Plastics: Recycling

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Alyn and Deeside of 23 October 2012, Official Report, column 801W, on plastics: recycling, by what mechanism the packaging recovery note (PRN) system influences the amount of plastic packaging waste collected by local authorities; what assessment he has made of the effect of the PRN price on local authorities' collection of plastic packaging waste; and if he will make a statement. [130315]

Richard Benyon: The Impact Assessment supporting the consultation on new recovery and recycling targets for packaging waste for 2013-17 looked at the impact of increased packaging recovery note (PRN) costs and revenues and the likely impact on levels of collection.

The packaging recovery note PRN system provides a mechanism by which additional funding is generated to support the collection and recycling of packaging waste materials. As PRN prices rise, reprocessors will receive more revenue which they are expected to invest in increasing capacity for collection and reprocessing of packaging waste. This could take the form of increased support for waste collectors, including local authorities, to collect more material.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 263W

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Alyn and Deeside of 23 October 2012, Official Report, column 800W, on plastics: recycling, what investigation he has made as to whether local weight-based recycling targets discourage local authorities from collecting lighter materials such as plastic packaging; what estimate he has made of the effect that weight-based recycling targets will have on the packaging recovery note price once new national recycling targets are introduced for plastic packaging; what plans he has to work with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government to ensure that local and national recycling targets are co-ordinated to deliver improvements in collection and recycling of plastic packaging waste; and if he will make a statement. [130316]

Richard Benyon: There are no recycling targets on local authorities, weight-based or otherwise. Centrally imposed targets were removed to enable local authorities to focus on local priorities.

River Rom

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent work his Department has carried out on the River Rom. [132230]

Richard Benyon: The Environment Agency undertakes maintenance work, such as managing vegetation growth and removing obstructions, on the River Rom. This reduces flood risk by ensuring the channel has the capacity to carry flood flows after heavy rainfall. The Environment Agency cuts back vegetation once a year during winter, with the next round of work due to be carried out before March 2013.

Once a year the Environment Agency also sprays herbicide on Japanese Knotweed growing in, or next to, the river. This is to control the spread of this invasive species and to prevent it from damaging concrete sections of the river bank. It last undertook this work in October 2012.

Once a month, the Environment Agency checks the river to remove any debris likely to obstruct flow. Between these checks, if it receives a report from a member of the public of any obstruction that may increase flood risk in the river it deals with it as a matter of urgency.

The Environment Agency is currently working with Thames 21 on a Catchment Plan for the Rivers Rom and Beam to identify and address the main issues with the watercourses in this area.

Staff Surveys

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will place in the Library a copy of the results of his Department's most recent staff survey; which organisation carried out the survey; and what the cost of the survey was. [132115]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA participates in the annual civil service people survey (CSPS) co-ordinated by the Cabinet Office, which measures the attitudes and motivations of staff. All staff are invited to take part. The 2012 civil service people survey ran from 1-31 October 2012.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 264W

A copy of core DEFRA's results for the 2011 CSPS can be found at

http://archive.defra.gov.uk/corporate/about/who/documents/staffsurvey2011.pdf

Core DEFRA will publish the results of this year's survey on our website by the end of January 2013.

The cost to core DEFRA for participating in the 2011 survey was £11,882 plus VAT. We have not yet received notification from the Cabinet Office of core DEFRA's share of the costs of the 2012 CSPS, but we expect to pay a similar amount to 2011.

Waste Management

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate his Department has made of likely levels of growth in the waste sector in the next 12 months. [132392]

Richard Benyon: Britain's waste and recycling sector was valued at over £12 billion in 2010-11, employing between 104,000-150,000 people. For 2012-13, short-term growth figures are forecast as waste management growth in sales of 3.0% and recovery and recycling of 3.9%. Growth figures for 2013/14 for these two sectors are forecast as 3.1% and 4.0% respectively.

The 2011 Review of Waste Policy in England sets us on the path towards a zero-waste economy where materials are valued and nothing of value is discarded. It will support the sector's transition from focusing on disposal to landfill to greater reuse, recycling and recovery of waste material.

Health

Autism

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made in implementing his Department's autism strategy; and if he will make a statement. [132401]

Norman Lamb: The Government will review the 2010 adult autism strategy “Fulfilling and Rewarding Lives”, from April to October next year. This is an opportunity for the Government to review progress, take stock and consider where further action is required to realise the vision of improving the lives of people with autism. In a memorandum to the Committee of Public Accounts of 17 July 2012, the National Audit Office stated that considerable progress had already been made in the two years since the strategy was published.

