Schools: Inspections

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which schools which are not academies were judged by Ofsted to be in the category (a) satisfactory/requires improvement and (b) inadequate at their last inspection; and on what date each such inspection took place. [130794]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM chief inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, providing him with the information requested, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw, dated 28 November 2012:

Your recent parliamentary question has been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Since 2005, maintained school inspections have been carried out under section 5 of the Education Act 2005, and more recently the Education Act 2011.

Under these Acts, 19,622 schools, excluding academies, had been inspected by 31 August 2012. Of these, 5,728 schools were judged satisfactory and 520 were judged inadequate at their latest inspection. Lists of those schools with a satisfactory judgement and those with an inadequate judgement, and their respective inspection dates, are provided with this response.

Under section 5, Ofsted inspects maintained schools (nursery, primary, secondary and special schools and pupil referral units), state-funded independent schools such as academies and certain non-maintained special schools in England. All schools, excluding

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academies, have been included in this response. On 1 January 2012 Ofsted implemented a new school inspection framework for section 5 inspections. This reflected amendments made by the Education Act 2011 and included a sharper focus on the judgements that matter most, even more time spent in the classroom and a continued drive to raise standards, particularly in literacy. On 1 September 2012 there were further changes to the inspection framework, which saw the introduction of the ‘requires improvement’ judgement to replace the ‘satisfactory’ grade.

The most recent official statistics release covering the judgements of maintained school inspections carried out between 1 September 2011 and 31 August 2012 was released on 27 November 2012. As part of this release there are data on the latest inspections of all schools at their latest inspection on 31 August 2012 and this can be accessed on the Ofsted website:

http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/resources/advanced-resources-search/results/Maintained%20schools/2/all/any/200/any

Schools: Uniforms

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has any plans to work with schools to ensure that the cost of school uniforms is kept to a minimum. [130863]

Mr Laws: This is a matter for the school governing body but we have asked governing bodies to give high priority to the cost considerations when setting the school's uniform policy. Our advice available via the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/schoolethos/a0014144/guidance-for-schools-on-school-uniform-and-related-policies

is that no school uniform should be so expensive as to leave pupils or parents feeling unable to apply to or attend the school of their choice. Some local authorities offer financial support by providing grants to help with the cost of school uniform.

We have no plans at present to work with schools on this matter, although the Office of Fair Trading wrote to all UK head teachers on 25 October asking them to review the arrangements they make for the sale of school uniforms.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Animal Welfare

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many reported incidents of animal cruelty there have been in England and Wales in the last five years. [129896]

Mr Heath: There is no central record of all cases of reported cruelty to animals. However, the number of offenders found guilty at all courts for “cruelty offences” under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, in England and Wales, from 2007 to 2011, can be viewed in a table, which I will place in the Library of the House.

The number of offenders found guilty at all courts under section 1 of the Protection of Animals Act 1911, in England and Wales, for the periods from 2007 to 2011, can also be viewed in the table, which I will place in the Library of the House.

In addition, the RSPCA report that the number of complaints of cruelty to animals investigated by their inspectors was as follows:

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 Number

2007

137,245

2008

140,575

2009

141,280

2010

159,686

2011

159,759

The RSPCA figures are the numbers of cases reported by their inspectors and do not include cases resolved before inspectors' involvement.

Animals: Exports

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many transport failures there have been which have required the unexpected unloading and reloading of live animals for export at (a) ports and (b) other locations in the UK in the last five years. [131370]

Mr Heath: No centralised records of such events are available.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what specific training is provided for (a) farmers, (b) traders, (c) assembly-centre operators and (d) employees at ports involved in the trade of live animals for export via UK ports in accordance with EU Council Regulations. [131374]

Mr Heath: The EU legislation (Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005) requires that all transporters of animals and personnel at assembly centres are trained in the relevant technical rules laid down in Annex I to that legislation. In addition, those transporting the major species of livestock must obtain a certificate of competence, the format of which is set out in Chapter III of Annex IV of the same legislation. Other than transporters of

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animals, there is no requirement for any other personnel at ports to be trained or to obtain a certificate of competence.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what liaison there is between Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency inspectors and inspectors overseas on the whole-journey animal welfare considerations of live animals which originate from the UK for export to other countries. [131376]

Mr Heath: Article 24 of Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005 requires that each member state has a national contact point to provide a single point of contact for the exchange of information and mutual assistance in relation to cross-border trade. Animal Health Veterinary Laboratory Agency (AHVLA) will report any concerns or channel any requests for information from other member states, through this contact point in DEFRA's Animal Welfare team. Any infringements found in relation to transporters authorised in other member states will be reported to that member state in line with article 26(3) of the regulation. Similarly, any infringement or query on the operation of UK transporters in other member states will be reported to the national contact point in DEFRA who will liaise with AHVLA on what action needs to be taken in accordance with article 26(4) of the regulation.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the major final European destinations are of (a) sheep, (b) pigs, (c) cattle and (d) horses sent as live animal exports from the UK. [131377]

Mr Heath: The following figures have been obtained from the EU Commission's TRACES Data Warehouse and show the largest four importers for each species of animals from the UK. The last column reflects the total number to all countries for the current year to date 2012.

Live animals exported from UK
 Numbers exported to the main countries of destination 
 CountryNumberCountryNumberCountryNumberCountryNumberTotal number of exported animals

Sheep

Belgium

8,827

France

23,670

Ireland

338,682

Netherlands

13,672

388,394

Pigs

Belgium

319

Spain

653

Ireland

5,795

Malta

529

7,643

Cattle

Spain

20,472

France

2,022

Ireland

14,830

Italy

973

38,901

Horses

Belgium

1,099

Spain

899

Germany

1,365

Netherlands

1,183

6,973

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether there have been any changes in the ability of RSPCA inspectors to inspect live animal exports at ports or in transit since the High Court judgment of October 2012. [131378]

Mr Heath: RSPCA inspectors have no statutory powers to inspect either road vehicles using the ferry, nor the vessel itself, at ports or in transit. The recent High Court Order did not change that situation. When export consignments are inspected either in transit or at ports, it is up to the RSPCA to seek permission from the transporter to inspect their vehicle or, where relevant, the vessel.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what factors were taken into account by the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency inspectors in the decision to allow the transportation of live animals on 21 November 2012 from Ramsgate; and if he will make a statement. [131380]

Mr Heath: There were no additional factors in relation to the decision by Animal Health Veterinary Laboratory Agency (AHVLA) to allow the transportation of live animals on 21 November 2012. The decision to sail was made by the captain of the vessel. Prior to the sailing, AHVLA implemented its normal adverse weather procedures. This is a check that involves AHVLA seeking

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clarification from the captain of the vessel that he is satisfied it is safe for him and the vessel to sail, and that there would be no risk to the welfare of the livestock being shipped. The captain confirmed to AHVLA staff that he was satisfied it was safe on both counts. In addition, AHVLA contacted the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) which is responsible for all issues relating to the seaworthiness of the vessel, including any limitations on it sailing during rough weather. The MCA confirmed that the weather conditions were windy, with low wave height and moderate sea. This was in line with those weather details given to AHVLA by the captain of the vessel. There was no indication at that time that the weather conditions would deteriorate to such a degree that the sailing would need to be aborted.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will carry out a full review into the animal welfare considerations of the live export trade from the UK. [131381]

Mr Heath: The Government have no plans to carry out such a review.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has made an assessment of the recommendation of the European Parliament Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development Report on the protection of animals during transport. [131382]

Mr Heath: Yes. The Government agree with many of the findings including the call for better enforcement of existing welfare in transport legislation across the EU and acknowledgement that there is no scientific basis for a ban on journeys over eight hours for all major species of livestock.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he has made an assessment of the effects of the conditions under which live animals are transported over significant distances on the risk of transmission and spread of diseases. [131383]

Mr Heath: The EU legislation on animal welfare during transport (Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005) acknowledges that the unloading and subsequent reloading of animals could be a source of stress to animals and could also, in certain conditions, lead to the spread of infectious diseases. For this reason the legislation strengthened the conditions under which control posts used for resting livestock have to operate (amending Council Regulation (EC) 1255/97) and introduced detailed journey logs that have to be completed by the transporter at certain stages of the journey.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the potential benefits of conducting animal slaughter and meat processing at the closest possible proximity to the breeding location. [131384]

Mr Heath: The Government are in favour of a trade in meat and germ plasm in preference to one in live animals. It also believes that slaughter and subsequent processing should be as close to the place of production as possible.

