Sri Lanka

Mike Gapes: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the post-conflict situation in Sri Lanka; and whether such considerations will inform decisions as to UK representation at the 2013 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Colombo. [133470]

Alistair Burt: The British Government continue to have concerns about human rights in Sri Lanka. We

17 Dec 2012 : Column 577W

seek to promote progress through direct lobbying, working with international partners, and funding human rights projects. We also regularly urge the Sri Lankan Government to improve the human rights situation, to investigate infringements of human rights, and prosecute those responsible.

We believe that reconciliation and lasting peace in Sri Lanka can best be achieved through an inclusive political solution that addresses the underlying causes of the conflict and takes into account the legitimate grievances and aspirations of all Sri Lanka's communities. We believe that the Sri Lankan people should decide what form this solution should take.

It is too early to confirm UK attendance at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Colombo in 2013. We will look to Sri Lanka, as any other CHOGM host, to demonstrate its commitment to upholding the Commonwealth values of good governance and respect for human rights.

Syria

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps the Government are considering to bring an end to the violence in Syria; and what recent discussions on this matter he has had with his international counterparts. [133636]

Alistair Burt: The UK continues to work with its international partners in an effort to bring an end to the violence in Syria. The UK is focusing its efforts on supporting and providing practical assistance to the opposition National Coalition which represents a credible alternative to the Assad regime. The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, my right hon. Friend the Member for Richmond (Yorks) (Mr Hague), updated the House on 20 November 2012, Official Report, columns 443-46, and highlighted the steps the British Government are taking to help bring an end to the violence and create a stable environment to enable a political transition to a more democratic Syria.

The Secretary of State regularly meets with his international counterparts to discuss Syria, most recently at the Friends of Syria meeting held in Marrakech on 12 December 2012. The meeting resulted in further recognition and practical assistance to the National Coalition, and further pledging humanitarian support to alleviate immediate suffering. The UK will continue to work with international partners and the National Coalition to help bring an end to the violence and on transition to a stable, democratic Syria.

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the present rate of defections from the Syrian army, and of steps that could be taken by the international community to encourage such defections. [133639]

Alistair Burt: The lack of independent reporting from Syria makes it difficult to assess the present rate of desertions from the Syrian military and to know how many are defecting to the ranks of the opposition, but we have reports that desertions and defections are having an impact on the regime's ability to conduct its military

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operations. The regime has progressively increased the use of heavy weaponry, including artillery attacks from fighter aircraft and most recently scud missiles.

After many months of brutal military repression, we believe Assad should step aside in the interests of the Syrian people. The UK has been at the forefront of international efforts to support the internal and external opposition to become a viable and political alternative to the Assad regime and we welcome the recent establishment of the National Coalition. The UK has so far provided the opposition with £7 million of practical non-lethal support as they seek to secure a better future for Syrian people, and a future free from indiscriminate attacks from their own Government. We hope this will further encourage those who currently support Assad to step away from him.

Turkey

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent representations he has made to his counterpart in Turkey about press freedom. [133663]

Mr Lidington: The Deputy Prime Minister raised the issue of freedom of expression with the Turkish Prime Minister on a visit to Turkey in October. I regularly discuss human rights issues including freedom of expression in meetings with my Turkish counterpart, Egemen Bagis, the Turkish Minister for European Union Affairs, most recently at a meeting in October.

The UK Government share the concerns expressed by our EU partners surrounding press freedom in Turkey, which were reflected in the Conclusions of the General Affairs Council on 11 December. The Turkish Government have recognised the need for reform and we welcome their proposed fourth judicial reform package. We hope this can be implemented quickly.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans his Department has for future funding of the Special Investigation and Prosecution Team investigation in the Turks and Caicos Islands. [134004]

Mark Simmonds: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave him, on 11 December 2012, Official Report, column 228W.

Western Sahara

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs pursuant to the answer of 26 November 2012, Official Report, column 104W, on Western Sahara, what recent progress his Department have made on negotiations to ensure that money received in respect of fishing opportunities is used for the benefit of the local population. [133490]

Alistair Burt: The UK fully supports the efforts of the UN Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Western Sahara, Ambassador Christopher Ross, to encourage Morocco and the Polisario Front to address issues regarding the use of the territory's natural resources.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 579W

The latest round of negotiations on a new protocol to the EU-Morocco Fisheries Partnership Agreement took place on 8-9 November between the European Commission and Morocco but negotiations are ongoing. We continue to call on Morocco to produce evidence that the agreement is conducted to the benefit of the people of Western Sahara.

Zimbabwe

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what estimate his Department has made of the number of UK citizens in receipt of a disability pension from the Government of Zimbabwe. [133964]

Mark Simmonds: We do not hold records of the number of British citizens receiving a disability pension from the Government of Zimbabwe. Our embassy has contacted the pensions department in Zimbabwe with regard to this matter, but they have not been able to provide us with an answer to date.

The Overseas Services Pensioners Association estimate there are approximately 1,250 to 1,500 people worldwide who are entitled to a pension from the Government of Zimbabwe, of whom 300 to 400 are estimated to be resident in the UK.

We are aware there have been issues of non-payment of pensions by the Zimbabwe Government to pensioners residing overseas, including through our contacts with the Overseas Service Pensions Association, who I met on 10 December to discuss this issue. We have for many years and will continue to make representations, through our embassy in Harare, to the Government of Zimbabwe on the importance of fulfilling their legal responsibilities to former public servants who are entitled to a Zimbabwe Government pension.

Communities and Local Government

Rented Housing: South-east

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent assessment he has made of the availability and cost of rented housing in local authority areas which border London. [133602]

Mr Foster: The 2011 census shows that 24.4% of households in Slough rent privately compared with 16.8% across England.

For Slough, the Valuation Office Agency last week published an indicative median rent of £750 a month in the 12 months to September 2012.

