Natural Resources

Barry Gardiner: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) on how many occasions the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs has discussed (a) the work of the Natural Capital Committee and (b) the state of natural capital in the UK. [131634]

(2) if the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs will discuss the annual State of Natural Capital Report. [131635]

Mr Letwin: In line with the practice of previous governments, information relating to the proceedings of Cabinet Committees, including what issues were discussed, is generally not disclosed as to do so could harm the frankness and candour of internal discussion.

Simon Wright: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what progress has been made by the Office for National Statistics towards inclusion of the value of natural capital into the UK environmental accounts by 2020. [131789]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated 5 December 2012:

As Director General of the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking, what progress has been made by the Office of National Statistics (ONS) towards inclusion of the value of natural capital into the UK environmental accounts by 2020 (131789).

In November 2011, the ONS published a paper "Towards a Sustainable Environment - UK Natural Capital and Ecosystem Economic Accounting" to outline its approach to including natural capital in the UK Environmental Accounts. In terms of ecosystems accounting, the paper identified the compilation of a pilot ecosystems account for woodlands as an important first step in the process of increasing the coverage of natural capital within the UK Environmental Accounts. The ONS has already started work on a pilot woodlands ecosystem account.

In July 2012, the ONS published a consultation on "Accounting for the value of nature in the UK", which set out the rationale for the accounts, provided a tentative outline timetable of development work, and sought views on the scope of the accounts and relative priorities for their development.

The consultation, which was completed in September 2012, was followed up by a stakeholder workshop in October to discuss the priorities and scope of a roadmap which will provide a more detailed timetable for the development of the accounts. The roadmap will be published on 19 December 2012, which will provide a detailed timetable for including natural capital into the UK Environmental Accounts by 2020.

Pay

Mr Raab: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many employees in his Department were paid (a) between £80,000 and £100,000 per year and (b) in excess of £100,000 per year in each of the last five years. [131849]

Mr Maude: The following table shows the number of staff in my Department that were paid (a) between £80,000 and £100,000 per year and (b) in excess of £100,000 per year, in each of the last five years.

However it is important to note that there have been substantial machinery of government changes since May 2010, with functions brought into the Cabinet Office from elsewhere, and therefore figures from before May 2010 are not directly comparable.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 847W

As at April each year£80,000 to £100,000More than £100,000

2012

53

44

2011

49

37

2010

40

45

2009

59

60

2008

58

56

Public Sector: Standards

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office in what circumstances the publication of performance data by individual public service providers is regarded as inappropriate because it pre-empts the subsequent publication of official statistics. [131829]

Mr Hurd: Preserving the independence and quality of official statistics is overseen by the UK Statistics Authority. Each individual set of official statistics has a process that underpins it, and the responsible Departments should consider how that relates to other pieces of data. When necessary, the National Statistician can be consulted for professional advice.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office with reference to his Department's Open Public Services White Paper, whether the commitment that providers of public services from all sectors will need to publish information on performance applies in the case of services for which official statistics are already published. [131830]

Mr Letwin: In the Open Public Services 2012 update the Government committed to ensure that key data about public services (including data about user satisfaction and performance of providers from all sectors) are in the public domain in a comparable and accessible form.

In meeting this commitment publication may take a number of forms, including the publication of official statistics. Arrangements are decided by the respective Department or organisation.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office with reference to his Department's Open Public Services White Paper, for which public services the commitment that providers of public services from all sectors will need to publish information on user satisfaction has so far been (a) implemented and (b) not implemented; and if he will make a statement. [131871]

Mr Letwin: In the Open Public Services 2012 update the Government committed to ensure that key data about public services (including data about user satisfaction and performance of providers from all sectors) are in the public domain in a comparable and accessible form.

The release of data is a process of continuous improvement and we have made significant progress in releasing user satisfaction, spending and performance data in a range of individual service areas. All Whitehall Departments have published Open Data Strategies which will continue to put the Open Data agenda deep in the delivery of frontline Government services and will result in the release of more accessible data.

These were published in June 2012 and can be accessed at:

www.data.gov.uk

6 Dec 2012 : Column 848W

Deputy Prime Minister

Lord Lieutenants

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister whether potential candidates for lord lieutenant posts are judged against the Nolan principles on standards in public life. [131901]

Miss Chloe Smith: A lord lieutenant is Her Majesty's representative in the county. They are not public appointments, but those appointed are expected to maintain the highest standards in public life.

Business, Innovation and Skills

Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what steps the Government is taking to sign up to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative as a membership country. [131847]

Jo Swinson: The Government is committed to strong transparency rules and the need to encourage more countries to sign up to the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative. There have been meetings with NGOs and industry to discuss this issue.

Pay

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills how many employees in his Department were paid (a) between £80,000 and £100,000 per year and (b) in excess of £100,000 per year in each of the last five years. [131851]

Jo Swinson: The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) was created in June 2009 following the merger of the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills and the Department for Enterprise and Regulatory Reform.

The number of employees in BIS who were paid (a) between £80,000 and £100,000 per year and (b) in excess of £100,000 are set out in the BIS Annual Reports of 2009/10, 2010/11, 2011/12.

 At 31 March:
 201020112012

£80,000 to £99,999

67

51

44

£100,000 +

44

37

37

Regional Growth Fund

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what proportion of successful bids in each round of the Regional Growth Fund in (a) the East Midlands and (b) England have payments outstanding. [131498]

6 Dec 2012 : Column 849W

Michael Fallon: A payment is outstanding when a beneficiary has put in a properly documented claim that we have not yet paid. We aim to process and pay grant claims within 30 days of them being submitted.

There are currently no payments outstanding in the East Midlands. There are six outstanding payments in England. Two of these are in relation to Round 1 projects.

Health

Abu Qatada

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to the NHS has been of services provided to Abu Qatada since 2001. [131876]

Dr Poulter: Patient medical records are confidential and can be accessed only by medical professionals involved directly in that patient's care, therefore the costs associated with an individual's treatment are not collected centrally.