Care Homes: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) private, (b) voluntary and (c) independent residential homes in Birmingham fall within the ambit of the Care Quality Commission's inspection regime. [131979]

Norman Lamb: The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has provided the following information.

The CQC does not capture information on the type of ownership of care homes registered with them and therefore cannot provide a response on the number of residential homes in Birmingham that are private, voluntary or independent.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 265W

However, as at 5 December 2012 there are 342 care homes in Birmingham registered under the Health and Social Care Act 2008. Of these, 269 are residential homes and 73 are nursing homes. For the purpose of this answer, the CQC has defined Birmingham as the local authority area.

Charities

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding his Department allocated to (a) Centrepoint, (b) Crisis, (c) Skill Force and (d) Shelter in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [132461]

Norman Lamb: The Department has allocated the following funding to Crisis.

CrisisOpportunities for volunteeringImproving access to mental health

2010-11

144,745

36,745

2011-12

142,286

48,875

2012-13

0

100,401

Total

287,031

186,021

The Department has not made any payments to Centrepoint, Skill Force or Shelter in 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13.

It should be noted that funding for 2012-13 represents the latest allocations and additional funding could be allocated in the remaining months of the financial year.

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many full-time equivalent staff were employed on consultancy contracts in his Department on the latest date for which figures are available; how many such staff were employed on the same date 12 months ago; and if he will make a statement. [132209]

Dr Poulter: The core Department does not employ management consultants or their staff. They contract for the delivery of consultancy services from companies and do not keep central records of the number of management consultants used by those companies to deliver the service for each contract.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 266W

Information about the Department's work force, both payroll and non-payroll workers, is published monthly and is available from the Department's transparency website:

http://transparency.dh.gov.uk/tag/workforce/

Contraceptives: Greater Manchester

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS community contraception clinics there are in (a) Denton and Reddish constituency and (b) Greater Manchester in each of the last 10 years. [132316]

Anna Soubry: This information is not collected centrally.

Primary care trusts commission contraception services offered by national health service community contraception clinics and sexual health clinics. From 1 April 2013, these services will be commissioned by local authorities.

English Language

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much his Department spent on English language classes for staff in each of the last 10 years. [132313]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not hold central records of expenditure on English language classes. To gather the relevant information would incur disproportionate costs, as it would involve searching records held locally by directorates.

Eyesight: Testing

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many pensioners in Denton and Reddish constituency aged over 60 had free eye tests in each of the last 10 years. [132318]

Dr Poulter: Information is not available in the format requested. National health service sight test data are not collected by constituency. Some information can be provided at primary care trust (PCT) level from 2007-08.

Estimated numbers of NHS sight tests for persons aged 60 or over in Stockport PCT and Tameside and Glossop PCT are shown in the following table:

 Stockport PCTTameside and Glossop PCT
 NumberSize of patient eligibility sample used (percentageNumberSize of patient eligibility sample used (percentage)

2007-08

26,238

2

26,634

2

2008-09

26,969

2

25,977

2

2009-10

30,320

100

22,511

2

2010-11

29,062

100

18,464

1

2011-12

28,677

100

21,339

2

Notes: 1. Patient eligibility is based on a sample of General Ophthalmic Services (GOS) claim forms collected. This can result in anomalies in the data, depending on the sample used. This is particularly apparent when comparing year on year PCT level data. 2. From 1 April 1999, eligibility for a free NHS sight test was extended to everyone aged 60 or over. Patients may qualify for an NHS sight test on more than one criterion. However, they would only be recorded against one criterion on the form. Patients are more likely to be recorded according to their clinical need rather than their age. For example, a patient aged over 60 with glaucoma is likely to be recorded in the glaucoma category only. The count by eligibility is therefore approximate. Patients may also have had more than one sight test in the specified time period. Source: Annex D of the “General Ophthalmic Services Activity Statistics—England, 2011-12” report, available on the Health and Social Care Information Centre website.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 267W

General Practitioners

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints from each region he has received on lack of access to GP services in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [133199]

Dr Poulter: The Department receives a wide range of correspondence on general practitioner (GP) services. To identify the number of individual complaints by region in each year would therefore incur disproportionate cost.

