17 Dec 2012 : Column 491W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 491W

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 17 December 2012

Northern Ireland

Devolution

Paul Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland pursuant to the answer of 28 November 2012, Official Report, column 358W, on devolution, what meetings she has had on devolution; who attended such meetings; what was discussed; and what steps she took after each such meeting. [132332]

Mrs Villiers: Since being appointed I have had regular meetings with a number of Ministers in the Irish Government covering a range of issues.

Home Department

Asylum

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what criteria are used to determine how asylum seekers are allocated to the detained fast track process. [131055]

Mr Harper [holding answer 5 December 2012]: Entry to the detained fast track is strictly determined by the application of published policy, “Detained Fast Track Processes”:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/policyandlaw/asylumprocessguidance/detention/guidance/detained_fast_processes?view=Binary

In summary, an applicant may enter into or remain in detained fast track processes only if there is a power in immigration law to detain, and only if on consideration of the known facts relating to the applicant it appears that a quick decision is possible and if none of the detained fast track suitability exclusion criteria (which relate to categories of particularly vulnerable people) apply.

Asylum: Afghanistan

David T. C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Afghan nationals living in the UK are asylum seekers. [129810]

Mr Harper: The number of asylum applications pending a decision by nationality is published on a quarterly basis. Latest figures are available in table as.01.q of the release “Immigration Statistics, July to September 2012” which is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office Science website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q3-2012/

17 Dec 2012 : Column 492W

At the end of September 2012, 1,078 Afghan asylum applications for main applicants were pending an initial decision, appeal or further review.

Asylum: Sudan

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment she has made of the potential risk to failed Sudanese asylum seekers of being tortured by the Sudanese security services after removal from the UK; and if she will make a statement. [131854]

Mr Harper [holding answer 6 December 2012]: The UK Border Agency's Country of Origin Information (COI) Service monitors the situation in all the countries that generate asylum seekers to the UK, including the Sudan. Information is compiled from material produced by a wide range of external information sources, such as the United Nations agencies, human rights organisations, Government and NGOs and the news media. This enables the agency's decision-makers to have access to accurate, up-to-date, balanced and impartial country information.

Guidance on handling applications for protection is also provided to case owners in an Operational Guidance Note for Sudan. Thus the agency ensures that claims for protection are considered in light of objective information.

City of London Police

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much funding the City of London Police have received from the private sector in each year since 2010. [133357]

Damian Green: This information is not collected by the Home Office.

Closed-circuit Television

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what change there has been in the level of CCTV coverage in local authority areas since May 2010. [131083]

James Brokenshire: This information is not held centrally. The Government does not hold a view on what might be the right number of CCTV cameras in public places. What is more important is that, wherever there is a necessity to deploy CCTV in a public place, the system operator gives careful consideration to both the proportionality and effectiveness of a CCTV system in meeting its intended purpose. The Surveillance Camera Code of Practice being prepared as part of the implementation of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 will provide guidance on doing this for local authorities and other operators of overt surveillance camera systems in public places.

Detention Centres

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the capacity is of each immigration removal centre operated by the UK Border Agency. [132949]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 493W

Mr Harper [holding answer 10 December 2012]: The following table shows the capacity of immigration removal centres and residential short-term holding facilities. The UK Border Agency also established in 2011 pre-departure accommodation to support the Government's new approach to returning families without permission to be in the UK.

 Bed capacity

Immigration removal centres

 

Brook House

426

Campsfield House

216

Colnbrook

408

Dover

316

Dungavel

217

Harmondsworth

615

Haslar

160

Morton Hall

392

Tinsley House

157

Yarl's Wood

368

  

Residential short-term holding facilities

 

Yarl's Wood

38

Larne House

19

Pennine House

32

  

Pre-departure accommodation

 

Cedars(1)

44

Total

3,408

(1 )Accommodating up to nine families.

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people are being held in each immigration removal centre operated by the UK Border Agency. [132950]

Mr Harper [holding answer 10 December 2012]: The requested information is released quarterly in table dt.10.q of Immigration Statistics and is available from the Library of the House and from the Home Office's Science, Research and Statistics website at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-tabs-q3-2012/detention-q3-2012-tabs?view=Binary

The following table shows the number of people detained in immigration removal centres, short-term holding facilities and pre-departure accommodation as

17 Dec 2012 : Column 494W

at 30 September 2012, the latest date for which information is published. All people held are detained in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers and exclude those in police cells, Prison Service establishments, short-term holding rooms at ports and airports (for less than 24 hours), and those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers and their dependants.

People in detention by place of detention, as at 30 September 2012
 Detainees

Immigration removal centres

 

Brook House

413

Campsfield House

214

Colnbrook

367

Dover

303

Dungavel

185

Harmondsworth

592

Haslar

149

Morton Hall

381

Tinsley House

114

Yarl's Wood

351

  

Short-term holding facilities

 

Colnbrook Short Term

4

Lame House

7

Pennine House

11

  

Pre-departure accommodation

 

Cedars

0

Total

3,091

Entry Clearances

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cases the UK Border Agency has dealt with in each visa tier in each year since 2006; and how many such cases were dealt with (a) in-country and (b) elsewhere. [133217]

Mr Harper [holding answer 12 December 2012]: The points based system (PBS) was introduced in 2008. Tier 1 was phased in between April and July 2008, Tier 2 and 5 in November 2008 and Tier 4 in April 2009.

The figures in the tables are from 2008 and for main applicants only.

