Teachers

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many teachers who trained since 1997 are no longer in teaching. [131011]

Mr Laws: Provisional figures show that, of those teachers who gained qualified teacher status between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2009, 56,700 had left service by 31 March 2010 having previously entered. This is 17.0% of all those who qualified and entered service during the period.

The figure includes all teachers that had been in service in a teaching capacity in England in publicly funded schools and further education. It also includes those with service in some higher education colleges and independent schools that are members of the teachers' pensions scheme. An unknown number of the teachers will be teaching outside of these sectors. The figure excludes any teachers aged over 60 and those under the age of 60 who are in receipt of a pension from the teachers' pensions scheme.

Third Sector

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many allocations of funding from his Department's voluntary and community sector funding stream there have been to date; and to whom such allocations have been made. [133955]

Elizabeth Truss: The bidding exercise for the National Prospectus Grants Programme 2013-15 closed on 30 November 2012. Eligible applications are under active consideration and no funding allocations have yet been made.

The previous National Prospectus Grants Programme 2011-13 made 118 funding allocations. The list of those successful organisations can be found at the following web address:

http://www.education.gov.uk/inthenews/inthenews/a0074906/60-million-grant-vcs

17 Dec 2012 : Column 601W

Voluntary Organisations

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much funding remains in the allocation for voluntary sector organisations being bid for within his Department. [133954]

Elizabeth Truss: The Department for Education announced a new round of VCSE funding under the National Prospectus Grants Programme 2013-15 on 26 October 2012. The bidding exercise for this programme, which will offer up to £30 million a year in 2013-14 and 2014-15, closed on 30 November 2012. Eligible applications are under active consideration and no funding allocations have yet been made.

Defence

Afghanistan

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what his Department's policy is on the recording of civilian deaths as a consequence of unmanned aerial vehicle strikes in Afghanistan. [133763]

Mr Robathan: We deeply regret all civilian casualties. While we investigate carefully all alleged incidents involving UK forces, the Government does not record total figures for civilian casualties in Afghanistan because of the immense difficulty and risks that would be involved in collecting robust data.

Protecting the Afghan civilian population is a cornerstone of the international security assistance force's mission, and all British troops undergo comprehensive training on the strict rules of engagement. This contrasts directly with the attitude of the insurgents, who use indiscriminate tactics, including suicide bombs and improvised explosive devices, as well as the deliberate and targeted killing of civilians.

Aircraft Carriers

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department spent on the (a) concept and (b) assessment phase of the decision to install catapult and arrestor gear to the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers. [131834]

Mr Dunne [holding answer 6 December 2012]: Up until the end of May 2012, we had committed up to £44 million on our conversion investigations with both the US Department of Defense and UK Aircraft Carrier Alliance, and £1 million on an air-to-air refuelling study. Work to finalise the run-down costs of our conversion work continues. I am withholding the information as estimates of these costs would prejudice commercial interests.

Animal Experiments

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which animals have been used in scientific procedures undertaken under the provisions of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 and commissioned directly by his Department in each year since 2009; and how many such animals were used in procedures at the Porton Down facility. [130824]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 602W

Mr Dunne: DSTL research supports safe and effective protective measures for the UK and its armed forces which could not, currently, be achieved without the use of animals.

DSTL has a remit to undertake research on behalf of the UK Government. This can involve participation in International Collaboration Programmes with other allied nations on behalf of the Ministry of Defence. This collaboration results in burden sharing and means that our use of animals in research studies can be reduced below that which would be required if we were not to collaborate.

As part of the licensing process, the researchers have to convince the Home Office that the work is required, that the results cannot be obtained without the use of animals and that every step has been taken to minimise pain and suffering to the animals involved.

DSTL returns the numbers of procedures undertaken involving animals at DSTL Porton Down to the Home Office on an annual basis. The numbers of procedures returned for the last three years are:

 Number

2009

8,452

2010

9,582

2011

9,882

The animals involved were pigs, rabbits, monkeys and rodents.

The numbers of procedures for the 2012 calendar year is currently being compiled and will be returned to the Home Office towards the end of January 2013.

Armed Forces

Steve Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make it his policy that contact between military officers and hon. Members does not require Ministerial approval if that contact is in the course of official business. [132643]

Mr Philip Hammond: I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave on 27 March 2012, Official Report, columns 1050-51W, to the right hon. Member for East Renfrewshire (Mr Murphy). There are no plans to change the policy.

Armed Forces Covenant

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when he intends to publish the next report on the Armed Forces Covenant. [131075]

Mr Francois [holding answer 30 November 2012]: We published the report on 6 December 2012.

Armed Forces: Compensation

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence in what circumstances the taxable nature of the Survivors Guaranteed Income Payment (SGIP) would mean that a recipient of the SGIP would receive a lower overall guaranteed income than a recipient of the Guaranteed Income Payment. [126933]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 603W

Mr Francois [holding answer 6 November 2012]: A service person who sustains an injury is compensated, under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme, for loss of earnings that would otherwise have been earned through post-service civilian employment. This takes the form of a regular Guaranteed Income Payment (GIP) on leaving service. Where a service person dies in service, an eligible surviving adult dependant receives a Survivor's Guaranteed Income Payment (SGIP) in recognition of the loss of the deceased person's earnings.

The GIP and SGIP are calculated in a similar way, based on the service person's age and salary at service termination or date of death. An injured service person may receive 100% of the calculated figure or, depending on the nature of their injuries, the GIP may be paid at 75%, 50% or 30% levels. The SGIP is set at 60% of the full GIP. Thus in identical career circumstances, the SGIP will be lower than the GIP received by more seriously injured personnel, but more than the GIP received by those with less serious injuries (although this does not take account of other payments, additional to the SGIP, made to eligible children).

HM Revenue and Customs legislation regards the SGIP as “additional income” in recognition of any salary that the spouse may be earning, and it is therefore subject to taxation. SGIP payments are calculated in such a way as to make an element of the award effectively tax-free. It is primarily the method of calculating the award, rather than its taxable status, which results in the SGIP representing a lower overall guaranteed income than the 100% GIP.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many people in receipt of (a) in-work and (b) out-of-work benefits received in-service fatality compensation in each year since 2005. [131831]

Mr Francois [holding answer 6 December 2012]: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not hold information on how many people in receipt of in-work and out-of-work benefits received in-service fatality compensation.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the average payment by his Department was of in-service fatality compensation in each year since 2005. [131832]

Mr Francois [holding answer 6 December 2012]: The information is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions he and Ministers of his Department have had with their Ministerial colleagues in the Department for Work and Pensions on exempting in-service fatality compensation from calculations of welfare entitlement. [131833]

Mr Francois [holding answer 6 December 2012]: Ministry of Defence Ministers have regular discussions with ministerial colleagues in the Department for Work and Pensions about a wide variety of issues.

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the guarantee not to reassess those who are part of the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme

17 Dec 2012 : Column 604W

when they transfer from being in receipt of disability living allowance to the personal independence payment applies to those on all armed forces compensation schemes. [131880]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: Service and ex-service personnel who are awarded an Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) award at tariffs 1-8 or who receive a guaranteed income payment of 50% or higher will be eligible, without reassessment, for the Armed Forces Independence Payment (AFIP) when it is introduced. All other service and ex-service personnel in receipt of disability living allowance (DLA) will be subject to the personal independence payment (PIP) rules, including reassessment, when it is introduced. However, those who receive compensation under the War Pensions Scheme have access to other, more generous, allowances in place of DLA. These additional war pensions allowances will continue and not be changed when PIP is introduced.