Advertising

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his Department plans to spend on (a) television, (b) radio, (c) print and (d) online advertising in (i) 2011-12 and (ii) 2012-13. [131554]

Dr Poulter: The Department's media spend for 2011-12 is as follows:

Older people media spend
Campaign2011-12 spend (£)

Dementia

 

Television (TV)

960,000

Radio

280,000

Print(1)

270,000

Online

100,000

  

Flu

 

Print(1)

60,000

  

Stroke

 

TV

720,000

Radio

40,000

  

Cancer

 

TV

1,590,000

Radio

670,000

Print(1)

1,140,000

Online

370,000

  

111

 

Radio

30,000

Print(1)

560,000

(1) Print includes pharmacy bags, outdoor and door drops.
Change4Life media spend
Campaign2011-12 spend (£)

Alcohol

 

TV

810,000

Online

100,000

  

Summer activity/Games4Life

 

TV

1,080,000

6 Dec 2012 : Column 850W

Print

10,000

Online

650,000

  

January healthy eating

 

Print

350,000

Online

270,000

Tobacco media spend
Campaign2011-12 spend (£)

Smokefree Generation

 

TV

1,100,000

Radio

250,000

Online

40,000

  

January Quit Kit 2012

 

TV

1,600,000

Radio

410,000

Online

80,000

Total media spend
 2011-12 spend (£)

Total TV

7,860,000

Total Radio

1,680,000

Total Print

2,390,000

Total Online

1,610,000

Notes: 1. Advertising spend is defined as covering only media spend (inclusive of agency commissions but excluding production costs, COI commission (where applicable) and VAT). 2. These figures do not include departmental recruitment/classified advertising costs and ad hoc spend under £10,000. 3. These figures may include occasional minor spend through COI by NHS organisations, to supplement national campaigns in their area. While this expenditure has been excluded as far as possible so that this spreadsheet reflects central departmental spend, it would incur disproportionate cost to validate that every item of NHS expenditure has been removed.

We are unable to provide planned spend figures for 2012-13 public health campaigns as we are currently in that financial year and campaign budget allocations are still being finalised. A full evaluation of all 2012-13 campaigns, including costs, will be completed and published in line with the Department's freedom of information publication scheme.

Alcoholic Drinks: East Midlands

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many alcohol-related hospital admissions there were in (a) High Peak constituency, (b) Derbyshire and (c) the East Midlands in each of the last five years; and if he will make an assessment of those figures compared to the UK averages for such admissions. [131502]

Dr Poulter: The tables contain the sum of the estimated alcohol attributable fractions for admissions for High Peak parliamentary constituency, Derbyshire county primary care trust (PCT) of residence, East Midlands strategic health authority (SHA) of residence, England (residence), population data and crude admission rates for 2007-08 to 2011-12.

It should be noted that a parliamentary constituency breakdown is not possible before 2008-09.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 851W

It is not possible to make an assessment of such admissions compared to UK averages, only England figures can be provided for comparison.

It should be noted that these figures are not a count of people and do not represent an actual number of admissions that were attributable to alcohol.

Alcohol attributable fractions (AAF) are based on the proportion of a given diagnosis or injury that is estimated to be attributed to alcohol. Some diagnoses or injuries will, by definition, be wholly attributable to

6 Dec 2012 : Column 852W

alcohol and have an AAF of one, others will only be partly attributable to alcohol and have an AAF greater than zero, but less than one. Diagnoses or injuries that are not attributable at all to alcohol will have an AAF of zero.

These figures are derived by summing all AAFs for the relevant admissions and should therefore only be interpreted as an estimate of the number of admissions that can be attributed to alcohol.

A sum of the alcohol attributable fractions(1) for admissions to hospital in High Peak parliamentary constituency(2), Derbyshire county PCT of residence(3), East Midlands strategic health authority of residence and England (residence)(4), population estimates(5) and crude rate per 100,000 population for the years 2007-08 to 2011-12(6)
Region (of residence)
 2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

High Peak constituency

n/a

1,909

1,840

2,042

2,270

Derbyshire county PCT

13,373

15,344

16,488

17,935

17,566

East Midlands SHA

74,932

82,734

91,502

98,318

97,592

England

855,229

940,403

1,052,068

1,163,565

1,215,083

Population estimates
 2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

High Peak constituency

91,600

92,100

92,400

92,600

n/a

Derbyshire county PCT

720,700

724,400

726,300

729,800

737,400

East Midlands SHA

4,397,000

4,429,400

4,451,200

4,481,400

4,537,400

England

51,106,200

51,464,600

51,809,700

52,234,000

53,107,200

Crude rate per 100,000 population
 2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

High Peak constituency

n/a

2,073

1,991

2,205

n/a

Derbyshire county PCT

1,856

2,118 '

2,270

2,458

2,382

East Midlands SHA

1,704

1,868

2,056

2,194

2,151

England

1,673

1,827

2,031

2,228

2,288

(1) Alcohol-related admissions The number of alcohol-related admissions is based on the methodology developed by the North West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO), which uses 48 indicators for alcohol-related illnesses, determining the proportion of a wide range of diseases and injuries that can be partly attributed to alcohol as well as those that are, by definition, wholly attributable to alcohol. Further information on these proportions can be found at: www.nwph.net/nwpho/publications/AlcoholAttributableFractions.pdf The application of the NWPHO methodology has recently been updated and is now available directly from HES. As such, information about episodes estimated to be alcohol related may be slightly different from previously published data. Alcohol attributable fractions are not applicable to children under 16. Therefore figures for this age group relate only to wholly-attributable admissions, where the attributable fraction is one. (2) Parliamentary constituency This is the Westminster parliamentary constituency where the patient lives. This is only available for 2008-09 onwards. (3) Primary Care Trust/Strategic Health Authority(PCT/SHA) residence The SHA or PCT containing the patient’s normal home address. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated as they may have travelled to another SHA/PCT for treatment. A change in methodology in 2011-12 resulted in an increase in the number of records where the PCT or SHA of residence was unknown. From 2006-07 to 2010-11 the current PCT and SHA of residence fields were populated from the recorded patient postcode. In order to improve data completeness, if the postcode was unknown the PCT, SHA and country of residence were populated from the PCT/SHA value supplied by the provider. From April 2011-12 onwards if the patient postcode is unknown the PCT, SHA and country of residence are listed as unknown. (4) Assessing growth through time (Inpatients) HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, changes in activity may be due to changes in the provision of care. (5) Office for National Statistics (ONS) Population Estimates Population figures have been rounded to the nearest 100. ONS mid year population estimates are used for PCT, SHA and England areas. ONS publishes experimental population estimates at parliamentary constituency level up to mid-2010: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/sape/parliament-constituency-pop-est/index.html (6) Crude Rate per 100,000 population Care should be taken when interpreting crude rates since different areas have different populations. Alcohol fractions are assigned to a range of conditions and causes according to the gender and age of the patient therefore areas with different population profiles are expected to have a different number of alcohol attributable admissions. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Cancer