General Practitioners: East of England

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the average distance travelled for an out-of-hours GP appointment was in (a) Suffolk, (b) Bedfordshire, (c) Cambridgeshire, (d) Essex, (e) Hertfordshire and (f) Norfolk in each of the last three years; [132321]

(2) what the average waiting time for an out-of-hours GP appointment was in (a) Suffolk, (b) Bedfordshire, (c) Cambridgeshire, (d) Essex, (e) Hertfordshire and (f) Norfolk in each of the last three years. [132407]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not hold the information requested.

My hon. Friend may wish to approach the primary care trusts concerned who might hold this information.

Health Education: Harrow

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in the Harrow primary care trust area received advice from the NHS on (a) healthy eating, (b) stopping smoking, (c) managing long-term conditions and (d) losing weight in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [132253]

Anna Soubry: This information is not held centrally. The hon. Member may wish to contact the trust responsible for this information, which in this case is Harrow Primary Care Trust.

Heart Diseases and Liver Cancer

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) men and (b) women in each age group were diagnosed with (i) coronary artery disease and (ii) liver cancer in (A) Denton and Reddish constituency, (B) Greater Manchester and (C) England and Wales in each of the last 10 years. [132317]

Anna Soubry: Data on the numbers of men and women in each age group who were diagnosed with coronary artery disease in Denton and Reddish constituency, Greater Manchester and England and Wales in each of the last 10 years are not collected centrally.

However, the Health and Social Care Information Centre holds data from the national Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) publication, which collects the number of people recorded on general practice disease registers. For coronary heart disease (CHD) this relates to patients

11 Dec 2012 : Column 268W

who are diagnosed with CHD and usually remain on the register long term—a measure of prevalence rather than incidence.

The QOF also records the list size of each practice and number of practices per primary care trust (PCT) in each release.

The available information is set out in the following tables:

England
 List sizeNumber of general practitioner (GP) practicesNumber of patients on CHD registerPrevalence (percentage)

2004-05

52,833,584

8,486

1,893,184

3.58

2005-06

53,211,253

8,406

1,900,640

3.57

2006-07

53,681,098

8,372

1,898,565

3.54

2007-08

54,009,831

8,294

1,892,432

3.50

2008-09

54,310,660

8,229

1,886,406

3.47

2009-10

54,836,561

8,305

1,885,089

3.44

2010-11

55,169,643

8,245

1,877,518

3.40

2011-12

55,525,732

8,123

1,875,548

3.38

Stockport PCT
 List sizeNumber of GP practicesNumber of patients on CHD registerPrevalence (percentage)

2004-05

289,559

54

12,724

4.39

2005-06

289,556

54

12,609

4.35

2006-07

290,374

53

12,615

4.34

2007-08

291,255

53

12,378

4.25

2008-09

292,488

53

12,313

4.21

2009-10

297,736

54

12,232

4.11

2010-11

298,190

52

12,113

4.06

2011-12

299,243

51

12,006

4.01

Tameside and Glossop PCT
 List sizeNumber of GP practicesNumber of patients on CHD registerPrevalence (percentage)

2004-05

233,387

41

10,269

4.40

2005-06

232,519

40

10,251

4.41

2006-07

235,363

40

10,353

4.40

2007-08

236,571

40

10,258

4.34

2008-09

237,465

40

10,213

4.30

2009-10

238,915

44

10,117

4.23

2010-11

240,153

43

10,014

4.17

2011-12

240,654

43

10,040

4.17

Information concerning the number of men and women diagnosed with liver cancer in the Denton and Reddish constituency, Greater Manchester and England and Wales in each of the last 10 years has been provided in the following tables. These data have been provided by the Office for National Statistics, which collects cancer incidence data for both England and Wales.

However, because liver cancer is a rarer form of cancer, with small numbers reported, statistics presented by both age and sex for small geographical areas (e.g. constituencies) are potentially disclosive. To ensure that the identities of individuals diagnoses with liver cancer are protected these statistics have been aggregated for the last 10 years for the Denton and Reddish constituency and presented with 10 year age bands, as opposed to the five years norm, in Greater Manchester.