Armed Forces: Deployment

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what operations have involved the deployment of UK armed forces personnel since 2010. [131586]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 4 December 2012]: I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 17 September 2012, Official Report, column 453W, to the hon. Member for East Antrim (Sammy Wilson), which details deployment of UK armed forces personnel on United Nations-led missions and operations in support of United Nations Security Council Resolutions in the last five years.

I also refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 27 November 2012, Official Report, column 162W, to the hon. Member for North Devon (Sir Nick Harvey), which details the deployment of UK armed forces personnel on operations alongside other European nations, including EU and NATO operations in the last five years.

I also refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 October 2012, Official Report, column 657W and the answer I gave on 5 December 2012, Official Report, column 768W, to the hon. Member for Cheltenham (Martin Horwood), which details the deployment of UK personnel on Common Foreign and Security Policy or Common Security and Defence Policy operations.

In addition, the table details significant(1) deployments of UK armed forces personnel, on national operations overseas, since 2010:

(1) This table does not cover training, exercise and capacity building deployments.

OperationRemarks

Atlantic Patrol Task (North)

Providing support to British Overseas Territories, Humanitarian Aid, Disaster relief and counter-narcotics operations

Atlantic Patrol Task (South)

Protecting British overseas territories in the South Atlantic

Continuous At Sea Deterrence (Op Relentless)

CASD is the UK's most enduring operation, providing a credible and capable deterrent for over 40 years.

Defence Presence in the Gulf(Op Kipion)

Maritime Security Operations in the Gulf and counter-piracy off the Horn of Africa

17 Dec 2012 : Column 605W

Mr Russell Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) which postings in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force last longer than 13 weeks; and how many people undertook each such posting in each year since 2005; [132467]

(2) which training courses in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force take longer than 13 weeks; and how many people took part in each such course in each year since 2005; [132468]

(3) which deployments in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force last longer than 13 weeks; and how many people undertook in each such deployment in each year since 2005. [132469]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]:Postings in all three services exceed 13 weeks; most are for two years or more, although service personnel may be sent on short-term detachments during this period. Virtually all trained service personnel are posted to a unit. Most Army deployments are for a minimum of six months and the Royal Navy and RAF deploy units, composite unit elements or individuals to operational theatres for various lengths of time. Similarly there is a multitude of training courses run by the single services covering career, operational, platform specific and professional training, added to which are those run by the Defence Academy. Many of these exceed 13 weeks. The information requested about training is not held centrally and for the last seven years could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Armed Forces: Museums and Galleries

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many British Army regimental museums there are in the UK. [132017]

Mr Francois: There are 130 British Army regimental museums in the UK.

Armed Forces: Poverty

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will commission research to establish to what extent former armed service personnel are dependent on food banks both for themselves and members of their families, and to establish what efforts are being made to address that problem. [132488]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]:The Ministry of Defence has no plans to commission research along the lines suggested. There are some 4.6 million veterans in the UK, and it is therefore possible

17 Dec 2012 : Column 606W

that a proportion may be using food banks. There is no requirement to identify oneself as a veteran when using these services.

Armed Forces: Redundancy

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the number of members of the armed forces whose application for voluntary redundancy was approved based on their total years of service who had their redundancy package reduced because their accumulated years involved a break in service; and if he will make a statement. [130234]

Mr Francois [holding answer 26 November 2012]: We believe that in the Tranche 2 redundancy process there may have been a small number of personnel who, in calculating their entitlements using an online redundancy calculator, did not take into account gaps in service. Personnel who had a break in service that spanned the transition between the Armed Forces Pension Scheme (AFPS) 75 and AFPS 05 would not necessarily be eligible to aggregate their service for the purposes of a redundancy package.

Written redundancy forecasts, issued in June 2012, outlined the exact package to which applicants were entitled.

The online redundancy calculator is an anonymous tool and holds no personal data, so it is not possible to identify the number of personnel who used it to estimate their redundancy payment and subsequently received a lower formal forecast.

However, the Ministry of Defence is aware of 14 cases in which Army personnel have appealed after receiving lower redundancy payment forecasts than they had expected after using the online redundancy calculator. No known cases exist in the Royal Navy or Royal Air Force.

Armed Forces: Retirement

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 5 November 2012, Official Report, columns 438-9W, on armed forces: retirement, which of the retired service personnel listed in the answer have had meetings with Ministers in his Department after their official retirement date. [131594]

Mr Francois [holding answer 4 December 2012]: The following table shows meetings between Ministers and the 24 retired service personnel listed in the answer provided on 5 November 2012, Official Report, columns 438-39W:

MinisterDateRetired personnelPurpose of meeting

Right Hon. Andrew Robathan (Min AF)

27 November 2012

Lieutenant-General Barnabas White-Spunner

Constituency meeting

Philip Dunne MP (Min DEST)

25 October 2012

General Kevin O’Donoghue

RUSI Acquisition Focus Group had meeting with Minister—Kevin O’Donoghue attended

Right Hon. Andrew Robathan MP (Min DPWV)

22 March 2011, 20 July 2011 and 29 September 2011

Vice Admiral Alan Massey

As part of the UK Hydrographic Office Owners Council

Right Hon. Mark Francois MP (Min DPWV)

5 November 2012

Air Marshal Chris Nickols

Minister met him in his capacity as chief executive of the RAF Benevolent Fund to discuss service, family, welfare and veterans issues

17 Dec 2012 : Column 607W

Armed Forces: Sexual Offences

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many cases of alleged (a) rape and (b) sexual assault have (i) been tried in the Service Civilian Court and (ii) resulted in a conviction since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [131261]

Mr Francois: There have been two cases of alleged sexual assault that have been tried in the Service Civilian Court since 2005, one in 2005 and one in 2010. The charge of sexual assault in 2005 was changed to one of battery and a conviction resulted. The 2010 case resulted in a conviction for sexual assault. There were no trials for rape in the Service Civilian Court.

During this period there have been other cases of rape and sexual assault which were initially directed for trial in the Service Civilian Court, but subsequently directed to either District Court Martial (DCM) or General Court Martial (GCM). DCMs and GCMs were replaced by “Court Martial” after the implementation of Armed Forces Act 2006 in 2009.

The Service Civilian Court was referred to as the Standing Civilian Court until October 2009.

Information for the period 2000 to 2004 could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Assets

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library a list of each asset on the defence estate in each nation and region of the UK, by (a) estimated worth of each asset and (b) running cost of each asset in the last 12 months. [131941]

Mr Francois [holding answer 6 December 2012]: For commercial reasons the Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not release information on the value of individual assets. The information on the running cost of every asset on the Defence estate is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Information on the overall cost of the Defence estate is published in the MOD's Annual Report and Accounts, which is available on the MOD website at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-12

Astute Class Submarines

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of Project Chalfont. [132831]

Mr Dunne: I am withholding the information requested for the purpose of safeguarding national security. In addition, disclosure of the information would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our armed forces.

Canada

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what plans his Department has for defence co-operation with Canada. [133403]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 608W

Dr Murrison: The United Kingdom and Canada share a close and historic defence relationship; we remain the only two members of NATO, the G8, the G20 and the Commonwealth. UK armed forces work across a whole range of bilateral activities with their Canadian counterparts. This relationship was invigorated by the endorsement of the Canada-UK Joint Declaration in September 2011 by the Prime Minister and the Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper. In addition, we are pursuing areas through NATO where we can deliver closer ties across defence, particularly as we refocus post-Afghanistan; working with Canada is part of this effort.