(a) In-country: decisions on applications for an extension of stay by category (main applicants)
 CategoryDecisionsGrantsRefusals

2008

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

73,762

66,048

7,714

2009

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

81,364

65,962

15,402

2010

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

59,335

54,328

5,007

2011

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

70,245

66,508

3,737

     

2008

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

43,825

42,468

1,357

2009

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

30,336

27,851

2,485

2010

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

23,145

21,269

1,876

2011

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

19,566

18,205

1,361

     

2008

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

115,601

110,226

5,375

2009

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

125,019

108,548

16,471

2010

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

140,562

119,928

20,634

17 Dec 2012 : Column 495W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 496W

2011

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

116,876

102,561

14,315

     

2008

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

960

916

44

2009

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

675

469

206

2010

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

607

471

136

2011

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

735

646

89

(b) Elsewhere: decisions on entry clearance visa applications by category (main applicants)
 CategoryDecisionsIssuedRefused

2008

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

22,617

17,427

4,626

2009

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

23,891

18,851

4,822

2010

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

20,207

16,003

4,011

2011

Tier 1 & pre-PBS equivalent

10,027

8,655

1,304

     

2008

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

58,260

55,837

1,895

2009

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

40,646

36,287

3,928

2010

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

43,133

39,923

2,995

2011

Tier 2 & pre-PBS equivalent

39,760

38,062

1,462

     

2008

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

301,966

207,774

92,180

2009

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

373,695

273,207

93,278

2010

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

344,804

253,786

77,450

2011

Tier 4 & pre-PBS equivalent

283,421

237,028

41,565

     

2008

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

67,215

40,998

25,197

2009

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

42,762

36,318

5,875

2010

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

39,349

36,540

2,430

2011

Tier 5 & pre-PBS equivalent

39,116

36,622

1,963

Source: Tables ex.01 and be.01, Immigration Statistics July-September 2012

The published data on decisions, grants and refusals of extensions of leave to remain and on grants and refusals of entry clearance visas, by tier of the PBS, are published in the quarterly Immigration Statistics, a copy of which is available from the Library of the House of Commons or from the Home Office's website at:

www.homeoffice.gov.uk/science-research/research-statistics/migration/migration-statistics1/


Entry Clearances: Pakistan

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many visas were issued to Pakistani nationals in each of the last three years. [131772]

Mr Harper: There were 83,835, 96,455 and 124,818 entry clearance visas issued to Pakistani nationals (including dependants) in 2009, 2010 and 2011 respectively.

The latest Home Office immigration statistics on entry clearance visas issued is published in the release ‘Immigration Statistics’, which is available at:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/immigration-asylum-research/immigration-q3-2012/

A copy of the latest release, ‘Immigration Statistics July-September 2012’ has been placed in the House Library.

Fraud

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many specialist fraud officers there were in the police forces of England and Wales in each of the last five years. [133358]

Damian Green: The number of fraud officers (full-time equivalent) by police force area in England and Wales in each of the last five financial years can be seen from the following table.

Number of fraud officers, by police force area in England and Wales, as at 31 March 2008 to 2012(1,2,3,4)
 As at 31 March:
 20082009201020112012

Avon and Somerset

8

7

12

13

13

Bedfordshire

7

6

9

6

5

Cambridgeshire

10

7

0

3

4

Cheshire

13

3

8

8

18

Cleveland

20

18

18

20

18

Cumbria

3

3

2

5

6

Derbyshire

13

12

11

15

15

Devon and Cornwall

15

16

15

15

2

Dorset

15

14

15

14J

6

Durham

10

8

7

8

10

Dyfed-Powys

3

2

5

4

3

Essex

0

1

1

9

14

Gloucestershire

10

10

8

8

0

Greater Manchester

29

29

32

29

48

Gwent

7

7

7

6

7

17 Dec 2012 : Column 497W

Hampshire

1

1

4

6

13

Hertfordshire

0

14

16

16

18

Humberside

20

20

21

19

15

Kent

7

7

7

8

6

Lancashire

0

0

0

0

0

Leicestershire

15

16

12

12

0

Lincolnshire

4

3

2

2

2

London, City of

78

89

98

109

136

Merseyside

26

24

19

16

20

Metropolitan Police

247

225

230

233

212

Norfolk

11

8

9

8

11

Northamptonshire

7

5

21

20

14

Northumbria

14

16

22

16

14

North Wales

2

2

2

1

2

North Yorkshire

0

0

0

8

11

Nottinghamshire

21

21

15

13

27

South Wales

3

14

0

0

10

South Yorkshire

14

12

4

5

5

Staffordshire

10

10

7

5

9

Suffolk

2

3

2

3

3

Surrey

7

4

8

7

7

Sussex

11

16

14

15

14

Thames Valley

13

13

14

17

15

Warwickshire

9

9

7

6

3

West Mercia

10

9

5

7

0

West Midlands

44

42

48

24

43

West Yorkshire

46

32

27

21

25

Wiltshire

5

4

5

9

8

(1) Staff with multiple responsibilities (or designations) are recorded under their primary role or function. The deployment of police officers is an operational matter for individual chief constables. (2) This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (3) Fraud policing function is defined as staff who predominantly investigate fraud cases. Does not include staff who are predominantly employed in asset confiscation duties and includes those officers or staff in supporting roles. (4) Figures over time may be affected by organisational changes within forces. This may affect comparability over time and between forces.

G4S

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the status is of the G4S contract to re-house asylum seekers in private sector accommodation in Yorkshire. [131070]

Mr Harper: G4S were awarded the contract for the provision of accommodation and transport services for asylum applicants in June 2012. Since this time, there has been a period of transition during which asylum applicants have been moved from the previous housing provider to G4S accommodation. This transition completed on 4 December. All asylum applicants in the Yorkshire area are now accommodated by G4S.

Human Trafficking

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police forces in England and Wales have appointed a single point of contact for human trafficking cases. [129076]

Mr Harper: The Association of Chief Police Officers has identified single points of contact for each police region in England and Wales and is seeking to appoint

17 Dec 2012 : Column 498W

single points of contact in each force area. To date, 34 forces have appointed a single point of contact for human trafficking cases.