This figure is unchanged from the previous Valuation Office Agency figures which also showed an indicative median rent of £750 a month in the 12 months to September 2011. More broadly, I would observe that Rightmove have forecast that two-thirds of landlords are planning to freeze rents next year (Rightmove, Consumer Rental Forecast, 3 December 2012).

17 Dec 2012 : Column 580W

Early Intervention

Mr Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what support he plans to provide to local authorities to enable them to maintain spending on early intervention at existing levels when the early intervention grant is rolled into the rate support grant. [133607]

Brandon Lewis: The Business Rate Retention Scheme will give local authorities the flexibility and freedom to direct resources to meet priority needs of their communities. We will be retaining visibility of the Early Intervention Grant resources being rolled into the scheme by publishing the funding profile for each local authority.

Local Government: Joint Working

Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what steps he is taking to encourage joint working in local government. [133611]

Brandon Lewis: The Tri-borough initiative in London (Hammersmith and Fulham, Kensington and Chelsea, Westminster) report that they are on track to save £40 million by 2015-16 by combining back-office services and management costs. If other councils across the country were able to save half that amount by sharing services with neighbours, it could deliver potential national savings of £2 billion for councils.

Homelessness

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent assessment he has made of progress by his Department in reducing homelessness. [133615]

Mr Prisk: The latest statistics show that homelessness is under half what it was in 2003 at its peak. Despite the tough financial climate, we are investing £470 million to ensure that England continues to provide vulnerable people and families with a strong safety net protected in law.

Council Tax: Pendle

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many households in Pendle are (a) in receipt of and (b) entitled to claim a single person discount on council tax. [133404]

Brandon Lewis: In October 2012, Pendle borough council reported there were 13,678 dwellings subject to the 25% single person discount for council tax purposes in their area.

These data were published on Tuesday 20 November 2012 and are available on the gov.uk website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-communities-and-local-government/series/council-taxbase-statistics

No information is available of those that are entitled to claim the single person discount.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 581W

Single person discount is a long-standing feature of the council tax system, and reflects the fact that single adult households make less use of municipal services than larger households.

Environmental Impact Assessment

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what his policy is on the European Commission's legislative proposal to amend the Environmental Impact Assessment Directive; [133511]

(2) for what reason his Department plans to review the application of European Directive 2011/92/EU on environmental impact assessments to the planning system in England. [133512]

Nick Boles: I refer my hon. Friend to the written ministerial statement of 6 December 2012, Official Report, columns 71-72WS.

Fire Services: South West

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what support Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service received from neighbouring fire services during the recent adverse weather; and what specialist equipment was provided from neighbouring fire services. [133520]

Brandon Lewis: During the flooding in November, at the peak of activity on the 21st, 42 pumping appliances from Devon and Somerset were committed, with one High Volume Pump from Avon Fire and Rescue Service and three appliances from Dorset Fire and Rescue Service in assistance.

On Thursday 22 to Friday 23 November, four type-B flood rescue boat teams were stationed in Devon and Somerset from Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service, Merseyside Fire and Rescue Services, and two from the RNLI.

On Saturday 24 to Sunday 25 November, four type-B flood rescue boat teams were stationed in Devon and Somerset, two each from Severn Area Rescue Association and the RNLI.

In addition, high volume pump crews from Gloucestershire and Avon assisted with a major incident in Halberton, near Tiverton in Devon, when a canal embankment collapsed, displacing a large amount of water. The Gloucestershire and Avon crews took part in a 24/7 rota with Devon and Somerset Special Operations crews over several days to move a large amount of water, preventing a further canal breach which would have led to the flooding of the village of Halberton.

Housing: Standards

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) (a) how many and (b) what proportion of noise complaints were made by residents living in properties built to Robust Detail standards in each of the last five years; [133640]

(2) whether his Department has put in place measures to allow people who have purchased a property built to Robust Detail standards to have noise transference in

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the property tested once building has been completed and residents have moved in; [133641]

(3) what recent representations he has received on the performance of Robust Detail installations; and if he will meet a group of constituents from Dudley to discuss their concerns. [134164]

Mr Foster: Records of complaints made by residents in newly built houses are not held centrally.

There are no statutory provisions in place to address complaints about new homes. People who have a complaint about newly built houses that they have purchased should take their complaints to the house builder or their warranty provider.

The Department receives quarterly performance reports from Robust Details Ltd which continue to show a high rate of success in achieving the required levels of sound insulation.

I would be happy to consider meeting a group of constituents if it is established that their concerns relate to a matter within my control.

Local Government Finance: Halton

Derek Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the level of central government grant to Halton Borough Council area has been in each financial year since 2009-10. [133965]

Brandon Lewis: Formula grant, special grant and capital grant funding for each year is given on our website at:

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/0910/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1011/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1112/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1213/grant.htm#set

Funding for 2013-14 will be announced shortly alongside the 2013-14 Local Government Finance Report.

Local Government Finance: Tees Valley

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the net change in funding from central government to (a) Middlesbrough Borough Council and (b) Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council was between (a) 2009-10 and 2010-11, (b) 2010-11 and 2011-12 and (c) 2011-12 and 2012-13; and what the estimated net change in funding will be between 2012-13 and 2013-14. [133979]

Brandon Lewis: Formula grant, special grant and capital grant funding for each year is given on our website at:

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/0910/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1011/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1112/grant.htm#set

http://www.local.communities.gov.uk/finance/1213/grant.htm#set

17 Dec 2012 : Column 583W

Funding for 2013-14 will be announced shortly alongside the 2013-14 Local Government Finance Report.

