s nationality.

Planning Permission: Appeals

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to the Prime Minister's speech to the CBI on 19 November 2012, what the current time limit is for making (a) a judicial review application and (b) a statutory appeal relating to planning decisions. [130038]

Mrs Grant: Under the Civil Procedure Rules, claims for judicial review should be brought promptly and not later than three months after the grounds to make the claim first arose.

Where planning cases are appealed to and decided by the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, most judicial appeals are made through section 288 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, which are subject to a six week time limit.

Prisoners: Repatriation

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many UK citizens have been transferred to prisons in the UK from other EU member states since 5 December 2011. [130964]

Jeremy Wright: Since 5 December 2011, two British citizens have been transferred to prisons in England and Wales under the EU prisoner transfer agreement which entered into force on that date. A further 38 British citizens have been transferred from prisons in other EU member states to prisons here under other prisoner transfer arrangements.

The transfer of prisoners to Scotland and to Northern Ireland is a devolved matter and is the responsibility of the relevant Minister.

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign national prisoners from each EU country were transferred to prisons in the country of their nationality since 5 December 2011. [130966]

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Jeremy Wright: The Government do not hold information on the number of prisoners transferred between other member states of the European Union. To date no prisoners have been transferred from England and Wales to other EU member states under the EU prisoner transfer agreement which entered into force on 5 December 2011. A small number of requests for transfer to other member states have been made and decisions are awaited. However, 32 prisoners have been transferred from prisons in England and Wales to other member states of the European Union under other prisoner transfer arrangements during that period.

The transfer of prisoners from Scotland and from Northern Ireland is a devolved matter and is the responsibility of the relevant Minister.

Sentencing

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 19 November 2012, Official Report, column 291W, on the Policing and Crime Act 2009, what assessment he has made of the reasons behind the recording issues referred to in that answer; and if he will make a statement. [129981]

Jeremy Wright: Information that is published annually within the Criminal Justice Statistics publication has been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. The data from those systems have more than 22,000 different offence classifications available. It is not possible to individually check the accurate recording of each available offence classification on the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database used for preparing the Criminal Justice Statistics publication. A solution for the issue of recording in this centrally held database has been identified and is now being tested. As previously advised, revision to the 2011 information and 2012 data is planned for publication in May 2013.

Staff

Mike Freer: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department spent on (a) recruitment agency fees, (b) outplacement agency fees for displaced or redundant staff and (c) staff training in each of the last 12 months. [125662]

Jeremy Wright: The information is as follows:

(a) Expenditure on the fees paid to recruitment agencies for supplying contractors, consultants, and those taking up temporary and permanent positions in the Ministry of Justice is recorded differently across the various organisations within the Ministry. To arrive at a breakdown of monies paid for the provision of such services would require a manual examination of each invoice submitted by a recruitment agency. This would incur disproportionate cost.

(b) The Ministry of Justice provides career transition coaching, guidance and support to surplus staff (including those at risk of redundancy) through its in-house Career Transition Service. The support package to staff includes a guaranteed place at a full day career transition workshop facilitated by an external outplace support provider, six months unlimited access to an online career development resource site and distance coaching for six months after attendance at the workshop. The average cost of the

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outplacement support (workshop and follow-up support) is £165 per person. The average monthly cost across the full 12 month period is approximately £6,308.

(c) Budgets for internal training within the Ministry of Justice are devolved to business units and are deployed for staff training to meet business need. To arrive at a breakdown of monies paid for internal training would require a manual examination of individual budgets. This would incur disproportionate cost.

For external training, the most recent data available show that for the period between 1 August 2011 and 31 July 2012, the Department spent £10.351 million. External training costs are those which are delivered outside of the Department's internal resources with approval through the central civil service learning arrangement. This can include professional training and support through academic bodies. External training providers are able to deliver specialist training which is sometimes not available internally. Externally procuring specialist training in this way is often more cost effective than developing training packages because the training is targeted to smaller groups.

A monthly breakdown of this expenditure is detailed in the following table:

 Gross amount (£ million)

August 2011

0.483

September 2011

0.995

October 2011

0.654

November 2011

1.234

December 2011

0.701

January 2012

1.099

February 2012

0.906

March 2012

1.351

April 2012

1.181

May 2012

0.329

June 2012

0.591

July 2012

0.827