Immigration: EU Nationals

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures are in place to monitor the numbers of EU nationals entering into the UK and the purpose for which they have entered the UK. [123468]

Mr Harper: We monitor EU arrivals through the Office of National Statistics (ONS) International Passenger Survey (which provides the core data for the ONS estimates of Long-term International Migration as well as overall estimates of admissions). These are published quarterly on the ONS website and provide estimates for the numbers of migrants arriving and departing for work, study or to accompany/join another person. Data is also separately available on the large numbers of people who come to the UK as visitors.

DWP also publish new registrations for National Insurance Numbers annually.

While these will include short-term migrants who are not permanently resident, this data can be an indication of changes in numbers of foreign nationals coming to the UK principally to work.

E-Borders is a Home Office programme designed to improve border security by screening travel document information (TDI) on people travelling to, and from, the UK. Although e-Borders is designed for border security purposes, the data collected also has the potential to deliver improvements to migration and population statistics.

The most significant benefit would be to use e-Borders data to produce migrant counts. However, there are a number of potential issues and the feasibility of producing these will require further assessment. Reliable migration counts would also require virtually complete coverage and so this potential benefit is some years away. If feasible, these counts would not be available before 2018.

Interpol

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what assessment she has made of the governance of Interpol; [133454]

(2) how much the UK contributed to Interpol in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and how much is planned to be contributed in (i) 2012-13 and (ii) 2013-14. [133519]

James Brokenshire: The Government consider the governance structure of Interpol to be satisfactory. The Government are regularly consulted on the selection of senior appointments and is content with its ability to deliver a high quality service working with its member countries to support international police co-operation and tackle transnational crime.

The Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) hosts the UK National Central Bureau (NCB) for Interpol. SOCA made the following subscriptions to Interpol in 2010-11 and 2011-12.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 499W

Financial yearSubscription (£ million)

2010-11

2.862

2011-12

2.821

The estimated subscriptions for 2012-13 and 2013-14 are as follows.

Financial yearEstimated subscription (£ million)

2012-13

2.681

2013-14

2.710

Olympic Games 2012: Security

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had on the non-payment of contractors by G4S for London 2012 Olympic security. [133455]

James Brokenshire: No representations about non-payment of contractors by G4S for the London 2012 Games have been received by the Home Office. G4S's contract for security at Olympic and Paralympic venues was with the London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games (LOCOG). However, I understand from G4S that they have settled claims from 16 sub-contractors and are in commercial negotiation with the remaining three.

Police

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what account is taken of the popularity of a location as a tourist destination in the calculation of police numbers; and if she will make a statement. [133969]

Damian Green: The size and composition of a police force's workforce are determined by the relevant chief officer and police and crime commissioner.

Police and Community Support Officers: Dorset

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police community support officers there are in (a) Dorset Constabulary and (b) Bournemouth; [133968]

(2) how many police officers there were in (a) Dorset constabulary and (b) Bournemouth in each of the last 10 years. [133970]

Damian Green: The number of police officers within Dorset constabulary and Bournemouth as at 31 March 2003 to 2012 can be seen within the tables. Also shown in the second table is the number of police community support officers for the latest year figures were available for Dorset constabulary and Bournemouth (full-time equivalents).

Figures at basic command unit level ceased to be collected from 2011-12 by the Home Office.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 500W

Number of police officers within Dorset constabulary and Bournemouth as at 31 March 2003 to 31 March 2012(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
As at 31 March each yearDorset constabularyBournemouth

2003

1,422

318

2004

1,453

322

2005

1,475

317

2006

1,512

319

2007

1,526

315

2008

1,518

317

2009

1,512

506

2010

1,486

481

2011

1,452

2012

Number of police community support officers within Dorset constabulary and Bournemouth and Poole as at 31 March 2010(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
As at 31 March each yearDorset constabularyBournemouth and Poole

2010

164

79

(1) These figures are based on full-time equivalents that have been rounded to the nearest whole number. (2) Figures include those officers on career breaks or maternity/paternity leave. (3) As at 31 March 2011 Dorset constabulary was restructured and basic command units redefined part way through the period, as a result this data is not available. (4) Figures at basic command unit level ceased to be collected from 2011-12 following Lord Wasserman's assessment. (5) As at 31 March 2009, the basic command units Bournemouth and Poole merged.

Police and Crime Commissioners

Mr Brady: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will make it her Department's policy to allow candidates freepost deliveries in future elections for police and crime commissioners. [129864]

Damian Green [holding answer 26 November 2012]: There is no such thing as a free mailshot—to send information, as is the case in general elections, would cost over £30 million of taxpayers’ money. Information about every candidate was published online and delivered free of charge to the hundreds of thousands of people who requested it in hard copy.

The Government await the publication of the Electoral Commission's report in February 2013 to inform decisions about future elections.

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which police and crime commissioners she met on 3 December 2012; whether travel expenses were reimbursed following attendance at this meeting; and what the total amount was of any such expenses paid. [133409]

Damian Green: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department and her ministerial team met 39 of the 41 police and crime commissioners (PCCs) on 3 December. The PCCs for Cambridgeshire and Surrey were unable to attend. The Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime in London and the Chair of the City of London's Common Council Police Committee also attended. The Home Office did not pay expenses to PCCs who attended the day.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 501W

Police and Crime Commissioners: Fire Services

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration she has given to merging the role of fire authorities with that of police and crime commissioners for the purposes of achieving better integration. [133847]

Damian Green: Given the broad remit and powers of police and crime commissioners, and in light of the fact that they have only very recently assumed office, no further consideration has been given to extending their role to encompass fire authority responsibilities.

Police Stations

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police stations were open and operated by police forces in England for each of the last five years. [133844]

Damian Green: The requested information is not collected by the Home Office.