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the current average waiting time is for cancer treatments in (a) Suffolk Primary Care Trust and (b) England and Wales. [131611]

Anna Soubry: Statistics on average waiting times for cancer treatment are not collected centrally. The cancer waiting time standard of a maximum wait of two months (62 days) from urgent referral for suspected

6 Dec 2012 : Column 853W

cancer to first cancer treatment was introduced for all patients in England from December 2005. Statistics showing overall performance are published on a quarterly basis on the Department's website at:

http://transparency.dh.gov.uk/cancer-waiting-times/

6 Dec 2012 : Column 854W

Performance against this standard for the last period for which figures are available (July, August and September 2012) show the following performance levels for Suffolk Primary Care Trust (PCT) and England.

OrganisationTotal treated for cancer following urgent referral for suspected cancerNumber treated within two months (62-days)Percentage performanceOperational standard(3) (percentage)

Suffolk PCT(1)

415

342

82.4

85

England(2)

30,310

26,454

87.3

(1) The PCT figure is drawn from the quarterly commissioner based official statistics on cancer waiting times, which are derived from patient records submitted by NHS providers. (2) The England figure relates to ‘all English providers’ and is drawn from the quarterly provider based national statistics on cancer waiting times, the most complete assessment of performance available to the Department of Health. (3) As with all monitored waiting times, 100% achievement is not possible and therefore not expected from the NHS. The Department has published “operational standards” that identify an expected level of performance based on case mix, clinical requirements, potential levels of patients unfit for treatment and patient choice.

The Department does not hold or publish statistics on cancer waiting times for Welsh national health service organisations.


Cancer: Easington

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health where the nearest cancer centre is at which cancer patients in Easington constituency can receive stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment for tumours of the (a) prostate, (b) lung, (c) liver and (d) brain. [131428]

Anna Soubry: The information requested is not centrally held. The hon. Member may wish to contact the North of England Cancer Network, which may hold some relevant information.

Care Homes: Fees and Charges

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 22 November 2012, Official Report, column 575W, on care homes: fees and charges, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of capping care costs at £60,000 using the micro-simulation model set out on pages 33 to 34 of his Department's July 2012 report entitled Caring for Our Future: progress report on funding reform; and if he will place in the Library a copy of the calculation of the estimate. [131921]

Norman Lamb: The progress report gives the costs of five specific caps within a wide range of £25,000 to £100,000 to illustrate and give a sense of the scale of costs for all the different cap levels. We do not hold information on the cost for a £60,000 cap.


Diabetes

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to increase the number of patients not previously diagnosed with diabetes who receive diabetes testing. [131410]

Anna Soubry: Eligible people between the ages of 40-74 are offered the NHS Health Check. This programme, expected to reach some 15 million people, is a risk assessment and risk management programme for vascular disease and as such it will also identify those at high risk of diabetes.

According to the evidence base used to develop the programme, the NHS Health Check has the potential to detect at least 20,000 cases of diabetes or kidney disease earlier, improving their health outcomes. It could also prevent 4,000 people a year from developing diabetes by offering appropriate lifestyle advice.

The NHS Health Check programme has been running since 2009, with phased implementation. The programme is a key performance measure in the NHS Operating Framework for 2012-13, and take-up by the eligible population is an indicator in the Public Health Outcomes Framework. It has been mandated to local authorities from April 2013.

Family Nurse Partnership Programme

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many families have received assistance from family nurse partnerships in each year since the inception of the scheme. [131835]

Dr Poulter: The Government has committed to increase the number of places on the Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) programme to at least 13,000 by April 2015. Good progress is being made with 10,000 places available at November 2012.

FNP nurses visit families regularly over two and a half years from early in pregnancy until their child reaches two years of age. From its inception in April 2007, to the end of November 2012, 11,861 families have enrolled on FNP in England.

The number of families benefiting from FNP in each full year since its inception was:

 Number

2007-08

1,185

2008-09

1,778

2009-10

3,855

2010-11

5,615

2011-12

6,755

2012-13(1)

7,385

(1 )To date (1 April to 30 November).

6 Dec 2012 : Column 855W

Health Services: Foreign Nationals

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many health tourists have been treated (a) by NHS South Birmingham and (b) in Birmingham in each of the last three years; [131456]


(2) what the cost to the NHS was of treating non-EU health tourists in (a) England, (b) NHS South Birmingham and (c) Birmingham in each of the last three years. [131457]

Anna Soubry: Anyone not ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom, classed as an overseas visitor, is chargeable for national health service hospital treatment unless an exemption from charges applies under Regulations. However, any chargeable overseas visitor who has an urgent or immediate need for treatment will be provided with it even if they have not paid in advance, and any debts will then be pursued.

As the NHS does not categorise and record data under a definition of “health tourist”, the Department does not hold the information requested. However, the Department does hold data from NHS trusts’ and primary care trusts’ accounts relating to income received from overseas visitors liable for charges. This means the total amount that they invoiced overseas visitors for NHS hospital treatment, not what they received from them in payment. The figures for the last three years are provided in the following table. The Chairman of Monitor has provided similar data for NHS foundation trusts. The data include any charges to overseas visitors from the European Union.

Income received from overseas visitors
£000
 2009-102010-112011-12

England

26,927

35,433

32,738

NHS South Birmingham(1)

89

68

70

Birmingham(2)

236

277

452

(1) Incorporating University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Women's NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham Children's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Birmingham, Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust and South Birmingham PCT. (2) Incorporating NHS bodies within NHS South Birmingham, plus Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust and Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust. Source: NHS Trust and PCT Audited Summarisation Schedules and audited foundation trust data from Monitor.