Conditions of Employment

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of civil servants in his Department have requested (a) part-time, (b) job-share or (c) other flexible working arrangements in each of the last five years; and how many such requests were granted. [132740]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: No information is held on either the number of requests made or the number of civil servants working under flexible working arrangements.

However, the number of civilian staff who were granted part-time working arrangements, including job share arrangements, in the last five years is shown in the following table. The 2012 figures reflect the position to 30 November 2012.

 Number

2008

903

2009

801

2010

753

2011

663

2012

437

Total

3,557

As at 30 November 2012, there are 4,963 part-time civilian employees in the Ministry of Defence.

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many full-time equivalent staff were employed on consultancy contracts in his Department on the latest date for which figures are available; how many such staff were employed on the same date 12 months ago; and if he will make a statement. [132205]

Mr Francois: We contract for external assistance with consultancy companies to deliver a specific output at an agreed price. The number of individual consultants actually employed is a commercial matter for the contractor involved.

All spending on consultancy complies with the tighter controls announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne) on 24 May 2010, details of which can be found at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/cabinet-office-controls-guidance

17 Dec 2012 : Column 609W

Expenditure on consultancy is now published annually in UK Defence Statistics and can be found at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/modintranet/UKDS/UKDS2011/c1/trans_sup.php


Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the highest daily rate paid by his Department to a consultant with an existing contract is; [132440]

(2) what the average daily rate paid by his Department to consultants with an existing contract is; [132441]

(3) what the highest hourly rate charged to his Department is by a consultant with an existing contract in the (a) current and (b) previous financial year; [132924]

(4) what the current average hourly rate charged to his Department is by consultants with an existing contract; [132925]

(5) what the average daily rate charged to his Department is by consultants with an existing contract; [132926]

(6) what is the current highest daily rate charged to his Department by a consultant with an existing contract. [132936]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: We contract for external assistance with consultancy companies to deliver a specific output at an agreed price. The daily rate paid to individual consultants is a commercial matter for the contractor involved.

All spending on consultancy complies with the tighter controls announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), details of which can be found at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/cabinet-office-controls-guidance

Expenditure on consultancy is now published annually in UK Defence Statistics and can be found at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/modintranet/UKDS/UKDS2011/c1/trans_sup.php

Dalgety Bay

Mr Gordon Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of reports on the incidence of cancer in the Dalgety Bay area. [133288]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence has made no assessment of the recent reports concerning the incidence of cancer as this is not within its remit.

Mr Gordon Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) whether he has received any representations about the repositioning of radioactive materials from the Dalgety Bay foreshore; [133289]

(2) whether his talks with Moray Estates on Dalgety Bay foreshore have taken place; and what the result was of any such talks. [133290]

Mr Robathan: The Ministry of Defence has not received any representations about the repositioning of radioactive materials from the Dalgety Bay foreshore.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 610W

No discussions have occurred or are planned with Moray Estates.

Defence

Peter Luff: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what progress he has made on the plans announced by the Prime Minister at Farnborough Air Show on 10 July 2012 to create a defence and security industry initiative to parallel the Aerospace Grants Partnership; what areas of activity will be covered by the initiative; and if he will make a statement. [131926]

Mr Dunne: We support the work that the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, the right hon. Member for Twickenham (Vince Cable), is leading to develop the Defence Growth Partnership (DGP). This will bring industry and Government together to identify ways to remove barriers to growth and enhance the competitiveness of the UK defence sector. It is an opportunity to build on the work, as set out in the National Security Through Technology White Paper (CM 8278), to encourage UK-based companies to fulfil our requirements and export successfully. The partnership will look at a range of issues, including how we exploit links between civil and military technologies, skills required for the sector, and how there can be more flexibility in the workforce between the defence sector and advanced manufacturers.

BIS has been holding discussions with industry and its representatives to determine the framework for the DGP's work. The Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, my right hon. Friend the Member for Sevenoaks (Michael Fallon), will co-chair the DGP on behalf of the Government and we will shortly announce the name of the industry co-chair.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the significance of the (a) aerospace, (b) naval and (c) military ground vehicle industry as a component of the UK's defence industrial base; and if he will make a statement. [132012]

Mr Dunne: The Government recognise the significant contribution the UK defence industry makes in supplying our armed forces. The defence industry is an integral part of our advanced manufacturing base and UK companies have some of the most high-tech manufacturing facilities in the world. As we set out in the National Security Through Technology White Paper (CM 8278), the best way for UK industry to remain strong is to be competitive. Our approach provides the right incentives to grow thriving, vibrant companies that can compete globally and supply the UK armed forces with the capabilities they require. This is why the White Paper also set out a range of Government action, including sustaining investment in defence science and technology, encouraging small and medium sized enterprises to fulfil their potential, and increasing support to responsible defence exports.

Defence Equipment

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what airlift capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132888]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 611W

Mr Dunne: The airlift capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support costs for which funding is allocated:

A330 Voyager

A400M Atlas

BAE 146 Quick Change

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the Statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what helicopter capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132889]

Mr Dunne: The helicopter capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support and training costs:

Chinook Mk6 New Buy

Apache Capability Sustainment Programme

Merlin Capability Sustainment Programme

Puma Life Extension Programme

Falkland Island Search and Rescue and Support Helicopter

Wildcat—Army and Navy variants

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, (1) what carrier strike capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme; [132890]

(2) what the surface fleet is in the Core Equipment Programme. [132891]

Mr Dunne: The Carrier Strike capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of the following equipment programmes and their support and training costs for which funding is allocated:

Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers

Joint Combat Aircraft

Military Afloat Reach and Sustainability (MARS) Tankers

Crowsnest—Airborne maritime surveillance and control, to be fitted to the Merlin Mk2 helicopter, which will replace the Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (SKASaC) system

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the Statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what fast jet capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132892]

Mr Dunne: The fast jet capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support and training costs for which funding is allocated:

Typhoon Tranche 3

F35-B Joint Strike Fighter (Lightning II)

Typhoon Future Capability Package 1

Typhoon Future Capability Package 2

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what heavy armoured platforms are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132894]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 612W

Mr Dunne: The heavy armoured platforms in the Core Equipment Programme consist of the following in-service capabilities:

Challenger 2 Main Battle Tank

AS90 Self Propelled Artillery piece

Challenger Armoured Repair and Recovery Vehicle

Titan Armoured Bridge Layer

Trojan Armoured Engineer Vehicle

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what counter chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132895]

Mr Dunne: The chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support costs for which funding is allocated:

Aircrew Protective Equipment and Detection

Hazard Management

Light Role Team Enhancement

Medical Countermeasures

Networked Biological, Radiological, and Chemical Information System

Personal Decontamination

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what submarine capabilities form part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132896]

Mr Dunne: The submarine capabilities in the Core Equipment Programme consist of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support and training costs for which funding is allocated:

Astute Class submarines

Successor programme to replace the Vanguard Class submarines. The main investment decision is due in 2016.

Maritime Underwater Future Capability

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-64, on defence budget and transformation, whether the cost of personnel from all three services is included as part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132897]

Mr Dunne: The cost of service personnel is not included as part of the Core Equipment Programme.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-64, on defence budget and transformation, whether any items on the single integrated priority list are included in the Core Equipment Programme. [132899]

Mr Dunne: The single integrated priority list is a consolidated list of the Ministry of Defence's future priorities for investment in military capability. It is

17 Dec 2012 : Column 613W

separate from the core equipment programme, which consists of those equipment programmes to which we have already made a commitment to invest, their support costs, and the support costs for in-service equipment.