Police: Convictions

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police officers, (b) police community support officers and (c) police civilian staff in each police force have a (i) criminal conviction, (ii) conviction for a violent offence and (iii) conviction for an offence of dishonesty. [132640]

Damian Green: This information is not collected by the Home Office. Guidance issued by the Association of Chief Police Officers states that police forces should not recruit people with convictions which may call into question the integrity of the applicant or the police. Police officers who are convicted of a criminal offence can face disciplinary action including dismissal. Action in each individual case is the responsibility of the relevant chief constable and the police and crime commissioner.

Police: Prosecutions

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hours of police time have been spent leading prosecutions in each of the last five years. [134078]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not collect this information,

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many criminal prosecutions have been led by police officers in each of the last five years. [134092]

Damian Green: Figures on the numbers of police led prosecutions are not collated centrally, but it is estimated that around 310,000 minor road traffic cases each year are dealt with by police forces as specified proceedings. If is up to police forces whether such cases are dealt with by a police officer or a civilian member of police staff.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 502W

Police: Training

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what basic training is given to new recruits to police forces in England and Wales; and at what locations such training takes place. [133967]

Damian Green: Newly recruited police officers undergo a two year programme known as the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme (IPLDP). The College of Policing, on behalf of police forces in England and Wales, manages the national regulatory framework and a quality assurance monitoring system of the IPLDP.

Training is carried out locally by forces.

Respirex

Mr Blunt: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when Respirex International Limited will receive a substantive reply from the National Post Seizure Unit of the UK Border Force based at Plymouth to their email of 14.57 hours on 25 October 2012 and follow-up emails with reference to consignment reference CPT 345/12 and Export Licence Reference MBW-227703. [129306]

Mr Harper [holding answer 22 November 2012]: The National Post Seizure Unit provided a detailed reply to Respirex on 12 November 2012 confirming that the consignment would be released on payment of a restoration fee. The payment was confirmed on 19 November 2012. Due process was followed and decisions provided within agreed timelines.

Riot Damages Act 1886

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has any plans to reform the Riot (Damages) Act 1886. [133418]

Damian Green: We are currently reviewing the Riot (Damages) Act 1886 to ensure that it reflects the requirements of today's modern policing world. We plan to commission an independent review and further details will be announced early in 2013. The results from this independent review will be used to shape any possible future public consultation.

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations she has received on initiating an independent review of the Riot (Damages) Act 1886; and if she will make a statement. [134084]

Damian Green: There have been no representations received seeking an independent review of the Riot (Damages) Act 1886. Ministers took the decision to commission an independent review and an announcement is expected in the new year.

Social Services: Cambridgeshire

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will assess the effect of the removal of care staff from the Shortage Occupation List on care services in Cambridgeshire. [132737]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 503W

Mr Harper [holding answer 10 December 2012]: Care workers were removed from the Shortage Occupation List used in connection with the admission of skilled workers from outside the EEA under Tier 2 of the Points Based System. This action was taken on the advice of the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) in its report of March 2011, which found that this occupation did not meet the National Qualifications Framework Level 4 skills threshold applied to Tier 2 and concluded that labour shortages in the sector would have to be addressed through other means. This threshold has since been raised to National Qualifications Framework Level 6, and the Home Office has no plans to invite the MAC to specifically consider the re-inclusion of this occupation on the list.

Telephone Services

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the likely cost of her Department’s 0800 1070708 telephone number for the period since its commencement to 16 November 2012. [127584]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 8 November 2012]: The final cost of the 0800 1070708 telephone number was £73,384.05 which covers the period 5 October up until 4 pm on 14 November.

This figure is exclusive of VAT but includes initial set up and development of the service, call charges, costs for call handling and transcription of messages left via the automated orderline.

UK Border Agency

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the UK Border Agency's target time is to (a) complete an investigation of missing documents and (b) inform the applicant of the outcome. [130071]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency does not have a general process or target time for investigating missing documents and informing the applicant of the outcome. However, if a customer makes a complaint about a missing document the target time to respond to them is 95% within 20 working days.

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) budget and (b) staffing level of the UK Border Agency was in (i) 2009, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2011 and (iv) 2012; and what its (A) planned budget and (B) projected staffing level is for 2013. [130761]

Mr Harper: The (a) budgets and (b) staffing levels for the UK Border Agency for each financial year from 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 are detailed in the annual reports that can be found on the Home Office website via the following link.

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/sitecontent/documents/aboutus/annual-reports-accounts/

UK Border Agency average staffing for each financial year (excludes Border Force)
Total2009-102010-112011-12

Directly employed

13,086

12,902

11,583

Other

2,654

2,206

2,058

17 Dec 2012 : Column 504W

Staff engaged on capital projects

141

126

121

Total

15,880

15,234

13,762

The total average staffing number for 2011-12 in the annual report for that period was adjusted to 14,112 to take account of approximately 350 case-working staff working in Border Force on UK Border Agency casework.

The UK Border Agency's (A) planned budget and (B) projected staffing level for 2013-14 are currently being agreed as part of the annual planning round with the Home Office and are not yet available.

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many UK Border Agency (UKBA) officers with the power of arrest have been employed by UKBA in (a) the latest financial year and (b) the previous three financial years. [132945]

Mr Harper [holding answer 10 December 2012]: Management information indicates that there are approximately 1,150 arrest trained officers in the UK Border Agency's (UKBA's) Crime and Enforcement Group. Accurate comparative data for previous financial years is not available.