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Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the conclusion of the Commission Report presenting the state of implementation of Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 that severe problems during animal transport persist mainly due to poor compliance and implementation by member states. [131385]

Mr Heath: At the Agriculture Council meeting on 18 June 2012, the report by the Commission was discussed. The former DEFRA Minister of State, the right hon. Member for South East Cambridgeshire (Sir James Paice), entered the following statement for the Minutes, which summarises this Government's position on the report:

"The UK agrees with the EU Commission that the number one priority is better enforcement of the existing legislation on welfare during transport, across the EU. However, in addition, it would like to see a review of long journey rules to take account of existing and emerging scientific evidence, including that highlighted by the recent EFSA report, particularly in relation to revising the journey time down to a maximum of 12 hours for horses going to slaughter. We also wish to see discussion on greater protection for infant livestock, particularly calves, taking into account the Commission's own written guidance on the treatment of unweaned calves on long journeys and considering the very long distances some unweaned calves have to travel, which can involve multiple cycles of 19 hour journeys. We believe it is important that the rules should be updated where there is sufficient evidence to support such change. We note that the recent EFSA report does not include any recommendation suggesting that all major species of livestock going to slaughter should face the same maximum journey length in all cases."

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to ensure UK compliance with Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 of 22 December 2004 Point (5) on the transport of animals over long journeys, including animals for slaughter. [131386]

Mr Heath: UK compliance with Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005, including compliance with the rules on journey times and resting periods contained in Chapter V of Annex I, is routinely monitored and reported by the EU Commission through audit inspections by their Food and Veterinary Office (FVO).

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the (a) major regional sources and (b) regional economic effects are of the UK trade in live animals for export for (i) sheep, (ii) pigs, (iii) cattle and (iv) horses. [131387]

Mr Heath: No assessment has been made by the Government of the major regional sources of livestock going for export or on the regional economic impact these exports might have. Live animals going for export make up a tiny fraction of those animals that are transported for slaughter within the UK.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many on-the-spot checks have been made by veterinary experts from the European Commission in collaboration with the authorities of the member state in accordance with the procedures laid down in

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Article 45 of Regulation (EC) No 882/2004[21] of the European Parliament and of the Council in each of the last five years. [131388]

Mr Heath: The Food and Veterinary Office of the EU Commission undertakes regular audit inspection visits to the UK to assess compliance with Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005. During these visits, FVO inspectors will undertake accompanied inspections of farms, markets, ports and any other place of rest or transfer that they believe will assist them in their audit. No records of the number of these visits are held centrally.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he last met EU Commissioner Borg or his predecessor to discuss the live animal export trade from the UK to other EU countries. [131389]

Mr Heath: There have been no meetings between the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and Commissioner Borg, or his predecessor Commissioner Dalli specifically to discuss the animal export trade. However, the subject was raised informally by the former Minister of State, the right hon. Member for South East Cambridgeshire (Sir James Paice), with Commissioner Dalli, on a number of occasions.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will give consideration to revising the coalition agreement to include a policy to prevent the live export of animals. [131390]

Mr Heath: No. Such a policy would be illegal. However, the Government will continue to ensure that those that transport livestock for slaughter follow the rules on such trade and any infringements of the legislation will lead to the appropriate enforcement action being taken.

Ash Dieback Disease

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many trees in national parks have contracted ash dieback disease; and what the estimated cost is of felling those diseased trees. [130065]

Mr Heath: There are currently four confirmed infections in total that lie within national park boundaries, three in England and one in Scotland. There is one known site of infection in each of the following national parks.

England

Lake District—Recent Planting (this incidence of infection was added to Forestry Commission (FC) “Chalara” maps on 20 November 2012).

The Broads—Wider Environment (this incidence of infection was added to FC “Chalara” maps on 20 November 2012).

Dartmoor—Recent Planting (this incidence of infection was added to FC “Chalara” maps on 9 November 2012).

Scotland

Cairngorms—Recent Planting (this incidence of infection was added to FC “Chalara” maps on 8 November 2012).

Newly-planted diseased trees and diseased plants and trees in nurseries will be traced and destroyed, as once young trees are infected they succumb quickly. The cost

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of this work has not yet been estimated. More mature trees will not currently be removed, as they are valuable to wildlife, take longer to die and can help us learn more about genetic strains that might be resistant to the disease.

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when the Food and Environment Research Agency will publish the results of the consultation on the Rapid Assessment of Chalara fraxinea. [130548]

Mr Heath: The replies to the consultation have been valuable in developing a control plan, which is due for completion and publication in December. The results of the consultation will be published at the same time.

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs when he expects the Food and Environment Research Agency to submit a summary of the monitoring of ash dieback to the European Commission. [130753]

Mr Heath: The first finding of ash dieback in the UK was reported to the European Commission in March 2012 and updates given to the June, September, October and November meetings of the Commission's Standing Committee on plant health. We will continue to report significant developments to the Standing Committee at its monthly meetings.

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent estimate his Department has made of the cost to local authorities of (a) felling and burning and (b) managing in situ, trees infected with ash dieback disease. [130930]

Mr Heath: We have not made any estimates of these costs. We are currently developing a control plan for delivering our objectives for tackling Chalara fraxinea. Until this is in place we will not be in a position to consider the cost of managing the outbreak.

Climate Change

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the effect of climate change on recent (a) flooding and (b) other extreme weather events in the UK; and if he will make a statement. [131391]

Richard Benyon: It is too soon to make any such assessment. It is very difficult to attribute particular flood events to the effects of climate change. However, more extreme rainfall events, with increasing flood risk, are one of the likely effects and the Government are aware of one study which suggests that climate change increased the risk of floods during autumn 2000. DEFRA will keep such evidence under review.

DEFRA has made an assessment of anticipated changes in river flows and sea levels based on UK Climate Projections 2009. Guidance has been provided on how these changes should be taken into account by flood risk management authorities when apprising flood defence schemes.

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The Government laid the Climate Change Risk Assessment before Parliament in January 2012. This is an independent research project that analyses the key risks and opportunities that changes to the climate bring to the UK across 11 key sectors.

Dangerous Dogs

Mr Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he plans to take to help reduce the number of attacks on assistance dogs; and if he will make a statement. [130822]

Mr Heath: DEFRA has proposed a package of measures aimed at tackling irresponsible dog ownership and reducing the number of dog attacks generally, including attacks on assistance dogs. We have also been working closely with the Home Office to ensure that their new measures to deal with antisocial behaviour will also include such behaviour where it involves dogs. DEFRA's proposals were subject to recent public consultation and we are finalising the analysis of the 27,000 or so responses before making an announcement on a way forward shortly.

Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

Jim Fitzpatrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many people were prosecuted in 2011 under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991; and if he will make a statement. [130214]

Mr Heath: The number of persons proceeded against at all magistrates courts for offences under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England and Wales in 2011 was 1,485.

Floods

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what recent assessment he has made of the effect of dredging and maintaining watercourses on levels of recent flooding; and if he will make a statement; [130921]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effect of drainage on the level of recent flooding; and if he will make a statement. [130936]

Richard Benyon: The Environment Agency has not made an assessment of the effect of dredging and maintaining watercourses or of drainage on the levels of recent flooding.

However, in 2010 the Environment Agency carried out a pilot study at several locations in England to assess the effect of dredging and other watercourse maintenance, such as de-silting and removing gravel and obstructions, on flood risk to people and property.

The study showed that watercourse maintenance can reduce flood risk locally but it is not suitable in all locations and should be considered on a location-by-location basis.

Where it is not suitable other flood risk measures, such as building walls or embankments to protect property, providing storage upstream or changing land use or land management practices, can be more effective.

The study report and further details on watercourse maintenance are available on the Environment Agency's website.

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Floods: Sewers

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for what reasons he has not brought into force the sustainable drainage provisions in Schedule 3 to the Flood and Water Management Act 2010. [130985]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA remains fully committed to implementing Schedule 3 to the Flood and Water Management Act 2010, i.e. sustainable drainage systems. Progress has been made to encourage the use of sustainable drainage systems. For example, the National Planning Policy Framework says that when determining planning applications, local planning authorities should ensure flood risk is not increased elsewhere and that it gives priority to the use of sustainable drainage systems.

On implementing the provision of the Act, DEFRA has worked closely with key stakeholders and technical experts (including the Environment Agency, local authorities, developers and water companies) to develop draft National Standards and proposals for implementation, and these were consulted on earlier in 2012. On 13 August 2012, DEFRA published the summary of responses to the consultation on proposals to implement the requirements for sustainable drainage systems in England.

The consultation responses raised a number of issues that require more work and clarification before the policy is implemented. DEFRA officials will be engaging with stakeholders to work towards solutions to the challenging issues that need to be resolved to ensure implementation is effective.

Biosecurity: Advertising

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much the Forestry Commission spent on advertising its bio-security protocols for the periods (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12; and how much it plans to spend in 2012-13. [128637]

Mr Heath: The Forestry Commission has spent no money on advertising biosecurity protocols during these periods. However, a range of activities have been undertaken to communicate plant health issues and biosecurity guidance. Details are provided as follows:

2009-10

Three Plant Health Days delivered by Forest Research.

Working with the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) on a stakeholder engagement as part of the main Phytophthora Programme (staff time 22 days).

2010-11

Working with FERA on communications as part of the main Phytophthora programme (250 days of staff time). This included public awareness;

Production of two films on bio-security; a stand at the Chelsea Flower Show, which featured biosecurity (cost: £20,000).

Three Plant Health Days delivered by Forest Research.

South West Phytophthora ramorum stakeholder seminars (cost: £2,000).

2011-12

Working with FERA on communications as part of the main Phytophthora programme, and subsequently the Tree Health Plant Bio-security action plan 300 days staff time—general public awareness; films; Chelsea Show (£20,000).

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Produced 5000 biosecurity guidance z-cards, (cost: £1,800).

£1,000 spent on North West P.ramorum events.

Two events on Oak Processionary Moth.

P.ramorum Forest Health day jointly with Forest Research, (cost: £1,700).

2012-13

Working with FERA on Tree Health and Plant Biosecurity communications: 410 days staff time. Direct costs approx £20,000 for the Chelsea show in May 2013, further £20,000 for the two films. Also produced a suite of bio-security posters £1,500.

Produced 40,000 more biosecurity guidance z-cards, (cost: £4,000).

APF sector event biosecurity banners (cost: £280).

Plant health updates for Land Agents (cost: £2,700).

South West Woodlands Show, Phytophthora ramorum awareness (cost: £2,445).

Three Plant Health Days delivered by Forest Research, biosecurity is a part of these.

Phytophthora Ramorum communications toolkit and events (cost: £4,500).

Oak Processionary Moth communications toolkit and events (cost: £3,500).

Chalara Communications toolkit (cost: £15,000).

Chalara symptoms video (cost: £1,800).

Tree health reporting smartphone app (cost: £8,000).

Foxes: Urban Areas

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent estimate he has made of the number of urban foxes in (a) England, (b) London, (c) Lancashire and (d) Hyndburn constituency. [130929]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA has not made an estimate of the population of foxes over the last 10 years. Fox population figure estimates for British mammals, published by the Mammal Society in 2004, indicate that the fox population in Great Britain was around 258,000.

Polar Bears

Angela Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether he has received any representations from the Canadian Government on the US administration's proposal to add polar bears to CITES Appendix I. [130920]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA has not received any representations from the Canadian Government about the USA's proposal to include the polar bear in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). Representatives from Canada (and the USA) will be attending EU meetings in early December at which the UK will be represented to discuss the proposal. We look forward to hearing their views.

Seas and Oceans: Scotland

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how he plans to ensure that the sustainable development of the marine environment will be plan-led rather than development-led under the revised timetable for the Scottish National Marine Plan. [131319]

4 Dec 2012 : Column 720W

Richard Benyon: The marine policy statement agreed and published by the UK Government and devolved Administrations in 2011 sets out the policies that will contribute to the achievement of sustainable development in the UK marine area. It provides the framework for the preparation of all marine plans and for all decisions affecting the UK marine area. The Scottish Government's approach to marine planning and decision making is the responsibility of the Scottish Government within the framework of the agreed marine policy statement.

Work and Pensions

Access to Work Programme

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what his Department's budget is for the promotion of access to work to (a) disabled people and (b) employers. [131251]

Mr Hoban: The Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) does not have a single budget for the promotion of Access to Work (AtW) to either disabled people or employers. The Department's approach to raising awareness of the ATW provision is to work through the Specialist Disability Employment Team (SDEP) umbrella, which promotes social inclusion for the disabled across the labour market.

Expenditure to raise disability awareness will therefore be made by a number of functions within DWP, and is not attributed to a single customer group. Increasingly, awareness is raised by directing inquiries to the Government’s digital channel through the You Gov Portal, and the AtW website has an average of 850 visits per week.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people who have applied for access to work have not had their support preferences fully met; and for what reasons in each such case. [131252]

Esther McVey: Access to Work is a specialist disability programme delivered by Jobcentre Plus, providing practical advice and support to disabled people and their employers, helping them overcome work related obstacles, resulting from disability. Access to Work funds the support that is beyond what an employer should provide, as reasonable adjustments.

Customer's work related support needs are assessed and the Access to Work adviser negotiates agreements with the customer and their employer, about the support that will be provided and the contribution that Access to Work will make. Access to Work aims to ensure that every eligible customer's support needs are fully met.