Hospitals: Food

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what guidelines his Department issues to hospitals for the use of glucose-fructose syrup in meals served to patients; [131435]

(2) whether his Department provides guidelines to food manufacturers on the use of glucose-fructose syrup in food products. [131436]

Anna Soubry: The Department does not provide guidelines on the use of glucose-fructose syrup either to food manufacturers or to hospitals.

Last year the Government issued a challenge to the nation to reduce its overconsumption of calories. Food and drink manufacturers are already making a contribution to helping people reduce their calorie intake by signing up to the Responsibility Deal calorie reduction pledge.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 856W

Action being taken under the pledge includes reductions in the sugar content of food and drink.

As part of the Government's improving hospital food programme, we encourage hospitals to adopt Government Buying Standards for Food and Catering Services. These include criteria that will help move food provision towards healthier options.

Hospitals: Infectious Diseases

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients contracted (a) MRSA and (b) other hospital-acquired infections in NHS hospitals in each NHS hospital trust in England and Wales in each of the last three years. [131612]

Dr Poulter: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections and C. difficile infections are at their lowest levels since mandatory surveillance began. Compared to the 12 months to May 2010, the latest annual data show that MRSA bloodstream infections have fallen by 48% and C. difficile infections by 38%.

Data on health care associated infections in Wales are collated and published by the Welsh Healthcare Associated Infection Programme. Information on all health care associated infections covering England is not collected routinely by the Health Protection Agency. However, the agency does collect data on specific health care associated infections in England, such as MRSA bacteraemia, Clostridium difficile infection, and Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, that are detected and reported by an acute NHS Trust laboratory.

The information on these infections has been placed in the Library.

Hospitals: Private Finance Initiative

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) annual cost, (b) the total cost and (c) length of contract is for the private finance initiative contracts with (i) Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woolwich and (ii) Princess Royal University Hospital, Farnborough; and what (A) financial and (B) special conditions attach to each contract. [131555]

Dr Poulter: Information on the national health service bodies (NHS trusts, NHS foundation trusts and primary care trusts) which have private finance initiative contracts can be found on the Treasury's website at:

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/d/pfi_current_projects_ list_march_2012.xls

The health sector schemes are clearly marked “Department of Health” (column C) and the NHS schemes “DH-Acute (ie Hospitals)” (column E). Row 425 of the projects sheet shows details for the Princess Royal University Hospital (Bromley), and row 426 for the Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Woolwich). Each row contains information on a project's capital value, annual unitary charge payments, financial close date, contract duration and the private sector counterparty companies and their sub-contractors.

The data show that the annual unitary charge for financial year 2011-12 for the Princess Royal University Hospital was £37.2 million and that for Queen Elizabeth Hospital was £26.6 million. The total estimated payments over the 30 year operational lifetime of each contract

6 Dec 2012 : Column 857W

are respectively £1.5 billion and £1.0 billion (the payments are subject to meeting agreed performance and quality standards and include an annual uprate assumption for inflation of 2.5%).

The annual unitary charges for these two schemes—as for many others—include not just the financing costs for initial construction but also the costs of building maintenance and many non-clinical support services (cleaning, catering, portering etc) provided over the lifetime of the contract. The hon. Member may wish to contact South London Healthcare NHS Trust in regard to the detailed terms and conditions of these two contracts.

Internet

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on (a) strategy and planning, (b) design and build, (c) hosting and infrastructure, (d) content provision and (e) testing and evaluation for its websites in each of the last two years; and how much has been allocated for each such category of expenditure in 2012-13. [131560]

Dr Poulter: The Department has spent the following:

2010-11£

Managed service

 

(c) hosting and infrastructure

727,744

  

Projects

 

(a) strategy and planning (b) design and build (d) content provision (e) testing and evaluation

429,940

2011-12£

Managed service

 

(c) hosting and infrastructure

928,125

  

Projects

 

(a) strategy and planning (b) design and build (d) content provision (e) testing and evaluation

398,950

2012-13 estimated expenditure£

Managed service

 

(c) hosting and infrastructure

976,600

  

Projects and contract exit

 

(a) strategy and planning (b) design and build (d) content provision (e) testing and evaluation

(1)500,000

(1) Includes closedown, decommissioning and exit costs

It is not possible to break down the costs of projects into the four elements of strategy and planning, design and build, content provision and testing and evaluation.

Muscular Dystrophy

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many unplanned emergency admissions of people with (a) muscular dystrophy and (b) other neuromuscular diseases there were to hospitals in (i) Greater Manchester, (ii) the North West and (iii) England in the latest period for which figures are available. [131822]

6 Dec 2012 : Column 858W

Norman Lamb: The information requested for muscular dystrophy is shown in the following table. Other neuromuscular conditions cannot be identified separately within the source data.

Count of emergency finished admission episodes (FAEs)(1) with a primary diagnosis of muscular dystrophy(2) for (i) selected primary care trusts (PCTs) of main provider located in Greater Manchester(3), (ii) North West Strategic Health Authority (SHA) of main provider(3), and (iii) England for the year 2011-12
Activity in English national health services hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
 Greater ManchesterNorth WestEngland

2011-12

*

16

81

(1) An emergency finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one health care provider where the method of admission was emergency (between 21 and 28). FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital. ICD-l0 Code used: G71.0 — Muscular dystrophy. (3) This indicates the PCT or SHA area within which the organisation providing treatment was located. Greater Manchester is defined as the following PCTs of main provider: 5HG—Ashton, Leigh And Wigan PCT 5HQ—Bolton PCT 5JX—Bury PCT 5NQ—Heywood, Middleton And Rochdale PCT 5NT—Manchester PCT 5J5—Oldham PCT 5F5—Salford PCT 5F7—Stockport PCT 5LH—Tameside And Glossop PCT 5NR—Trafford PCT. Data QualityHospital Episode Statistics (HES) are compiled from data sent by more than 300 NHS trusts and PCTs in England and from some independent sector organisations for activity commissioned by the English NHS. Health and Social Care Information Centre liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. Small numbersTo protect patient confidentiality, figures between 1 and 5 have been replaced with “*” (an asterisk). Where it was still possible to identify figures from the total, additional figures have been replaced with “*”. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Nurses: North-East

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate he has made of the (a) current and (b) future supply of and demand for urgent care trained nurses within Teesside, East Cleveland and North Yorkshire; [131860]

(2) if he will meet the hon. Member for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland to discuss urgent care provision in East Cleveland. [131877]

Dr Poulter: Information on numbers of urgent care trained nurses is not centrally held.