11 Dec 2012 : Column 269W

11 Dec 2012 : Column 270W

Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of liver cancer(1) for men and women by age group, Denton and Reddish parliamentary constituency, 2001-10 combined(2,3)
 Age group
 0 to 6465 to 6970 to 7475 to 7980 to 8485+

Men

8

4

7

9

6

3

Women

4

4

2

4

5

3

(1) Cancer of the liver is coded as C22 according to the International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10). (2) Based on boundaries as of November 2012. (3) Cancer incidence figures are based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year. These numbers may not be the same as the number of people diagnosed with cancer, because one person may be diagnosed with more than one cancer. The 10-year period is combined. Source: Office for National Statistics
Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of liver cancer(1) for men and women by age group, Greater Manchester, 2001-10(2,3)
 Men
Age2001200220032004200520062007200820092010

All ages

88

94

75

88

114

100

118

129

148

167

0 to 54

17

8

11

13

10

15

19

20

21

23

55 to 64

17

17

15

20

27

16

26

25

22

42

65 to 74

29

30

22

26

28

36

45

39

42

51

75 to 79

14

20

12

15

19

17

16

20

25

23

80 to 84

2

12

7

9

16

8

8

18

22

13

85+

9

7

8

5

14

8

4

7

16

15

Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of liver cancer(1) for men and women by age group, Greater Manchester, 2001-10(2,3)
 Women
Age2001200220032004200520062007200820092010

All ages

62

49

50

61

68

82

73

68

94

104

0 to 54

4

7

5

8

5

5

11

7

4

5

55 to 64

7

4

7

9

11

15

12

16

11

19

65 to 74

18

7

13

6

12

18

18

19

22

20

75 to 79

7

9

7

8

12

11

9

7

19

20

80 to 84

13

11

9

15

17

19

10

9

18

13

85+

13

11

9

15

11

14

13

10

20

27

(1) Cancer of the liver is coded as C22 according to the International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10). (2) Based on boundaries as of November 2012. (3) Cancer incidence figures are based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year. These numbers may not be the same as the number of people diagnosed with cancer, because one person may be diagnosed with more than one cancer. Source: Office for National Statistics
Registrations of newly diagnosed cases of liver cancer(1) for men and women by age group, England and Wales, 2001-10(2,3)
Registrations
 Men
Age2001200220032004200520062007200820092010

