Clinical Commissioning Groups

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what his policy is on whether accountable officers in clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are able to undertake work outside the CCG; [133825]

(2) what code of conduct governs the behaviour of an accountable officer of a clinical commissioning group. [133827]

Dr Poulter: It is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to determine the appropriate performance measures for their governing body members. Nevertheless, all members of a CCG, including the accountable officer, will be expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the Nolan Principles of ethical standards for holders of public office.

The National Health Service Act 2006, as amended by the Health and Social Care Act 2012, requires CCGs to describe in their constitutions how they will manage conflicts of interest, and ensure the transparency and integrity of their decision-making processes. CCGs will have to, for example, set out in their constitution the way in which decisions will be made, and how decision-making will be transparent; and have up-to-date registers of interests that are made available for public scrutiny.

Accountable officers will be able to undertake work outside the CCG, for example, a clinician who is an accountable officer and who wants to continue to practise will be able to do so. However, they will be subject to the strict conflict of interest safeguards outlined above.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 634W

Dementia

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he intends to publish a report of local progress against the National Dementia Strategy for England. [134015]

Norman Lamb: A progress report on the Prime Minister's challenge on dementia was published on 8 November 2012 and a further progress report will be published in March 2013. In addition to these progress reports, the Department has commissioned an audit of antipsychotic prescribing and a survey of memory services, both of which will be published in 2013.

Dental Services: East of England

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many dentists in (a) the East of England, (b) Suffolk and (c) Bury St Edmunds constituency (i) are registering NHS patients and (ii) were so doing in each of the last three years. [133517]

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not held centrally.

Under the current dental contractual arrangements, introduced on 1 April 2006, patients do not have to be registered with a national health service dentist to receive NHS care.

Dental Services: West Yorkshire

Greg Mulholland: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much funding he intends to allocate for the provision of NHS dental care in Leeds in each of the next three years; what plans he has for future levels of access to NHS dentistry in Leeds; and how many people in (a) the city of Leeds and (b) West Yorkshire are registered with an NHS dentist. [133509]

Dr Poulter: Funding for national health service services, including dentistry services, is currently allocated to primary care trusts (PCTs). PCTs commission services to meet the health care needs of their local populations, taking account of national and local priorities. From 2013-14, the NHS Commissioning Board will commission NHS dentistry services.

The number of people accessing NHS dentistry has increased by over 1.1 million nationally since May 2010.

Information on numbers of patients registered with an NHS dentist is not available. Under the current dental contractual arrangements introduced on 1 April 2006, patients do not have to be registered with an NHS dentist to receive NHS care. The closest equivalent measure to ‘registration’ is the number of patients receiving NHS dental services (‘patients seen’) over a 24-month period. However, this is not directly comparable to registration data for earlier years.

Information on number of patients seen by an NHS dentist in PCTs in West Yorkshire in the 24-month period ending 30 September 2012 (including orthodontic patients) is shown in the following table.

Primary care trustNumber of patients seen

Bradford and Airedale Teaching PCT

297,940

17 Dec 2012 : Column 635W

Calderdale PCT

129,514

Kirklees PCT

263,514

Leeds PCT

426,274

Wakefield District PCT

218,893

Sum of specified PCTs

1,336,135

Notes: 1. The ‘patients seen’ measure shows the number of patients who received NHS dental care in the previous 24 months, an equivalent measure covering the 12-month period is not available. 2. Information is only available by PCT and strategic health authority area. Source: The Information Centre for health and social care. Table Al of Annex 2 of the ‘NHS Dental Statistics for England 2012-13, First Quarterly report’.

Fertility

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether tertiary infertility services will be commissioned by clinical commissioning groups from April 2013; and what guidance those groups will be given to (a) help them commission such services and (b) ensure that patients receive access to a range of infertility services. [133482]

Anna Soubry: Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are set to take on responsibility for commissioning infertility services from April 2013, with the NHS Commissioning Board providing oversight and support. This will include the provision of supportive commissioning resources for CCGs.

We will continue to expect that those involved in commissioning infertility treatment services are fully aware of the importance of having regard to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence fertility guidelines.

Glaucoma

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has to make iStent surgery available to patients with glaucoma. [133840]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 636W

Dr Poulter: It is for local national health service commissioners to make funding decisions on the use of specific interventions such as iStent, based on an assessment of the available evidence and patients’ individual clinical circumstances.

Health Professions: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many vacancies there were for (a) doctors and (b) nurses specialising in the treatment of cancer at hospitals providing cancer treatment services in the London strategic health authority area in March (i) 2010, (ii) 2011 and (iii) 2012 (A) in total and (B) by NHS trust; and if he will make a statement . [133673]

Dr Poulter: The information is not available in the format requested. A table showing vacancy rates and numbers for consultants in the six main cancer specialties in the London strategic health authority area as at 31 March 2010 has been placed in the Library.