During the course of Annual Budgeting Cycle 13, the new discipline in our budgetary regime has allowed us to give the go-ahead for a series of equipment projects, some of which were previously on the Single Integrated Priority List, which have now been brought into the core equipment programme. This includes targeting pods for fast jets, 76 additional Foxhound patrol vehicles, better protection systems for Tornado GR4, additional precision-guided Paveway IV bombs and enhancements to Merlin helicopters.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-4, on defence budget and transformation, what Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance capabilities are part of the Core Equipment Programme. [132900]

Mr Dunne: Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition, and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) in the Core Equipment Programme consists of current in-service capabilities plus the following equipment programmes and their support costs for which funding is allocated:

Airseeker—Airborne signals intelligence

Crowsnest—Airborne maritime surveillance and control

Scavenger—Future armed operational unmanned air system (UAS)

Seaseeker—Maritime electronic surveillance

Seer—Tactical electronic surveillance deployed on land

Sentinel—Airborne wide area surveillance

Sentry—Air command and control and situational awareness

Solomon—A programme to improve the coordination and dissemination of ISTAR

Watchkeeper—Tactical UAS

Defence Equipment and Support

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) civilian and (b) military staff have been employed at (i) COD Donnington and (ii) COD Bicester by Defence Equipment and Support in each year since 2005; and if he will make a statement. [132904]

Mr Dunne: Figures for 2005 and 2006 cannot be supplied because Defence Equipment and Support was not formed until 2007. The number of civilian staff employed by Defence Equipment and Support at the Central Ordnance Depots Donnington and Bicester, as at 1 April each year since 2007 is shown in the following table:

(i) Civilian staff
 200720082009201020112012

COD Donnington

614

669

609

613

588

577

COD Bicester

866

832

719

756

656

613

Information on military personnel before 2008 is not held. The overall numbers of military personnel involved in COD tasks over the years 2008 to 2012 are shown in the following table:

17 Dec 2012 : Column 614W

(ii) Military staff
 20082009201020112012

Donnington

14

12

10

14

8

Bicester

66

48

56

54

40

Total

80

60

66

68

48

Defence Infrastructure Organisation

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will estimate the number of people who will be employed by his Department's Defence Infrastructure Organisation in (a) Scotland, (b) England, (c) Northern Ireland and (d) Wales in 2014. [130437]

Mr Francois: The Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) transformation programme will determine both the future operating model and most appropriate corporate structure for the DIO. Further work is ongoing on the future laydown of personnel and bases; this is expected to report in early 2013.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which companies have given a formal expression of interest to become the Defence Infrastructure Organisation's strategic business partner. [131776]

Mr Francois: Following an exercise which saw over 50 companies expressing initial interest in becoming the Strategic Business Partner to the Defence Infrastructure Organisation, seven formal Pre-Qualification Questionnaires were received. After evaluation, the following three consortia have been selected to continue in the competition:

Telereal Trillium/KPMG/Mace

Serco/DTZ/Bechtel

Capita/URS/PA Consulting

Defence: Procurement

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many platforms have had the assessment phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of such changes on the (a) overall cost of programmes and (b) in-service dates; [131861]

(2) how many platforms have had the detail of the manufacturing phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of such changes on the (a) overall cost of programmes and (b) in-service dates; [131862]

(3) how many platforms have had the detail of their development phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of such changes on the (a) overall cost of programmes and (b) in-service dates; [131863]

(4) how many platforms have had the detail of the disposal phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of such changes on the (a) overall cost of programmes and (b) in-service dates; [131864]

(5) how many platforms have had the detail of their in-service phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what assessment he has made of the effect of such changes on the (a) overall cost of programmes and (b) in-service dates. [131865]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 615W

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many and which platforms have had their in-service date changed since May 2010; [131878]

(2) how many platforms have had the detail of the Concept phase of the procurement cycle altered since May 2010; and what the effect has been on (a) the overall cost of the programme across its lifespan and (b) its in-service date in each case. [131879]

Mr Dunne [holding answers 6 and 10 December 2012]: We do not routinely publish in-service dates (ISD) and costs for projects which have not passed their main investment decision as to do so would risk prejudicing the Department's commercial position. I am therefore withholding the information requested about projects in their assessment phase.

The following major projects (that is, those with an acquisition value greater than £100 million) which were in the demonstration and manufacture stage had changes made to their ISD or costs due to deliberate decisions made by the Department. I have excluded changes to projects caused by unforeseen factors or factors outside the Department's control. The details of changes to the following platforms can be found in the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) 2010 and the NAO Major Projects Report 2011:

Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers

Joint Combat Aircraft

Astute class submarines

T45 Destroyer

Nimrod MRA4.

Two other projects which were post-Main Gate have been delayed. The details of these decisions are commercially sensitive and their release could prejudice the Department's negotiations with its industrial partners.

Twenty-seven platforms have had the length of their expected time in-service altered as a result of departmental planning round decisions taken since May 2010. The expected financial impact of these changes was a saving of around £4.8 billion over the course of the decade. Of the 30 individual decisions (some platforms had more than one decision attached to them over this period), the effect of 21 of them was to bring forward the out-of-service date (OSD) and the effect of nine of them was to delay it.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what recent decisions have been taken by the Major Projects Review Board to alter the timeline of scope of specific platforms; [132572]

(2) what the net total saving to his Department was directly arising from the work of the Major Projects Review Board in the latest period for which figures are available. [132573]

Mr Dunne: The purpose of the Major Projects Review Board is regularly to review the Ministry of Defence (MOD) most significant projects and in particular those at risk of failure. Its aim is to ensure that projects keep to the cost and time parameters agreed by the Department’s Investment Approvals Committee and HM Treasury at the major investment decision point.

It was agreed by the then Secretary of State, my right hon. Friend the Member for North Somerset (Dr Fox), in June 2011 that the discussions would not be made

17 Dec 2012 : Column 616W

public to protect any commercial confidentialities and the provision of free and frank advice to Ministers. However, where projects of concern were identified, these would be publicly listed. There has only been one project of concern listed to date, which was Project Valiant Jetty.

The latest edition of the NAO’s Major Project Review is due for publication in early January 2013 and this will provide review and analysis of the MOD’s project performance, how the Department seeks to control cost and timeline and the performance of major acquisition projects.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many defence equipment and support contracts his Department has renegotiated in the latest period for which figures are available; and what saving accrued from each such renegotiation. [132574]

Mr Dunne: I refer the right hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 October 2012, Official Report, column 665W, to the hon. Member for Plymouth, Moor View (Alison Seabeck).

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the armed forces have worked in defence procurement in his Department for a period of two years or more. [132575]

Mr Dunne: Information on the number of armed forces personnel that have worked in any aspect of defence procurement for over two years is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. In terms of those armed forces personnel currently employed in Defence Equipment and Support, of 3,817 posts, 18 have served in their current posts for two years or more as at 30 November 2012.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence over what period the £8 billion contingency in the defence equipment and support budget will be available. [132582]

Mr Dunne: I refer the right hon. Member to the statement made by the Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond) on 14 May 2012, Official Report, columns 261-65.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which countries the UK has procured defence (a) equipment and (b) support services from in each financial year since 2000-01 by contract value. [132589]

Mr Dunne: The compilation of statistics relating to imports of defence equipment or support services was discontinued under the last administration. The final set of statistics relating to defence imports for 2007 were published in UK Defence Statistics 2008 which can be viewed at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/modintranet/UKDS/UKDS2008/c1/table113.html

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many meetings (a) he and (b) each Minister in his Department had with defence contractors on the renegotiation of defence contracts since May 2010. [132927]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 617W

Mr Dunne [holding answer 10 December 2012]: As part of routine business, Defence Ministers hold regular meetings on a number of issues with our major contractors. These include discussions on defence equipment and support programmes.