All ages

1,369

1,526

1,542

1,596

1,785

1,905

2,004

2,118

2,266

2,344

Under 5

13

9

10

1

7

7

9

10

6

7

5 to 9

0

1

1

4

1

1

0

1

0

3

10 to 14

1

4

1

1

2

1

2

2

1

1

15 to 19

2

4

0

5

2

4

6

0

2

3

20 to 24

1

1

1

6

5

4

0

1

2

1

25 to 29

10

3

2

7

6

3

8

12

8

8

30 to 34

12

10

7

9

6

6

10

14

6

12

35 to 39

9

8

11

9

13

19

8

13

17

15

40 to 44

28

25

34

27

27

37

33

33

45

33

45 to 49

47

54

56

50

64

56

56

75

78

85

50 to 54

90

84

88

79

98

117

106

97

128

130

55 to 59

121

108

131

137

172

158

191

185

199

197

60 to 64

151

153

158

187

195

202

249

242

255

282

65 to 69

188

217

254

225

243

232

274

301

291

338

70 to 74

215

275

240

248

307

309

330

360

382

359

75 to 79

233

264

259

297

270

329

314

346

358

348

80 to 84

128

182

171

192

229

246

244

244

277

283

85+

120

124

118

106

138

174

164

182

211

239

Registrations
 Women
Age2001200220032004200520062007200820092010

All ages

989

1,005

943

1,052

1,118

1,124

1,212

1,234

1,372

1,406

Under 5

8

6

6

4

6

8

11

5

10

3

5 to 9

0

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

1

11 Dec 2012 : Column 271W

11 Dec 2012 : Column 272W

10 to 14

0

0

2

3

1

0

3

1

2

2

15 to 19

3

4

3

1

4

1

0

5

1

1

20 to 24

0

2

6

3

3

3

1

2

2

5

25 to 29

3

1

0

0

1

0

6

2

6

2

30 to 34

3

3

3

12

3

4

6

8

7

6

35 to 39

7

8

3

9

4

12

8

13

6

6

40 to 44

12

15

10

11

12

16

21

21

20

14

45 to 49

12

24

24

22

28

26

21

30

34

29

50 to 54

33

33

34

47

39

45

35

40

56

56

55 to 59

50

62

54

53

70

62

66

69

66

75

60 to 64

76

66

58

69

76

94

122

112

111

127

65 to 69

102

113

113

112

128

131

123

132

123

135

70 to 74

153

147

124

166

151

166

171

159

196

191

75 to 79

209

154

162

164

188

187

194

204

233

229

80 to 84

167

180

185

205

205

165

205

201

218

241

85+

151

187

156

169

199

204

218

230

281

283

(1) Cancer of the liver is coded as C22 according to the International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision (ICD-10). (2) Based on boundaries as of November 2012. (3) Cancer incidence figures are based on newly diagnosed cases registered in each calendar year. These numbers may not be the same as the number of people diagnosed with cancer, because one person may be diagnosed with more than one cancer. Source: England data Office for National Statistics; Wales data Welsh Cancer Intelligence and Surveillance Unit

Hepatitis

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has any plans to instruct the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence to establish a quality standard and guidelines for the treatment of hepatitis C. [133111]

Norman Lamb: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has been asked to develop a clinical guideline on the diagnosis and management of hepatitis C. The clinical guideline is expected to inform the development of the quality standard on “liver disease (non-alcoholic)” that was referred to NICE as part of the quality standards library in March 2012. NICE has not been asked to develop a separate quality standard on hepatitis C.

John Healey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is taking to ensure full and open access by those most economically disadvantaged to hepatitis C (a) screening and (b) treatment services; and if he will make a statement. [133113]

Anna Soubry: From 1 April 2013, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will work with local authorities and other local partners in Health and Wellbeing Boards, to ensure the needs of local people are appropriately assessed, and that those needs are captured in a health and wellbeing strategy, which will inform commissioning plans, for securing services to meet those needs.

CCGs will have a statutory obligation to arrange for the provision of health services it considers necessary to meet the requirements of those patients for whom they are responsible. The Health and Social Care Act 2012 will require CCGs to act with a view to securing continuous improvement in the quality of services provided to individuals in relation to the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of illness, including hepatitis C.

Hospices: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding was allocated to hospices in London in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; how much such funding has been allocated in 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [132149]

Norman Lamb: The Department does not provide revenue funding to hospices that provide care for adults; that is the responsibility of local national health service commissioners.

The Department did allocate £39,906,158 capital funding to adult and children's hospices across England in 2010-11. Table 1 shows which hospices in London received capital funding and how much was received. The hospices in London receiving funding are all adult hospices. The total capital funds made available for hospices across England in 2010-11 was £40 million.

In addition to the above, hospices are eligible to apply for project funding via the Innovation, Excellence and Strategic Development (IESD) Fund and the Social Enterprise Investment Fund (SEIF). £40,740 was received by St Francis Hospice (Romford) under the IESD allocations. The funding received by hospices from the SEIF is set out in Table 2. The SEIF is still considering applications for 2012, and therefore the 2012-13 figures are not available at this time.

Table 1: Capital grants allocated to hospices in London in 2010-11
Organisation nameActivity typeGrant received (£)

Greenwich and Bexley Cottage Hospice

In-patient unit/Refurb

252,257

Harris HospisCare with St Christopher's

Day care unit/Refurb

95,747

Marie Curie Cancer Care Hampstead

Hospitality/Refurb

120,440

Meadow House Hospice

Therapy centre /New building

300,000

11 Dec 2012 : Column 273W

North London Hospice

Day care unit/New building

750,000

North London Hospice

In-patient unit/Refurb

196,317

St Christopher's Hospice

In-patient unit/Refurb

445,289

St Francis Hospice (Romford)

Bathroom/Refurb

346,000

St John's Hospice (London) .

In-patient unit/Refurb

600,000

St Joseph's Hospice (London)

Viewing room/Refurb

546,000

St Luke's Hospice (Harrow)

Reception/Refurb

277,217

St Raphael's Hospice Sutton

Bathroom/Refurb

500,000

Table 2: Organisations awarded funds from the SEIF in 2011-12
£
OrganisationTotal investmentRevenue grantCapital grant

Greenwich and Bexley Community Hospice

169,948

20,000

149,948

John Taylor Hospice CIC

915,113

541,443

373,670

St Catherine's Hospice (Lancashire) Ltd

150,000

150,000

Note: The data above comprise only those organisations that are known to be hospices because the service category “hospice” is not identified separately in the SEIF. The table does not therefore include other organisations providing hospice care that may have been funded.