The national health service and GP vacancy collections and publications have been suspended since 2011 pending the outcome of the Department of Health-led Fundamental Review of Data Returns.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many vacancies there were for (a) doctors and (b) nurses specialising in emergency medicine (i) in total and (ii) by NHS trust within the London strategic health authority area in (A) April 2010 and (B) April 2011; and if he will make a statement. [133674]

Norman Lamb: The information is not available in the format requested. The following table shows vacancy rates and numbers for consultants in the accident and emergency speciality in the London strategic health authority (SHA) area as at 31 March 2010.

The national health service and GP vacancy collections and publications have been suspended since 2011 pending the outcome of the Department of Health-led Fundamental Review of Data Returns.

Total and three month vacancy rates and numbers for all consultants working within the accident and emergency specialty in London strategic health authority

0

 Accident and emergency
  Vacancy rate (%)Vacancy number3-month vacancy rate (%)3-month vacancy numberStaff in post (full-time equivalents)Staff in post (headcount)

England

 

9.1

91

3.3

31

906

938

        

London

Q36

8.1

14

2.5

4

158

163

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

RF4

16.7

2

16.7

2

10

10

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

RVL

*

2

*

2

7

8

Barnet Primary Care Trust (PCT)

5A9

0

0

0

0

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

RRP

0

0

0

0

Barts and The London NHS Trust

RNJ

7.9

1

0

0

12

12

Bromley PCT

5A7

0

0

0

0

Camden and Islington Foundation Trust

TAF

0

0

0

0

Central And North West London NHS Foundation Trust

RV3

0

0

0

0

17 Dec 2012 : Column 637W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 638W

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

RQM

*

0

*

0

6

6

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

RC3

*

0

*

0

5

5

Ealing PCT

5HX

0

0

0

0

East London NHS Foundation Trust

RWK

0

0

0

0

Enfield PCT

5C1

0

0

0

0

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

RVR

*

0

*

0

7

7

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Trust

RP4

0

0

0

0

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

RJ1

0

0

0

0

11

11

Hammersmith and Fulham PCT

5H1

0

0

0

0

The Hillingdon Hospital NHS Trust

RAS

*

1

*

0

4

4

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

RQX

*

0

*

0

5

5

Hounslow PCT

5HY

0

0

0

0

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

RYJ

20.2

4

0

0

16

16

Islington PCT

5K8

0

0

0

0

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

RJZ

*

0

*

0

7

8

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

RAX

*

0

*

0

2

3

Kingston PCT

5A5

0

0

0

0

The Lewisham Hospital NHS Trust

RJ2

*

0

*

0

3

3

Mayday Healthcare NHS Trust

RJ6

*

0

*

0

5

5

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

RP6

0

0

0

0

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

RNH

*

0

*

0

5

5

North East London NHS Foundation Trust

RAT

0

0

0

0

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

RAP

*

0

*

0

5

5

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

RV8

*

0

*

0

5

5

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust

RPG

0

0

0

0

Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

RT3

0

0

0

0

Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust

RAL

*

0

*

0

5

5

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

RPY

0

0

0

0

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

RAN

0

0

0

0

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

RV5

0

0

0

0

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

RYQ

0

0

0

0

10

10

17 Dec 2012 : Column 639W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 640W

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

RQY

0

0

0

0

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

RJ7

*

0

*

0

7

7

Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust

RNK

0

0

0

0

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

RRV

*

0

*

0

7

8

West London Mental Health NHS Trust

RKL

0

0

0

0

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

RFW

*

1

*

0

4

4

Westminster PCT

5LC

0

0

0

0

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

RGC

*

1

*

0

6

6

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

RKE

*

2

*

0

4

5

Notes: 1. SHA figures are based on trusts and do not necessarily reflect the geographical provision of health care. 2. A vacancy is defined as one which employers are actively trying to fill as at 31 March. 3. Total vacancy rates are total vacancies expressed as a percentage of total vacancies plus staff in post from the previous September medical and dental workforce census (full-time equivalent). 4. Three month vacancies are vacancies as at 31 March 2010 which trusts are actively trying to fill which had lasted for three months or more (full-time equivalents). 5. Three month vacancy rates are three month vacancies expressed as a percentage of three month vacancies plus staff in post from the previous September medical and dental workforce census (full-time equivalent). 6. * = figures where staff in post and number of vacancies are less than 10. 7. — = figures where staff in post and vacancies are both nil. 8. Vacancy and staff in post numbers are rounded to the nearest whole number. 9. Percentages are calculated on unrounded figures and are then rounded to one decimal place. 10. Data Quality The NHS Information Centre for health and social care seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses. Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre Vacancies Survey March 2010.