Customers who are unhappy with the support offered by Access to Work can ask for their application to be reconsidered. Since April 2012, 162 customers have asked for their application to be reconsidered and in 82 cases the original decision was changed. Of the 80 cases where the original decision was upheld, 18 people asked for review by a more senior person and of these five were successful in having the original decision overturned. The subsequent decision, whether upheld or overturned, is fed back to the original adviser and the adviser's manager, helping improve the quality of future decision making.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 721W

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people applied for access to work but did not receive it in each of the last five years by (a) impairment type, (b) constituency, (c) size of employer, (d) age that people started receiving access to work and (e) gender. [131253]

Esther McVey: The information requested is not available.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people received access to work in each of the last five years by (a) impairment type, (b) constituency, (c) size of employer, (d) age that people started receiving access to work and (e) gender. [131254]

Esther McVey: Information on size of employer is not available. The tables, which I will place in the Library, show the number of individuals helped by the Access to Work programme in each of the last five financial years between 1 April 2007 and 31 March 2012. The figures are broken down further by primary medical condition, parliamentary constituency, age and gender.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the cost of administering access to work is; and what proportion of that cost was due to (a) applications, (b) assessments, (c) review, (d) monitoring and (e) processing payments. [131255]

Mr Hoban: The administrative spend for the 12 months to March 2012 was £7.2 million, and for the seven months to the end of October 2012 £4 million.

The requested breakdown of the administrative cost is not available.

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the reasons for the reduction in the number of disabled people receiving support through access to work; and if he will make a statement. [131258]

Esther McVey: In 2010, the Department brought in changes such as cost share and a standard equipment list to clarify the sort of support we would not expect Access to Work to fund. However the list has not always operated as effectively as it might have done, and may have discouraged some applications.

This is why on 19 November I announced a range of measures aimed at strengthening and improving the Access to Work scheme. These included:

The removal of the standard list of equipment from guidance. Instead Access to Work advisers will work constructively with employer and employee to identify where Access to Work can assist.

Removing cost share for employers who employ between 10 and 49 people. This brings these relatively small businesses in line with provisions that already exist for micro businesses.

Carer’s Allowance

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will ensure that the introduction of personal independence payments will not result in a (a) loss of carer's allowance from existing claimants and (b) reduction in the projected future caseload for carer's allowance. [129792]

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Esther McVey: The available information on the impact of PIP on carer's allowance is published in the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Impact Assessment (May 2012). The impact on carer's is covered in paragraphs 23-26. This can be found on the Department's website at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/dla-reform-wr2011-ia.pdf

DWP publishes information on forecasted caseloads and expenditure on a range of benefits, including carer's allowance, at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd4/index.php?page=expenditure

Disability Living Allowance

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many households identified as being affected by the benefit cap contain at least one person in receipt of disability living allowance. [131546]

Mr Hoban: Within the benefit cap household definition, all households, who have at least one member receiving disability living allowance will be exempt from the benefit cap, therefore there will be no households affected.

For the purposes of the benefit cap, a household or family unit refers to the benefit claimant, their partner (if they have one) and any child or qualifying young person for whom that adult or couple are responsible for and who lives with them. Some houses may comprise of more than one household unit for the purpose of income-related benefits, for example, where an adult child is in receipt of disability living allowance in their own right. In this example, the household benefit unit comprising the DLA recipient's parent(s) would not be exempt.

Employment and Support Allowance

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many households identified as being subject to the benefit cap contain at least one person in receipt of employment and support allowance support group. [131547]

Mr Hoban: All households who have at least one member receiving employment and support allowance (support component) will be exempt from the benefit cap, therefore none will be affected.

For the purposes of the benefit cap, a household or family unit refers to the benefit claimant, their partner (if they have one) and any child or qualifying young person for whom that adult or couple is responsible and who lives with them. Some houses may comprise of more than one household unit for the purpose of income related benefits, for example, where an adult child is in receipt of the support component of employment and support allowance in their own right. In this example, the household benefit unit comprising the ESA recipient's parent(s) would not be exempt.

Housing and Council Tax Benefits

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many local authorities operate a 100 per cent disregard of the war disablement pension and widow's pension for housing and council tax benefit claims; whether his Department issues

4 Dec 2012 : Column 723W

guidance on the level of disregard local authorities should provide; and if he will make a statement. [131357]

Steve Webb: Housing benefit and council tax benefit regulations permit local authorities to disregard beyond the standard disregard of £10 a week the whole or part of any war disablement pensions, war widow's pensions, war widower's pensions and guaranteed income payments under the Armed Forces and Reserve Forces Compensation Scheme. Departmental housing benefit and council tax benefit guidance for local authorities makes this clear.

Having made such a modification a local authority may revoke or vary it at any time. This Department does not hold information about whether and the extent to which individual local authorities apply the discretionary disregard.

Housing Benefit

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the (a) highest and (b) median weekly housing benefit claim was in each (i) local authority area and (ii) parliamentary constituency in each year since 1997-98. [130569]

Steve Webb: Information on individual level weekly housing benefit amounts prior to November 2008 is not held by the Department.

Information on individual level weekly housing benefit amounts by parliamentary constituency prior to 2012 is not readily available, and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

It is not possible to give the highest weekly housing benefit award for any individual due to data disclosure issues. The available information for (a) the payment band in which the highest individual award falls and (b) the median weekly housing benefit award by local authority, from 2009 to 2012, and parliamentary constituency, for 2012, will be placed in the Library.

Hyperactivity

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have received support from (a) Access to Work, (b) Work Programme and (c) Work Choice in (i) Vauxhall constituency and (ii) England and Wales since May 2010; [131480]

(2) how many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder his Department has helped into employment since May 2010. [131488]

Esther McVey: The information requested is not available for Access to Work, Work Choice or Work programme customers. The Department does not collect information on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder for those on out-of-work benefits.

Industrial Diseases

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people have been diagnosed with a reportable industrially-related disease in the UK in the last five years. [131401]

4 Dec 2012 : Column 724W

Mr Hoban: The number of new cases of occupational diseases reported under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) in Great Britain during the last five years (2007-08 to 2011-12) was 9,397 and is summarised in the following table:

 Number of reported disease cases under RIDDOR

2007-08

1,920

2008-09

1,969

2009-10

1,789

2010-11

1,774

2011-12

1,945

Total

9,397

Information from a variety of data sources indicates that the number of new cases of diseases reported each year under RIDDOR is likely to be a substantial underestimate of the total number of diagnoses that are reportable according to the RIDDOR criteria.

Social Security Benefits

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many households had been contacted by his Department advising them that they may be affected by the household benefit cap by September 2011; and how many were (a) couples with children, (b) couples without children, (c) single person households, (d) lone parents, (e) households with one to four children, (f) households with five or more children, (g) private tenants, (f) tenants of social landlords and (g) in temporary or emergency accommodation. [131548]

Mr Hoban: Households were sent letters notifying them that they may be affected by the incoming benefit cap in May 2013. The first direct mail letters were sent in May 2012 and further letters were sent in July 2012 and September 2012 for new cases. Information on the number of letters sent has previously been published by the department here:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=adhoc_analysis

The published figures show each of the categories requested.

No letters were sent out prior to May 2012.

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the number of (a) households and (b) individuals who (i) became liable to the household benefit cap and (ii) ceased to be liable to benefit cap (A) nationally and (B) in each region in the most recent month for which figures are available. [131549]

Mr Hoban: The Department has published information, through its impact assessment and ad hoc statistical releases, regarding the number of households and individuals it expects may be impacted by the benefit cap when it is introduced from April 2013. This information is available at:

http://statistics.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=adhoc_analysis

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/benefit-cap-wr2011-ia.pdf

4 Dec 2012 : Column 725W

By using the number of letters sent to households and individuals as a proxy, a comparison can be made to the number of households and individuals who were liable for the household benefit cap. Although figures for the most recent month are not available, the number of letters sent to households and individuals between the July direct mail and the start of the September direct mail can be found at the national level in the published information. Information is not available to answer the remaining parts of the question.