The Department provides revenue funding for children's hospices through the Department's £10 million recurrent

11 Dec 2012 : Column 274W

annual children's hospice and hospice-at-home grant. Hospices have received funding in the years 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13. Further details are available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/06/childrens-hospice-grants/

Revenue funding may also come from NHS commissioners. London-based hospices in receipt of the Department's funding are shown as follows:

£
 Grant for:
Hospice2010-112011-122012-13

Haven House Children's Hospice, Woodford Green, Essex

200,000

199,752

199,752

Richard House Children's Hospice, E16

330,017

329,769

329,769

Shooting Star, Middlesex

213,237

212,989

212,989

Total

743,254

742,510

742,510

Children's hospices and the wider children's palliative care sector received a further one-off non recurrent grant of £19 million in 2010-11 to support local projects (from a total of £30 million made available). The £19 million was on top of the annual recurrent funding of £10 million, to which we are committed until a transparent and fair per-patient funding system is established in 2015. The London-based organisations in receipt of this funding are in the following table.

Organisation applyingProject title£

ALD Life, London

Practical Information Leaflets: dealing with diagnosis

3,883

Brent Community Services

Training and equipment for children and young people

29,000

Camp Simcha, NW4

Family Retreats

30,000

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital; Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust; University of London Institute of Child Health

Improving access to palliative care

41,685

Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust

Development of practical guidance in neonatal unit

63,000

Children's Home Care Team (CHCT) Sutton Hospital

Better Care for End of Life Children

4,000

Coombe Trust Fund, SE13

Children's Special Care Rooms and Transportation

79,000

Demelza Hospice Care for Children (SE London)

Blood transfusion training

33,870

Demelza Hospice Care for Children (SE London)

Peer facilitated, interactive workshops for young people

66,838

Demelza Hospice Care for Children (SE London)

Development of KPI measurement tools

46,349

Diana Children's Community Team, Children's Community Nursing Service, NHS Newham Community Health and Care Services

Bringing together stories -Groups for Adults and Children anticipating and experiencing death

7,000

Enfield Community Services

Training, resource pack, staff development and equipment

65,000

Evelina Children's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

Formalised structure for delivering paediatric palliative care services

105,000

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, University College London Institute of Child Health

Changing the culture of care in Tertiary Centres

128,138

Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, University College London Institute of Child Health

Developing a home Patient Controlled Analgesia.(PCA) service

31,911

Greenwich Community Health Services

Meeting the Holistic Needs of children in Greenwich

62,000

Haven House Children's Hospice

Square Table Discussion

2,067

King's College, London

Development of a person-centred case-mix classification

149,815

Life Force Paediatric Palliative and Bereavement Care Team, NHS Islington, SLOW (Surviving Loss of Our World), Islington Parent Support Group for bereaved parents

Volunteer training to support bereaved parents

1,700

Life Force Team, NHS Islington, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, University College London Royal Free and University College London Institute of Child Health

Spiritual support for children and young people

53,773

Life Force Team, NHS Islington

Bereavement Training for Staff

11,000

Life Force Team, NHS Islington

Discharge Planning

17,000

Life Force Team, NHS Islington

Syringe drivers for NCL network

17,000

NHS Ealing, Children's Commissioning

Collation of data

37,000

Noah's Ark Children's Hospice

Promoting health, independence, and tackling inequalities

50,500

Noah's Ark Children's Hospice

Square Table Discussion

8,165

11 Dec 2012 : Column 275W

11 Dec 2012 : Column 276W

Noah's Ark Children's Hospice

Psychosocial support for children and families

71,700

Outer North East London Community Services - Specialist Children's Community Services (Waltham Forest)

Home based play service

5,000

Richard House Children's Hospice

Awareness for non-English speaking families

18,000

Richard House Children's Hospice

Training for staff and volunteers in managing grief

22,500

Richard House Children's Hospice

Piloting of a rapid response home care

344,570

Richard House Children's Hospice

Appointment of a community liaison officer (three months)

9,165

Richard House Children's Hospice

Projects including developing London-wide training and education strategy

135,523

Richard House Children's Hospice

Family hand-held medication record pilot

58,770

Richard House Children's Hospice

Safeguarding Training

13,540

Richard House Children's Hospice

Square Table Discussion

1,900

Teenage Cancer Trust

Service Development

15,052

The Margaret Centre Psychological Support Service, Whipps Cross University Hospital Trust

Development of a six-month Child-Parent Relationship Therapy pilot scheme

29,000

The Margaret Centre Psychological Support Service, Whipps Cross University Hospital Trust

Development of six-month pilot scheme for facilitated support for professionals

31,000

Wandsworth PCT

Training in grief and loss

17,000

Total

 

1,917,414.