Health Services: Suffolk

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the financial deficit was of each (a) primary care trust and (b) NHS hospital trust in Suffolk in each of the last three years. [133411]

Dr Poulter: All primary care trusts and national health service hospital trusts in Suffolk reported a surplus in their annual accounts from 2009-10 to 2011-12.

HIV Infection

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to raise awareness of HIV testing. [133846]

Anna Soubry: The Department funds the Terrence Higgins Trust and partners to deliver a three-year programme for the HIV Prevention England, which targets gay and bisexual men and African communities, the groups most affected by HIV in the United Kingdom. HIV Prevention England includes information and awareness interventions, promotion of HIV testing and work to inform the evidence base on effective HIV prevention. The Department also supported the first National HIV Testing Week run by HIV Prevention England which took place between the 23 and 30 November.

HIV Prevention England is additional to work on HIV prevention and health promotion, including testing, commissioned and funded by the national health service and others locally.

Hospitals: Uniforms

Andrew Bingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that hospital uniforms are not worn outside hospitals. [133487]

Dr Poulter: It is for individual national health service trusts to determine their own policies on the wearing and laundering of uniforms in and around the workplace and in March 2010, the Department published refreshed guidance to help them do so: ‘Uniforms and workwear: Guidance on uniform and workwear policies for NHS employers’. A copy of this document has been placed in the Library.

One of the main conclusions of the working group that developed the guidance was that there was no conclusive evidence that uniforms or other work clothes pose a significant hazard in terms of spreading infection.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 641W

The group did though recognise that the public believe there is a risk and do not like seeing hospital staff in uniform away from the workplace.

A trust's chief executive has the responsibility for ensuring that hospital staff have enough suitable clothing and equipment to carry out their work effectively and to make any other supporting arrangements that may be necessary.

As well as an evidence base, the Uniforms and Workwear guidance identified examples of good (and poor) practice that were based on common sense rather than scientific evidence. Changing into and out of uniforms at work is included as a good practice example in the guidance.

In Vitro Fertilisation

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether the provision of IVF treatment will be monitored by the NHS scorecard scheme. [133390]

Anna Soubry: The publication of an Innovation Scorecard is a commitment in the NHS chief executive’s report “Innovation Health and Wealth”. It aims to drive national health service compliance with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) technology appraisals, which include medicines and medical technologies, by publishing levels of compliance at a local level. The Innovation Scorecard will help the NHS identify gaps in compliance which can then be justified, challenged or acted upon. The Innovation Scorecard is predicated on NICE technology appraisals, as there are clinical guidelines from NICE on the use of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) but no technology appraisals relating to IVF, the first Innovation Scorecard will not include IVF.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to improve the treatment given to patients suffering from Crohn's disease. [133845]

Norman Lamb: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published a clinical guideline for the treatment of Crohn's disease in October 2012. NICE has also been asked to develop a quality standard on Crohn's disease as part of the library of quality standards announced in March 2012. Through the NHS Outcomes Framework we will be holding the national health service to account for improving the quality of life of people with longer term conditions; including Crohn's disease.

NHS: Procurement

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the role of the Competition Commission is in relation to the tendering of providers of NHS services in England and Wales. [133459]

Dr Poulter: The Competition Commission has no role in relation to tendering of NHS services.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 642W

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the statutory minimum level of consultation required with service users is when proposing to transfer the provider of non-emergency ambulance services in an NHS trust as a result of a tendering process. [133460]

Dr Poulter: The Department published statutory guidance in October 2008—‘Real Involvement’. The guidance provides advice to national health service organisations about their obligations under section 242 of the NHS Act 2006. This duty requires NHS organisations to make arrangements to involve patients and public in the planning and development of services and decisions affecting the operation of services. NHS bodies may discharge their obligations by informing, involving or consulting NHS service users, depending on the nature and extent of the proposed changes and its impact on service users.

Nurses: Incontinence

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many specialist nurses in Harrow Primary Care Trust were employed to help people with continence problems in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13 to date; and if he will make a statement. [133368]

Dr Poulter: The numbers of specialist nurses employed to "help people with continence problems is not collected centrally.

The responsibility for specific decisions on staffing numbers and skill mix rests with the local national health service. We have given local NHS organisations; the freedom to decide how best to use their resources, in consultation with local stakeholders, as they know the health needs of their local communities best.