Non-domestic Rates: Empty Property

Mr Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 27 November 2012, Official Report, column 169W, on non-domestic rates: empty property, if he will publish the calculations that were used to provide the estimate in that answer. [133679]

Brandon Lewis: The starting point of the estimate is the cost of the scheme in 2008-09 or 2011-12 as reported by local authorities on the National Non-domestic Rate 3 returns. In these years 100% relief was given for three months for non-industrial properties and six months for industrial properties. These years are selected as the starting point because they are the two most recent years for which empty property relief closely resembled the proposal outlined in the original question. In 2008-09, the cost of relief was £606 million and in 2011-12 the cost of relief was £859 million. These two figures, along with an adjustment for the change in the number of empty properties, are used as the basis of the low and high end of the range. Both figures are adjusted for inflation to produce an equivalent in 2013-14 prices.

It is then necessary to estimate the additional cost of offering relief for an extra three months to non-industrial properties. To do this, the current cost of relief is reduced by the amount of relief given to properties below the £2,600 rateable value threshold for 100% ongoing relief. This leaves only the temporary relief given to industrial and non-industrial properties. This relief is then split between industrial and non-industrial properties based on the shares as reported by local authorities on the 2008-09 National Non-domestic Rate 1 returns. Once the cost of giving industrial properties relief for three months is estimated it is multiplied by two to estimate the cost of giving relief for six months. This assumes that all those properties empty for three months will still be empty after six months. This cost is then added to the adjusted existing cost of relief to give a gross cost of giving permanent 100% relief to all properties with a rateable value of less than £2,600 and temporary 100% relief for six months for all properties.

I would note that the autumn statement announced plans to exempt empty new-build property from business rates for 18 months until October 2016. This will help promote development and regeneration. The costings for this tax cut are in the autumn statement (Cm 8480).

Planning Permission

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government under what circumstances planning permission can be refused on the grounds of lack of infrastructure. [133757]

Nick Boles: Planning law requires that applications for planning permission must be determined in accordance with the development plan for the area, unless material considerations indicate otherwise. The National Planning Policy Framework states that development plans should set out the strategic priorities for the area. This should include policies to deliver the provision of infrastructure, such as transport, telecommunications, waste management,

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and flood risk. Whether lack of infrastructure justifies a reason for refusing a planning application is a matter for the decision maker, having regard to the merits of the case and the legal framework.

Riot Communities and Victims Panel

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 15 October 2012, Official Report, column 228W, on Riot Communities and Victims' Panel, when he plans to publish further information on the Government's response to the Riot Communities and Victims' Panel report. [133456]

Brandon Lewis: The panel published its final report on 28 March 2012 and the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, my right hon. Friend the Member for Brentwood and Ongar (Mr Pickles), made a written ministerial statement to Parliament on 13 July 2012, Official Report, columns 74-78WS, in response. In the statement, the Government made the commitment to publish further information on the Government's response to the panel's report in due course; this will be published shortly.

Social Rented Housing: Greater London

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will estimate the proportion of local authority social housing lets in London in 2011-12 that have been recorded in the Continuous Recording of Lettings and Sales data for that year. [R] [134133]

Mr Prisk: I will write to the right hon. Member with the information requested following the release of data on the total number of local authority social housing lettings on 20 December.

Education

Arts

Fiona Mactaggart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which representatives of national organisations connected to the creative sectors he met on 3 December 2012. [131949]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 6 December 2012]: On 3 December 2012, the Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), met with the following representatives of creative sector organisations.

NameRepresenting organisation

Marcus Davey

Artistic Director and Chief Executive, Roundhouse

Sir John Sorrell

Chairman, the Sorrell Foundation

Darren Henley

Managing Director, Classic FM

Alistair Spalding

Chief Executive and Artistic Director, Sadler’s Wells

Ed Vaizey MP

Minister for Culture, Communications and the Creative Industries

17 Dec 2012 : Column 585W

Basic Skills

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what lifeskills educational programmes (a) he and (b) his Department has evaluated. [134072]

Elizabeth Truss: This Department is in the process of assessing the strength of the evaluation of Botvin Life Skills Training Programme. Once completed, the assessment will be added to the Department’s open-access database of evaluations of programmes aimed at improving outcomes for young people.

There is some international evidence that shows that life skills programmes can have an effect on substance use onset rates, for example, though some studies have found that the size of these effects is small (Coggans et al., 2003) and in other studies the methodology has been challenged (Botvin 1999 and Gorman 2002).

Children in Care

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much Ofsted (a) spent on inspections of children's homes and (b) received from such inspections in the last 12 months for which figures are available; and what the scheduled budget was of costs of such inspections in that period. [121812]

Mr Timpson: This question is a matter for Ofsted. Sir Michael Wilshaw, the Chief Inspector, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Libraries.

Letter from Sir Michael Wilshaw:

Your recent parliamentary questions have been passed to me, as Her Majesty's Chief Inspector, for response.

Between 1 April 2011 and 31 March 2012, Ofsted:

(a) spent £13.1m on the full and interim inspections of Children's and Secure Children's Homes. This total expenditure represents the full cost of inspection and includes direct, indirect and overhead costs.

(b) received £3.3m for the inspection of Children's and Secure Children's Homes.

As the full cost of inspection includes direct, indirect and overhead costs, it is not possible to provide a single figure for the scheduled budget of costs for such inspections.

A copy of this reply has been sent to David Laws, Minister of State for Schools, and will be placed in the Library of both Houses.

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what residential children's homes he has visited since his appointment; and on what dates. [128676]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 19 November 2012]: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove) has not visited any residential children's homes since his appointment.

Climate Change: Curriculum

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will take steps to place climate change on the national curriculum for (a) physics, (b) chemistry and (c) biology lessons for 11 to 16 year olds. [133812]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 586W

Elizabeth Truss: The Government are currently reviewing the national curriculum in England to make sure that it is as rigorous as the curricula used in the most successful education jurisdictions and that it focuses on essential knowledge, while giving schools greater freedom to design and teach their wider school curriculum in a way that best meets the needs of their pupils.