European Fighter Aircraft

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what progress his Department has made on the development of the e-scan radar planned for deployment on Typhoon aircraft; and if he will make a statement. [131283]

Mr Dunne [holding answer 3 December 2012]: The Typhoon partner nations are currently assessing industry proposals for a range of options to integrate e-scan radar onto the Typhoon fleet as part of the project's assessment phase activity.

Germany

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 5 December 2012, Official Report, column 246W, on Germany, if he will list each meeting in the last six months he has had with ministerial colleagues on the withdrawal of British military bases from Germany. [134098]

Mr Robathan: A specific list of meetings on the withdrawal of British military bases from Germany is not held. However Ministers and Ministry of Defence officials continue to have regular meetings on a range of issues some of which will have included basing.

Investment Approvals Committee

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the Investment Approvals Committee will next meet; and what items will be discussed at this meeting. [132670]

Mr Dunne: The Ministry of Defence Investment Approvals Committee will next meet on 16 January 2013. The Committee will discuss a range of equipment capability projects.

ISTAR

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish his Department’s assessment of the UK’s ISTAR requirements. [132584]

Mr Robathan: It would be inappropriate to publish a full assessment of the UK’s intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance (ISTAR) requirements as its disclosure could prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the armed forces.

Leasing

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he plans to take to ensure that his Department complies with accounting requirements with regard to leases. [133173]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 618W

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence's policies on leases, and action to be taken to comply with accounting standards and legislation, can be found on page 120 of the 2011-12 annual report, a copy of which is available in the Vote Office. It is also available on the MOD website at the following address:

http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/AboutDefence/CorporatePublications/AnnualReports/

Military Aircraft

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the last TriStar aircraft will be retired; and what estimate he has made of the cost of extending the service life of those aircraft to that date. [133235]

Mr Dunne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 31 October 2012, Official Report, column 297W.

Military Aircraft: Helicopters

Mr Scott: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what consideration he is giving to the procurement of an alternative model of attack helicopter if the Apache AH-64D cannot be upgraded at an acceptable price. [133531]

Mr Dunne: The Attack Helicopter Capability Sustainment Programme is currently in its concept phase. All viable options are being investigated to maintain operational attack helicopter capability and no decisions have been made.

Military Alliances

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to ensure that robust budgets are being adhered to in collaborative defence projects. [130408]

Mr Dunne: Before approval is given for any major investment decision, including international collaborative defence projects, the business case and contracts are subjected to rigorous independent departmental and cross-departmental scrutiny and due diligence. This scrutiny includes the cost assurance, value for money, commercial rigour and affordability of the proposals.

As is the case with national programmes, international collaborative proposals must demonstrate that they represent a cost-effective approach throughout the procurement process.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost to his Department was of military collaboration projects (a) in the EU, (b) with non-EU countries, excluding the US and (c) with the US in the last year. [132354]

Mr Dunne: Ministry of Defence expenditure on military collaboration equipment projects for the financial year 2011-12 is shown in the following table.

Military collaboration projectsExpenditure (£ million)

EU

2,503

Non-EU

27

US

481

17 Dec 2012 : Column 619W

Two projects include a collaboration of EU, non-EU countries and the US which have been included in the non-EU category above.

Ministry of Defence Police and Guarding Agency

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many detectives have been employed by the Ministry of Defence Police in each year since 2005; and if he will make a statement. [132905]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence Police Criminal Investigation Department's strength as at the end of March in each year is as follows:

As at March each year:Strength

2005

148

2006

150

2007

162

2008

189

2009

182

2010

180

2011

165

2012

147

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimated value of fraud has been the trigger for an investigation by Ministry of Defence Police in each year between 2005 and 2012; and if he will make a statement. [132906]

Mr Francois: Ministry of Defence Police investigations, including fraud, are generally determined in terms of whether the crime impacts significantly against Defence capability rather than a predetermined value.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the investigation responsibilities are of the (a) Ministry of Defence Police and (b) Royal Military Police; and if he will make a statement. [132907]

Mr Francois: The general responsibility for the maintenance and enforcement of the criminal law in the United Kingdom rests with local police forces. However, the service police have a concurrent jurisdiction over all persons subject to the Armed Forces Act 2006. The Ministry of Defence Police (MDP) also have a concurrent jurisdiction (under the MDP Act 1987), over what may very broadly be described as defence property and defence personnel. In some cases it will be more appropriate for the MDP or service police to deal with defence-related crime. A flexible approach, based on consultation and agreement at local level, is encouraged, where the respective police forces discuss who is best placed to take action based on availability of resources, jurisdiction and the public interest. These arrangements are set out in Home Office Circular 028/2008 ‘A Protocol between police forces and the Ministry of Defence Police’.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the contribution of the Ministry of Defence Police to investigating theft from the Ministry of Defence. [133066]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 620W

Mr Francois: The general responsibility for the maintenance and enforcement of the criminal law in the UK rests with local police forces. However, in order to counter its major crime threats and risks, the Ministry of Defence has a requirement for dedicated Ministry of Defence police resources to be focused on the prevention and investigation of fraud, corruption and theft of key Defence equipment and assets, the loss of which would have a significant impact on Defence operational effectiveness, and the recovery of such equipment and assets. The MOD has assessed that such capabilities should remain available to it.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of future manpower requirements for the Ministry of Defence Police; and if he will make a statement. [133067]

Mr Francois: Work is currently under way to determine the future Ministry of Defence police requirements across the United Kingdom.

Official Hospitality

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has spent for hospitality purposes on (a) Champagne, (b) wines, (c) spirits, (d) soft drinks, (e) flowers, (f) laundry, (g) porterage, (h) china, (i) cutlery and (j) venue hire since May 2010. [132871]

Mr Francois: The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Information on overall hospitality and entertainment expenditure is published in the annual report, which is available on the Ministry of Defence website at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-12

Overseas Workers

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence in which countries staff of his Department are permanently based. [132585]

Mr Francois: Military and civilian employment figures in countries where staff are permanently based, are published in the United Kingdom Defence Statistics Quarterly Location Statistics Tables 1.1a (all personnel) and Tables 1.1b (military broken down by service) showing the position as at 1 October 2012.

These figures can be found at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index. php?page=48&thiscontent=120&pubType=0&date=2012-11- 22&disText=01%20Oct%202012&from=historic&topDate=2012-11- 22&PublishTime=09:30:00

Pay

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much was paid in (a) year end and (b) in-year bonuses to officials in his Department in each of the last two years. [132855]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 621W

Mr Francois: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Moray (Angus Robertson) on 31 October 2012, Official Report, columns 294-95W. I reiterate that the performance-related element of pay, colloquially referred to as a 'bonus', is actually part of the Ministry of Defence's pay bill, an arrangement set up by the previous Government. Such payments are non-pensionable, and reduce the overall cost of employing civil servants.

Piracy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for which trade routes the UK participates in counter-piracy operations. [132588]

Mr Robathan: The UK contributes to three multi-national counter-piracy operations in the Indian ocean region, principally to protect the trade route through the gulf of Aden. These are Combined Maritime Forces’ Combined Task Force 151, the EU’s Operation Atalanta and NATO’s Operation Ocean Shield.

These commitments are consistent with the policy of the previous Government. In addition, the UK is providing personnel to the European Union’s regional maritime capacity-building mission to Somalia and the Indian ocean EUCAP Nestor. The UK is also a member of the Singapore-based Regional Co-operation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery (ReCAAP) in Asia.

