Debt Collection

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice when his Department plans to publish the results of the Transforming Bailiff Action consultation launched in February 2012. [133123]

Mrs Grant: The Ministry of Justice is currently finalising the Government response to this consultation paper and will issue this in due course.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 517W

European Court of Human Rights

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the average delay is between the first petition and final judgment for cases before the European Court of Human Rights in the last 30 years; and what the longest such delay was. [133829]

Damian Green: Information published on the Court's website states that between 1959 and the end of 2011 it delivered 14,854 judgments. Information on the length of time it took between the initial application and the final judgment, including the longest such delay, is not available to the Government.

Freedom of Information

David Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require that a person making a request under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 be identified. [133498]

Mrs Grant: Section 8 of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (the Act) requires that an applicant provides their name when making a request under the Act. The future direction of policy in relation to the Act is made clear in the Government's response to post legislative scrutiny published on 30 November 2012. We do not intend to bring forward legislative proposals to require any further identification of applicants.

Information Officers

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many full-time equivalent press office staff his Department employs; and how many such staff were employed in April 2010. [133543]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice press office operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, dealing with all media relations for the Department, including the National Offender Management Service (NOMS), from the international, national, regional, local and specialist media.

As at 30 October 2012, there were 31 (full-time equivalent) press officers in the Ministry's press office and four

17 Dec 2012 : Column 518W

vacant posts. Additionally there were three (full-time equivalent) press officers in HM Courts and Tribunals Service.

As at 30 April 2010, there were 40 (full-time equivalent) press officers in the Ministry's press office and two vacant posts. There were also two (full-time equivalent) press officers working across HM Courts Service and the Tribunals Service and two vacant posts. (HM Courts and Tribunals Service was created on 1 April 2011 by combining Her Majesty's Courts Service and the Tribunals Service.)

Judiciary

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what proportion of the judiciary in England and Wales were male in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012; [133578]

(2) what proportion of the judiciary were (a) white British, (b) black Caribbean, (c) black African, (d) Pakistani, (e) Indian, (f) Bangladeshi and (g) of another ethnicity in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012; [133579]

(3) what proportion of the judiciary were (a) Christian, (b) Muslim, (c) Jewish, (d) Hindu, (e) Sikh, (f) of no faith and (g) of another faith in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012. [133580]

Mrs Grant: The data on the gender and ethnicity of the Judiciary are held and published by the Judicial Office. These data are available at:

for 2012:

http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/publications-and-reports/statistics/diversity-stats-and-gen-overview

from 2001 to 2011:

http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/publications-and-reports/statistics/diversity-stats-and-gen-overview/archived-diversity-stats

The data available for the period between 2001 and 2006 only include the percentage of women judges and the percentage of those from a Black, Asian or Minority Ethnic (BAME) background. As such, the only available series for both the gender and ethnicity of judges since 1998 is that presented in table 1. Data from 2007 onwards include the gender breakdown and the five point self-identified ethnicity classification.

Percentage of judges by gender and ethnicity
Table 1: Percentage of women judges and judges from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME), 1998 to 2012
 Total number of judgesWomen (percentage)Percentage BAME out of known ethnicity(1)Percentage BAME out of total number of judges

1998

3,174

10.3

n/a

1.6

1999

3,312

11.2

n/a

1.7

2000

3,441

12.7

n/a

2.1

2001

3,535

14.1

n/a

1.9

2002

3,545

14.5

n/a

2.0

2003

3,656

14.9

n/a

2.2

2004

3,675

15.8

n/a

2.5

2005

3,794

16.9

n/a

2.9

2006

3,774

18.0

n/a

3.8

2007

3,545

18.7

n/a

3.5

2008

3,820

19.0

5.0

4.1

2009

3,602

19.4

4.5

3.6

2010

3,598

20.6

4.8

3.9

2011

3,694

22.3

5.1

4.2

17 Dec 2012 : Column 519W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 520W

2012

3,575

22.6

5.2

4.2

n/a = not available (1) The black and minority ethnic figure is calculated as a percentage of those members of the judiciary who provided ethnicity data. Notes: 1. The database of the ethnic origin of the judiciary may be incomplete as (a) candidates are asked to provide the information on a voluntary basis and (b) such details have only been collected since October 1991. Further ethnicity data were collected from judiciary in post through a diversity survey undertaken by the Judicial Office in 2007. In May 2009 the Judicial Office began collecting ethnicity data from all new judicial appointees with the help of Ministry of Justice. 2. Figures from 2008 onwards are not directly comparable with earlier years as the data have been widened to include four new types of judicial post. Source: Historical data from Judicial Office website and archived website of the Department for Constitutional Affairs http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/publications-and-reports/statistics/diversity-stats-and-gen-overview http://www.dca.gov.uk/dept/depstrat.htm

Information on the religion of the Judiciary is not routinely collected by the Judicial Office.

Litter

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were (a) charged, (b) prosecuted and (c) convicted for dropping litter in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [132073]

Jeremy Wright: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for littering offences in England and Wales, from 2009-10 to 2010-11 by financial year, can be viewed in the following table.

Charging data are not collected by the Ministry of Justice.

Annual court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Persons proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts for littering offences(1), England and Wales, by financial year 2009-11(2, 3)
 2009-102010-11

Proceeded against

4,784

4,796

Found guilty

3,758

3,777

(1) An offence under s. 87, 93, 94, 94(8)(9) Environmental Protection Act 1990, as substituted by s. 21 Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005. (2) The figures given relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offence for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, the offence selected is the one for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services, Ministry of Justice.

Lost Property

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many laptops issued to members of his Department have been reported lost in the last six months; and what the cost to the public purse was of such incidents; [133676]

(2) how many memory sticks issued to members of his Department have been reported lost in the last six months; and what the cost to the public purse was of such incidents. [133677]

Jeremy Wright: Members of the Ministry of Justice have reported the loss of 23 laptops and three memory sticks for the two latest quarters of 2012-13 (April to September 2012). The costs of these losses fall into the monthly service management costs, and are not reported separately.

All Ministry of Justice laptops are encrypted and protected with a complex password. The Ministry also implements security incident management procedures to ensure that the impacts of incidents are risk managed and investigations are undertaken to seek, where possible, to retrieve lost/stolen assets.