Work Capability Assessment

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the ability of the work capability assessment to establish the capability to work of a person with a fluctuating medical condition. [131516]

Mr Hoban: The assessment already gives people with fluctuating conditions the opportunity to explain how their condition varies over time.

The health care professionals who carry out the WCA are trained to ask about and take account of fluctuation. The assessment is not a snapshot—if a person cannot carry out a function repeatedly and reliably they will be treated as unable to carry out that function at all.

In his second independent review of the work capability assessment, Professor Harrington addressed the particular concerns raised by the way the WCA works for people with fluctuating conditions. He asked leading charities, to make recommendations to refine the physical descriptors used in the WCA and the Department is currently working closely with the charities to create a strong evidence base for suggested changes to both the physical and the mental descriptors.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will publish the guidance his Department provides to Atos Healthcare for delivery of work capability assessments. [131517]

Mr Hoban: The central guidance, the WCA handbook for Atos health care professionals, is already published online:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/wca-handbook.pdf

Work Programme

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions based on the Work programme data published by his Department on 27 November 2012, what is the Key Performance Measure after 12 months, as defined in the Invitation to Tender for the Programme, for (a) JSA 18 to 24, (b) JSA 25 and over and (c) ESA flow. [131412]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on Work programme referrals, attachments and job outcomes for (a) JSA 18 to 24, (b) JSA 25 and over and (c) ESA flow can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

4 Dec 2012 : Column 726W

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many Work programme participants have obtained job outcomes; and how many were (a) men, (b) women and (c) from an ethnic minority. [131447]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on how many Work programme participants have obtained job outcomes; and how many were (a) men, (b) women and (c) from an ethnic minority can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users can be found at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many Work programme participants who have obtained job outcomes since June 2011 had previously been unemployed for (a) more than 12, (b) more than 24 and (c) more than 36 months. [131525]

Mr Hoban: This information is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many participants in the Work programme have started an apprenticeship since June 2011. [131529]

Mr Hoban: The Department does not hold this information. Participants who start apprenticeships is not recorded separately from other Work programme job outcome statistics.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average number of sustainment payments made subsequently to their Work programme provider has been in respect of Work Programme participants who have secured job outcomes. [131532]

Mr Hoban: The following table shows the number of Work programme sustainment payments per paid job outcome by provider.

As the Work programme has not been in place long enough for a significant number of job outcomes to accrue the maximum number of possible sustainment payments these figures should be considered as indicative and will be subject to change over time as the programme reaches steady state.

To maintain consistency with released statistics and to allow reasonable time to allow job outcomes to accrue sustainment payments, job outcomes and sustainments paid after the end of July 2012 have been excluded from the table.

It will be some time before we can give firm results. For example, we will not be able to provide definitive ratios of sustainments to job outcomes for payment groups with 13 four week sustainment payments until mid 2013 and mid 2014 for those payment groups with 26 four week sustainment payments.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 727W

Table 1: Sustainments paid per paid job outcome (for job outcomes paid up to end July 2012)
Work programme providerAverage number of sustainment payments

All

1.87

Reed in Partnership

2.16

Pertemps

2.28

Ingeus UK LTD

2.10

Working Links

2.15

Careers Development Group

1.67

Business Employment Services

1.74

JHP Group Ltd

2.18

Seetec

1.14

Serco Ltd

1.95

A4E Ltd

1.54

Newcastle College Group

1.29

Avanta Enterprise Ltd

2.20

EOS-Works Ltd

2.39

Maximus Employment UK Ltd

1.64

Prospects Services Ltd

0.09

G4S

2.26

Rehab Jobfit

0.79

ESG

1.77

Notes: 1. Figures are given to two decimal places. 2. Job outcomes: The Work programme IT payment system update went live in April 2012. All outcomes prior to this were recorded clerically and uploaded to the system during April and May 2012. The outcome date for these is based on the date the information was uploaded to the system. For job outcomes recorded after this, outcome dates are based on the date that payments were made to providers following pre-payment validation processes to confirm job outcomes. The manual pre-payment validation checks may take time to conduct resulting in a delay between the job outcome being claimed and the date the payment is made to providers, and hence recorded in the statistics. Validation procedures continue to improve to streamline the process as issues are identified. For further details around issues and delays to job outcome payments please see the information note available here: http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page-wp 3. Sustainments are only paid once a job outcome has been achieved and paid by DWP. 4. Sustainments can be paid for up to 13, 20 or 26 four week periods depending on payment group after a paid job outcome has been achieved. 5. The Work programme has not been in place long enough for any job outcome to reach its maximum number of sustainment payments. The first job outcomes achieved from September 2012. Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate (IGS)

Justice

Civil Proceedings: Mental Capacity

John Hemming: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people whose litigation capacity was challenged were found (a) incapacitous and (b) to actually have capacity in each year since 2005; [131247]

(2) how many people have applied to have their litigation capacity reinstated in each year since 2005; and how many of those applications were granted; [131248]

(3) how many times the Official Solicitor has been requested to review his appointment for a person deemed not to have litigation capacity in each year since 2005; and in how many cases he has concluded that he was wrongly appointed in each such year; [131249]

(4) how many people who were found to be incapacitous had a litigation friend appointed in each of the last five years. [131250]

Mrs Grant: The information requested is not available centrally and can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 728W

Community Orders

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the cost of introducing punitive elements to all community orders in a full financial year. [131572]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice published its response to the “Punishment and Reform: Effective Community Sentences” consultation on 23 October 2012. The impact assessment that we published alongside the Government response estimated that the cost of introducing a punitive requirement to all community orders could be between £15 million and £40 million per year.

The full impact assessment that MOJ published alongside the Government response can be found on the MOJ website on the following webpage:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/effective-community-services-1/results/community-sentences-response-ia.pdf

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of whether the inclusion of a punitive element in a community order will improve reoffending rates. [131577]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice published its response to the ‘Punishment and Reform: Effective Community Sentences’ consultation on 23 October 2012. We are legislating to require courts to include a punitive element in every community sentence unless there are exceptional circumstances.

We have undertaken research to determine the relative effectiveness of community order requirements at reducing reoffending, for offenders with similar characteristics. This research indicates that certain punitive requirements can, reduce reoffending behaviour depending on the combinations of other requirements with which punitive requirements are used.

This research is published on the MOJ website and can be located on the following webpage:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/publications/research-and-analysis/moj-research/niesr-report.pdf

Debt Collection

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he last met trade and representative bodies from the enforcement and bailiff industry. [131149]

Mrs Grant: The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice has not met with any trade or representative bodies from the enforcement and bailiff industry.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when he plans to issue a response to the consultation on Transforming bailiff action which closed on 14 May 2012. [131151]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice is currently finalising the Government response to this consultation paper and will issue this in due course.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 729W

Drugs: Children

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many children have been (a) prosecuted and (b) imprisoned for (i) all and (ii) Class A drugs offences in each of the last three years. [131402]

4 Dec 2012 : Column 730W

Jeremy Wright: The number of juveniles (ages 10 to 17) proceeded against at magistrates courts and sentenced at all courts for all drug offences and all Class A drug offences, in England and Wales, for the years 2009 to 2011, can be viewed in the following table.