Porton Down: Animal Experiments

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many of the project licences granted under the provisions of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 for use in Porton Down involve collaboration with defence agencies from the US; and for what reasons such collaboration was undertaken in each case. [130795]

Mr Dunne: A total of six of the currently active project licences in operation at Dstl Porton Down cover work that is funded directly by US Defence Agencies. Additionally, the work performed under a large proportion of the remaining 15 licences, although not funded by the US, produces results that are shared through a number of different collaborative agreements with our US and other international partners.

Dstl has a remit to undertake research on behalf of the UK Government. This can involve participation in International Collaboration Programmes with other allied nations on behalf of the Ministry of Defence. This collaboration results in burden sharing and means that our use of animals in research studies can be reduced below that which would be required if we were not to collaborate.

Public Expenditure

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the value will be of resources transferred from the 2011-12 defence budget to the 2012-13 budget for the Ministry of Defence. [133200]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 11 December 2012]:No resources were transferred from 2011-12 to 2012-13.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 622W

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to Table 2.2 of the Autumn Statement, (1) from where the saving of £245 million to his Department's resource budget is to be made in 2013-14; [133203]

(2) how much of the reduction in his Department's budget in 2013-14 is accounted for by unallocated provision. [133223]

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the savings announced in the Autumn Statement on the contingency for the Core Equipment Programme; [133219]

(2) what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the savings announced in the Autumn Statement on the Core Equipment Programme in each year from 2014-15. [133220]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 12 December 2012]: The saving of £245 million required in 2013-14 will be found from the Departmental Unallocated Provision from 2012-13, which the Treasury has agreed can be carried forward.

The autumn statement of 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-822, announced reductions in the Defence Resource budget in 2013-14 and 2014-15. This had no effect on the Core Equipment Programme in these years, including the contingency, which remains in excess of £4 billion over the 10-year budget period.

The 2013 spending review will set departmental budgets for 2015-16, but HM Treasury have confirmed that the Department can continue to plan on an assumption of a 1% real-terms annual increase in the MOD Equipment Programme from 2015.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the Autumn Statement, how much of the reduction in his Department's budget in 2013-14 results from underspends in 2011-12. [133204]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 12 December 2012]: None of the reductions in the MOD's budget in 2013-14 results from underspend in 2011-12.

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the savings announced in the autumn statement on the planned annual increase in the defence equipment and support budget from 2015. [133221]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 12 December 2012]:The savings announced in the autumn statement of 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-82, relate only to financial years 2013-14 and 2014-15, and therefore have no effect on the planned annual increase in the Defence Equipment and Support budget from 2015. The Treasury have confirmed that the Department can continue to plan on the assumption of a 1% real terms annual increase in the Ministry of Defence Equipment programme from 2015.

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the autumn statement, whether the flexibilities agreed with HM Treasury are permanent. [133222]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 623W

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 12 December 2012]:The improved financial discipline that the Ministry of Defence has demonstrated has enabled us to agree exceptional flexibilities with HM Treasury this year. We will continue to pursue improvements in our financial management and will expect to have, as a minimum, access to Budget Exchange on the same basis as all other Departments, in future years.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the Autumn Statement, how much of the reduction in his Department's budget in 2014-15 is accounted for by departmental underspend in 2011-12. [133224]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 12 December 2012]: None of the reduction in the MOD's budget in 2014-15 is accounted for by departmental underspend in 2011-12.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the Autumn Statement 2012, from which categories of expenditure the projected saving of £490 million in 2014-15 will be made. [133428]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]: The Treasury has agreed that the MOD can carry forward its unallocated provision. This is adequate to absorb the budget reduction of £490 million in 2014-15 that was announced in the autumn statement.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence from what baseline the annual real one per cent increase in the defence budget post-2015 will be delivered. [133429]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]: HM Treasury have confirmed that the MOD can continue to plan on the assumption of a 1% real terms annual increase in the Equipment Programme from 2015. The baseline remains as set by HM Treasury at the conclusion of the three month exercise in July 2011.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much unallocated provision existed within his Department's budget in 2011-12. [133430]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]:None; we started making unallocated provision from financial year 2012-13.

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what changes he plans to make to the Single Integrated Priority List as a result of the £245 million reduction in his Department's spending in 2013-14 announced in the Autumn Statement 2012; [133433]

(2) what changes he plans to make to the Single Integrated Priority List as a result of the £490 million reduction in his Department's spending in 2014-15 announced in the Autumn Statement 2012. [133434]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]: None. The savings required will be found from the departmental unallocated provision.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 624W

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the definition is of unallocated provisions as included in his Department's budget. [133435]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]: Departmental unallocated provision is a contingency reserve held centrally to meet unforeseen pressures. It is not allocated to individual programmes, or for specific purposes, until needed.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the amount was of his Department's underspend in 2011-12. [133436]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 13 December 2012]: We have published this information in the Statement of Parliamentary Supply on pages 108 and 109 of the MOD's 2011-12 Annual Report and Accounts (HC 62), laid before the House on 6 December 2012. This publication is also available online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-12

Reserve Forces

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the planned annual running cost of the Reserve Force is in each year between 2012 and 2020; [131889]

(2) what the projected annual running cost of the Reserve Force is once it has reached a complement of 30,000 personnel. [131904]

Mr Francois: In a force where regular and reserve elements are increasingly integrated it is becoming more difficult to separate the running costs of one from the other. There are costs associated with, for example, infrastructure, training and equipment that cannot readily be separated. For that reason, it is not possible to provide a precise figure for running costs of the Reserve Forces. However, the MOD plans to invest an additional £1.8 billion in the Reserves to increase and develop their trained strength and to enhance their capability over the period to 2020.

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what (a) training courses, (b) postings and (c) deployments for Reserve Forces under Reservists 2020 plans will take longer than 13 weeks; [132721]

(2) what training the UK Reserve Forces will be expected to undertake under the Future Reserves 2020 measures. [132756]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: Reservists will be given the training courses that they need to carry out their role in the integrated force. The aim is to provide a sufficient foundation on which to add further training should there be a requirement to mobilise an individual reservist or reserve sub-unit. This varies by service in accordance with their need, but will require an average annual commitment, after initial training, of between 24 and 40 days per year, which would normally involve a continuous training period of between 10 and 16 days.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 625W

There will be parity between reservists and regulars where it is appropriate, such as pre-deployment training for operations. With the exception of a small cadre of reservists held at high readiness, the intention of both the Royal Navy and the Army is for Maritime and Army reservists to be mobilised for no more than one six-month deployment in any five-year period. Air reservists are expected to work on a mobilisation cycle of around one six month deployment every three years. With the exception of pre-deployment training there are no training courses that exceed 13 weeks.

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the Reservists 2020 plan will provide reservists with service accommodation. [132743]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: It is too early to say. Reservist conditions of service are being reviewed as part of the Future Reserves 2020 Consultation Exercise.

Under current tri-service accommodation regulations, volunteer reserve service carries no entitlement to publicly funded single living or service families accommodation. During periods of authorised training and mobilised service, single services administer and provide reservists with accommodation at public expense to achieve the necessary standards of training and/or operational capability.

Senior Civil Servants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what proportion of senior civil servants have left (a) his Department and (b) each of the public bodies for which he is responsible since May 2010; what the rate of turnover of senior civil servants has been in (i) his Department and (ii) each such body since May 2010; and if he will make a statement. [132175]

Mr Francois: Between 1 May 2010 and 31 October 2012, 98 senior civil servants left the Department. This figure includes those that have retired, resigned, died in service or left on voluntary release terms. The figure does not include individuals who have permanently transferred to other Government Departments or who have transferred on temporary loan.