From April 2012-13, the Government made an additional £720,000 available to new children's hospices services. The London-based hospices in receipt of this funding are in the following table:

Hospice£

Demelza House Children's Hospice, Eltham

121,181

Noah's Ark Children's Hospice, Barnet

121,181

Total

242,362

Hospitals: Admissions

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which NHS acute trusts have not met the national commissioning for quality and innovation requirement to risk assess 90% of in-patients upon admission to hospital in the latest period for which figures are available. [132136]

Anna Soubry: Six NHS acute trusts did not meet the national commissioning for quality and innovation goal for Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment in Q2 2012-13 (July-September 2012). Details are as follows:

Organisation namePercentage of admitted patients risk-assessed for VTE

Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

89.6

Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust

80.9

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

89.4

Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust

85.7

Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust

88.3

Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

89.6

ICT: Theft

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) computers, (b) mobile telephones, (c) BlackBerrys and (d) other pieces of IT equipment were lost or stolen from his Department in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [132191]

Dr Poulter: The following table gives details of the departmental losses and thefts for the financial years 2010-11 and 2011-12.

April to March
Departmental losses and thefts2010-112011-12

Computers

10

11

Mobile telephones

6

4

BlackBerrys

44

32

Other IT equipment

26

16

Total

86

63

NHS Connecting for Health (NHS CfH) is part of the Department's Informatics Directorate. However, there are a number of fundamental differences between the Department and NHS CfH including suppliers of equipment used. It is therefore deemed appropriate to display the figures for NHS CfH losses and thefts separately to the rest of the Department.

April to March
NHS CfH losses and thefts2010-112011-12

Computers (Laptops)

10

5

Mobile telephones (includes all mobile devices)

7

29

BlackBerrys (not used)

0

0

Other IT equipment

0

0

Total

17

34

Midwives

Stephen Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many student midwives were in receipt of a bursary in the last five academic years; what the average bursary paid to a student midwife was in each such year; and what the total cost was to his Department of such bursaries; [132264]

(2) what the average cost was of training a midwife in the latest period for which figures are available; [132329]

(3) what the total cost to his Department of training student midwives was in each of the last three years. [132330]

11 Dec 2012 : Column 277W

Dr Poulter: Midwifery degrees are generally a three- year course, for which the tuition and student support costs are funded through the Multi-Professional Education and Training (MPET) budget issued to strategic health authorities.

The number of midwifery students who held a bursary, the average bursary paid to those students and the total cost of all bursaries paid to student midwives in each of the last five academic years can be found in the following table:

 Number of bursary holders(1)Average amount paid per bursary holder(2) (£)Total amount paid(2)()(£)

2007-08

3,996

5,813

23,228,490

2008-09

4,265

5,715

24,373,689

2009-10

4,777

5,765

27,539,804

2010-11

5,218

5,722

29,854,947

2011-12

5,345

5,799

30,997,396

(1) Includes nil award holders (European Union fees only students and students whose living allowance element of the bursary has been reduced to nil after income assessment). (2) Includes the basic award and all supplementary allowances and one off payments. Notes: 1. All figures are rounded to the nearest pound. 2. Information on the total cost of training student midwives is not available as the Department does not monitor training spend to this level of granularity. Source: NHS Business Services Authority

The tuition costs for midwifery degree and diploma students are paid by the national health service based on the national benchmark price. The benchmark price for both midwifery degree and diploma courses over the last three years are shown in the following table:

11 Dec 2012 : Column 278W

£
 StandardOuter LondonInner London

2010-11

9,018

9,469

9,740

2011-12

9,181

9,640

9,915

2012-13

9,374

9,842

10,123

In addition to the above costs, most midwifery degree students will also be eligible for a student loan. This loan is provided by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills.