Juveniles(1) proceeded against at magistrates courts and sentenced at all courts for all drug offences and all Class A drug offences, England and Wales, 2009-11(2,3)
OffenceOutcome200920102011

Total drug offences(4)

Proceeded against

6,969

6,676

5,758

 

Sentenced—of which:

6,309

5,914

5,157

 

Immediate custody

223

222

181

     

Drug offences relating to Class A drugs(5)

Proceeded against

834

786

671

 

Sentenced—of which:

663

606

537

 

Immediate custody

167

138

116

(1) Includes defendants aged between 10 and 17 years old. (2) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) Includes unlawful importation and exportation of, inciting another to supply, possession of, production of, supply of, and possession with intent to supply a controlled drug of class A, B, C or unspecified class plus other miscellaneous indictable and summary drug offences. (5) Includes all offences listed under footnote 4 where it is specifically known that the offence applies to a Class A controlled drug. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services— Ministry of Justice

Legal Aid

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the total (a) budget and (b) amount of money spent on legal aid was in each of the last five years. [129919]

Jeremy Wright: The funding, provision for legal aid forms part of the overall departmental spending limit for the Ministry of Justice (MOJ). The overall spending limit specifically includes a budget provision for legal aid. The MOJ'S budget may change throughout the year and the amount spent on legal aid can and has exceeded the final published budget for legal aid in some years. However, the MOJ has remained within its overall spending limit.

The following table sets out the latest grant in aid for legal aid and spending for each of the last five years:

£ million
 2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

Legal aid expenditure (cash)

2,03l

2,105

2,149

2,134

2,039

Last published legal aid sub delegation (grant in aid)

2,050

2,099

2,145

2,193

2,066

Lincoln Prison

Karl McCartney: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the (a) capital expenditure and (b) revenue costs were for HM Prison Lincoln in each of the last five years. [131595]

Jeremy Wright: The capital and resource expenditure for HMP Lincoln for the last five financial years is shown in the following table.

£ million
Description2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

Major capital

0.4

1.5

3.1

6.8

3.7

Local capital acquisitions

0.021

0.174

0.080

0.024

0.046

Resource expenditure

15.4

15.6

15.5

14.5

14.0

Notes: 1. Figures subject to rounding. 2. The capitalisation threshold increased from £5,000 to £10,000 from 1 April 2010. 3. Figures may not be directly comparable over time due to changes in scope and accounting treatment.

The resource and local capital expenditure is that met directly by the establishment and excludes expenditure met at regional or national level. Local capital acquisitions include purchases of plant and mechanical equipment, and machinery. Expenditure on major capital works is that met at regional or national level.

Offences Against Children: Convictions

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many British citizens have been convicted in UK courts for sexual offences against children abroad since extra-territorial legislation came into force in the UK. [131061]

Jeremy Wright: Court proceedings data held centrally in an aggregated format by the Ministry of Justice provide information on offences provided by the statutes under which proceedings are brought, but not all the specific circumstances of each case. It is not possible to identify separately identify from this centrally held information the jurisdiction in which offences have taken place, nor the nationality of each defendant.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 731W

Offensive Weapons: Sentencing

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many individuals have (a) been prosecuted for and (b) subsequently received a custodial sentence for an offence of carrying a bladed or pointed article in a public place in England and Wales in each of the last seven years. [131300]

Jeremy Wright: The number of individuals proceeded against at magistrates court and sentenced to an immediate custody at all courts for having a bladed or pointed article in a public place in England and Wales, from 2005 to 2011 can be viewed in the table:

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates court and sentenced to immediate custody at all courts for “Having an article with blade or point in public place”(1), England and Wales, 2005-11(2,3)
 Proceeded againstImmediate custody

2005

7,277

965

2006

7,654

1,070

2007

7,356

1,060

2008(4)

7,466

1,373

2009

9,132

1,671

2010

7,972

1,403

2011

7,590

1,529

(1) Criminal Justice Act 1988 as amended by Offensive Weapons Act 1996, S139. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (4) Excludes data for Cardiff magistrates court for April, July and August 2008. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Prisoners: Repatriation

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what progress has been made on the prisoner transfer agreement between the UK and Iraq in relation to Danny Fitzsimons. [130993]

Jeremy Wright: Discussions with Iraq are taking place on the possibility of a prisoner transfer agreement. Such an agreement would enable Iraqi nationals imprisoned in the UK, and British nationals imprisoned in Iraq, to serve their sentences in their own country. Negotiation of prisoner transfer agreements can take some time and it is not possible to say when the discussions with Iraq will be concluded.


Probation

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders currently under supervision by probation trusts have been assessed as (a) tier 1, (b) tier 2, (c) tier 3 and (d) tier 4. [131584]

4 Dec 2012 : Column 732W

Jeremy Wright: The number of offenders supervised by probation trusts under court orders by tier as at 30 June 2012 is provided in the following table. Supervision tier is the level of intervention required with offenders, with tier 1 being the lowest and tier 4 the highest.

Offenders supervised by the Probation Service at end of period under court orders by tier, June 2012, England and Wales
 Number

Community orders:

80,403

Tier 1 (Low)

21,534

Tier 2 (Low/Medium)

19,802

Tier 3 (Medium/High)

34,679

Tier 4 (High)

4,206

Tier not stated

182

  

Suspended Sentence Orders:

40326

Tier 1 (Low)

9,036

Tier 2 (Low/Medium)

10,933

Tier 3 (Medium/High)

18,054

Tier 4 (High)

2,425

Tier not stated

78

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prostitution

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice on which occasions (a) officials and (b) Ministers of his Department met representatives of other Government Departments to determine policy on prostitution since May 2010. [131338]

Damian Green: The Ministry of Justice is responsible for the criminal law on prostitution; the overall lead in this area lies with the Home Office. There have been a number of meetings between my officials and their counterparts in the Home Office on the subject of prostitution during the period referred to.

Public Expenditure

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how the funding received by his Department from the Treasury Reserve was spent in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [131407]

Jeremy Wright: The information on drawdown from the Treasury Reserve is published in the Departmental Supplementary Estimates. The details for 2010-11 and 2011-12 can be seen using the following links. In addition, we have also produced the drawdown details in the following table.

2010-11 Winter Supplementary Estimates

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/8486.htm

2010-11 Spring Supplementary Estimates

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/psr_pse_spring10_11.htm

2011-12 Supplementary Estimate

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/psr_pse_201112.htm

4 Dec 2012 : Column 733W

Details of drawdown from the Treasury Reserve
2010-11
Supplementary EstimateType of fundingAmount (£ million)Purpose

Winter

DEL

139.0

Drawdown of resource reserve claim in relation to the Carter Prisons Capacity programme

    

Spring

DEL

36.0

End Year Flexibility (EYF) drawdown of voted resource in relation to the work force modernisation

  

17.0

EYF drawdown of voted resource in relation to Pleural Plaques Compensation

  

1.4

EYF drawdown of voted resource for Victims of Overseas Terrorism

Total

 

193.4

 
2011-12
Supplementary EstimateType of fundingAmount (£ million)Purpose

Spring

DEL

235.0

Drawdown to cover costs of Pre-Tariff cases within the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

  

51.0

Drawdown to cover cost pressures emerging in the Ministry

Total

 

286.0

 

Victims Commissioner

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the new Victims Commissioner will be required to seek representations from a wide range of organisations offering services sought by families of homicide victims. [131150]

Mrs Grant: The Victims Commissioner has a statutory duty to promote the interests of victims and witnesses and to encourage good practice in their treatment. In fulfilling these statutory obligations, I expect the Victims Commissioner to listen to the views of victims and witnesses and their representative organisations, including those offering services sought by families of homicide victims.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Apprentices: Essex

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills if he will estimate the number of (a) apprenticeship and (b) advanced apprenticeship starts in (i) Southend West constituency, (ii) the Southend Borough Council area and (iii) Essex in each of the next five years. [131237]

Matthew Hancock: Table 1 shows the provisional number of apprenticeship programme starts in (a) Southend West parliamentary constituency, (b) Southend on Sea and Essex local education authorities by level for the 2011/12 academic year.