Changes to the size and shape of the work force are the responsibility of local employers and are not determined centrally. Local health care organisations, with their knowledge of the patients that they serve, are best placed to plan and deliver a work force appropriate to the needs of their patients, based on clinical need and sound evidence.

I would however be happy to meet the hon. Member to discuss urgent care provision in East Cleveland.


Patients: Death

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will publish the most recent standardised mortality ratio for each NHS hospital trust. [131609]

Dr Poulter: The standardised hospital-level mortality indicator is published on the NHS Choices website:

www.nhs.uk

6 Dec 2012 : Column 859W

Primary Care Trusts

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 29 November 2012, Official Report, column 504W, on health services, what the 18 unallocated functions are. [131896]

Anna Soubry: Since my answer of 29 November, Official Report, column 504W, on health services, the number of unallocated functions has reduced from 18 to five. These are listed in the following table.

These are limited to localised primary care trust (PCT) functions and do not affect the relevant PCT's individual operational or statutory duties. As these are local issues raised in individual PCTs, and are not replicated around the country, the work to resolve the future hosting of these functions is being taken forward locally.

PCT function descriptionPCT

Fountains Hall Medical Practice

Bradford and Airedale PCT

Joint Interface Team

Shropshire County PCT

Other hosted contracts

Bradford and Airedale PCT

South East Coast Health Policy Support Unit

Sussex PCT Cluster

Thames Valley Research Management and Governance

Oxfordshire PCT

Social Services: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department has spent on social care costs in Birmingham in each of the last five years; and what it plans to spend in each of the next three financial years. [131459]

Norman Lamb: Social care is a local service, delivered by local authorities for their local populations. Local spending on social care is therefore not set by the Department of Health, but determined by councils, according to their local priorities and pressures. The best source of information on spending decisions in Birmingham is the council itself.

The Department for Communities and Local Government also publishes expenditure data for local authorities, which are available online at gov.uk. The latest publication is “Local authority revenue expenditure and financing England: 2011 to 2012 individual local authority data”.

Social Services: Cambridgeshire

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the adequacy of supply of care staff in Cambridgeshire. [131918]

Norman Lamb: It is the responsibility of care commissioners, such as local authorities working with social care employers, to ensure the adequacy of supply of the social care work force who provide care for the local population in Cambridgeshire.

My hon. Friend may wish to approach Cambridgeshire county council for information on the supply of care staff in Cambridgeshire.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 860W

Social Services: Finance

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made on implementing the recommendations of the Dilnot Commission; and if he will make a statement. [131500]

Norman Lamb: The Government published a progress report on funding reform in July 2012. The progress report set out that the Government agrees the principles of the Commission's model—financial protection through capped costs and an extended means test—would be the right basis for any new funding model. It is our intention to base a new funding model on them if a way to pay for it can be found. There are important questions that need to be addressed about how those principles could be applied to any reformed system and we are engaging with stakeholders to explore the issues.

We are taking definitive steps now to pursue several important recommendations made by the Dilnot Commission. This includes the introduction of universal deferred payments for residential care from April 2015 so that nobody will have to sell their home in their lifetime to pay for care. In addition, we will introduce for the first time a national eligibility threshold for adult care and support in England from April 2015 so that people have consistent access across the country. We have also committed to providing a clear, universal and authoritative source of national information about the health and care and support system to improve the information available to support people who have care needs.

A copy of the “Caring for our future: progress report on funding reform” published in July 2012 has already been placed in the Library.

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will publish the (a) methodology and (b) evidential basis on which the Special Administrator for South London Healthcare NHS Trust has concluded that it is possible to transfer 30% of the work of a full accident and emergency department to community services. [131894]

Anna Soubry: This is a matter for the Trust Special Administrator appointed to South London Healthcare NHS Trust. He is expected to work independently of the Government in developing and consulting on a draft report, and will in due course make final recommendations to the Secretary of State about securing a sustainable future for services provided by the trust. The draft report is available at:

www.tsa.nhs.uk

and is out for public consultation until 13 December.

Surveys

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will place in the Library a copy of the results of his Department's most recent staff survey; which organisation carried out that survey; and what the cost of the survey was. [131561]

6 Dec 2012 : Column 861W

Dr Poulter: A copy of the results of the October 2012 Department's people survey will be placed in the Library in the new year. The results will similarly be published publicly on the Department's website at that time:

www.dh.gov.uk

The survey was carried out by ORC International Ltd as part of the civil service people survey, which is carried out across a number of civil service organisations, co-ordinated by the Cabinet Office.

The cost of the survey will be approximately £20,000 and this covers costs for both the Department and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. This is around 50% lower than the cost of the survey in 2009-10 (£40,390).

Taxis

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on taxi fares in each of the last two years. [131562]

Dr Poulter: The Department spent the following amounts on taxi fares during the last two full financial years:

2010-11: £154,934

2011-12: £139,791.

These figures include expenditure from both Administration and Programme budgets. During the same period NHS Connecting for Health (NHS CFH) spent the following:

2010-11: £87,675.73

2011-12: £68,372.95.

NHS CFH Travel and Subsistence policy makes it clear that the use of taxis is subject to there being a health and safety reason or where either public transport is not available or the number of staff travelling together make this the best value for money method of travel.

International Development

Developing Countries: Agriculture

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to ensure that development aid supports smallholder farmers in developing countries. [131857]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID provides support for smallholder farmers in many countries through a wide range of implementing partners. In at least 13 countries in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, DFID is investing in public goods, such as infrastructure and research, which benefit smallholders. Through other country programmes DFID is increasing the market opportunities for smallholders to buy inputs, such as fertiliser, and to sell their produce. Examples of our direct support for smallholders include:

supporting land tenure in Rwanda which will provide 4 million poor men and women with title to the land they farm;

supporting a Farm Input Subsidy Programme in Malawi to help 1.5 million poor farmers increase their agricultural productivity.