The Ministry adopts government security policy framework requirements to securely protect its assets.

Clear processes are in place for notification of any loss, including reporting it to the police. The compliance of staff with policy and guidance is a line management responsibility, and in the event of any breach, disciplinary action may be taken. Specific sanction is applied to the removal of unencrypted laptops or other official IT equipment containing personal or protectively-marked data from a secure location and in the event of this occurring disciplinary action will be taken which may result in dismissal.

Magistrates

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of magistrates in England and Wales (1) were male in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012; [133581]

(2) were (a) white British, (b) black Caribbean, (c) black African, (d) Pakistani, (e) Indian, (f) Bangladeshi and (g) of another ethnicity in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012; [133582]

(3) were (a) Christian, (b) Muslim, (c) Jewish, (d) Hindu, (e) Sikh, (f) of no faith and (g) of another faith in each year from 1 April 1997 to 2012. [133583]

Mrs Grant: The data on the gender and ethnicity of the magistracy is held and published by the Judicial Office. Data for 2008, 2010, 2011 and 2012 can be found at

http://www.judiciary.gov.uk/publications-and-reports/statistics/magistrates-statistics

17 Dec 2012 : Column 521W

The Judicial Office also provides data on gender and ethnicity for inclusion, respectively, in the Ministry of Justice's publications "Statistics and Women and the Criminal Justice System" and "Statistics and Race and the Criminal Justice System". The most recent editions of these publications include data for the most recent five years available at the time of publication (2008 to 2012 for gender, and 2007 to 2011 for ethnicity). These can be found at

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/criminal-justice/women

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/criminal-justice/race

Combining these data sources, Table 1 as follows presents the breakdown of magistrates by gender, 2008 to 2012, as at 31 March.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 522W

Table 1: Percentage of magistrates by gender, 31 March 2008 to 2012
 Women (percentage)Men (percentage)Total (number)

2008

50.1

49.9

29,419

2009

50.6

49.4

29,270

2010

50.8

49.2

28,607

2011

51.1

48.9

26,966

2012

51.3

48.7

25,170

Table 2 as follows presents the breakdown of magistrates by self-identified ethnicity (five point classification), 2007 to 2012, as at 31 March.

Table 2: Percentage of magistrates by self identified ethnicity, 31 March 2007 to 2012
 White (%)Mixed (%)Asian (%)Black (%)Chinese or other (%)Not stated (%)Total (number)

2007

93.0

0.4

2.3

3.7

0.6

0.1

29,816

2008

92.7

0.4

2.4

3.8

0.7

0.0

29,419

2009

92.4

0.5

2.5

3.9

0.7

0.0

29,270

2010

92.3

0.5

2.5

3.9

0.7

0.0

28,607

2011

92.0

0.5

2.7

4.1

0.8

0.0

26,966

2012

91.9

0.5

2.6

4.1

0.8

0.0

25,170

There is limited information available for some years on the gender and ethnicity of magistrates before 2008 and 2007, respectively. Please note that that comparisons across the years must be done with care, as some measures and definitions may have changed through time. This information can be found in the archived editions of “Statistics on Women and the Criminal Justice System” and “Statistics on Race and the Criminal Justice System”:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110109132045/http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/womencriminaljusticesystem-archive.htm

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/+/http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/raceandcjs-archive.htm

Reports prior to 2007 were published by the Home Office and can be found here:

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110204191850/rds.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/section951.html

Information on the religion of magistrates is currently not collected by the Judicial Office.

National Offender Management Service

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what evidence his Department has that competition in offender services can lead to (a) greater efficiency and (b) greater value for money. [131583]

Jeremy Wright: Competition for offender services has been shown to have significant benefits and has delivered both greater efficiency and greater value for money.

Prison Competition Phase 1 has driven efficiencies in the prisons which were competed. Contracts for Birmingham, Doncaster and Buckley Hall are forecast to save over £200 million relative to previous spend over the life of the contracts: a 16% saving against previous spend. The competition also secured better value as result of the public sector winning HMP Buckley Hall where there was a significant improvement in delivery requirements from the public sector.

Significant savings are expected from Prison Competition Phase 2 which is still under way. We announced to the House on 8 November that we will reduce costs without compromising public safety across the whole system to improve outcomes and deliver value for money by setting a new benchmark for running prisons which we will now apply to all public sector prisons in order to maximise savings over the next two spending review periods. This approach flows directly from the competition and enables us to utilise the market to drive down costs and provides the potential to rapidly expand the payment-by-results approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. We estimate an additional £450 million savings will be generated over the next six years by applying this new public sector benchmark and by competing ancillary and through-the-gate resettlement services across all public sector prisons.

There is also evidence of how the benefits can be applied to non-custodial services.

The recent competition for community payback in London resulted in a winning bid that delivers substantial savings to the taxpayer of £25 million (37%) over the life of the four-year contract working closely with a range of providers to deliver the service, including London Probation Trust.

We are currently running a competition for Electronic Monitoring. Previous competitions have seen financial benefits. In 2004-05, the Home Office spent £102.3 million on the electronic monitoring of curfews. The contracts let in 2005 made an average saving of £950 per subject monitored which equated to a reduction of 40% on the 2004-05 expenditure (£40.92 million). The Department has since negotiated further cost reductions with the contractors of: £3.6 million in 2009-10; £4.8 million in 2010-11; and £5.5 million in 2011-12. The increase in the overall cost of electronic monitoring, setting aside inflation, is attributable to volume increases.

We will be setting out plans shortly for how we intend to apply competition more broadly to non-custodial offender services.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 523W

Official Hospitality

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much his Department has spent for hospitality purposes on (a) Champagne, (b) wines, (c) spirits, (d) soft drinks, (e) flowers, (f) laundry, (g) porterage, (h) china, (i) cutlery and (j) venue hire since May 2010. [132849]

Mrs Grant: The Department does not hold central records for expenditure on hospitality. Our accounting systems do not identify separate expenditure on items of hospitality. To obtain information on departmental expenditure on specific items would involve disproportionate cost.