In terms of lessons on climate change, the Government believe that the Programme of Study for science should prescribe the core scientific knowledge that underpins scientific understanding, including understanding of climate change. The detailed content of the new Programme of Study for all subjects of the new national curriculum, including physics, chemistry and biology, are still being developed and will be published for consultation early next year.

Domestic Violence: Education

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of relationship education in (a) combating violence against women and girls and (b) changing attitudes towards domestic violence; what evidence on these issues has been presented to his Department in the last five years; what plans he has to review any such evidence; and if he will make a statement. [133981]

Mr Timpson: There is some evidence, such as Taylor et al 2010, showing that schools-based programmes can improve awareness, attitudes and knowledge of gender violence and harassment prevention. Relationship education can be provided by schools as part of Personal Social Health and Economic (PSHE) education. It is for schools to determine what they teach on these issues, and the Government trusts professionals in schools to decide what is most appropriate for their pupils.

The Government recognise the importance of tackling violence against women and girls and all forms of domestic violence. The Home Office leads cross-government work on these issues, and has an Action Plan setting out what is being done to address them. The Department for Education is responsible for some actions in the plan and is represented at ministerial and official level on the cross-government groups chaired by the Home Office.

Free Schools: Teachers

Stephen Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teachers without a teaching qualification have been employed by free schools since their introduction in 2010. [113770]

Mr Laws [holding answer 25 June 2012]: The information is not collected in the format requested.

Information on the number of teachers in service is collected in the annual School Workforce Census. In November 2011, 17 free schools completed the School Workforce Census and, within these schools, 21 (10%) teachers in post did not have qualified teacher status. In nine of the schools (53%), all teachers had qualified teacher status. This is the latest information available.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 587W

Ministerial Policy Advisers

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education which special advisers and policy advisers in his Department have attended departmental board meetings since May 2010; and what the dates of any such meetings were. [131971]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 588W

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 6 December 2012]: The names of the special/policy advisers and the dates that they attended departmental board meetings between May 2010 and October 2012 can be found in the following table.

 Special/policy advisers

Tuesday 26 October 2010

Henry de Zoete—Special adviser Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser Janet Grauberg—Senior policy adviser Elena Narozanski—Special adviser

Tuesday 11 January 2011

Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser

Monday 4 April 2011

Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser Dominic Cummings—Special adviser Henry de Zoete—Special adviser Janet Grauberg—Senior policy adviser

Tuesday 10 May 2011

Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser

Tuesday 21 June 2011

Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser Janet Grauberg—Senior policy adviser

Tuesday 7 February 2012

Janet Grauberg—Senior policy adviser Sam Freedman—Senior policy Adviser Henry de Zoete—Special Adviser Dominic Cummings—Special adviser

Thursday 12 July 2012

Dominic Cummings—Special adviser

Thursday 4 October 2012

Dominic Cummings—Special adviser Sam Freedman—Senior policy adviser Matt Sanders—Special adviser

Pupil Exclusions

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many and what proportion of pupils permanently excluded from (a) primary and (b) secondary school in each local authority (i) had a special need, (ii) were in care and (iii) were in receipt of free school meals in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [132296]

Elizabeth Truss [holding answer 10 December 2012]: Information has been placed in the House Libraries for 2006/07 and for the latest year available, 2010/11 for special educational needs and free school meal eligibility and 2009/10 for in care. To provide data for further years would incur disproportionate cost.

The latest data on exclusions were published in the “Permanent and Fixed Period Exclusions from Schools in England 2010/11” Statistical First release on 25 July 2012 at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001080/index.shtml

School Meals

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what assessment he has made of the potential health effects on students of his decision to exempt schools with academy freedoms from minimum nutritional food standards; [133270]

(2) what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health on the potential health effects on students in academy schools of his decision to exempt such schools from minimum nutritional food standards; [133271]

(3) what information his Department holds on the number of schools exempt from nutritional food standards that are offering products for sale that would be disallowed by those standards if they were applied; [133272]

(4) what representations he has received from health profession experts on the potential effects of his decision to exempt schools with academy freedoms from minimum nutritional food standards. [133273]

Elizabeth Truss: The Secretary of State for Education, my right hon. Friend the Member for Surrey Heath (Michael Gove), has not made any assessment of, or discussed with the Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), the potential health effects on students of academies not having to comply with the standards.

However, a number of pieces of research undertaken by the School Food Trust, looking at school food in both academies and maintained schools, were published earlier this year. Together these showed that all of the academies interviewed identified food as an important part of overall education, and showed a strong commitment to providing healthy, nutritious food and to following the standards without the requirement to do so. We do not know the numbers of Academies or maintained schools who are offering products for sale that would not comply with the standards.

The research did make it clear, however, that while leaders in schools recognise that healthy school food is important, there is room for improvement in all schools, including those in the maintained sector.

Although the Department has not received representations from health profession experts on the effects of academies not having to comply with the standards, we have received a number of representations, including other parliamentary questions, from stakeholders and interested parties. We take this matter very seriously, and want all pupils to have the opportunity to select a healthy, balanced school lunch. The Secretary of State has asked Henry Dimbleby and John Vincent to examine school food across the country, in order to produce an action plan for schools. The plan will build on the successes of the last seven years, accelerate improvements and define the role schools have to play in shaping eating habits. The reviewers are due to present their findings in 2013.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what his policy is on food nutrition standards in schools with academy freedoms; [133410]

(2) how many schools with academy status have (a) voluntarily applied and (b) declined to apply minimum nutritional food standards; [133419]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 589W

(3) when his investigation into food nutrition standards will report. [133457]

Elizabeth Truss: Free schools and academies set up from September 2010 are not required to comply with the school food standards set out in the Education (Nutritional Standards and Requirements for School Food) (England) Regulations 2007.