We publish apprenticeship starts at region, local education authority and parliamentary constituency levels of geography, therefore data for Southend borough council is not presented.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 734W

Provisional data for the 2011/12 academic year provide an early view of performance and will change as further data returns are received from further education colleges and providers. They should not be directly compared with final year data from previous years. Figures for 2011/12 will be finalised in January 2013.

Table 1: Apprenticeship programme starts by geography and level, 2011/12 (provisional)
 Level2011/12 (provisional)

Southend West constituency

Intermediate

390

 

Advanced

190

 

Higher

 

Total

580

   

Southend on Sea local education authority

Intermediate

790

 

Advanced

370

 

Higher

 

Total

1,170

   

Essex local education authority

Intermediate

7,510

 

Advanced

4,020

 

Higher

70

 

Total

11,590

Notes: 1. All figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Geographic breakdowns are based upon the home postcode of the learner. 3. Figures are based on the geographic boundaries as of May 2010. 4. Provisional data for 2011/12 should not be directly compared with data for earlier years. Source: Individualised Learner Record

Apprenticeships are demand led and rely on employers to offer suitable job opportunities. It is therefore difficult to predict the number of apprenticeship places for the next five years.

Information on the number of apprenticeship starts by Geography is published in a supplementary table to a quarterly Statistical First Release (SFR). The latest SFR was published on 11 October 2012:

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_current

http://www.thedataservice.org.uk/statistics/statisticalfirstrelease/sfr_supplementary_tables/Apprenticeship_sfr_supplementary_tables/

Environmental Protection: EU Grants and Loans

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what submissions the Government has made to the recent EU consultation on Guidelines on state aid for environmental protection and environmental support measures in relation to (a) new nuclear power and (b) other matters; if he will publish details of any such submissions; and if he will make a statement. [131008]

Jo Swinson: The UK sent a full response to the public consultation on the European Commission Guidelines on Environmental Protection.

In relation to (a) new nuclear power, the response pointed out that in order to both meet our national and international emissions targets and for security of supply purposes, the new guidelines would have to make some

4 Dec 2012 : Column 735W

provision for flexible support of low carbon technologies including nuclear energy, as state aid may be required in certain circumstances. This however should be subject to strict conditions. This is consistent with the Government's stated policy of no public subsidy for new nuclear generation as set out by the then Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, my right hon. Friend the Member for Eastleigh (Chris Huhne), in his statement to the House on 18 October 2010,

Official Report

, columns 42-46WS.

In relation to (b) the response proposed that the new guidelines should be more supportive to the supply of finance for environmental projects and the need to help industry with the transition to a low carbon economy.

The European Commission has published the responses it received, including that of the UK, on its website.

Export Controls: Israel

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills whether he suspended the export licensing process with regard to exports to Israel at the time of the recent hostilities in Palestine and Israel. [131009]

Michael Fallon: No. Any such formal suspension would be announced to Parliament. We are of course constantly monitoring the situation in the region and we take into account any changes in circumstances during our assessment of export licence applications.

Financial Services: Africa

James Duddridge: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills (1) what steps he is taking to promote UK financial services in growth markets in Africa; [130982]

(2) whether he has had discussions with other Government Departments on promotion of the UK's financial expertise and skills in (a) Africa and (b) elsewhere in the developing world. [130983]

Michael Fallon: As one of the UK's leading industries, UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) actively promotes UK financial services in Africa and elsewhere in the developing world, through a combination of bespoke work for UK financial services companies and the promotion of UK strengths in this sector generally. UKTI's primary partner in this respect is TheCityUK (TCUK) which, with its members, sets the strategic direction for the international promotion of the financial services industry. TheCityUK's sub-Saharan Africa Market Advisory Group was launched in June 2012 to develop and build closer business links between the financial and related professional services sector in the UK and sub-Saharan Africa. To this end, UKTI and TCUK have commissioned independent market research on the scope and reach of opportunities for the financial and professional services industry in South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Angola and Ghana.

The Lord Mayor of London, who is a unique ambassador for the City and the financial, professional and business service sectors in general, will visit Angola, Nigeria and Ghana in 2013, as well as other developing markets including Chile, Peru and Mongolia. The Lord Mayor will be accompanied on these visits by delegations

4 Dec 2012 : Column 736W

from the financial and professional services, and will report back to UKTI and other Government Departments on his visits.

With regard to discussions with other Government Departments, I refer my hon. Friend to my answer on 22 November 2012, Official Report, columns 593-4W, in which I replied that the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills and ministerial team meet regularly with colleagues in both the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and HM Treasury to discuss trade issues, including those relating to the financial services sector.

Instagram Your Policy Scheme

Mark Reckless: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent estimate he has made of the cost of the Instagram Your Policy scheme. [131234]

Jo Swinson: The Instagram Your Policy scheme did not incur any direct costs.

One member of staff spent a total of one hour writing an article for the intranet and promoting the scheme through other internal channels.

This was an internal employee engagement exercise, organised as part of Social Media Week 2012, by the BIS digital communications team. The aim was to encourage staff to try new digital tools, as part of the Civil Service Reform Plan, which encourages greater use of digital within Government.

Overseas Trade

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what recent estimate he has made of the contribution to UK income and growth made by trade with developing nations. [131195]

Michael Fallon: A broad range of evidence suggests that international trade, including trade with developing countries, boosts incomes and growth over the longer term. It enhances competition, encourages greater specialisation and facilitates the dissemination of knowledge and innovation and these boost both the UK's and our partner countries' productivity and hence long-term growth.

Regional Growth Fund

Mr Umunna: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills pursuant to the answer of 8 November 2012, Official Report, column 697W, on Regional Growth Fund, how many Regional Growth Fund bids have been withdrawn under (a) round one and (b) round two; and how many individual awards those correspond to. [128760]

Michael Fallon: Eight bids from round one and 20 bids from round two have withdrawn. The eight withdrawn bids in round one correspond to 11 individual awards as a bid may have multiple counterparties and thus contain a number of individual awards. In round two, it is however also 20 awards, making a total of 31 withdrawn, to update the figures given on 12 November 2012.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 737W

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how funds committed to approved bids for the Regional Growth Fund which have failed the due diligence tests will be used. [131499]

Michael Fallon: The money released by projects that withdraw from the Regional Growth Fund (RGF) will be recycled back into the RGF.

International Development

Developing Countries: Sanitation

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment she has made of the effect of inadequate sanitation, hygiene and toilet facilities in contributing to violence against women across the world. [131538]

Lynne Featherstone: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Rutherglen and Hamilton West (Tom Greatrex) on 29 November 2012, Official Report, column 465W.

Health

Bisphenol A

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 22 October 2012, Official Report, column 625W, on COPHES, whether the Health Protection Agency has conducted any research on measuring levels of Bisphenol A in the human body. [131063]

Anna Soubry: The Health Protection Agency (HPA) lead the UK component of the Consortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale (COPHES) program. In each country, the exposure to cadmium, mercury, phthalates and (passive) environmental tobacco smoke was assessed in up to 120 children and their mothers by sampling urine and/or hair. In six countries exposure to Bisphenol A and Triclosan were also carried out. The UK did not take part in this section of the project. The HPA has not carried out any other research into the levels of Bisphenol A in the UK population.