The Department's policy on the provision of alcohol prohibits the supply of any alcohol paid from taxpayers' money on in-house hospitality. For external hospitality, given the significant savings being delivered by the Department and the stringent financial controls in place, such discretionary expenditure is incurred only on the rare occasions in which director-level approval is granted.

The following restrictions apply to all staff in respect of expenditure on refreshments.

No lunches, tea or coffee can be ordered for any internal meeting (i.e. a meeting between MOJ staff). Water and jugs are freely available in most of our offices.

For all external meetings (i.e. a meeting between MOJ staff and external stakeholders), lunch, tea and coffee purchases require director-level sign-off and are only allowed in exceptional circumstances.

Prisoners: Foreign Nationals

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many foreign national prisoners there are in UK prisons from each of the five countries with the largest number of nationals in UK prisons. [134087]

Jeremy Wright: The following table includes the number of foreign national prisoners by nationality for each of the five countries with the largest volume of nationals in England and Wales, as at 30 September 2012. These figures are published quarterly in table 1.6 of the ‘Offender Management Statistics Quarterly Bulletin’ available at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/prisons-and-probation/oms-quarterly.htm

Issues arising in Scotland and Northern Ireland are matters for the Scottish Government and Northern Ireland Executive respectively.

Population in prison by nationality, for each of the five countries with the largest volume of nationals, England and Wales, 30 September 2012
CountryPopulation in prison establishments

Jamaica

868

Poland

861

Irish Republic

767

Romania

571

Nigeria

560

  

All nationalities

86,457

British nationals

73,651

Foreign nationals

10,951

Nationality not recorded

1,855

17 Dec 2012 : Column 524W

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prisons: Security

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the number of occasions where due to the loss or theft of keys a prison has had to be re-locked since May 2010; and what the cost to the public purse was of such incidents. [133764]

Jeremy Wright: There have been four occasions when a prison has had to be re-locked since 2010, The cost to the public purse was £337, 551 (excluding VAT).

Sentencing

Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many child sex offenders have received an indeterminate sentence for public protection in each category of offence in each of the last 15 years. [132289]

Jeremy Wright: The sentence of imprisonment for public protection (IPP) was created by the Criminal Justice Act 2003 and implemented for offences committed after 4 April 2005.

Offenders given an indeterminate sentence for public protection at all courts for child sexual offences in England and Wales, from 2005-11, can be viewed in the following table.

Offenders given an indeterminate sentence for public protection, at all courts, for sexual offences against children, England and Wales, 2005-11(1, 2, 3)
 2005200620072008200920102011

Sexual offences against children(4)

25

209

259

243

186

183

161

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences, it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Imprisonment for public protection became available from April 2005. (4) Includes sexual offences against a child where the age of the victim has been recognised: Sexual Offences Act 2003, s1, s5, s6, s7, s8. s9, s10, s11, S12, s14, s15, S16, s17, s18, s19, s25, s26, s47, s48, s49, s50. Criminal Justice Act 1988, s160 Protection of Children Act 1978, s1 Indecency with Children Act 1960, s1 Sexual Offences Act 1956, s28 Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services: Ministry of Justice.

Work Capability Assessment: Appeals

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many appeals to work capability assessments where the appellant had received zero points in the original assessment were upheld by the tribunal service in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [133497]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 525W

Mrs Grant: The First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support (SSCS), administered by Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service, hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (decisions in which the work capability assessment is a key factor) rather than appeals against work capability assessment decisions themselves.

The SSCS Tribunal only holds information on the number of points an individual has received in the work capability assessment within individual case files, not in its database. The information requested could, therefore, only be provided at disproportionate cost by manually checking individual files.

Cabinet Office

Alcoholic Drinks and Drugs: Yorkshire and the Humber

Mr David Davis: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how many alcohol-related deaths there have been in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) East Yorkshire and (c) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last three years; [134018]

(2) how many drug-related deaths there have been in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) East Yorkshire and (c) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last three years. [134019]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated December 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent questions.

The following tables provide the number of deaths where the underlying cause was alcohol-related (Table 1) and related to drug poisoning (Table 2), for (a) Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency, (b) East Riding of Yorkshire unitary authority and (c) Yorkshire and the Humber region, for the years 2009 to 2011 (the latest year available).

Alcohol-related deaths are reported consistently across the United Kingdom using an agreed National Statistics definition that only includes those causes regarded as being most directly due to alcohol consumption (see Box 1 as follows). Alcohol-related death figures for the UK and its constituent countries are available on the ONS website at:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-29395

Figures on the number of deaths related to drug poisoning registered in England and Wales are available on the ONS website at:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/subnational-health3/deaths-related-to-drug-poisoning/index.html

Table 1. Number of deaths where the underlying cause was alcohol-related, Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency, East Riding of Yorkshire unitary authority, and Yorkshire and the Humber region, 2009 to 2011(1, 2, 3, 4)
Deaths (persons)
 200920102011

Yorkshire and the Humber Region

666

672

717

East Riding of Yorkshire unitary authority

30

40

40

17 Dec 2012 : Column 526W

Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency

5

8

7

(1 )Cause of death was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD 10). The specific conditions which are included in the National Statistics definition of alcohol-related deaths, and their corresponding ICD-10 codes, are shown in Box 1 as follows. (2) Based on boundaries as of November 2012. (3) Figures exclude deaths of non-residents. (4 )Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year.
Box 1. National Statistics definition of alcohol-related deaths
DescriptionICD 10 codes

Mental and behavioural disorders due to use of alcohol

F10

Degeneration of nervous system due to alcohol

G31.2

Alcoholic polyneuropathy

G62.1

Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

I42.6

Alcoholic gastritis

K29.2

Alcoholic liver disease

K70

Chronic hepatitis, not elsewhere classified

K73

Fibrosis and cirrhosis of liver (Excluding K74.3-K74.5, Billiary cirrhosis)

K74

Alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis

K86.0

Accidental poisoning by and exposure to alcohol

X45

Intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to alcohol

X65

Poisoning by and exposure to alcohol, undetermined intent

Y15

Table 2. Number of deaths related to drug poisoning, Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency, East Riding of Yorkshire unitary authority, and Yorkshire and the Humber region, 2009 to 2011(1, 2, 3, 4)
Deaths (persons)
 200920102011