Preventive Medicine

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of his Department's annual budget is allocated to preventative and early intervention measures. [133664]

Dr Poulter: Funding for NHS services is currently allocated to primary care trusts (PCTs). Once allocated it is for PCTs to commission the services they need to meet the health care needs of their local populations, taking account of national and local priorities.

In February we estimated that in 2012-13 around £5.2 billion will be spent on the future responsibilities of the public health system, and £2.2 billion will be for services that will in future be the responsibility of local authorities.

From 2013-14 the Department will allocate ring-fenced public health grants, targeted for health inequalities, to upper-tier and unitary local authorities for improving the health and wellbeing of local populations; this is expected to include preventative and early intervention measures.

The estimated spending in the local authority sector has been revised and will be published alongside the details of the grants to those authorities.

17 Dec 2012 : Column 643W

Smoking: Young People

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of 15-year-olds were regular smokers in 1999; and if he will estimate the proportion that remained regular smokers in the latest period for which figures are available. [133360]

Dr Poulter: The Survey of Smoking, Drinking and Drug Use Among Young People showed that 23% of children aged 15 in England were regular smokers in 1999. It is possible to gain some insight into the proportion that have remained smokers using information from the 2010 General Lifestyles Survey, by looking at the current smoking status of those who said they started smoking regularly when they were 15 or younger. As the sample contains an insufficient number of 26-year-olds (who would have been 15 in 1999), it is necessary to use a broader age range. Of those 24 to 28-year-olds in England who said they started smoking regularly when they were 15 or younger, 71% said that they currently smoked cigarettes.

Social Services: Fees and Charges

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make an assessment of the likely effect on the use of preventative care services if the cap on care costs was set above £50,000. [134014]

Norman Lamb: As stated in the Progress report on funding reform, a cap on care costs may encourage people to start spending on their care when they need it, since they do not fear having to use all of their assets for care. Similarly, if people are willing to start spending earlier, they are more likely to use preventive services. Better information and advice, resulting from more people coming into contact with their local authority, would also make people more aware of their options and the benefits of preventing a care and support need from worsening.

A copy of the progress report on funding reform is in the Library.

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations he has received from organisations and individuals on capping the long-term costs of care. [134016]

Norman Lamb: Following the publication of the Dilnot Commission's recommendations, the Government engaged with a wide range of people, including service users, their families and carers, local authorities, charities, providers of care services and the financial services sector to get views on the Commission's proposals.

We set out in the progress report on funding reform in July 2012 that the Government agrees that the principles of the Dilnot Commission's model—financial protection through capped costs and an extended means-test—would be the right basis for any new funding model. It is our intention to base a new funding model on them if a way to pay for it can be found.

Since then, we have continued to engage with partners from the care sector, financial services and local authorities

17 Dec 2012 : Column 644W

and others on the detail underpinning the principles of the capped cost model before making a decision in the spending review.

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for Health at what level the cost of care to individuals will be capped; and if he will make a statement. [134017]

Norman Lamb: We set out in the progress report on funding reform in July 2012 that the Government agree that the principles of the Dilnot Commission's model—financial protection through capped costs and an extended means-test—would be the right basis for any new funding model. It is our intention to base a new funding model on them if a way to pay for it can be found.

Sodium Valproate

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what information and advice his Department has given to women of child-bearing age on the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence concerning sodium valproate; [133488]

(2) what information is given to women of child-bearing age when prescribed the Epilim form of sodium valproate on the potential effects of that drug on mental health. [133491]

Dr Poulter: Although there is no substitute for a full and comprehensive discussion with the health care team, we have supplemented this with guidance available on the NHS Choices website, which reflects the recommendations of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

NHS Choices' Pregnancy Planner provides information on the issues women with long-term or chronic conditions may need to consider before and during pregnancy. This includes information on drug treatment to control epileptic seizures, which can be found at the following link:

www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/epilepsy-pregnant.aspx

In addition, more detailed information on the use of sodium valproate and considerations in family planning and pregnancy is also available on NHS Choices within its medicine guides pages, which can be found at the following link:

http://www.nhs.uk/medicine-guides/pages/medicineover view.aspx?condition=epilepsy&medicine=sodium+ valproate&preparation=sodium+valproate+100mg+tablets

The current product information for sodium valproate (Epilim) products contains detailed advice in relation to its use during pregnancy. The product information for prescribers and the patient information leaflet, which accompanies the medicine, contain clear information about the potential side effects when prescribed to women of child bearing potential. Product information for health care professionals clearly states that Epilim should not be prescribed to women of child-bearing potential unless clearly necessary.