There are several other ways midwives can be trained and where an existing NHS employee is seconded on to a midwifery programme, the student would be entitled to a salary, rather than student support. These salary costs are not collected centrally.

NHS: Staff

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) hospital doctors, (b) nurses, (c) GPs, (d) GP practice nurses, (e) nurse practitioners, (f) modern matrons, (g) community matrons and (h) managers there were in the NHS in (i) 2010 and (ii) the latest period for which figures are available. [132312]

Dr Poulter: The annual workforce census shows the number of staff employed by the NHS in England at 30 September each year. The following table shows the number of staff employed at 30 September 2010 and 30 September 2011.

The monthly workforce statistics show the number of staff employed by the NHS in England but exclude general practitioners (GPS) and GP practice staff. The latest figures for August 2012 are shown on the table.

Nurse practitioner numbers are not collected centrally.

Selected NHS staff in England as at 2010, 2011 and August 2012
Full-time equivalents
 20102011August 2012(1)

Hospital doctors

97,636

99,394

100,599

GPs (excluding retainers and registrars)

31,356

31,391

n/a

GP practice nurses

13,167

13,573

n/a

Qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff

309,139

306,346

304,566

Of which:

   

Modern matrons

4,769

4,396

4,159

Community matrons

1,552

1,469

1,391

Managers and senior managers(2)

40,094

36,613

35,550

“n/a” = not available (1) As from 21 July 2010 the Health and Social Care Information Centre has published experimental, provisional monthly NHS workforce data. As expected with provisional, experimental statistics, some figures may be revised from month to month as issues are uncovered and resolved. The monthly workforce data are not directly comparable with the annual workforce census; they only include those staff on the electronic staff record (i.e. they do not include primary care staff or bank staff), they also include locum doctors (not counted in the annual census)—the figures presented in this column are for August 2012, and are the latest available from this source. They are not fully comparable with census data. GP practice staff (all general practice staff other than GPs) are collected manually by primary care trusts and collated and published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre in the annual census. The collection form does not include a breakdown of nurse practitioners; these staff are included in the GP practice nurse category and cannot be identified separately. (2) Managers and senior managers have responsibility for budgets, staff, assets or significant areas of work and report to directly to the executive team. Data Quality: The Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Note: 1. 2010 and 2011 data are taken from the annual workforce census taken on 30 September each year. GP data are not taken from the NHS electronic staff record system and are currently only available annually. 2012 census data are expected to be published March 2013.

Nurses

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many commissions there were in (a) total and (b) each region for (i) health visitors, (ii) school nurses, (iii) district nurses and (iv) community psychiatric nurses in (A) 2010-11, (B) 2011-12 and (C) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [132070]

Dr Poulter: The number of training commissions in each strategic health authority (SHA) between 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 are shown in the following tables:

11 Dec 2012 : Column 279W

11 Dec 2012 : Column 280W

Nursing training commissions by SHA 2010-11 to 2012-13
2010-11 actual commissions
 NHS North EastNHS North WestNHS Yorkshire and the HumberNHS East MidlandsNHS West MidlandsNHS East of EnglandNHS LondonNHS South East CoastNHS South CentralNHS South WestEngland

Health visitors

35

78

59

44

56

82

88

31

36

36

545

School nurses

17

30

28

12

23

24

35

15

9

19

212

District nurses

31

51

28

14

43

0

52

0

17

0

236

Community psychiatric nurses

0

4

0

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

8

2011-12 actual commissions
 NHS North EastNHS North WestNHS Yorkshire and the HumberNHS East MidlandsNHS. West MidlandsNHS East of EnglandNHS LondonNHS South East CoastNHS South CentralNHS South WestEngland

Health visitors

83

207

157

159

187

236

141

95

131

210

1,606

School nurses

15

39

21

0

26

0

49

14

20

26

210

District nurses

22

34

18

0

42

0

42

0

19

0

177

Community psychiatric nurses

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

2012-13 planned commissions
 NHS North EastNHS North WestNHS Yorkshire and the HumberNHS East MidlandsNHS West MidlandsNHS East of EnglandNHS LondonNHS South East CoastNHS South CentralNHS South WestEngland

Health visitors

79

251

230

237

377

296

374

292

180

210

2,526

School nurses

12

40

20

0

22

0

50

28

20

20

212

District nurses

37

49

43

0

40

0

68

0

20

0

257

Community psychiatric nurses

0

6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

6