Yorkshire and the Humber Region

270

244

233

East Riding of Yorkshire unitary authority

14

9

12

Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency

3

1

1

(1) Cause of death for was defined using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD 10) codes shown in Box 2 as follows. (2) Based on boundaries as of November 2012. (3) Figures exclude deaths of non-residents. (4) Figures are for deaths registered in each calendar year
Box 2. ICD-10 codes for deaths related to drug poisoning
DescriptionICD 10 codes

Mental and behavioural disorders due to drug use (excluding alcohol and tobacco)

F11-F16, F18-F19

Accidental poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X40-X44

Intentional self-poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X60-X64

Assault by drugs, medicaments and biological substances

X85

Poisoning by drugs, medicaments and biological substances, undetermined intent

Y10-Y14

17 Dec 2012 : Column 527W

Big Society Capital

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office whether Big Society Capital will lend money to community development finance institutions; and if he will make a statement. [133966]

Mr Hurd: Big Society Capital (BSC) is an independent organisation. Further information on Big Society Capital; including its investment criteria can be found on the Big Society Capital website:

www.bigsocietycapital.com

Charities: Fraud

Graham Jones: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) if he will assess the adequacy of the powers available to prevent fraud by UK-based charities that operate primarily abroad; [133087]

(2) what assessment he has made of the role of the Charity Commission in monitoring the employment rights of overseas workers employed by UK-based charities. [133098]

Mr Hurd: It is for trustees to ensure that the charity complies with the relevant laws in the countries in which it operates. Where UK-based charities operate abroad, the trustees must put in place measures to ensure the charity's funds are used for charitable purposes. The Charity Commission promotes charities' compliance with their legal obligations by providing charities with guidance on relevant matters of charity law; The Commission can intervene and use its regulatory powers where there is serious misconduct or mismanagement that puts at risk a charity's assets or beneficiaries.

Conditions of Employment

Ann McKechin: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of officials in his Department have requested (a) part-time, (b) job-share or (c) other flexible working arrangements in each of the last five years; and how many such requests were granted. [133657]

Mr Maude: Flexible working will only be granted subject to business need. As at November 2012, 6.5% of my Department's work force work part time.

Employment

John Robertson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people were employed in (a) part-time and (b) full-time work in (i) Glasgow North West constituency, (ii) Glasgow, (iii) Scotland and (iv) the UK in (A) 2009, (B) 2010, (C) 2011 and (D) 2012. [133787]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated December 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many people were employed in (a) part-time and (b) full-time

17 Dec 2012 : Column 528W

work in (i) Glasgow North West constituency, (ii) Glasgow, (iii) Scotland and (iv) the UK in (A) 2009, (B) 2010, (C) 2011 and (D) 2012. (133787)

ONS compiles Labour Market Statistics following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions for areas smaller than the UK from the Annual Population Survey (APS).

The tables show the number of people who were employed part-time or full-time in their main job, according to interviews held during the period July 2011 to June 2012, the latest period available, and the corresponding periods ending in June 2011, June 2010 and June 2009.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates accompanies the estimates for the latest period.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Table 1: Number of people employed part-time(1)
Thousand
12 months ending:June 2009June 2010June 2011June 2012(2)

Glasgow North West

n/a

n/a

n/a

****n/a

Glasgow

56

67

64

**70

Scotland

632

657

672

*687

UK

7,508

7,697

7,785

*7,855

n/a = estimate not available (1) Respondent considers themselves employed part-time. (2) Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality. Source: Annual Population Survey
Table 2: Number of people employed full-time(1)
Thousand
12 months ending:June 2009June 2010June 2011June 2012(2)

Glasgow North West

37

31

31

***26

Glasgow

209

190

195

**190

Scotland

1,880

1,804

1,796

*1,779

UK

21,429

21,002

21,084

*21,124

(1) Respondent considers themselves employed full-time. (2 )Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV – for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: * 0 ≤ CV<5%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered precise ** 5 ≤ CV <10%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered reasonably precise *** 10 ≤ CV <20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered acceptable **** CV ≥ 20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes Source: Annual Population Survey

Internet

John Robertson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate he has made of the number of people with access to the internet in (a) Glasgow North West constituency, (b) Glasgow, (c) Scotland and (d) the UK. [133929]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 529W

Mr Hurd: The information requested fails within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated December 2012:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question concerning what estimate has been made of the number of people with access to the internet in (a) Glasgow North West constituency, (b) Glasgow, (c) Scotland and (d) the UK. (133929)

Estimates of Internet use by adults aged 16 years and over are published quarterly by the Office for National Statistics and are available on our website. These estimates are derived from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and have United Kingdom (UK) coverage. The latest available estimate (in respect of 2012 Q3) of the number of adults who have ever used the Internet in Glasgow is 375,000. The estimate for Scotland is 3,592,000, whilst the estimate for the UK is 42,792,000. Estimates at parliamentary constituency level are not available.

Olympic Games 2012: Anniversaries

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will organise a celebration of the London 2012 Olympics games makers and other Olympic volunteers to mark the first anniversary of the games; and if he will make a statement. [133369]

Mr Hurd: Various plans are under way to commemorate the 2012 games. Further details will be announced in due course.

In addition, the Prime Minister has written to thank the thousands of games makers for their work in London 2012 and awarded them the 50(th) Big Society Award at a reception at Downing street in November.

Her Majesty the Queen has recognised the work of the LOCOG games makers by awarding them a Queen's Diamond Jubilee Volunteering Award 2012 this month.

Pay

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much was paid in (a) year end and (b) in-year bonuses to officials in his Department in each of the last two years. [132868]

Mr Maude: As part of this Government's transparency programme, last year for the very first time, all Departments published analysis of non-consolidated performance related payments. Information for 2010-11 is available at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/payroll-costs-and-non-consolidated-pay-data

Awards for 2011-12 are being finalised and the data will be published at the above link shortly.