The patient information leaflet for Epilim encourages women to discuss with their doctor the possible problems associated with Epilim when it is taken in pregnancy. Women of child-bearing potential are advised to use an

17 Dec 2012 : Column 645W

effective method of contraception and talk to their doctor before planning pregnancy.

The patient information for Epilim also advises that women taking Epilim during pregnancy have a higher risk of having a child with an abnormality compared with other women. Women are also advised that their babies may develop less quickly than normal or have autistic disorders and that these children may require additional educational support.

Streptococcus

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research his Department has carried out to establish why the updated Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists guidelines on prevention of group B streptococcus (GBS) have not resulted in reduced incidence of GBS infection in newborn babies. [133489]

Dr Poulter: The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists published their updated guidelines on prevention of group B streptococcus (GBS) on incidence of GBS infection in neonates in July 2012. The updated guideline took into account new evidence on the prevention of early-onset neonatal GBS disease. It is important that services undertake local clinical audits to ensure the effective use of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis recommended by the guideline.

This year The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence published two clinical audit tools which include clinical audit standards, a data collection form and an action plan template for use by services that care for women in labour or for babies at risk of, or being treated for, early onset neonatal infection.

Tobacco

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will request (a) his Department's Chief Scientific Adviser and (b) the Government's Chief Scientific Advisers' Committee to conduct an assessment of the published scientific evidence concerning the health risks associated with the use of Swedish snus and other forms of smokeless tobacco; [133408]

(2) with reference to paragraph 5.11 of his Department's Tobacco Control Plan for England, Healthy Lives, Healthy People, if he will cite the scientific evidence used to assess the health risks associated with the use of smokeless tobacco. [133461]

Dr Poulter: Directive 2001/37/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 June 2001 concerning the manufacture, presentation and sale of tobacco products prohibits the placing on the market of tobacco for oral use, including snus.

In February 2008, the European Commission's independent Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) published a report titled “Health Effects of Smokeless Tobacco Products” that reviewed the evidence on the safety of smokeless tobacco products. SCENIHR concluded that smokeless tobacco products are addictive and their use is hazardous to health.

The SCENIHR is one of three independent non-food Scientific Committees that provide the European

17 Dec 2012 : Column 646W

Commission with scientific advice to support policy development relating to consumer safety, public health and the environment.

The Government is satisfied that SCENIHR's report is comprehensive, and has no plans to undertake any further specific reviews into the safety of snus.

A copy of SCENIHR's report has been placed in the Library.

Tobacco: Australia

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has had discussions with his counterpart in Australia on the implementation of standardised packaging for tobacco in that country. [133359]

Dr Poulter: The Department has received many thousands of responses to the “Consultation on standardised packaging of tobacco products” from a range of interested parties. The Department is in the process of collating and analysing these responses. We will give full and proper consideration to all of the responses received, as well as to the evidence, and other relevant information, before making any decisions on future policy for tobacco packaging.

No current health minister has met with any Australian health minister to specifically discuss standardised packaging of tobacco products. However, I met with Senator the hon. Kim Carr, the Australian Minister for Human Services on 6 December 2012, where he discussed experiences in Australia.

Contact is also maintained at official level with the Australian Department of Health and Ageing regarding tobacco control.

Work and Pensions

Atos Healthcare

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the oral evidence of the Permanent Secretary of his Department to the Public Accounts Committee of 19 November 2012, HC 744-i, Q161 and Q162, what proportion of health care professionals employed by Atos Healthcare for the purposes of carrying out the work capability assessment were (a) doctors, (b) nurses and (c) physiotherapists in (i) the UK and (ii) each region in (A) 2010, (B) 2011, (C) 2012 to date and (D) each month since May 2010. [131959]

Mr Hoban: Data on the number of staff employed by Atos Healthcare to work specifically on the work capability assessment (WCA) are not available. Atos Healthcare headcount is recorded nationally against the DWP Medical Services Contract which extends beyond delivery of the WCA.

Carers

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what support his Department will provide for carers when making applications for personal independence payments. [133283]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 647W

Esther McVey: Personal independence payment has been designed to be easy for disabled people to claim. However, if the disabled person requires support in making a claim, then the process will allow the carer to act as the disabled person's “voice” during the claimant journey. Where the claimant is so disabled that they are unable to act for themselves, the Department can appoint a person to act on that claimant’s behalf.

Where a claimant is required to attend an assessment, provision has been made for allowing a third party, which can include carers, to accompany the disabled person whether it is held in an assessment centre or in their own home.

A person can be awarded carer's allowance if the person being cared for is in receipt of the daily living component of personal independence payment at either rate, as long as they satisfy the other qualifying criteria.