Turnover of staff is calculated on an annual basis and defined as the number of leavers divided by the average strength of substantive senior civil servants and excludes those on temporary promotion. The average strength of substantive senior civil servants during this period is 240.

The annual turnover rates for financial years 2010-11 and 2011-12 and the figures for the previous 12 months are as follows:

 Turnover (percentage)

1 May 2010 to 30 April 2011

7.7

1 May 2011 to 30 April 2012

25.3

1 November 2011 to 31 October 2012

24.0

17 Dec 2012 : Column 626W

Sickness Absence

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 21 November 2012, Official Report, columns 497-8W, on sick leave, what assessment he has made of the difference in the proportion of working days lost due to ill health between officers at AA grade and at SCS grade; and what assessment he has made of the use of mindfulness-based therapies in reducing the proportion of working days lost in his Department. [132698]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) continues to take a robust approach to managing civilian sickness absence, and a major review of absence policies has ensured that they remain relevant. Occupational health and well-being advice and support is available to all employees and line managers.

No specific assessment has been made of the difference in the proportion of working days lost between the various grades, although part of the explanation for the higher rates seen in the lowest grades is that industrial staff, who undertake physically demanding civilian roles in the Ministry of Defence, are clustered predominantly in equivalent grades AA, AO and EO. Industrial staff have historically had higher rates of sickness absence than those of equivalent-graded office-based staff. This Department is unique in this respect, in that it employs over 80% of all industrial staff in the civil service.

The Ministry of Defence has made no assessment as to the utility of mindfulness-based therapies in reducing sick absence. Officials do, however, remain fully aware of evolving best practice in health and well-being.

Staff

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of staff were employed in his Department in each financial year since 2008. [132908]

Mr Francois: The headcount for UK regular forces, excluding Gurkhas, full-time reserve service personnel and mobilised reservists, is as follows, as of 1 April each year:

 Headcount

2008

186,910

2009

188,600

2010

191,660

2011

186,360

2012

179,800

The headcount for civilian personnel as of 1 April each year is as follows:

 Headcount

2008

93,670

2009

90,630

2010

89,970

2011

87,060

2012

73,960

The total headcount combining UK regular forces and civilian personnel as of 1 April each year is as follows:

17 Dec 2012 : Column 627W

 Headcount

2008

280,580

2009

279,230

2010

281,630

2011

273,420

2012

253,760

Military and civilian employment figures are published in the United Kingdom Armed Forces Quarterly Personnel Report and the Quarterly Civilian Personnel Report which can be found at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=48&pubType=1&thiscontent=240&PublishTime =09:30:00&date=2012-11-15&disText=01%20 October%202012&from=listing&top Date=2012-11-15

and

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=48&pubType=1&thiscontent=510&PublishTime =09:30:00&date=2012-11-08&disText=1%20October %202012&from =listing&topDate=2012-11-08

respectively.

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of civilian staff are employed by his Department. [132910]

Mr Francois: Civilian employment figures are published in the Quarterly Civilian Personnel Report and the position at 1 October 2012 is 70,360. This is a reduction of 19,610 personnel from the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) baseline figure of 89,970 personnel on 1 April 2010.

These figures can also be found at:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=48&pubType=1&thiscontent=510&PublishTime =09:30:00&date=2012-11-08&disText=l%20October%202012 &from=listing&topDate=2012-11-08

Temporary Employment

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many staff on casual contracts have been working in his Department for a period of (a) less than six months, (b) six months or longer, (c) 12 months or longer and (d) 18 months or longer. [132626]

Mr Francois [holding answer 12 December 2012]: The number of staff on casual contracts currently working in the Ministry of Defence is shown in the following table:

Period of casual contractNumber of casual staff

Less than six months

93

Six to 11 months

2

12 to 17 months

1

18+ months

0

Theft

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Bridgend of 30 November 2012, Official Report, columns

17 Dec 2012 : Column 628W

562-64W, on theft, to which service the pony listed was attached; and for what purpose the service used the pony. [132431]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: The pony in question is not owned by any of the services, and is not funded by MOD; it belongs to the Royal Artillery Equestrian Centre and has been used by the Royal Artillery Saddle Club, although it is now retired.

Trident Submarines

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department spent on the (a) maintenance, (b) operation and (c) re-fitting of Trident submarines in each of the last 10 years. [133234]

Mr Dunne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), on 7 November 2012, Official Report, column 629W.

Turks and Caicos Islands

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what plans he has to encourage recruiting for the armed forces from the Turks and Caicos Islands. [132453]

Mr Francois [holding answer 10 December 2012]: There are no specific plans to encourage recruiting outside the UK. The services recognise and value the contribution which foreign and Commonwealth personnel, including those from the overseas territories, have made, and continue to make, to our armed forces. Anyone with access to the internet can access the services' recruiting websites and apply to join if they meet published eligibility criteria, including those from Turks and Caicos. However, the recruitment process is conducted in the UK and applicants must have the right to remain in the UK during that period, as is the case for all applicants for the armed forces, except Gurkhas.

Veterans: Plymouth

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service leavers in Plymouth are in employment six months after leaving the services. [132968]

Mr Francois: This information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many servicemen and women based in Plymouth (a) retired from and (b) otherwise left the armed services in 2011-12. [132970]

Mr Francois: The following table shows the numbers of UK regular forces who were permanently based in Plymouth on 1 April 2011 and who subsequently left their service in the financial year 2011-12. Details are available for those who left voluntarily (voluntary outflow(1)), for those who completed their contract (time expiry) and for those who left for any other reason (other).

17 Dec 2012 : Column 629W

We are not able to further break down the data to provide numbers for those who retired.

(1 )Voluntary outflow is defined as all exits from trained UK regular forces which are voluntarily generated by the individual before the end of their agreed engagement or commission period.

Table 1: Numbers of UK regular forces(1) permanently based in Plymouth on 1 April 2011 who left service in the financial year 2011-12
 TotalArmyNavy(2)RAF

Total

840

30

800

(3)

Voluntary Outflow

320

20

310

(3)

Time expiry

141

10

130

(3)

Other

370

10

360

(3)

(1 )UK regular forces includes all trained and untrained personnel. Gurkhas, full-time reserve personnel, and mobilised reservists are excluded. Due to the rounding methods used, figures may not always equal the sum of the parts. When rounding to the nearest 10, numbers ending in five have been rounded to the nearest 20 to prevent systematic bias. (2 )Naval service personnel on sea service are included against the local authority containing the home port of their ship. (3 )Fewer than 5.

Warships

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the maximum speed will be of the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier and the Astute Class submarine. [132829]

Mr Dunne: I am withholding details of the maximum speed of the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers and the Astute Class submarines, as their release would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of our armed forces.

Women and Equalities

Public Appointments

Mr Weir: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how many public appointments (a) regulated by and (b) not regulated by the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments have been made by her Department since 2007; and in how many such cases the services of recruitment consultants were retained. [132770]

Maria Miller: The Minister for Women and Equalities has made the following public appointments regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments, since 2007.

Organisation200720082009201020112012

Women's National Commission

0

10

4

0

n/a

n/a

Equality and Human Rights Commission

3

0

12

1

1

3

Note: Includes reappointments

The services of recruitment consultants were used for all new appointments except those to the Women's National Commission in 2008.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 630W

The Minister for Women and Equalities made the following appointments not regulated by the Commissioner for Public Appointments since 2007.