Since May 2010 the Government have reversed the “all must have prizes” culture which saw the majority of civil servants awarded bonuses. Bonuses have been restricted to the top 25% of performers for the senior civil service (down from an average of 65% across Departments in previous years), saving the taxpayer around £15 million. They are only paid to reward excellence, for example to recognise and incentivise those delivering high quality public services and savings to the taxpayer. In 2009-10 the Cabinet Office paid awards to 48.3% of its senior civil service, compared to 25% of its senior civil servants in 2011-12.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 530W

As part of the Civil Service Reform Plan, Ministers are now able to feed into the appraisals of civil servants whose work they see. This will help ensure that appraisals of civil servants better reflect the dual leadership of Departments.

Plymouth Brethren

Caroline Flint: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what his policy is on the inclusion of The Brethren's Trust in the charity register of England and Wales; [133139]

(2) what representations he has received from The Brethren's Trust on its request to be registered as a charitable organisation. [133140]

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will consider bringing forward legislative proposals relating to public benefit to ensure that previously accepted religious charities are not threatened with removal of their charitable status. [133071]

Mr Hurd: I refer the right hon. Members to the answer I gave on 26 November 2012, Official Report, column 89W, to the hon. Member for South Antrim (Dr McCrea).

Strategic Defence and Security Review

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) with reference to the Strategic Defence and Security Review, how many times the Strategic Defence and Security Review Implementation Board has met; [134048]

(2) which Minister in his Department chairs the Strategic Defence and Security Review Implementation Board. [134122]

Mr Letwin: The Strategic Defence and Security Review Implementation Board has met seven times.

The Strategic Defence and Security Review Implementation Board is a committee of senior officials chaired by the Cabinet Office and reporting to the National Security Council chaired by the Prime Minister.

Unmanned Air Vehicles

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 4 December 2012, Official Report, column 703W, on unmanned air vehicles, if he will undertake a risk assessment of the potential threat to national security of (a) the proliferation of drone technology and (b) its use by Governments and non-state actors. [133524]

Miss Chloe Smith: The National Security Risk Assessment (NSRA) provides a comprehensive assessment and prioritisation of all major extant and emerging risks which seriously threaten the UK's national security interests. The way in which potentially hostile government and/or non-state actors could employ an array of offensive technologies, including drones, is considered as part of this assessment.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 531W

Voluntary Work: Young People

Mr Blunkett: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 10 September 2012, Official Report, column 120W, on voluntary work: young people, what best practice from 2012 pilots of the National Citizen Service his Department has shared with future providers. [133837]

Mr Hurd: In order to capture best practice from the 2012 pilots of National Citizen Service (NCS), the Cabinet Office visited 41 programmes across the country, ran workshops with 2012 providers and collected feedback from participants, parents and staff. This information was used to produce guidance on recruitment techniques and programme design and content. The guidance is being shared with 2013 NCS providers through workshops, one to one meetings and written toolkits. In addition the vast majority of the 2013 providers delivered NCS programmes in 2012.

Energy and Climate Change

Building Research Establishment

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will visit the Building Research Establishment Innovation Park in Watford. [133406]

Gregory Barker: I visited the Building Research Establishment Innovation Park on the 30 April 2012.

Carbon Sequestration

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many of the projects shortlisted for the carbon capture and storage competition have provided evidence that they could be fully commissioned and generating power by 31 December 2016. [132270]

Mr Hayes: In order to remain eligible for the competition, projects had to demonstrate the potential to be operational between 2016 and 2020. The carbon capture and storage competition continues and it would be inappropriate to disclose details regarding the bids, as doing so might undermine competition.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish his evidence submitted to the Cabinet Office Project Assessment Review Panel as part of its due diligence on his Department's carbon capture and storage competition. [132271]

Mr Hayes: The evidence submitted is commercially sensitive as it refers to the current competition and will not be released into the public domain at this stage. The PAR report will be published at the appropriate time.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department has set aside during the current spending review period to fund any successful project arising from the carbon capture and storage competition. [132272]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 532W

Mr Hayes: Capital funding of £l billion remains available to support carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects and the mechanism for making that capital grant available for successful bids within the CCS competition has been agreed with HM Treasury. I expect CCS projects to come forward in this spending review period and for expenditure to be committed as part of that process.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when his Department will confirm to the EU the UK’s commitment to co-fund any successful project arising from the carbon capture and storage competition currently under way. [132273]

Mr Hayes: As set out in the written ministerial statement made by the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), on 30 October 2012, Official Report, columns 10-12WS, DECC officials have confirmed (to the Commission) UK support for the three UK Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) New Entrant Reserve 300 (NER300) applicants remaining in the UK CCS competitive process. This support is subject to success in the UK process.

Conditions of Employment

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what proportion of officials in his Department have requested (a) part-time, (b) job-share or (c) other flexible working arrangements in each of the last five years; and how many such requests were granted. [133658]

Gregory Barker: DECC offers a variety of flexible working such as part-time working, job-sharing and flexible working hours. The Department does not record requests for flexible working and so cannot provide the number of requests or the number that were granted. In September 2012 7.8% of DECC employees worked part-time which includes job-sharing.

Electricity Generation

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraph 2.7 of his Department’s Gas Generation Strategy, published on 5 December 2012, what his Department’s policy is on carbon intensity of 50G carbon dioxide/KWh for the power sector in 2030. [133243]

Mr Hayes: The Government will take a power to set a legally binding decarbonisation target for the electricity sector specifically, as a Government amendment to the Energy Bill.

The level of the decarbonisation target will be set when the Committee on Climate Change has provided advice on the 5th Carbon Budget covering the corresponding period (2028-32), and when the Government has set the level of this budget (in 2016).

Before then, to ensure clarity, we will be issuing guidance to National Grid consistent with the least cost approach to achieve our overall 2050 carbon target.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 533W

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraphs 2.26 to 2.29 of his Department’s Gas Generation Strategy, published on 5 December 2012, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of (a) 50G carbon dioxide/KWh, (b) 100G carbon dioxide/KWh and (c) 200G carbon dioxide/KWh grid carbon intensity on overall carbon dioxide emission levels in (i) 2030 and (ii) 2050. [133244]

Mr Hayes: The estimated emission levels from the GB power sector in 2030 under the three grid carbon intensity sensitivities in 2030, for an assumed level of GB electricity demand, are shown in the following table.