DFID also invests in key multilateral organisations which provide support for smallholder agriculture. For example:

6 Dec 2012 : Column 862W

funding the International Fund for Agricultural Development to help smallholders in about 40 countries to adapt to climate change;

supporting the international agricultural research organisation, CGIAR, to develop drought-tolerant maize, which benefits more than 2 million smallholders in sub-Saharan Africa.

Rwanda

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which projects funded by her Department in Rwanda are to be cut in 2013. [131911]

Justine Greening: As my written ministerial statement of 30 November 2012, Official Report, column 38WS, explained, I have decided not to release the £21 million general budget support payment to Rwanda, due to be paid in December 2012. I have instructed my officials to provide advice on options for how the UK can continue to help the poorest in Rwanda.

Sudan and South Sudan

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent discussions she has had on the situation in Sudan and South Sudan; and if she will make a statement. [131858]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK remains strongly committed to supporting peace, development and good governance in both Sudan and South Sudan. We continue to press both countries to implement the agreements signed in Addis Ababa on 27 September, and to resolve outstanding areas of disagreement in line with the African Union Peace and Security Council's communiqué of 24 October. We are also pressing the Government of Sudan to find peaceful solutions for the conflict in Darfur, and for the conflicts in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile, where we are also delivering the same messages to the Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North. During my recent visit to South Sudan, I discussed DFID's development and humanitarian programme with members of the Government of South Sudan, members of the National Legislative Assembly of South Sudan, representatives from South Sudanese civil society, and international partners including the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General and the UN Humanitarian Co-ordinator. The Secretary of State for International Development has also met the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs to discuss the international response to the humanitarian situation in South Sudan and in Sudan. Ministers and officials will continue to make clear to both Sudan and South Sudan that long-term, peaceful relations are in their best interests.

Education

Academies: Finance

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will place in the Library the value of Local Authority Central Services Equivalent Grant being paid to all converter academies that had converted prior to September 2011 for the year 2012-13; and if he will show the school's local authority and its LAESTAB number alongside the schools in each case. [122803]

6 Dec 2012 : Column 863W

Mr Laws: The Department is currently looking at the options for releasing academies' budget data, including the LACSEG amount, and we expect that this will be published shortly. Once it is published, we will place a copy in the Library.

The Department published academies' budget data on 9 November 2012. These show the amount of LACSEG funding given to academies for the 2012/13 academic year. In addition to publishing this information on the Department's website a copy has also been placed in the House Library.

Children in Care

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many young people who entered care at each age and who left care at 16 or older and who did not return to their birth parents had been taken into care because of (a) abuse or neglect, (b) child's disability, (c) parents' illness or disability, (d) family in acute stress, (e) family dysfunction, (f) socially unacceptable behaviour, (g) low income, (h) absent parenting and (i) any other reason in the most recent year for which figures are available; [130790]

(2) how many live placements each young person had who was aged (a) 11, (b) 12, (c) 13, (d) 14, (e) 15 and (f) 16 when starting their last period of care and who left care at 16 or older and did not return to his or her birth parent in the last year for which figures are available; [130833]

(3) how many young people taken into care at age 13 or older and who left care at the age of (a) 16, (b) 17

6 Dec 2012 : Column 864W

and

(c)

18 did not return to their birth parents in each of the last 10 years [130791]

Mr Timpson: The number of young people who entered care at each age and who left care at 16 or older, and who did not return to their birth parents, and had been taken into care because of (a) abuse or neglect, (b) child's disability, (c) parents' illness or disability, (d) family in acute stress, (e) family dysfunction, (f) socially unacceptable behaviour, (g) low income, (h) absent parenting and (i) any other reason for the year ending 31 March 2012 is shown in Table 1.

The number of placements each young person had who was aged (a) 11, (b) 12, (c) 13, (d) 14, (e) 15 and (f) 16 when starting their last period of care and who left care at 16 or older and did not return to his or her birth parents, for the year ending 31 March 2012 is shown in Table 2.

To produce information on the number of young people who were taken into care at age 13 or older and who left care at the age of (a) 16, (b) 17 and (c) 18, and who did not return to their birth parents, for each of the last 10 years can be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Information on the number of children who ceased to be looked after aged 16 and over is provided in table D1 of the Statistical First Release ‘Children Looked After by Local Authorities in England (including adoption and care leavers)—year ending 31 March 2012' which can be found on the Department's website via the following link:

http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00213762/children-looked-after-las-england

Table 1: Children aged 16 and over who ceased to be looked after during the year ending 31 March 2012, who did not return home to live with parents or relatives, by age at the start of their last period of care, and category of need(1, 2, 3, 4,5). Year ending: 31 March 2012. Coverage: England
Number
  Category of need on entering care
 All children aged 16 and overAbuse or neglectChild's disabilityParents illness or disabilityFamily in acute stressFamily dysfunctionSocially unacceptable behaviourLow incomeAbsent parenting

All children

2,980

2,160

60

150

180

300

50

10

80

          

Age at start of final period of care

         

Under 1

70

50

10

10

x

10

0

0

0

1

70

60

x

10

10

10

0

0

0

2

130

110

10

10

x

10

0

x

x

3

140

110

x

10

10

10

0

x

10

4

190

160

0

10

10

20

x

0

x

5

220

160

x

20

10

20

x

x

x

6

240

180

x

10

10

20

0

x

10

7

260

200

10

10

10

20

x

0

10

8

290

220

x

20

20

30

x

0

10

9

280

200

10

10

10

30

10

x

10

10

260

190

10

10

20

30

10

x

10

11

220

150

10

10

30

30

x

x

10

12

160

100

x

10

10

20

10

0

10

13

170

110

x

10

10

30

10

0

x

14

140

80

x

x

10

20

10

0

10

15

110

70

10

0

10

20

10

0

x

16

30

20

x

0

x

x

x

0

x

17

x

x

0

0

0

0

0

0

x

6 Dec 2012 : Column 865W

6 Dec 2012 : Column 866W

(1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placements. (3) Figures only include children who were taken into care, i.e. children who started to be looked after under a care order, police protection, emergency protection order or child assessment order. (4) The most applicable category of the eight “Need Codes” at the time the child started to be looked after rather than necessarily the entire reason they were looked after. (5) Only the last occasion on which a child ceased to be looked after in the year has been counted. Source: SSDA 903
Table 2: Children aged 16 and over who ceased to be looked after during the year ending 31 March 2012 who did not return home to live with parents or relatives, by age at the start of their last period of care, and number of placements in their final period of care(1, 2, 3, 4). Year ending: 31 March 2012. Coverage: England
Number
  Number of placements in final period of care
 All children aged 16 and over12345678910 or more