Wales

EU Law

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) which EU directives his Department transposed in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012 to date; which EU directives his Department expects to transpose in (i) 2013 and (ii) the next two years; and what estimate he has made of the cost of each such directive to the (A) public purse and (B) private sector; [133717]

(2) which regulations his Department introduced as a result of EU legislation in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012 to date; which regulations his Department expects to implement as a result of EU legislation in (i) 2013 and (ii) the next two years; and what estimate he has made of the cost of each such regulation to the (A) public purse and (B) private sector. [133718]

Mr David Jones: None. In order to increase transparency, in the forthcoming Statement of New Regulation (SNR5) the Government will, for the first time, be publishing those new European Union (EU) measures which are being implemented in UK law and have a direct effect on business.

Migration

Jonathan Edwards: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what assessment he has made of levels of migration (a) from Scotland, England and Northern Ireland to Wales and (b) from Wales to Scotland, England and Northern Ireland in each of the last five years. [133523]

Mr David Jones: I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer given to him by the Parliamentary Secretary for the Cabinet Office, my hon. Friend the Member for Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner (Mr Hurd), on 12 December 2012, Official Report, columns 378-80W.

No assessment of these figures has been undertaken.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 505W

Scotland

Battle of Flodden: Anniversaries

Mr Davidson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what plans he has to commemorate the five hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Flodden in 2013. [133420]

Michael Moore: The Scotland Office has no plans to commemorate the five hundredth anniversary of the battle of Flodden in 2013. In my capacity as Member of Parliament for the adjacent constituency, from which many of the Scots soldiers were drawn, I will be participating in a series of engagements to commemorate the battle.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 506W

Visits Abroad

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what overseas travel (a) he, (b) other Ministers in his Department and (c) officials in his Department have undertaken since taking office; what the destination and purpose of each such visit was; and what the total cost to his Department was of all such overseas travel. [133438]

Michael Moore: Since taking office, the Under-Secretary of State for Scotland, the right hon. Member for Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale (David Mundell), and I have undertaken the following international visits:

TripMinister and groupPurposeTotal cost (£)

USA: 3 to 9 April 2011

David Mundell

Attend Tartan Week events and promote Scottish businesses

2,685.71

Brussels: 14 to 15 June 2011

Michael Moore (plus 2)

Meetings with European Commission, MEPs and businesses

841.19

Brazil: 26 November to 1 December 2011

Michael Moore (plus 2)

Lead Scottish trade delegation, meeting businesses, Brazilian Government and others

22,844.98

Vatican City: 14 to 15 February 2012

Michael Moore (plus 1)

UK Government delegation to the Vatican

1,166.80

USA: 9 to 14 April 2012

David Mundell (plus 1)

Supporting Scotland Week, a UKTI trade delegation and promoting Scottish small and medium-sized enterprises

12,657.44

Brussels: 5 to 6 December 2012

Michael Moore (plus 2)

Meetings with European Commission, MEPs and businesses

(1)

USA/Canada: 9 to 12 December 2012

Michael Moore (plus 3)

To promote trade and meet with companies with an interest in Scotland and the UK, and to carry out other Government business

(1)

(1) Costs being finalised.

Attorney-General

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Attorney-General how many full-time equivalent staff were employed on consultancy contracts of the Law Officers' Departments on the latest date for which figures are available; how many such staff were employed on the same date 12 months ago; and if he will make a statement. [132202]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has a consultancy contract with one individual as at 30 November 2012. The contract is for approximately 20 days work between the periods 1 August 2012 to 31 July 2013. No staff had been employed on a consultancy contract on 30 November 2011.

As at 31 October the Serious Fraud Office was not employing any staff on consultancy contracts. In October 2011, a full-time equivalent of 2.3 staff were employed on a consultancy basis.

The remaining Law Officers' Departments do not currently employ anyone on a consultancy contract and the same position applied as at 31 October 2011.

Corporate Manslaughter

Paul Burstow: To ask the Attorney-General how many cases for potential prosecution of offences under the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 have been referred to the Crown Prosecution Service by (a) police forces and (b) the Health and Safety Executive since the commencement of the Act. [133972]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has four Casework Divisions, one of which is the Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division (SCCTD). Cases involving suspected corporate manslaughter are referred to the Special Crime unit within SCCTD, unless the suspect is an unincorporated partnership, as these cases will be referred to a Complex Casework Unit. The number of cases referred to SCCTD and recorded as being “corporate manslaughter” since the commencement of the Act is 141. The CPS does not hold this data broken down by referring agency. The Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 does not apply to pre-Act deaths, thus some cases may have been recorded as gross negligence manslaughter rather than corporate manslaughter. The CPS figures are based on a single categorisation of the case type and so, some cases that include a corporate manslaughter element will not necessarily be recorded as a case of that type.

Fraud

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what conviction rates have been secured by the Crown Prosecution Service for fraud in each of the last five years. [133355]

The Solicitor-General: The records held by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) provide an analysis of the outcome of proceedings, divided into 12 principal offence categories indicating the most serious offence with which the defendant was charged at the time of finalisation. The following table shows, in each of the last five years, the conviction rates for defendants whose principal offence was fraud and forgery.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 507W

 Percentage

2007-08

89.7

2008-09

90.0

2009-10

87.9

2010-11

87.1

2011-12

86.2

As well as offences of fraud, the conviction rate figures include bankruptcy offences, forgery and counterfeiting, and fraud and forgery associated with vehicle or driver records. The figures represent all convictions for fraud and forgery handled by the 13 areas of the CPS and, from April 2010, cases prosecuted by the specialist Central Fraud Division established following the merger of the CPS’s Fraud Prosecution Division with the Revenue and Customs Prosecution Office.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what conviction rates were secured by the Crown Prosecution Service for frauds worth (a) between £10,000 and £100,000, (b) between £100,000 and £500,000, (c) between £500,000 and £1 million and (d) more than £1 million in each of the last five years. [133356]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service maintains no central record of the values of frauds prosecuted. Such data could not be reasonably obtained locally or nationally other than by undertaking a manual exercise of reviewing individual case files at a disproportionate cost.