CO2/kWhEstimated emissions from the power sector in 2030 (Mt CO2)

50g

17

100g

35

200g

68

The three different grid carbon intensity trajectories to 2030 considered in the Gas Generation Strategy do not impact on overall carbon dioxide emission levels in 2050. Analysis for the Carbon plan suggested that in order to achieve the 2050 carbon target cost effectively, the power sector would need to be largely decarbonised in the 2030s.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraph 3.60 of his Department's Gas Generation Strategy, published on 5 December 2012, what the evidential basis is for the statement that in September 2012 45% of GB power was traded through auction. [133245]

Mr Hayes: Paragraph 3.60 of the Gas Generation Strategy states that 45% of GB power was traded through day-ahead auctions in September 2012.

In September 2012, total GB electricity generation was 23.05 terawatt hours. This is based on Elexon's data on Initial National Demand Out-Turn (INDO), which is the half-hour average megawatt transmitted electrical energy metered by National Grid Electricity Transmission plc.

According to DECC calculations based on APX Power UK Auction and Nord Pool Spot data in the same month, 10.39 terawatt hours were traded though day-ahead auctions. This equates to 45.07% of GB generation.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraph 5.25 of his Department's Gas Generation Strategy, published on 5 December 2012, what the responsibilities will be of the Office for Unconventional Gas and Oil; and if he will make a statement. [133246]

Mr Hayes: As was explained in the Gas Generation Strategy, DECC will set up an Office for Unconventional Gas and Oil, which, working with relevant Departments and agencies, will join up responsibilities across Government, provide a single point of contact for investors, and ensure a simplified and streamlined regulatory process. DECC will be consulting with the relevant Departments and agencies on how to take this forward.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 534W

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change with reference to paragraph 6.2 of his Department's Gas Generation Strategy, published on 5 December 2012, whether his Department has made an estimate of the proportion of the gas generation mix that will need to be equipped with carbon capture and storage technology by 2030. [133247]

Mr Hayes: There is considerable uncertainty over not only how the electricity sector will develop to 2030, but also how low carbon technologies will develop. The Government is committed to supporting carbon capture and storage (CCS). However the level of CCS that will be deployed by 2030 will be dependent on whether CCS projects are cost competitive with other low carbon generation projects.

Given this DECC carried out scenario analysis, which was presented in the Gas Generation Strategy. This analysis suggested that CCS could contribute up to 13GW by 2030. How this is deployed between coal and gas plant will be for the market to determine.

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on the generation of electricity by local authorities; and if he will make a statement. [133614]

Gregory Barker: In 2010, we gave local authorities the power to sell electricity generated from renewable sources. It is therefore up to local authorities to generate and sell electricity if they wish and we are encouraging them to do so where this is appropriate. We have also facilitated this through ‘lite’ electricity supply licence, which would allow a local authority district heating operator to sell electricity at retail rates to consumers.

We are also supporting community ownership of localised renewable energy projects through the Feed-in-Tariffs scheme. Local projects engage neighbourhoods and communities in becoming involved with generating local heat and power e.g. Combined Heat and Power with District Heating (CHP-DH) networks in Woking, Southampton, Nottingham and Sheffield.

Local authorities also have a role in encouraging energy efficiency take up, including the Green Deal, and looking after consumer interests, for example, through the pioneer places and core cities initiatives and through supporting or running collective switching schemes.

Energy: Finance

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what funding his Department has allocated directly to investment in (a) renewable, (b) gas, (c) nuclear and (d) coal energy in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [133168]

Mr Hayes: It is estimated that replacing and upgrading our electricity infrastructure and closing power stations over the next decade will require approximately £110 billion of capital investment:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/policy-legislation/EMR/5349-electricity-market-reform-policy-overview.pdf

Much of this investment will come from the private sector with Government putting in place the right market incentives.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 535W

DECC also provides some direct funding, primarily for the purpose of reducing the costs of commercial deployment:

(a) Renewable energy

Actual, and planned spend through the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is:

2010-11: £1.56 million•

2011-12: £6.8 million

2012-13: £37.5 million

These figures are based on accruals calculated using applications received and an estimate of what the financial commitment would be if these all were accredited onto the scheme and generated heat as per our assumptions.

Actual spend by DECC in innovation for renewables in 2010-11 was £29 million through the Environmental Transformation Fund (ETF) and Low Carbon Investment Fund (LCIF).

In addition, in this Spending Review, (2011-12 to 2014-15) the following DECC funding is available for innovation in renewable technologies:

Up to £20 million for marine technology

Up to £30 million for offshore wind technology

Up to £17 million for bioenergy systems demonstration projects

DECC has also committed £60 million to support offshore wind manufacturing through the Grant for Business Investment scheme.

(b) Gas and (d) coal

There was no direct DECC funding for gas or coal per se, but there is funding for carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies.

In 2010-11, £3.1 million was spent on CCS R&D projects.

In addition, in this Spending Review, (2011-12 to 2014-15), up to £20 million is available for innovation in carbon capture and storage technologies;

(c) Nuclear energy

In 2012-13 DECC has direct funding available for:

£1.132 million for an early R&D programme on the fuel cycle by the National Nuclear Laboratory

An estimated £17.0 million investment into facilities and skills to support future R&D activities.

There was nil spend on nuclear energy in 2010-11 and 2011-12.

Energy: Meters

Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment his Department made of the different types of smart meters available in advance of the national roll-out of smart meters. [132606]

Gregory Barker: The Department has assessed smart meters offered by manufacturers in Britain and internationally. Our assessments have covered: the range of functionality supported by each type; the standards used to 'talk' to meters remotely; security requirements; and the support that different types of smart meter will provide to smart grids. This analysis has informed the Department's work to develop the technical specification for the smart meters to be used in Britain, which has been progressed in conjunction with meter manufacturers, consumer bodies and other stakeholders.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 536W

Environment Protection

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the oral statement of 29 November 2012, Official Report, column 389, on energy policy, what his Department’s forecast is of (a) energy efficiency savings and (b) support for low-carbon electricity generation in 2020. [132681]

Gregory Barker: According to the current projections, the existing package of energy efficiency policies is projected to save 163 TWh in 2020 relative to the business as usual baseline.