A number of pieces of research undertaken by the School Food Trust, looking at school food in both academies and maintained schools, were published earlier this year. Together these showed that all of the academies interviewed identified food as an important part of overall education, and showed a strong commitment to providing healthy, nutritious food and to following the standards without the requirement to do so.

We do not know the numbers of academies or maintained schools who have chosen to either follow or not follow the standards.

The research did make it clear, however, that while leaders in schools recognise that healthy school food is important, there is room for improvement in all schools, including those in the maintained sector.

We take this matter very seriously, and want all pupils to have the opportunity to select a healthy, balanced school lunch. The Secretary of State has asked Henry Dimbleby and John Vincent to examine school food across the country, in order to produce an action plan for schools. The plan will build on the successes of the last seven years, accelerate improvements and define the role schools have to play in shaping eating habits. The reviewers are due to present their findings in 2013.

Schools: Asbestos

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what representations he has received on the presence of asbestos in school premises in England following the recent discovery of asbestos at Cwmcarn high school in Caerphilly; and if he will make a statement; [133817]


(2) what steps he has taken to ensure that local authorities are fulfilling their statutory duties in relation to a risk-based approach to the management of asbestos in schools. [133818]

Mr Laws: The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) continues to investigate the management of asbestos at Cwmcarn high school in Wales.

The investigation is assessing the local authority's and the school's compliance with their duties under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. This includes reviewing the asbestos surveys, monitoring and test results; and a report prepared by Santia who are asbestos

17 Dec 2012 : Column 590W

management consultants. The Santia report has been published on Caerphilly council's website.

The responsibility for managing the risks from asbestos- containing materials under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 falls to those responsible for the maintenance and repair of the school buildings.

Following the reporting of this incident, the Department has received representations from members of the Asbestos in Schools Group and a number of points have been raised by them. These points are being carefully considered but it is proper to wait until HSE have concluded their investigations and reported before deciding what action, if any, is appropriate for the Department to take.

The Department does not have a regulatory role to ensure that local authorities are fulfilling their duties in the management of asbestos. It does, however, take the issue of managing asbestos in our schools seriously and is proactive in promoting good asbestos management in schools. On-line guidance on managing the risks from asbestos-containing materials was published on the departmental website on 24 October 2012.

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/schoolscapital/buildingsanddesign/managementofpremises/b00215518/asbestosmanagementschools/asbestosmanagementresources

DFE and the Education Funding Agency do, however, liaise with the HSE, as necessary, as it is the lead regulator and enforces the duty to manage asbestos in non-domestic premises, such as schools.

Schools: Repairs and Maintenance

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what funds his Department has distributed to schools for improvements to changing facilities in each of the last five years in each local education authority; [134081]

(2) what funding his Department makes available for improvements to school changing facilities; [134082]

(3) what recent assessment he has made of changing facilities for physical education in schools. [134083]

Mr Laws: The Department does not allocate capital funding specifically for improvements to changing facilities. We make maintenance funding available to local authorities and schools, and its use is determined at a local level.

The Department does not make an assessment of the provision of changing facilities. The School Premises Regulations 2012 state that

'suitable changing accommodation must be provided for pupils aged 11 years or over at the start of the school year who receive physical education'.

The following table details capital maintenance (condition maintenance and devolved formula capital) allocations for 2007/08 to 2011/12 by local authority area.

Capital allocations: Capital maintenance and devolved formula capital(1)
£ million
Name2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12