Carer's Allowance: Warrington

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people are in receipt of carer's allowance in Warrington North constituency. [133828]

Esther McVey: Statistics on how many people are in receipt of carer's allowance in Warrington North constituency can be found here:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available here:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Construction: Safety

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps his Department is taking to reduce serious accidents and fatalities in the construction industry and to promote safe practices. [133841]

Mr Hoban: The Health and Safety Executive has a dedicated division for regulating the construction industry. It engages with the industry through a plan of work that supports industry in complying with legal requirements, encourages those who are complying with the law and takes a robust enforcement line with those who are not.

The plan of work is a mix of inspection, investigation, enforcement and other activities. Inspections are targeted at high-risk work and where health and safety standards are poor, such as refurbishment work, asbestos removal and smaller sites. This is supported by a range of other work including interventions with trade bodies, clients and others in the supply chain to promote good practice; the provision of guidance through the HSE website and its publications; and support for the Working Well Together campaign which delivers key health and safety messages to construction workers.

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many full-time equivalent staff were employed on consultancy contracts in his Department on the latest date for which figures are available; how many such staff were employed on the same date 12 months ago; and if he will make a statement. [132217]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 648W

Mr Hoban: DWP (core Department and its agencies) does not employ consultants on a full-time staff equivalent basis.

Consultancy services are delivered on a project basis, usually for a fixed fee following delivery of defined outcomes or deliverables. The consultancy supplier is responsible for providing appropriate resource.

Disability Living Allowance

Mrs McGuire: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many disability living allowance claimants have carers claiming carer's allowance. [133151]

Esther McVey: The available information is published in a response to a Freedom of Information request. This can be found on the Department's website at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/foi-2270-2012.pdf

Employment and Support Allowance

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions which recipients of employment and support allowance will be exempted from referral to mandatory community benefit work placements under the Mandatory Work Activity scheme. [133758]

Mr Hoban: Employment and support allowance claimants are not referred to the Mandatory Work Activity Scheme—it is exclusively for jobseeker's allowance claimants.

Employment Schemes

Mr McCann: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people are undertaking mandatory work activity at (a) Google, (b) Amazon and (c) Starbucks. [132666]

Mr Hoban: The Department does not hold information on the number of MWA places undertaken with particular placement providers. However, the Department specifies that all placements under the mandatory work activity (MWA) scheme must be of benefit to the local community. Consequently, the vast majority of MWA placements will be outside the private sector.

Employment Schemes: Young People

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Croydon Central of 10 September 2012, Official Report, column 85W, on youth unemployment: London, what funding model his Department has adopted for providers participating in the Day One Support for Young People Trailblazer. [133528]

Mr Hoban: The payment model used in the Day One Support for Young People trailblazer comprises three separate payments:

(1) a start fee (30% of the contract value, paid when a claimant starts work placement)

(2) a completion fee (30% of the contract value, paid when a claimant has been either in employment or on placement for 13 weeks)

17 Dec 2012 : Column 649W

(3) a job outcome fee (40% of the contract value, paid when a claimant has been in work for 26 out of 30 weeks).

More detail can be found in the Day One Support for Young People Trailblazer Specification at the following link:

http://www.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/Common/View%20Notice.aspx?site-1000&lang=en&NoticeId=744579

Housing Benefit

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people his Department estimates will be affected (a) nationally and (b) in each local authority area by planned changes to housing benefit eligibility for people under-occupying social housing. [133391]

Steve Webb: We estimate around 660,000 working age housing benefit claimants will be affected by the social housing under-occupation measure.

We are not able to estimate the impact of this measure at a local authority area level, but regional impacts can be found in the impact assessment:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Paul Goggins: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the administrative costs are of a (a) new claim and (b) change of circumstance within an existing claim for housing benefit. [133959]

Steve Webb: Claims for housing benefit are administered by local authorities. The Department does not hold details of the administrative costs of a housing benefit new claim or change of circumstances.

Housing Benefit: Wales

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what his most recent estimate is of the number of individuals in Wales who will lose housing benefit under the new under-occupancy rules for social housing by (a) county, (b) those in receipt of benefit, (c) those in full-time employment and (d) those in part-time employment from April 2013. [133493]

Steve Webb: Impacts of the under-occupancy measure at a regional level can be found in the impact assessment:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

We estimate around 40,000 working age housing benefit claimants in Wales will be affected by the social housing under-occupation measure at the time of its introduction in 2013-14.

The further breakdowns requested are not available.