Cancer

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether there is a uniform policy for the use of the Cancer Drugs Fund in the East Midlands, West Midlands and East Anglia following the recent reorganisation of the NHS in those areas. [131444]

Norman Lamb: NHS East Midlands, NHS East of England and NHS West Midlands form the Midlands and East strategic health authority (SHA) cluster, with each remaining a statutory body within the cluster.

We understand that each SHA has retained its own regional clinically-led panel to make decisions on the use of the Cancer Drugs Fund.

SHA clinical panels are working collectively to promote improved access to cancer drugs.

4 Dec 2012 : Column 738W

Colorectal Cancer

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) who is responsible for determining the willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life year figure for the use of Bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer; [131441]

(2) what the current willingness-to-pay per quality-adjusted life year is for the use of Bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. [131442]

Norman Lamb: Local primary care organisations are responsible for taking funding decisions on drugs and treatments based on an assessment of the available evidence and taking into account guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). The Department has made no assessment of local organisations' willingness-to-pay per quality adjusted life year (QALY) for bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer.

NICE technology appraisal guidance makes recommendations for the national health service on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of drugs and treatments, and the NHS is legally required to provide funding in line with NICE's recommendations.

In developing its guidance, NICE takes into account a drug's incremental cost effectiveness ratio as expressed in cost per QALYs. NICE does not use a fixed threshold in making its recommendations to the NHS but considers the cost per QALY alongside other factors. NICE's methods guide, which explains the way in which NICE uses the cost per QALY, is at:

www.nice.org.uk/aboutnice/howwework/devnicetech/guidetothemethodsoftechnologyappraisal.jsp

NICE has appraised the use of bevacizumab for a number of indications for metastatic colorectal cancer and does not recommend the use of the drug in any of these.

Where a cancer drug is not routinely funded by a primary care organisation, patients may be able to access it through the Cancer Drugs Fund, subject to the decisions of regional clinically-led panels.

Disease Control

Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to address pathogenic resistance to antimicrobials. [130943]

Dr Poulter: The Department is leading work on a new cross government “UK five year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy and Action Plan (2013-18)”. This is due to be published in early 2013.

Drugs: North East

Julie Elliott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) deaths and (b) hospitalisations due to legal high drugs there were in (i) the North East, (ii) Sunderland local authority and (iii) Sunderland Central constituency in each of the last three years. [130997]

Anna Soubry: In respect of substances which have in recent years become subject to control under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971, the Office for National Statistics

4 Dec 2012 : Column 739W

(ONS) has collected information about deaths relating to gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its precursor gamma-butyrolactone (GBL), piperazines (benzylpiperazine—BZP and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine —TFMPP) and cathinones such as mephedrone.

The following table provides the number of deaths relating to these substances for (a) England and Wales,

4 Dec 2012 : Column 740W

and

(b)

the North East region in each year from 2009 to 2011 (the latest year available).

Figures have not been provided for Sunderland local authority and Sunderland central constituency in line with the ONS guidance for protecting confidentiality within birth and death statistics.

Number of deaths related to drug poisoning where GHB/GBL, BZP/TFMPP or a cathinone was mentioned on the death certificate, England and Wales, North East 2009-2011(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
Death (persons)
 200920102011

England and Wales

25

22

29

North East

2

3

0

(1) Based on boundaries as of August 2012. (2) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year. (3) Figures exclude deaths of non-residents. (4) Cause of death related to drug poisoning was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD 10). The ICD-10 codes for drug poisoning are: F11-F16, F18-F19—Mental and behavioural disorders due to drug use (excluding alcohol and tobacco) X40-X44—Accidental poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances X60-X64—Intentional self-poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances X85—Assault by drugs, medicaments and biological substances Y10-Y14—Poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances, undetermined intent (5) Figures presented here may not agree with figures presented for each substance separately as where more than one drug is mentioned on a death certificate the death will be counted in more than one category if the substances are presented separately. Source: Office for National Statistics

The information which is collected centrally about hospital admissions for drug poisoning does not distinguish between any of these newer substances. In “Statistics on Drug Misuse England, 2012” published on 29 November, the Health and Social Care Information Centre highlighted a consultation on whether additional codes should be included in collecting statistics on hospital admissions for drug poisoning.

Health Services: East of England

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many staff of each primary care trust in (a) Suffolk, (b) Norfolk and (c) Cambridgeshire received redundancy payments in each of the last three years; and what the value was of such payments. [130923]

Dr Poulter: Information on redundancy numbers and costs is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is in the following table:

Primary care trust (PCT) exit packages information
2009-10
OrganisationTotal number of exit packagesTotal cost of exit packages (£000)Cost of compulsory redundancies (£000)Cost of other exits (£000)

Cambridgeshire PCT

0

0

0

0

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

1

70

0

70

Norfolk PCT

0

0

0

0

Peterborough PCT

1

14

14

0

Suffolk PCT

1

9

0

9

2010-11
OrganisationTotal number of exit packagesTotal cost of exit packages (£000)Cost of compulsory redundancies (£000)Cost of other exits (£000)

Cambridgeshire PCT

7

64

0

64

Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT

7

167

22

145

Norfolk PCT

9

402

222

180

Peterborough PCT

3

59

16

43

Suffolk PCT

59

1,390

0

1,390

2011-12
OrganisationTotal number of exit packagesTotal cost of exit packages (£000)Cost of compulsory redundancies (£000)Cost of other exits (£000)

Cambridgeshire PCT

4

336

0

336

Great Yarmouth and Waveney per

5

148

148

0

Norfolk PCT

25

969

943

26

Peterborough PCT

8

378

0

378

4 Dec 2012 : Column 741W

4 Dec 2012 : Column 742W

Suffolk PCT

17

271

271

0

Notes: 1. Exit packages includes compulsory redundancies and other departures. The latter includes the cost of early retirements (except those due to ill health), voluntary redundancies, Mutually Agreed Resignation Scheme, pay in lieu of notice etc. However, it is not possible to separately identify the value of compulsory and voluntary redundancies from these costs from the data collected. Therefore, an overall figure for redundancies is not separately identifiable. 2. The expense associated with these departures may have been recognised in part or in full in a previous period. Source: 2010-11 and 2011-12 PCT and NHS Trusts Audited Summarisation Schedules

The data are taken from the audited summarisation schedules of PCTs, from which NHS elements of the Department's annual report and accounts are prepared. The disclosure in the accounts reports the number and value of exit packages taken by staff leaving in the year. The expense associated with these departures may have been recognised in part or in full in a previous period.

Information on Great Yarmouth and Waveney PCT has been provided as it covers the geographical area of both Norfolk and Suffolk. As the lowest level of detail at which financial data is collected by the Department for statutory accounting is by PCT, we are unable to disaggregate this data any further.

Information on Peterborough PCT has been provided as it covers part of the geographical area of Cambridgeshire. As the lowest level of detail at which financial data are collected by the Department for statutory accounting is by PCT, we are unable to disaggregate this data any further.

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much has been spent by (a) Suffolk Primary Care Trust and (b) the East of England Strategic Health Authority on (i) management and (ii) other business consultants in each of the last three years. [130924]

Dr Poulter: Spending on consultants by Suffolk Primary Care Trust (PCT) and the East of England Strategic Health Authority (SHA) is set out in the following table:

£000
Organisation2009-102010-112011-12

Suffolk PCT

878

861

1,665

East of England SHA

6,370

3,854

742

Source: NHS audited summarisation schedules for 2009-10 to 2011-12