City of London

0.07

0.13

0.10

0.07

0.06

Camden

5.90

6.00

8.06

3.86

4.51

Greenwich

7.10

7.42

9.76

5.30

5.99

Hackney

5.11

6.25

8.00

4.70

4.41

Hammersmith and Fulham

6.28

4.15

6.53

1.82

3.55

Islington

5.47

5.33

6.96

3.56

3.61

17 Dec 2012 : Column 591W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 592W

Kensington and Chelsea

3.78

3.24

3.43

2.38

2.41

Lambeth

7.41

8.58

11.03

4.15

5.49

Lewisham

8.29

7.49

9.38

6.07

5.66

Southwark

9.04

7.75

11.35

4.24

6.09

Tower Hamlets

6.41

7.85

11.36

5.77

6.38

Wandsworth

11.45

8.23

8.85

5.06

5.56

Westminster

4.36

4.43

6.81

2.84

3.09

Barking and Dagenham

7.53

7.26

9.14

3.66

5.01

Barnet

13.41

12.10

16.99

5.22

7.53

Bexley

12.88

7.67

10.76

3.10

6.70

Brent

9.13

8.87

14.15

3.33

7.34

Bromley

12.06

9.25

15.19

3.76

10.11

Croydon

10.61

11.24

17.01

5.81

8.44

Ealing

10.03

8.04

12.78

3.11

7.16

Enfield

12.07

9.89

12.64

6.85

7.75

Haringey

6.21

6.59

10.80

3.28

5.67

Harrow

7.09

5.62

8.38

3.03

4.94

Havering

10.97

7.44

9.25

5.82

7.24

Hillingdon

11.80

8.04

12.97

3.58

8.59

Hounslow

9.75

8.65

10.14

6.04

6.40

Kingston upon Thames

6.43

4.93

6.70

2.65

4.36

Merton

4.22

4.77

7.33

2.67

3.98

Newham

7.14

7.39

12.48

3.98

6.91

Redbridge

11.87

8.66

10.89

6.07

7.31

Richmond upon Thames

5.85

4.65

5.37

3.11

3.19

Sutton

8.25

6.42

7.83

4.95

5.24

Waltham Forest

7.18

6.49

8.12

5.38

5.34

Birmingham

46.86

39.53

50.22

24.35

28.43

Coventry

14.03

10.20

14.76

4.45

6.96

Dudley

10.50

9.18

11.90

7.49

6.89

Sandwell

10.59

9.35

11.61

6.31

6.35

Solihull

9.35

6.96

8.63

5.05

5.24

Walsall

11.41

10.34

12.08

7.57

7.05

Wolverhampton

12.29

8.84

10.77

5.75

5.08

Knowsley

4.67

5.72

8.01

3.23

3.09

Liverpool

16.53

14.65

18.67

10.67

8.76

St Helens

7.94

6.07

8.28

3.51

3.62

Sefton

14.28

10.51

12.97

6.61

6.80

Wirral

13.56

10.39

14.23

6.34

7.08

Bolton

12.93

10.44

15.37

4.60

6.87

Bury

6.48

6.64

9.02

4.45

4.86

Manchester

17.78

14.61

21.09

6.22

8.70

Oldham

11.25

10.28

13.85

4.77

5.22

Rochdale

8.55

7.97

10.52

4.55

4.28

Salford

7.40

7.41

11.74

2.55

4.47

Stockport

10.71

9.72

13.76

4.49

6.26

Tameside

9.06

7.40

9.39

4.48

4.51

Trafford

9.36

8.10

10.79

5.36

5.94

Wigan

14.60

11.28

16.12

5.91

7.03

Barnsley

5.45

5.81

9.79

3.19

4.73

Doncaster

13.12

10.47

15.90

4.26

7.43

Rotherham

9.64

8.71

12.74

4.59

7.69

Sheffield

15.72

14.83

22.42

5.92

9.54

Bradford

16.94

17.77

22.14

13.42

11.72

Calderdale

8.25

7.62

11.44

3.59

5.29

Kirklees

15.44

14.94

18.24

11.52

10.90

Leeds

27.33

21.44

32.24

9.89

16.10

Wakefield

13.05

10.71

14.68

7.13

9.14

Gateshead

6.92

7.14

7.68

4.32

4.58

Newcastle upon Tyne

7.25

8.07

9.52

6.15

4.75

North Tyneside

5.92

6.37

9.99

2.69

4.52

South Tyneside

4.73

5.19

6.32

4.02

3.31

Sunderland

9.91

8.92

12.83

4.42

6.06

Isles of Scilly

0.10

0.12

0.08

0.05

0.06

17 Dec 2012 : Column 593W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 594W

Bath and North East Somerset

7.46

5.97

9.40

2.33

5.66

Bristol City of

12.35

10.48

15.10

5.12

7.66

North Somerset

9.73

5.25

7.68

2.62

4.90

South Gloucestershire

11.09

8.31

11.13

4.96

6.55

Hartlepool

3.39

3.62

4.31

2.67

2.44

Middlesbrough

3.88.

4.78

6.24

3.05

2.92

Redcar and Cleveland

6.34

4.44

5.62

3.16

.3.47

Stockton-on-Tees

6.99

6.88

8.19

5.21

4.38

Kingston upon Hull City of

7.85

7.04

11.03.