Housing Benefit: Young People

Mr Woodward: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people under the age of 25 in St Helens South and Whiston constituency received (a) housing benefit and (b) local housing allowance in each of the last five years. [133530]

Steve Webb: The information requested is available for data from June 2012 onwards on a new visualisation tool Stat-Xplore published at:

17 Dec 2012 : Column 650W

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Hyperactivity

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder as their primary medical condition received (a) employment and support allowance and (b) disability living allowance in (i) Vauxhall constituency and (ii) England and Wales since May 2010. [131481]

Mr Hoban: Information on how many people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as their primary medical condition received employment and support allowance is not available.

The available information on the number of recipients of disability living allowance (DLA) with ADHD as main disabling condition by area since May 2010 to February 2012 is shown in the following table:

 Area
 EnglandWalesVauxhall parliamentary constituency

May 2010

34,530

2,560

30

May 201

44,150

3,250

40

February 2012

48,750

3,650

40

Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 2. Figures do not include people with entitlement where the payment has been suspended for example if they are in hospital. 3. A diagnosed medical condition does not mean that someone is automatically entitled to DLA. Entitlement is dependent on an assessment of how much help someone needs with personal care and/or mobility because of their disability. For example, a customer would not be awarded DLA on the basis of a diagnosis of ADHD; the decision is based upon the care/supervision and difficulty getting around as a result of the substance dependency and any associated physical or psychological complications. These statistics are only collected for administrative purposes. 4. February 2012 data are the latest available data. Source: DWP Information Governance and Security Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study

Jobseeker's Allowance: Young People

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people aged between 18 and 24 were claiming jobseeker's allowance in (a) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (b) East Yorkshire and (c) Yorkshire and the Humber in October (i) 2009, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2011 and (iv) 2012. [134020]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on jobseeker's allowance by age and area are available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/index.php?page=tabtool

Guidance for users is available at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/asd1/tabtools/guidance.pdf

Motor Neurone Disease

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) what procedures are to be put in place to ensure that sufferers from Motor Neurone Disease are not disadvantaged by the introduction of personal independence payments and universal credits; [133565]

(2) what representations he has received on the treatment of Motor Neurone Disease under the new system of personal independence payments and universal credits. [133591]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 651W

Esther McVey: The personal independence payment assessment will not consider which impairments an individual has—labelling them simply on this basis—but how this impacts on their everyday lives. It will consider an individual's personal circumstances and the support they need, rather than basing eligibility on any medical condition.

During the initial data gather, claimants are not asked about their condition but only give basic personal details including their name, date of birth, national insurance number, nationality, full address including post code, daytime telephone number and bank or building society account details. If they are unable to make the call themselves, someone else can make the call for them provided the claimant is present with the caller. They can also have a supporter present with them at the consultation who is able to contribute to the discussion. If necessary, someone can be appointed to act for the claimant on either a temporary or a permanent basis.

Additionally, should the claimant be identified as being in a vulnerable situation, arrangements are in place that allow for a DWP Visiting Officer to assist the claimant in completing both the initial phone call and the ‘How your disability affects you’ form.

To date there has been one representation received on the treatment of Motor Neurone Disease under the new system of personal independence payments.

National Employment Savings Trust Scheme

Gregg McClymont: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the implications for his policy on small pension pots of the ban on transfers from the National Employment Savings Trust. [133259]

Steve Webb: The Department for Work and Pensions is continuing to work closely with the pensions industry and other interested parties, including NEST, to develop the automatic transfer proposals and to understand how they might be implemented.

The assumption is that NEST would be able to participate in any system for automatic transfers that may be introduced, and this was the basis of the Government's analysis in the response to the small pots consultation. This would require the current transfer restrictions on NEST to be lifted.

DWP has published a call for evidence on the impact on NEST of the transfer restrictions and the annual contribution limit. Details can be found on the DWP website at

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/consultations/2012/nest-auto-enrolment.shtml

The call for evidence ends on 28 January 2013.

Occupational Pensions

Gregg McClymont: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people would be excluded from the new workplace pensions scheme if the income trigger for auto-enrolment were to rise from £8,105 to £9,440. [133263]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 652W

Steve Webb: We estimate that there are 11 million workers eligible for automatic enrolment into a workplace pension of whom 37% are women.

Raising the value of the earnings threshold at which individuals become eligible for automatic enrolment, from £8,105 to £9,440 would exclude around 420,000 individuals, of whom 320,000 are women.

Anyone who is not automatically enrolled because of an increase in the earnings threshold will retain the right to opt in. If they earn above the lower limit of the qualifying earnings band, which currently stands at £5,564, they will also get an employer contribution. Employers are required to provide information about these opt-in rights to individuals.