Support for low-carbon electricity, generation is funded through the Levy Control Framework. Total levy support for 2020-21 has been set at £7.6 billion (real 2011-12) and will help fund low-carbon generation from a range of technologies. This level of support is consistent with delivering the Government’s ambition to generate 30% of electricity from renewable sources in 2020, while also supporting generation from both nuclear and carbon capture and storage plants.

On 29 November, we launched a consultation to explore what more can be done to reduce electricity demand across the UK economy. This consultation is a key part of our national Energy Efficiency Strategy published last month.

EU Law

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which EU directives his Department transposed in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012 to date; which EU directives his Department expects to transpose in (i) 2013 and (ii) the next two years; and what estimate he has made of the cost of each such directive to the (A) public purse and (B) private sector. [133699]

Gregory Barker: The information is as follows:

(a) DECC transposed the following directives in 2011:

Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources

Directive 2009/31/EC on the geological storage of carbon dioxide

Directive 2009/72/EC concerning common rules for the internal market in electricity

Directive 2009/73/EC concerning common rules for the internal market in gas

No new legislation was needed to transpose directive 2009/7l/Euratom establishing a community framework for the nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the UK.

(b) Transposition of the following directive was completed in 2012:

Directive 2009/29/EC to improve and extend the greenhouse gas emission allowance trading scheme of the community.

The following directive is expected to be transposed by the end of 2012:

Directive 2009/119/EC imposing an obligation to maintain minimum stocks of crude oil and/or petroleum products.

(i) Directives to be transposed in 2013:

The Department is considering whether legislation will be required to transpose directive 2011/70/Euratom establishing a community framework for the responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 537W

(ii) The following directive is expected to be transposed in 2014:

Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency

A and B:

Published Impact Assessments provide an estimate of costs. Impact Assessments for directive 2009/28/EC, directive 2009/72/EC, directive 2009/73/EC, directive 2009/31/EC and directive 2009/119/EC can be found at:

http://www.ialibrary.bis.gov.uk/uploaded/1_20090715120705_e_@@_UKRenewableEnergyStratey2009Overall ImpactAssessmenturn09D683150609.pdf

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/govt_response/govt_response.aspx

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/consultations/cons_co2_stor/cons_co2_stor.aspx

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/all?title-Oil%20Stocking%200rder%202012%20

An Office for Nuclear Regulation Impact Assessment for the changes to nuclear site licence conditions to implement directive 2009/71/Euratom—letter from Dr Mike Weightman Re: Nuclear Safety Directive 2009/71/Euratom—can be found at:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/nuclear/news/2011/may-consultation-letter.htm

Impact Assessments for directive 2009/29/EC can also be found above.

DECC will be consulting on implementation of directive 2012/27/EU in 2013. This will be accompanied by an Impact Assessment.

Exhaust Emissions: Aviation

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what agreements were made at the UN Climate Change Conference in Doha on reducing emissions from global aviation. [133907]

Gregory Barker: No decisions were made at the UN Climate Change Conference in Doha on reducing emissions from global aviation, although the issue was discussed at length. However, the Government remains committed to tackling the climate change impacts of international aviation and will continue to work through the International Civil Aviation Organization to push for a global agreement on measures to address emissions from this sector.

Kwasi Kwarteng: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on the inclusion of international aviation in the Climate Change Act 2008. [134180]

Gregory Barker: International aviation emissions are not currently included within the UK's net carbon account. The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), is taking into account the advice provided by the Committee on Climate Change on this matter and will respond by end 2012 as required by section 30 of the Climate Change Act 2008.

Fuel Poverty: Leeds

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to address levels of fuel poverty in Leeds North West constituency. [133505]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 538W

Gregory Barker: The coalition Government are committed to tackling fuel poverty and supporting vulnerable consumers to heat their homes at an affordable cost.

The Warm Home Discount scheme will provide over 1 million of the poorest pensioners with an automatic Core Group discount of £130 off their electricity bills this winter. Other low income vulnerable households may also be assisted through the scheme. Overall we expect 2 million low income vulnerable households a year to be assisted through the Warm Home Discount scheme.

We continue to fund the Warm Front scheme, providing low income vulnerable households, living in energy inefficient properties, with energy efficient heating and insulation measures. Since 2005 Warm Front has assisted 1,423 households in the Leeds North West constituency(1).

From January 2013, the new Energy Company Obligation, which will run alongside the Green Deal, will ensure that help goes to low income and vulnerable households to enable them to heat their homes more affordably on a long term basis. Through the Affordable Warmth and Carbon Saving Communities Obligations together should generate expenditure in home thermal efficiency improvements worth around £540 million per year, supporting around 230,000 low income households each year.

In addition, the Department for Work and Pensions provide pensioner households with winter fuel payments to help with additional heating costs during the winter. Cold weather payments are also made to low income and vulnerable households where there is an average temperature of 0°C or below for seven consecutive days. These payments have been permanently increased to £25 per week and in winter 2011-12 over 5 million cold weather payments were paid in Great Britain worth an estimated £129 million.

(1) This figure is as at end of November 2012. Data is not available prior to 2005.

Gas-fired Power Stations

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will make the approval of applications for consent for new gas-fired power stations conditional on such stations being equipped with carbon capture and storage technology. [133644]

Mr Hayes: The Government believe carbon capture and storage technology can play a significant role in achieving the decarbonisation of the UK economy at least cost. That is why we are supporting the deployment of this technology through our Commercialisation Programme.

All new thermal power stations at or over 300MWe, and of a type covered by the EU large combustion plant directive, including gas, are required to be carbon capture ready (CCR), meaning that they must demonstrate it to be technically and economically feasible to retrofit CCS to the power station in the future and retain control over sufficient additional space on which to install the carbon capture equipment. There are no plans to make consent for new gas-fired power stations conditional on them being equipped with carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 539W

The regime created under EMR will incentivise further investment in CCS equipped generation plant, alongside other forms of low-carbon generation such as renewables and nuclear.