3.20

5.10

East Riding of Yorkshire

16.84

10.92

12.91

7.59

10.01

North East Lincolnshire

6.42

5.92

6.45

4.01

3.01

North Lincolnshire

4.68

4.54

7.16

2.78

3.83

North Yorkshire

23.52

23.96

30.48

19.38

20.05

York

6.97

5.65

6.98

3.05

4.08

Pre LGR (2009) Bedfordshire

21.31

15.42

0.00

0.00

0.00

Luton

5.14

5.70

9.82

2.49

5.06

Bedford

0.00

0.00

7.55

4.57

7.42

Central Bedfordshire

0.00

0.00

11.44

7.09

8.26

Buckinghamshire

22.58

13.04

28.01

6.81

15.44

Milton Keynes

11.58

8.06

9.33

5.55

7.04

Derbyshire

35.78

26.49

39.14

11.85

21.27

Derby

9.30

8.65

9.86

6.11

6.12

Dorset

16.15

13.60

19.54

7.42

10.60

Poole

4.28

4.21

4.93

3.15

2.87

Bournemouth

4.29

4.58

5.45

3.59

3.05

Durham

19.82

19.64

27.09

12.82

15.52

Darlington

3.86

3.57

3.86

2.48

2.31

East Sussex

18.38

14.76

20.69

8.65

12.18

Brighton and Hove

5.96

6.75

8.20

5.37

5.18

Hampshire

61.46

43.65

54.47

22.00

34.84

Portsmouth

5.30

5.53

6.83

4.34

4.15

Southampton

6.21

5.98

7.78

3.91

4.72

Leicestershire

26.41

20.98

26.13

14.98

16.58

Leicester

8.23

8.00

13.00

3.93

5.80

Rutland

1.34

1.15

1.55

0.98

1.00

Staffordshire

35.16

27.50

42.72

13.18

21.20

Stoke-on-Trent

5.11

6.37

8.24

5.89

4.64

Wiltshire

17.39

16.93

20.90

12.46

12.53

Swindon

7.00

5.71

9.37

2.35

4.76

Bracknell Forest

3.23

3.47

5.35

1.71

2.77

Windsor and Maidenhead

5.75

4.88

8.09

1.84

4.16

West Berkshire

5.64

6.11

8.73

5.51

5.75

Reading

5.15

3.61

5.92

1.40

3.56

Slough

5.32

4.38

5.27

3.19

3.41

Wokingham

5.41

5.47

6.76

4.19

4.09

Cambridgeshire

22.24

15.50

25.28

8.01

14.20

Peterborough

7.43

6.17

8.07

3.67

4.36

Pre LGR (2009) Cheshire

27.50

23.11

0.00

0.00

0.00

Halton

5.78

4.70

6.29

2.93

3.16

Warrington

8.90

7.25

9.99

4.25

4.87

Devon

30.82

22.43

34.53

9.71

22.17

Plymouth

13.59

9.24

10.64

5.41

9.17

Torbay

5.85

5.17

5.54

3.08

3.20

Essex

54.51

44.07

66.96

20.15

38.59

Southend-on-Sea

5.53

5.83

7.08

4.57

4.98

Thurrock

5.13

4.15

6.02

2.77

3.46

Herefordshire

7.87

6.12

8.78

3.08

4.92

Worcestershire

24.78

18.34

22.49

13.43

13.37

Kent

57.64

47.98

76.37

17.55

36.65

Medway

13.12

9.19

10.93

6.67

6.78

Lancashire

51.63

45.93

61.80

28.62

30.94

Blackburn with Darwen

7.37

6.01

6.98

4.58

3.41

Blackpool

4.74

4.44

5.88

2.77

2.79

Nottinghamshire

27.75

25.83

39.41

11.59

21.43

17 Dec 2012 : Column 595W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 596W

Nottingham

8.58

8.72

11.53

5.17

5.61

Shropshire

10.99

9.44

13.95

5.75

7.68

Telford and Wrekin

8.02

5.58

6.43

3.87

3.19

Cheshire East

0.00

0.00

14.56

8.19

10.24

Cheshire West and Chester

0.00

0.00

15.45

8.13

9.07

Cornwall

24.09

16.87

20.27

11.13

14.72

Cumbria

21.20

21.97

26.94

17.29

15.70

Gloucestershire

24.34

21.26

27.24

15.33

20.28

Hertfordshire

54.77

40.91

61.28

22.00

37.38

Isle of Wight

4.76

4.54

8.32

2.07

4.11

Lincolnshire

31.65

24.12

37.07

9.77

18.26

Norfolk

33.83

28.18

34.69

20.58

20.97

Northamptonshire

29.12

22.48

35.45

8.55

17.36

Northumberland

19.24

11.47

17.37

5.43

9.40

Oxfordshire

22.02

18.88

28.69

10.90

16.08

Somerset

22.75

17.71

26.89

8.26

14.49

Suffolk

28.61

23.60

29.87

18.31

21.32

Surrey

35.24

36.08

46.24

25.73

29.04

Warwickshire

21.31

19.91

26.95

10.74

14.74

West Sussex

30.06

23.68

33.03

12.26

18.37

(1) DFC and capital maintenance (including modernisation) for maintained schools, and Academies Capital Maintenance Fund. Includes capital grant and supported borrowing.

Schools: Sports

Dame Tessa Jowell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether his Department has undertaken any research to establish the effects of Government funding reductions on the level of participation by young people in school sport. [132667]

Mr Timpson: The Department no longer collects data on the participation of school children in physical education and sport, as it was felt that this placed a burden on schools that distracted them from the provision of PE and school sport. Data relating to sports participation are collected by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport's Taking Part survey and Sport England's Active People survey.

Schools: Standards

Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what comparative assessment he has made of the performance of schools in the London Challenge and other schools in narrowing the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and other pupils. [132974]

Mr Laws: The Department published its “Evaluation of the City Challenge Programme” report in June 2012, and it is available at

https://www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/publicationDetail/Page1/DFE-RR215

The report sets out the findings of a mixed methods evaluation of the City Challenge programme in London, Greater Manchester and the Black Country, and retrospectively reviews the London Challenge.

Concerning the latter, it is clear that between 2003 and 2011, secondary pupil attainment in London improved more rapidly than that in other parts of the country. The percentage of London secondary pupils achieving 5 A*-C GCSEs including English and mathematics was below the national figure until 2004, but from 2005 on, was above the national figure.

In the City Challenge, which built on the success and lesson of the London Challenge, the attainment of pupils eligible for free school meals (FSM) increased by more than the national figure in all areas, with the exception of Greater Manchester primary pupils. The attainment gap between pupils eligible for FSM narrowed for London primary and secondary pupils, and Greater Manchester primary pupils. The proportion of good and outstanding schools increased in all three areas.

The Government are determined to narrow attainment gaps between disadvantaged pupils and their peers in all parts of the country, and that is why we have introduced the pupil premium. This investment currently stands at £1.25 billion and will rise to £1.875 billion in 2013-14. We believe that head teachers and school leaders should decide how to use the pupil premium, as they are the professional experts who know their own pupils' needs. This means that we also expect schools to take the lead responsibility in assessing and accounting for their use of the premium.

The Government have commissioned an external evaluation of the premium's first year, and also asked Ofsted to study how effectively schools are using their premium funding to close the gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers.

Ofsted published their interim study in September 2012, and they will publish further findings early in 2013. In addition to this, they have an increased focus on the performance of pupils who attract the premium, and on how it is used to remove barriers to learning for premium pupils. Since September 2012, as part of routine school inspection, Ofsted have been holding school leaders to account for how schools have spent their pupil premium and what difference this is making to the learning and progress of the pupils concerned. Their judgments on schools' leadership will consider the use of both the premium and other resources to overcome barriers to achievement for their pupils.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 597W

Sickness Absence

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education pursuant to the answer of 12 November 2012, Official Report, columns 55-56W, on sick leave, what assessment he has made of the difference in the proportion of working days lost due to ill health between officers at EA grade and at SCS grade; and what assessment he has made of the use of mindfulness-based therapies in reducing the proportion of working days lost in his Department. [132700]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department has not carried out an assessment on the variation in proportion of sick days between officers at different grades, or the use of mindfulness-based therapies in reducing the proportion of working days lost.

The Department encourages proactive line management of staff that are unwell and provides a range of options to support and reduce absence. These include access to guidance, occupational health and employee assistance.