All children

2,980

50

170

390

400

310

290

230

200

170

790

            

Age at start of final period of care

           

Under 1

70

0

10

10

10

x

x

10

x

x

30

1

70

0

x

10

x

10

10

10

10

10

30

2

130

x

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

50

3

140

x

10

20

10

10

20

10

10

x

40

4

190

x

10

40

10

20

20

10

10

10

60

5

220

10

10

30

40

20

20

10

10

20

60

6

240

x

10

40

30

20

20

20

30

10

60

7

260

0

20

40

30

30

30

20

10

20

70

8

290

x

10

40

40

30

30

20

20

20

80

9

280

x

10

30

40

30

30

20

20

20

90

10

260

x

x

20

50

40

20

20

20

20

60

11

220

0

20

20

40

20

20

20

10

10

60

12

160

x

10

20

20

20

20

20

10

10

40

13

170

0

10

30

30

20

20

10

10

10

40

14

140

x

10

20

30

10

10

10

10

10

30

15

110

10

10

30

20

10

10

10

10

x

10

16

30

10

10

10

x

x

x

0

0

0

x

17

x

x

x

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

x = Figures not shown in order to protect confidentiality. See Technical Notes for information on data suppression. (1) Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 10. (2) Figures exclude children looked after under an agreed series of short-term placements. (3) Figures only include children who were taken into care, ie children who started to be looked after under a care order, police protection, emergency protection order or child assessment order. (4) Only the last occasion on which a child ceased to be looked after in the year has been counted. Source: SSDA 903

Child: Protection

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to his Department's evaluation report, The impact of more flexible assessment practices in response to the Munro Review of Child Protection: Emerging findings from the trials, published in July 2012, for what reason the report did not seek views from children, young people and their families in the trial authorities; and if the views of such people will be sought before revised statutory guidance is published. [131522]

Mr Timpson [holding answer 4 December 2012]: The views expressed by children and young people, their families and their advocates have been obtained and taken into account when informing the Government's proposed changes to the assessment process for children in need.

The evaluation report ‘The impact of more flexible assessment practices in response to the Munro Review of Child Protection: Emerging findings from the trials’, (July 2012) is an independent report by the Childhood Wellbeing Research Centre. The report was commissioned by the Department for Education and forms one part of the evidence which will be used to inform the final revisions to statutory guidance. Consideration was given by the Department as to whether the views of children should be obtained as part of the formal consultation process. This was discussed with the Office of the Children's Commissioner and the Office of the Children's Rights Director (OCRD) and it was agreed that this was not necessary as there was already considerable information

6 Dec 2012 : Column 867W

before the Department from children about their experiences of the assessment process and that the focus should be on reflecting such views in the revised statutory guidance.

Children's views were obtained as part of the Munro review which was an independent, wide-ranging review by Professor Eileen Munro which looked closely at the assessment of children in need. Professor Munro held three events with children and young people during her year long review and called specifically for directors of children's services in England to obtain the views of children and young people on her proposals for changing the assessment process.

The final report of Professor Munro's review was published in May 2011. In May 2012, Professor Munro asked the Office of the Children's Rights Director (OCRD) to work with some children in the trial authorities to gather their views to inform her report on the progress on the recommendations from her review. The work undertaken by the OCRD led to a report entitled ‘Children's experiences of child protection procedures’ (May 2012). Although only a small number of children took part in this work by the OCRD, the evidence from this report will also inform the proposed revisions to the statutory guidance.

The Government ran a 12-week consultation over the summer on the proposed changes and received detailed responses from a number of organisations who reflect the views of children, young people and their families. These views along with all the evidence from the Munro review and from the trial authorities are being considered before final guidance is issued.

Families

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to reduce the incidence of family breakdown. [130632]

Mr Timpson: Research shows that relationship breakdown affects the health and wellbeing of the whole family, and that children whose parents split up are more likely to experience breakdown in their own adult relationships. That is why the Government have committed £30 million to funding relationship support programmes between 2011 and 2015, and the Department for Education has recently run a procurement exercise for the delivery of new services from 2013 to 2015. A number of expert providers in the voluntary and community sector will be funded to deliver a range of services, including preventative support targeted at couples at risk of family breakdown; activities to encourage the take up of relationship support; and counselling for couples who may be experiencing difficulties.

The Department funds a number of family information services, which include helpline and online information, providing advice and guidance on relationships. These services are delivered by expert providers including Relate as well as through online support communities such as Netmums, and will continue to be funded up until 2015.

The Government will also be providing greater support to separating and separated parents through a web service designed to help parents collaborate and make their own arrangements for child maintenance and contact. DWP also recently launched an “Innovation Fund”

6 Dec 2012 : Column 868W

worth £14 million that will test out the most effective means of helping separating and separated parents work together in the best interests of their children.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Pauline Latham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the use of the pupil premium in Mid Derbyshire. [130187]

Mr Laws: The Government believe that head teachers and school leaders should decide how to use the Pupil Premium, in order to support pupils entitled to the premium and close the gaps in performance between pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds and other pupils. This means that we also expect schools to take the lead responsibility in assessing and accounting for their use of the premium. Schools are accountable to parents and to their communities, and we have therefore taken steps to improve the local information available about the attainment of disadvantaged pupils. First, their educational attainment in each school is now published through the performance tables. In addition, schools receiving the Pupil Premium are required to publish an annual statement online which includes: the school's Pupil Premium funding for the current academic year; their plans for spending the premium; the funding allocation for the previous academic year and details of how it was spent; and the effect of this expenditure on the educational attainment of the school's premium pupils.