Plymouth Brethren

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Attorney-General if he will recommend that appeals by the Plymouth Brethren be heard in the Upper Tribunal. [133667]

The Attorney-General: I have considered joining as a party to the current appeals to the Charity Tribunal relating to the registration of Brethren meeting halls. I have decided that, at this stage, it is not necessary for me to do so. The appropriate forum for the appeal is therefore a question for the tribunal. I will be keeping my position under review as the case progresses.

Dr Offord: To ask the Attorney-General what representations he has received on the charitable status of the Plymouth Brethren; and what response has been given. [133904]

The Attorney-General: As of 14 December 2012 I have received papers relating to an ongoing appeal to the Charity Tribunal, 28 letters from Members of Parliament and four letters from members of the public. I have responded informing correspondents that I have considered joining as a party to the ongoing appeal and have decided that, at this stage, it is not necessary for me to do so. I will, however, be keeping that position under review as the case progresses.

Proceeds of Crime

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General how much of its annual budget the Crown Prosecution Service spends on tracing and recovering the proceeds of crime. [133354]

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The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has allocated £15,400,000 of its annual budget, in both 2011-12 and 2012-13, to tracing and recovering the proceeds of crime.

Prosecutions

Mr Thomas: To ask the Attorney-General pursuant to the answer of 10 December 2012, Official Report, columns 18-9W, on the Crown Prosecution Service, how many prosecutions were launched by the Crown Prosecution Service's (a) Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division, (b) Organised Crime Division, (c) Welfare, Rural and Health Division and (d) Central Fraud Group in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12 (A) in total and (B) in each region of England; and if he will make a statement. [133820]

The Solicitor-General: The information requested is as follows. Due to the specialised nature of the cases dealt with by these divisions, expertise is centred in specific locations and so a breakdown by geographic region is not available. Figures for offices located outside of London are provided where available.

(a) The Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division was set up on 4 April 2011 and merges the formerly separate Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Divisions. The Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division commenced the following number of prosecutions in England in 2010-11 and 2011-12:

 2010-112011-12

Special Crime London

61

32

Special Crime York

62

131

Counter Terrorism London

58

74

Total

181

237

(b) The CPS Organised Crime Division (OCD) was set up in 2005 in order to provide a one-stop shop for investigators from the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and its affiliate, the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP). OCD has offices in London, Birmingham, Manchester and York. OCD commenced the following number of prosecutions in England in 2010-11 and 2011-12:

 2010-112011-12

OCD London

304

387

OCO Birmingham

110

130

OCD Manchester

272

165

OCD York

134

48

Total

820

730

(c) The Welfare, Rural and Health Division (WRHD) was set up in its present form on 1 April 2012 following the merger of the prosecution function of the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) with the already established Welfare, Rural and Health Division dealing with prosecutions from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA). WRHD has been responsible from April 2012 for prosecuting certain types of crime on behalf of the DWP, the Department of Health and some local authorities.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 509W

Cases prosecuted on behalf of the Department of Health (DH) are brought forward by NHS Protect or the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

As WRHD was created in its present form on 1 April 2012 it did not commence any prosecutions in 2010-11 or 2011-12, but instead inherited cases that had been commenced by other authorities and units. On 1 April 2012, it took on responsibility for 3,706 prosecutions as detailed in the following table.

 2011-12

DEFRA

57

DWP Birmingham

1,059

DWP Cardiff

884

DWP Leeds

519

DWP Liverpool

713

DWP London

459

Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA)

15

Total

3,706

(d) The Central Fraud Group (CFG) was set up within the CPS in April 2010 to provide a specialist prosecution and advisory service for complex, sensitive and high value fraud cases throughout England and Wales, and for all fiscal fraud and export control cases investigated by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs. CFG commenced the following number of prosecutions in England and Wales in 2010-11 and 2011-12:

 2010-112011-12

CFG North

267

485

CFG South

523

598

Total

790

1,083

Serious Fraud Office

Mike Wood: To ask the Attorney-General how many staff are employed by the Serious Fraud Office; and of these, how many are (a) senior civil servants and (b) special advisers. [133650]

The Solicitor-General: The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) does not employ any special advisers. As of 30 November there was a full-time equivalent (FTE) of 297.39 staff employed at the SFO, of which a FTE of 11.56 were senior civil servants.

Mike Wood: To ask the Attorney-General how many investigators are employed in the Serious Fraud Office. [133651]

The Solicitor-General: As of 30 November there was a full-time equivalent of 116.09 investigators employed at the Serious Fraud Office.

Mike Wood: To ask the Attorney-General how much was spent on the away day for senior civil servants in the Serious Fraud Office held between 17 and 19 October 2012. [133653]

The Attorney-General: The cost of the event was £5,090 plus VAT.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 510W

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what investigations have been carried out into the Serious Fraud Office’s use of consultants since 2010; if he will place in the Library the findings of any such investigations; and if he will make a statement. [133666]

The Attorney-General: There has been one such investigation during this time period. Sir Alex Allan was asked by the Cabinet Secretary, Sir Gus O’Donnell, to review the SFO’s use of consultants in autumn 2011 and he reported back in November 2011. This review was commissioned following a number of allegations made by some members of staff. Sir Alex Allan interviewed and collected evidence from those who made the allegations, from the SFO’s senior management team, from the non-executive directors and from a number of outside bodies including the National Audit Office and Cabinet Office’s Efficiency and Reform Group.

He found no evidence of improper conduct in respect to the processes by which consultancy contracts were awarded, but identified that there was a lack of documentation for some decisions, and different processes for handling consultancy contracts and other contracts. He recommended that all payments to consulting firms, whether for consultancy or for interim managers, are aggregated and treated as part of a single, continuing contract.