Special Educational Needs

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether it is his intention that disabled children with health or care plans will have their needs met through the local offer. [132840]

Mr Timpson: The Government published draft legislative provisions for special educational needs in September 2012, including proposals for local authorities in England to publish a local offer of services for children and young people with special educational needs, including those who are disabled. The local offer would set out what families can expect from local services across education, health and social care and the eligibility criteria for accessing those services where appropriate. The local offer would include information about how to seek an assessment for an Education, Health and Care Plan. Local authorities would be required to involve local children, young people and families in developing their local offer to ensure it takes account of their needs.

The draft special educational needs provisions are being scrutinised by the Education Select Committee. The Government will give careful consideration to the Committee's report when framing the legislation for introduction to Parliament.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to ensure that the services set out in local offers are sufficient to meet the needs of disabled children and their families in the relevant area. [133130]

Mr Timpson: The Government published draft legislative provisions for special educational needs in September 2012, including proposals for local authorities in England to publish a local offer of services for children and young people with special educational needs, including those who are disabled. We anticipate that in many cases this would cover services that are accessed by both disabled children and young people with and without SEN. The local offer would enable families to see readily what they can expect from mainstream services across

17 Dec 2012 : Column 598W

education, health and social care; how to access more specialist support; how decisions are made, the including eligibility criteria for accessing services where appropriate; and how to complain or appeal. Local authorities would be required to involve local children, young people and families in developing their local offer to take account of their needs and aspirations.

The draft special educational needs provisions are being scrutinised by the Education Select Committee. The Government will give careful consideration to the Committee's report when framing the legislation for introduction to Parliament.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he will take to ensure that health and social care agencies are accountable for the services they provide under the local offer. [133131]

Mr Timpson: The Government published draft legislative provisions for special educational needs in September 2012, including proposals for local authorities in England to publish a local offer of services for children and young people with special educational needs, including those who are disabled. The local offer would set out what families can expect from local services across education, health and social care and the eligibility criteria for accessing those services where appropriate. Local authorities would be required to involve local children, young people and families in developing their local offer to take account of their needs and aspirations. Each service would be accountable for delivering what is set out in the local offer and if families are unhappy with what they receive or what is available they would be able to take this up with those services. The local offer would give details of how to complain about provision and about rights of appeal.

The draft special educational needs provisions are being scrutinised by the Education Select Committee. The Government will give careful consideration to the Committee's report when framing the legislation for introduction to Parliament.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children with dyslexia are recorded as being in receipt of additional support at the (a) school action, (b) school action plus and (c) statement level. [133632]

Mr Timpson: Information on pupils with dyslexia is not available.

The available information on the number of pupils with statements of special educational needs or at School Action Plus whose primary need has been identified as a specific learning difficulty (SpLD) is shown in the following table. Pupils with dyslexia as their primary need are included in the SpLD category.

Information on pupils with special educational needs (including school level data) is available in the ‘Special Educational Needs in England: January 2012’ Statistical First Release which can be found at:

http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001075/index.shtml

17 Dec 2012 : Column 599W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 600W

State-funded primary, state-funded secondary and special schools(1,2,3,4): Number and percentage of pupils with a specific learning difficulty(5,6)—January 2012, England
 School Action PlusStatement of SENTotal
 NumberPercentage(7)NumberPercentage(7)NumberPercentage(7)

Total

63,695

13.4

10,880

5.1

74,575

10.8

State-funded primary schools(1,2)

28,995

10.6

2,580

4.4

31,580

9.5

State-funded secondary schools(1,3)

34,665

17.3

7,280

11.6

41,940

15.9

Special schools(4)

35

2.0

1,020

1.1

1,055

1.1

(1) Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Includes all primary academies, including free schools. (3) Includes city technology colleges and all secondary academies, including free schools. Includes all-through schools. (4) Includes maintained and non-maintained special schools and special academies. Excludes general hospital schools. (5) Includes pupils who are sole or dual main registrations. (6) Pupils at School Action Plus and those pupils with a statement of SEN provided information on their primary need and, if appropriate, their secondary need. Information on primary need only is given here. (7) Number of pupils with a specific learning difficulty expressed as a percentage of those pupils at either School Action Plus or with a statement of SEN by type of school. Note: Totals may not appear to equal the sum of the component parts because numbers have been rounded to the nearest five. Source: School Census

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education whether independent specialist colleges providing further education for young people with learning difficulties and disabilities will be included within the scope of his forthcoming legislative proposals to reform special educational needs. [133633]

Mr Timpson: The draft SEN provisions are currently undergoing pre-legislative scrutiny. I have been listening carefully to arguments that independent specialist colleges should be included in the provisions.

If included, it would mean that parents or young people would have a right to express a preference for an independent specialist college. Local authorities would then be required to name that institution in the education, health and care plan unless they consider it unsuitable for their education, or incompatible with the education of others, or efficient use of resources. I am considering the arguments for this carefully.

Mrs Hodgson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what support his Department plans to provide to local authorities as they take on new responsibilities for the education of people aged between 16 and 25 with a special educational need or disability. [133634]

Mr Timpson: The new Special Needs Code of Practice will provide guidance to local authorities on their duties around young people aged 16 to 25 with a special educational need or disability. Officials are currently consulting representatives of the special educational need and disability sectors and wider groups on the information to be included in the draft code. The Government will be consulting publicly on the new code before it is published.

Since September 2011, 20 special educational need pathfinders consisting of 31 local authorities and primary care trusts have been testing out the main proposals contained within the Green Paper, ‘Support and Aspiration: A New Approach to Special Educational Needs and Disability’, published in March 2011.

The pathfinders have tested core elements including strong partnerships between local services and agencies working together to help children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities.

The pathfinders will run until September 2013 and have been sharing their learning on a local basis with non-pathfinder local authorities. At the beginning of 2013, we plan to recruit between nine and 15 pathfinder champions from the pathfinders to be responsible for spreading pathfinder learning more widely and providing support to all local authorities, and well as other groups such as parent forums. This engagement will take place on a regional and national basis.