Renewable Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the written ministerial statement by the Minister of State for Energy of 10 December 2012, on Post-Energy Council, Brussels, 3 December 2012, what his Department's policy is on post-2020 renewables targets. [133483]

Mr Hayes: The UK Government are committed to meeting EU and UK decarbonisation targets up to 2050. As part of this we envisage substantial growth in renewable energy deployment, with a binding target for 2020. However, we do not believe that it is appropriate to set specific renewables targets in the period post-2020. This is because of the need to take account of issues such as technology competitiveness, energy security, environmental sustainability, value for money, and support for less mature renewable technologies. It is more appropriate to focus on meeting legally-binding carbon reduction targets in the most cost-effective way, with flexibility about precise levels of renewables deployment.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what discussions he has had with the Co-operative movement on its clean energy revolution campaign. [134113]

Gregory Barker: The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), met with the Community Energy Coalition at a roundtable event in October. This brought together some of the UK's most influential civil society organisations and the Co-operative Group to talk about co-operative and community energy.

DECC officials are scoping a Community Energy Strategy for release in late spring 2013, and they will be working closely with the Department's expert advisory group, the Community Energy Contact Group, and the Community Energy Coalition in the coming months to develop the strategy.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what his policy is on support for community-owned renewable energy schemes. [134114]

Gregory Barker: The Government recognise the power of community enterprise and institutions to effect change in society, and the coalition agreement included a commitment to supporting community energy projects.

We are scoping a Community Energy Strategy at the request of the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), that will be released in late spring 2013.

Transport

A14

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many (a) road traffic accidents and (b) road fatalities there have been on the A14 in Suffolk in each of the last three years; [133745]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 540W

(2) how many accidents have occurred at or near each junction on the A14 in (a) Suffolk and (b) in total in each of the last three years. [133746]

Stephen Hammond: The Department only collects information relating to personal injury accidents, and therefore does not include damage-only accidents in its statistics.

In each of the last three years the number of reported personal injury accidents occurring at, or within 20 metres of, each junction of the A14, in (a) Suffolk and (b) in total, were as follows:

Reported number of personal injury accidents occurring at, or within 20 metres of, a junction of the A14(1) by nearest junction number, 2009-11
Number of accidents
Junction numberJunction located in Suffolk200920102011

1

 

3

4

1

2

 

7

3

6

3

 

2

2

4

 

3

3

5

 

1

1

7

 

4

3

4

8

 

1

2

2

9

 

1

3

10

 

5

1

1

11

 

1

12

 

1

13

 

1

14

 

1

15

 

1

1

17

 

2

1

19a

 

2

1

21

 

8

9

7

22

 

1

2

23

 

2

24

 

1

3

25

 

1

1

26

 

2

2

27

 

3

1

1

28

 

2

29

 

1

2

30

 

2

31

 

6

2

1

32

 

2

1

33

 

2

2

1

34

 

1

35

 

1

36

 

1

37

*

2

2

2

38

 

1

42

*

2

3

43

*

1

2

44

*

2

1

1

45

*

1

1

47

*

1

1

49

*

1

3

50

*

3

2

2

51

*

1

1

17 Dec 2012 : Column 541W

52

*

4

1

3

53

*

3

3

54

*

1

55

*

4

6

2

56

*

2

3

57

*

3

58

*

2

1

2

59

*

2

2

60

*

3

2

4

61

*

1

62

*

1

1

Unknown(2)

 

7

3

7

of which in Suffolk

 

4

2

5

Suffolk total

 

35

35

32

A14 total

 

96

89

70

(1) Includes Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire and Leicestershire. (2) Accidents occurring at road junctions that do not have junction numbers or where the precise location of the accident is unknown or uncertain. Note: Where a junction number is missing from the table this indicates that there were no accidents at this junction during this time period.

Police reports of accidents do not contain junction numbers. The accidents have been allocated to the closest junction using the grid reference of the accident. In some cases the grid reference provided on the accident report form cannot be used to allocate the accident to specific junction number or the accident occurred at a road intersection without a junction number. These accidents are recorded as being at an “unknown” junction.

In each of the last three years the number of reported personal injury accidents, and the number of fatalities, on the A14 in Suffolk, were as follows:

Reported number of personal injury accidents and fatalities occurring on the A14 in Suffolk, 2009-11
 200920102011

Accidents

100

118

121

Fatalities

4

2

5

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the most recent traffic flow data are for each section of the A14. [133748]

Stephen Hammond: The following table shows the latest annual average daily traffic flow (AADT) figures for the sections of the A14 between M1 Junction 19 and Felixstowe Docks, where figures are available:

SectionAADT

January to December 2011

 

M1 Junction 19 to A14 Junction 1

44,480

Junctions 1 to 2

44,634

Junctions 2 to 3

n/a

Junctions 3 to 4

n/a

Junctions 4 to 6

65,301

Junctions 6 to 7

n/a

Junctions 7 to 8

73,489

Junctions 8 to 9

68,055

Junctions 9 to 10

57,935

Junctions 10 to 11

42,520

17 Dec 2012 : Column 542W

Junctions 11 to 12

42,266

Junctions 12 to 13

42,237

  

October 2011 to September 2012

 

Junctions 13 to 21

38,618

Junctions 21 to 23

44,436

Junctions 23 to 24

67,435

Junctions 24 to 26

67,168

Junctions 26 to 31

80,132

Junctions 31 to 32

61,680

Junctions 32 to 35

51,324

Junctions 35 to 36

79,321

Junctions 36 to 37

58,746

  

January to December 2011

 

Exning to Waterhall

66,000

Waterhall to Higham

32,422

Higham to Westley

43,891

Westley to St Saviour's

39,772

St Saviour's to Moreton Hall

44,250

Moreton Hall to Beyton

37,651

Beyton to Woolpit

38,574

Woolpit to Stowmarket North

34,980

Stowmarket North to Cedars

27,857

Cedars to Beacon Hill

36,445

Beacon Hill to Claydon

48,760

Clayton to Whitehouse

47,184

Whitehouse to Sproughton

46,073

Sproughton to Copdock

48,164

Copdock to Wherstead

51,592

Wherstead to Nacton

54,204

Nacton to Levington

43,710

Levington to Trimley

38,133

Trimley to Dockspur

32,656

Dockspur to Felixstowe Dock

19,892