I would like to publish the findings of Sir Alex’s report in full and am currently considering any legal reasons as to why that may not be possible.

Sexual Offences

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what the Crown Prosecution Service’s conviction rate for crimes committed under section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 was in each of the last five years. [134079]

The Solicitor-General: The records held by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) identify the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced and reached a first hearing in magistrates courts, rather than the number of defendants prosecuted and convicted. It is not possible to ascertain the number of convictions obtained without examining individual case files which would incur a disproportionate cost.

CPS collects information about the number of defendants prosecuted for rape: offences contrary to sections 1 and 5 of the Sexual Offences Act 1956, sections 1, 5 and 30(3) of the Sexual Offences Act 2003, and attempts, incitement or conspiracy to commit the above offences.

The percentage of convictions of such defendants is shown in the following table.

 Percentage

2007-08

57.7

2008-09

57.7

2009-10

59.4

2010-11

58.6

2011-12

62.5

17 Dec 2012 : Column 511W

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General how many prosecutions the Crown Prosecution Service has conducted under section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 in each of the last five years. [134080]

The Solicitor-General: The records held by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) identify the number of offences in which a prosecution commenced and reached a first hearing in magistrates courts, rather than the number of defendants prosecuted. The following table shows, in each of the last five years, the number of offences charged under section 1 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (Rape).

 Number

2007-08

3,357

2008-09

3,499

2009-10

4,106

2010-11

4,555

2011-12

4,218

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Environment Protection: Telecommunications

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues on the potential effect of communications infrastructure on National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. [133237]

Richard Benyon: The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for North Shropshire (Mr Paterson), is meeting regularly with the Secretaries of State for Culture Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), and Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), and other key ministerial colleagues to discuss issues relating to broadband and mobile provision. This includes the interests of national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty in the rollout programme. Furthermore, on 13 November, I met with the Under-Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my hon. Friend the Member for Wantage (Mr Vaizey), to discuss broadband and mobile coverage and the impacts in all rural communities, including in protected areas.

Fish: Solent

Mr Tom Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs for what reasons his Department has not provided funding to the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science for the continuation of the annual Solent bass surveys. [133398]

Richard Benyon: The coalition Government’s first priority is to reduce the public sector deficit and so we are looking at all options that would ensure the continued delivery of essential services within a reduced budget from Government.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 512W

Consequently DEFRA officials have had to make a number of difficult decisions on the continuation of funding for various projects, including the Solent bass survey, based on prioritisation of where scientific research and development is needed the most, value for money and whether the projects are a requirement of our wider UK, EU and global commitments.

Fisheries: Atlantic Ocean

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department is taking to protect deep-sea fish stocks in the North East Atlantic. [133502]

Richard Benyon: In November, EU Ministers reached political agreement on fishing opportunities for certain deep-sea stocks for 2013 and 2014. This included continuing zero total allowable catches (TACs) for particularly vulnerable species such as deep-sea sharks and orange roughy, thus making it clear that these species are not to be targeted.

Earlier this year, the Commission issued a proposal to update the current EU deep sea access regime and this includes setting limits on the number of vessels that can target deep-sea fish. DEFRA fully supports the key objectives that underpin this proposal and anticipates contributing to the development of this dossier when active consideration begins under the Irish presidency in 2013.

In addition the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science continues to provide advice on deep-sea issues and is a key partner in the EU project DEEPFISHMAN, which is due to report this year. This project aims to develop a monitoring and management framework for deepwater fisheries in the NE Atlantic.

Humber Estuary

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many flood defence schemes in the Humber Strategy have (a) secure external funding and (b) funding from non-public sector sources. [132652]

Richard Benyon: The Humber Flood Risk Management Strategy includes nine flood risk management schemes which have either been delivered or are in progress. Eight schemes have been fully funded using flood defence grant in aid through the Environment Agency and one £5.5 million scheme delivered in Brough received £1.95 million external funding contributions from BAE Systems.

Primates: Conservation

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what work is being done internationally to (a) stop the hunting of mountain gorillas, (b) help support the training of rangers to detect and safely remove snares and (c) help protect vital gorilla habitat. [133372]

Richard Benyon: A wide variety of international conservation activities are ongoing to help ensure the long-term survival of the gorilla. These include through the auspices of international fora such as the agreement on the conservation of gorillas and their habitats, the

17 Dec 2012 : Column 513W

convention on the conservation of migratory species, the Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP) and the convention on international trade in endangered species (CITES). Work is also being carried out by gorilla range states, United Nations agencies, non-governmental organisations, research institutions and other supporters of gorilla conservation.

In the UK, we focus our efforts to conserve great apes, including gorillas, through GRASP and CITES. GRASP aims to lift the threat of extinction faced by gorillas and other great apes. The UK is a staunch supporter of the partnership, and recently contributed £100,000 to fund its second Council meeting. By bringing together range states and other key stakeholders, the meeting reenergised international effort to conserve great apes.

Through CITES, of which the UK is a party, international, commercial trade in gorillas is prohibited apart from in exceptional circumstances. Under CITES, a number of initiatives are being taken to tackle the problem of illegal trade in gorillas and other great apes, for example technical missions by the CITES secretariat to gorilla range states (Uganda, Cameroon and Gabon) to review the implementation and enforcement of CITES controls and the protection of great ape habitats.

We are also working with other EU member states to tackle the trade in illegal timber, which destroys habitats and threatens species. This includes bilateral agreements with African countries including Cameroon, Republic of Congo and Central African Republic to develop their legality systems, and a broader regulation, the EU timber regulation, which addresses all timber imports.

Salmon: Northumberland

Sir Alan Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the future of coastal salmon fisheries in Northumberland; and if he will make a statement. [133472]

Richard Benyon: I have recently reviewed the future of Northumberland salmon fisheries as part of new legislation limiting net fishing for salmon and sea trout along the north-east coast.