Nationally, the Government have made a significant funding investment in disadvantaged children through the Pupil Premium, which is currently £1.25 billion and will rise to £1.875 billion in 2013-14. We have therefore both commissioned an external evaluation of the premium's first year, and asked Ofsted to study how effectively schools are using their premium funding to close the gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers.

Ofsted published their interim study findings on 20 September 2012, and will publish the results of the full study in spring 2013. In addition to this, they have an increased focus on the performance of pupils who attract the premium, and on how it is used to remove barriers to learning for premium pupils. Since September 2012, as part of routine school inspection, Ofsted have been holding school leaders to account for how schools have spent their Pupil Premium and what difference this is making to the learning and progress of the pupils concerned. Their judgments on schools' leadership will consider the use of both the premium and other resources to overcome barriers to achievement for their pupils.

In his annual report published in November, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector has committed Ofsted to paying particular attention to attainment gaps affecting disadvantaged pupils in schools where they form a minority of less than 20% of all pupils.

Special Educational Needs

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the findings of the recent Pathfinder Interim Evaluation Report that no pathfinder local authority had developed their local offer by June 2012. [131464]

6 Dec 2012 : Column 869W

Mr Timpson: There was no requirement for pathfinder local authorities to publish their local offer by June 2012. The interim evaluation report on the pathfinder programme, published in October 2012, showed good overall progress in testing the Government's special educational needs reforms, with pathfinder areas making progress in developing their local offer.

Written Questions: Government Responses

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he plans to answer the question tabled by the hon. Member for Liverpool, West Derby, on 12 October 2012, on the Local Authority Central Services Equivalent Grant. [131920]

Mr Laws: A response to the hon. Member has been issued today.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) when he plans to provide a substantive reply to question 125281; [131970]

(2) when he plans to provide a substantive reply to question 125280; [131972]

(3) when he plans to provide a substantive reply to question 124326; [131973]

(4) when he plans to provide a substantive reply to question 124327. [131974]

Mr Timpson: Responses were issued to the hon. Member's questions as follows:

PQ 125281—5 December 2012, Official Report, column 778W

PQ 125280—5 December 2012, Official Report, column 775W

PQ 124326—5 December 2012, Official Report, column 779W

PQ 124327—has been responded to today.

Youth Services

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which youth projects (a) he and (b) each Minister in his Department has visited since May 2010. [124327]

Mr Timpson: Since May 2010, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), and his ministerial team have visited a wide range of settings and establishments working with and for young people.


Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Israel

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make it his policy to seek the prosecution of Israeli political and military leaders at the International Criminal Court for war crimes. [131947]

Alistair Burt: Israel is not a state party to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and so the prosecutor of the ICC does not have jurisdiction over either Israeli nationals or the situations in either Israel or the occupied Palestinian Territories. We judge that pursuing ICC jurisdiction over the Occupied Territories at this stage could make a return to negotiations impossible. This is extremely important given that we see 2013 as a crucial year for the middle east peace process.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 870W

Sri Lanka

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on the security of the Catholic Church in the north of Sri Lanka. [131914]

Alistair Burt: Our high commission monitors developments carefully on all human rights concerns in Sri Lanka, and keeps in contact with religious leaders including from the Catholic Church (our high commissioner met the Bishop of Mannar during a visit there in July). We have received reports relating to the security of Catholic Church officials in the north of Sri Lanka, and receive information on concerns relating to freedom of religion from non-governmental organisations such as Christian Solidarity Worldwide. We are aware of complaints of onerous administrative burdens placed on certain religions and religious education and have also received reports of discrimination against certain religious groups. We will continue to urge the Sri Lankan Government to make progress on all human rights issues.

Sudan

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions (a) he and (b) his ministerial colleagues have had with other European countries about allegations of the abuse and torture of asylum seekers returning to Sudan; and if he will make a statement. [131855]

Mark Simmonds: We are aware of recent reports gathered by Waging Peace which allege that Sudanese citizens, including some failed asylum seekers, have been ill-treated upon their return to Sudan from European countries. We have frequently made clear, publicly and in private discussions with the Sudanese authorities, our concerns over the ill-treatment of detainees in Sudan, such as those detained in public protests in June, and we continue to encourage the Government in Sudan to put in place a political process of constitutional reform that will address the needs and views of all its people, including full respect for human rights. We work closely in these areas with our European partners.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with the Sudanese government on allegations of the use of torture on returning asylum seekers removed from the UK; and if he will make a statement. [131856]

Mark Simmonds: We are aware of recent reports gathered by Waging Peace which allege that Sudanese citizens, including some failed asylum seekers, have been ill-treated upon their return to Sudan from European countries. We have frequently made clear, publicly and in private discussions with the Sudanese authorities, our concerns over the ill-treatment of detainees in Sudan, such as those detained in public protests in June, and we continue to encourage the Government in Sudan to put in place a political process of constitutional reform that will address the needs and views of all its people, including full respect for human rights. We work closely in these areas with our European partners.

6 Dec 2012 : Column 871W


Energy and Climate Change

Energy

Mr Tom Clarke: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 19 November 2012, Official Report, column 260W, on energy, if he will make it his policy to require Ofgem to publish the market shares of the six major energy companies in respect of (a) gas and (b) electricity in each of the last 10 years. [130111]

Mr Hayes: Annual figures for domestic market share are considered commercially sensitive and are likely to be subject to the general restrictions on disclosure under section 105 of the Utilities Act 2000. Ofgem has nevertheless collected and published data on market shares, with the consent of the companies concerned, in various market reports—for example Retail Market Review: Findings and Initial Proposals published in March 2011—covering the period 2002 to 2012, as provided in the answer given to you on 19 November 2012, Official Report, column 260W.


Energy: Scotland

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of how much energy companies invested in infrastructure in Scotland in each year since 2007. [131551]

Mr Hayes: The Department does not collect data on how much energy companies invest in infrastructure in any of the countries of the United Kingdom. For the UK, data on investment by the energy industries and the energy sectors, as provided by the Office for National Statistics, are available in my Department's statistical publication ‘UK Energy Sector Indicators’ available at:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/statistics/publications/indicators/indicators.aspx