Appointment200720082009201020112012

Voice of Older People

1

Women's Business Council

9

Equality and Human Rights Commission

(1)2

Public Sector Equality Duty Review

1

(1 )The non-regulated appointments to the Equality and Human Rights Commission were interim appointments.

Health

Breast Cancer: Hartlepool

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment his Department has made of breast cancer screening procedures in Hartlepool constituency; what discussions his Department has had with (a) NHS Hartlepool and (b) North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust on the provision of (i) skilled breast cancer specialists and (ii) up-to-date breast cancer equipment in Hartlepool; and if he will make a statement; [133463]

(2) what recent assessment he has made of the supply and operation of the digital breast screening service in Hartlepool constituency; and if he will make a statement. [133906]

Dr Poulter: The provision of services, including cancer services, is a matter for the local national health service. As such, the Department has made no assessment of the breast cancer screening service in Hartlepool.

In addition, there have been no discussions between the Secretary of State for Health or other Ministers with Hartlepool Primary Care Trust or North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust about the provision of skilled breast cancer specialists or breast cancer equipment in Hartlepool. Local health care organisations, with their knowledge of the patients that they serve, are best placed to plan and deliver a workforce appropriate to the needs of their patients based on clinical need and sound evidence. The provision of equipment, including breast cancer equipment, is also a matter for the local NHS.

Carbon Monoxide

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many local authorities are planning to use Warm Homes Healthy People funding received in 2012-13 to install carbon monoxide detectors in vulnerable households. [133399]

Anna Soubry: Information on the installation of carbon monoxide detectors in vulnerable households by local authorities has not been routinely collected as part of the Warm Homes Healthy People £20 million funding for 2012-13.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 631W

However, an analysis of the proposals shows that 14 local authority proposals covering 16 local authorities have included the installation of carbon monoxide detectors as part of their projects.

The Department has also awarded national grants to the value of £1.5 million to Age UK and the Foundations Independent Living Trust to complement the work carried out by local authorities.

As part of the Age UK proposals, local and national handyperson services will check if households have a working carbon monoxide detector and, where needed, will install a new one, with the aim of a roll-out of the installation of free carbon monoxide detectors nationwide.

The Cold Weather Plan for England 2012, which was published on 26 October 2012, recognises that carbon monoxide poisoning is a potential killer and urges individuals to consider fitting an audible carbon monoxide alarm which is EN 50291-compliant, but that fitting an alarm should not replace regular maintenance of appliances.

Care Homes: Fees and Charges

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 19 November 2012, Official Report, column 386-7W, on care homes: fees and charges, if he will place in the Library a copy of the tables and working papers that set out the assumptions and data used to draw the graph in figure 14 of the Progress Report. [134115]

Norman Lamb: In the Progress Report on Funding Reform, figure 14 sets out the indicative proportion of assets depleted under the current system, and with different levels of the cap (with an extended means test) for someone with very high residential care costs, by their initial level of assets on going into care. It highlights how this corresponds to wealth quintiles for older people in care.

This analysis is based on around eight years in residential care, costing £150,000 (plus £10,000 per annum general living costs). It assumes that people buy their care at the local authority rate—someone paying a higher rate for their care could spend more over their lifetime; and that they can pay £10,000 per annum living cost from their income—and estimates would be different for people with higher or lower income.

The following table shows the data presented in figure 14 in the Progress Report.

 Percentage
AssetsCurrent system£25,000£35,000£50,000£75,000£100,000

£0,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

£5,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

£10,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

£15,000

4

1

2

2

3

3

£20,000

23

7

9

12

17

20

£25,000

36

11

14

19

25

30

£30,000

47

13

17

23

31

36

£35,000

54

15

19

26

35

41

£40,000

60

16

21

28

38

44

£45,000

64

17

22

29

40

47

£50,000

67

18

23

31

42

49

£55,000

70

18

24

32

43

51

£60,000

72

19

25

33

44

52

17 Dec 2012 : Column 632W

£65,000

74

19

25

34

46

54

£70,000

76

20

26

34

46

55

£75,000

77

20

26

35

47

56

£80,000

78

20

27

35

48

57

£85,000

79

20

27

36

49

57

£90,000

80

21

27

36

49

58

£95,000

81

21

28

37

50

59

£100,000

82

21

28

37

50

59

£105,000

83

21

28

37

50

59

£110,000

83

21

28

37

51

60

£115,000

84

21

28

37

51

60

£120,000

84

21

28

37

50

60

£125,000

85

20

27

37

50

60

£130,000

85

19

27

36

50

60

£135,000

85

19

26

36

50

60

£140,000

86

18

25

35

49

59

£145,000

86

17

24

34

48

59

£150,000

86

17

23

33

48

59

£155,000

86

16

23

32

47

58

£160,000

86

16

22

31

46

57

£165,000

87

15

21

30

45

57

£170,000

87

15

21

29

44

56

£175,000

86

14

20

29

43

55

£180,000

83

14

19

28

42

54

£185,000

81

14

19

27

41

53

£190,000

79

13

18

26

39

52

£195,000

77

13

18

26

38

51

£200,000

75

13

18

25

38

50

£205,000

73

12

17

24

37

49

£210,000

71

12

17

24

36

48

£215,000

70

12

16

23

35

47

£220,000

68

11

16

23

34

45

£225,000

67

11

16

22

33

44

£230,000

65

11

15

22

33

43

£235,000

64

11

15

21

32

43

£240,000

63

10

15

21

31

42

£245,000

61

10

14

20

31

41

£250,000

60

10

14

20

30

40

£255,000

59

10

14

20

29

39

£260,000

58

10

13

19

29

38

£265,000

57

9

13

19

28

38

£270,000

56

9

13

19

28

37

£275,000

55

9

13

18

27

36

£280,000

54

9

13

18

27

36

£285,000

53

9

12

18

26

35

£290,000

52

9

12

17

26

34

£295,000

51

8

12

17

25

34

£300,000

50

8

12

17

25

33

£305,000

49

8

11

16

25

33

£310,000

48

8

11

16

24

32

£315,000

48

8

11

16

24

32

£320,000

47

8

11

16

23

31

£325,000

46

8

11

15

23

31

£330,000

45

8

11

15

23

30

£335,000

45

7

10

15

22

30

£340,000

44

7

10

15

22

29

£345,000

43

7

10

14

22

29

£350,000

43

7

10

14

21

29

£355,000

42

7

10

14

21

28

£360,000

42

7

10

14

21

28

£365,000

41

7

10

14

21

27

£370,000

41

7

9

14

20

27

£375,000

40

7

9

13

20

27

17 Dec 2012 : Column 633W

£380,000

39

7

9

13

20

26

£385,000

39

6

9

13

19

26

£390,000

38

6

9

13

19

26

£395,000

38

6

9

13

19

25

£400,000

38

6

9

13

19

25

£405,000

37

6

9

12

19

25

£410,000

37

6

9

12

18

24

£415,000

36

6

8

12

18

24

£420,000

36

6

8

12

18

24

£425,000

35

6

8

12

18

24

£430,000

35

6

8

12

17

23

£435,000

34

6

8

11

17

23

£440,000

34

6

8

11

17

23

£445,000

34

6

8

11

17

22

£450,000

33

6

8

11

17

22

£455,000

33

5

8

11

16

22

£460,000

33

5

8

11

16

22

£465,000

32

5

8

11

16

22

£470,000

32

5

7

11

16

21

£475,000

32

5

7

11

16

21

£480,000

31

5

7

10

16

21

£485,000

31

5

7

10

15

21

£490,000

31

5

7

10

15

20

£495,000

30

5

7

10

15

20

£500,000

30

5

7

10

15

20