The north-east coast fishery exploits salmon and sea trout from several rivers, thus making it difficult to protect the weakest river stocks. We have been progressively phasing out fisheries such as these and such a phase out already applies to the drift nets operating on the north-east coast. A phase out will now also apply to the T & J net fishery.

I have instructed the Environment Agency to close the north-east coast drift net fishery in September 2022. Until then currently-licensed netsmen will still be able to fish but no new netsmen will be licensed.

I have also instructed the Environment Agency to review the Net Limitation Order in five years and evaluate the potential for maintaining net fishing for salmon and sea trout in the region, other than with drift nets, if stock levels allow and if it can be demonstrated to be consistent with national policy and international guidance.

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Water: Pollution Control

Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate he has made of the potential additional cost to household water bills of the EU Commission's proposals to add estradiol, ethinylestradiol and diclofenac to the priority substances list. [132748]

Richard Benyon: In January 2012, the European Commission published a proposal that would set environmental quality standards for a number of substances, including estradiol (naturally excreted by humans and animals as well as being used as a medicine), ethinylestradiol (used in the birth control pill) and diclofenac (an anti-inflammatory commonly used to treat conditions such as arthritis).

The Commission estimated costs for meeting the standard for estradiol to be €18/head/year (about £15/head/year) for wastewater treatment in the UK, totalling €20billion (about £16 billion) over 20 years. The Environment Agency undertook more detailed modelling and estimates it will cost about £27 billion to £31 billion over 20 years to treat wastewaters so that surface waters in England and Wales meet the required standard for ethinylestradiol and estradiol.

The breakdown of costs by water bill payer has yet to be established by the Government. The Commission's proposal is still under negotiation and so standards are yet to be agreed. Meanwhile, detailed consideration of local conditions will be needed to assess where and when advanced wastewater treatment should be implemented. These considerations can be incorporated into existing investment planning cycles.

Deputy Prime Minister

Regional Planning and Development

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister what recent estimate he has made of the cost of establishing the Cities Policy Unit; and what estimate he has made of the likely annual cost of running the unit. [131244]

The Deputy Prime Minister: The Cities Policy Unit was established in August 2011 and is part of the Political and Constitution Reform Group within the Cabinet Office.

The Cabinet Office publishes Annual Reports and Accounts which outline the costs of Cabinet Office Departments. The costs associated with the Political and Constitution Reform Group can be found in the Cabinet Office Annual Reports and Accounts 2011/12 (HC56) on page 91.

Justice

Administration of Justice: Expenditure

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what capital expenditure there was since 2007 in all (a) prisons and (b) courts closed since May 2010. [134137]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 515W

Jeremy Wright: The details of capital expenditure since 2007 in all prisons and courts closed since May 2010 are given in the following table:

£ million
Type of capital expenditurePrisonsCourts

Major capital costs

15.6

10.4

Local capital acquisitions

0.5

0.9

Total

16.1

11.3

Charities

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much funding his Department allocated to (a) Centrepoint, (b) Crisis, (c) Skill Force and (d) Shelter in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13 to date; and if he will make a statement. [132464]

Mrs Grant: The Department's funding allocation to Crisis and Shelter is given in the following table.

£ million
Organisation2010-112011-122012-13

Crisis

0

0.020

0

Shelter

0.621

1.055

(1)1.176

(1 )Year-to-date position.

No funding was given to Centrepoint and Skill Force in the last three years.

Companies: Prosecutions

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will set out the statutes under which a corporate entity would be liable to prosecution in criminal law for neglect or abuse of a vulnerable person; and if he will make a statement. [134116]

Damian Green: In accordance with the Interpretation Act 1978 a body corporate or unincorporate can commit any offence which applies to a “person” unless the contrary intention appears. Where a corporate body cannot commit the offence as principal, it may still be liable as a secondary participant depending on the circumstances.

In extreme cases which result in death an organisation can be found guilty of the offence under the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 if the way in which its activities are managed or organised causes a death and amounts to a gross breach of a relevant duty of care to the deceased.

Credit Cards

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much has been spent by officials in his Department on Government-issued credit cards in the last six months. [133675]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice does not use credit cards so has no recorded spend against them.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 516W

Criminal Injuries Compensation

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many of the recipients of an award under the Criminal Injuries Compensation scheme resident in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) outside the UK also received an award for compensation for loss of earnings in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12, by each tariff band of the scheme; and what the total amount received as compensation for loss of earnings was by recipients in each of those tariff bands. [132608]

Mrs Grant: The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) only holds information about applicants' residency in individual files, and so could compile the answer only at disproportionate cost. They can, however, provide a close approximation by giving figures based on which police force was investigating the incidents that gave rise to claims.

I have placed figures in the Library of the House showing how many awards were paid in each tariff band in each of the specified years, broken down by the police force from which CICA received a report about the incident giving rise to the claim. No figures are available for outside the UK because CICA only compensates for injuries sustained in, and attributable to a crime that took place in, Great Britain.

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the contribution by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice of 1 November 2012, Official Report, Seventh Delegated Legislation Committee, column 6, (1) which organisations will be able to assist victims of crime in (a) England, (b) Scotland and (c) Wales in making an application to the hardship fund; [134090]

(2) whether victims of crime resident in (a) England, (b) Scotland and (c) Wales will be eligible to make applications to the hardship fund. [134091]

Mrs Grant: Victims of crime who sustained an injury in England and Wales on or after 27 November 2012 and who meet the other eligibility criteria are able to make applications to the hardship fund.

The hardship fund is administered by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority following the referral of an application based on an initial assessment of eligibility by Victim Support.

The hardship fund does not cover victims of crime who sustained an injury in Scotland.