Gregg McClymont: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the income tax threshold will be for auto-enrolment. [133265]

Steve Webb: The automatic enrolment earnings trigger determines who saves. The qualifying earnings band sets minimum contribution levels for money purchase schemes. These thresholds must be reviewed each year, and revised if appropriate, taking into account the prevailing rates of national insurance contributions, PAYE personal tax allowance, basic state pension, price and earnings inflation and any other factors that the Secretary of State considers appropriate.

The Government’s response to the consultation on the 2013-14 review and revision of earning thresholds for automatic enrolment will be published today, and I will place a copy of it in the House Libraries. These papers will also be available on the Department’s website at:

www.dwp.gov.uk/consultations

Pension Credit: Merseyside

Alison McGovern: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people in (a) Wirral South constituency and (b) Merseyside receive pension credit; and what the average weekly payment is. [134056]

Steve Webb: The information requested is in the following table:

 Number in receipt of pension creditAverage weekly payment (£)

Wirral South constituency

2,850

53.04

Wirral

17,240

57.11

Notes: 1. Figures for the metropolitan county of Merseyside are not available figures provided are for Wirral local authority area and Wirral South constituency. 2. Case load figures are rounded to the nearest 10. 3. Household recipients are those people who claim pension credit either for themselves or on behalf of themselves and a partner. Source: DWP Information Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study 100% data

Poverty

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many (a) children and (b) elderly people live in poverty. [133756]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 653W

Esther McVey: The Child Poverty Act 2010 sets four income-based UK-wide targets to be met by 2020. The targets are based on the proportion of children living in households with relative low income, combined low income and material deprivation, absolute low income and persistent poverty (all before housing costs have been taken into account).

The number of children in poverty based on relative, absolute and combined low income and material deprivation measures for 2010/11 can be found in Tables 4.3tr, 4.4tr and 4.5tr (found on pages 104, 105 and 106 respectively) of the Households Below Average Income series published at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/hbai/hbai2011/index.php?page=contents

The percentage of children in persistent poverty for 2005-08 can be found in Table A4 (found on page 78) of the Low Income Dynamics publication at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/hbai/low_income/low_income_dynamics_1991-2008.pdf

Income matters but considering this in isolation fails to properly reflect the reality of child poverty in the UK today. We are very interested in developing better measurements of child poverty which include income but provide a more accurate picture of the reality of child poverty and are seeking a wide range of views as part of a consultation on how best to measure child poverty.

Estimates of pensioner poverty are also published in the Households Below Average Income series. The most commonly used measure of pensioner poverty relates to those people with income below 60% of contemporary median income, after housing costs. This is often referred to as relative poverty.

The information is already published and can be found in Table 6.3tr (on page 208) of the Households Below Average Income series published at:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/hbai/hbai2011/index.php?page=contents

17 Dec 2012 : Column 654W

Social Security Benefits

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will assess whether the methodology used in his Department's January 2012 study of Nationality at point of National Insurance number registration of DWP benefit claimants to estimate the number of non-UK nationals who claimed for some working age benefits could be used to identify the number of non-UK nationals who claim (a) working tax credit and (b) housing benefit; and if he will undertake such an analysis. [133977]

Mr Hoban: Working tax credits are the responsibility of Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

The data to undertake the analysis suggested for housing benefit are not currently available in a suitable format and could be produced only with a new methodology and at disproportionate cost. We have no plans to undertake this work.

Looking forward, the Government will be recording nationality and immigration status of migrants who make a claim to universal credit.

Social Security Benefits: Greater London

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to his answer of 29 November 2012, Official Report, column 489W, on social security benefit: Greater London, what his most recent estimate is of the number of households in each borough of London whose weekly income will be reduced by (a) less than £20, (b) between £20 and £39.99, (c) between £40 and £59.99, (d) between £60 and £79.99, (e) between £80 and £99.99 and (f) over £100 through the operation of the benefit cap. [134085]

Mr Hoban: The following table shows for how many households in each borough of London the weekly reduction in benefit will be (a) less than £20, (b) between £20 and £39.99, (c) between £40 and £59.99, (d) between £60 and £79.99, (e) between £80 and £99.99 and (f) over £100.

Number
Local authorityLess than £20Between £20 to £39.99Between £40 to £59.99Between £60 to £79.99Between £80 to £99.99Over £100Total

Barking and Dagenham

100

200

100

*

*

300

800

Barnet

100

200

*

*

*

400

900

Bexley

*

*

*

*

*

*

300

Brent

300

400

100

200

300

1,100

2,500

Bromley

*

*

*

*

*

*

300

Camden

200

200

*

*

*

200

800

City of London

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Croydon

100

100

200

*

*

300

900

Ealing

300

200

200

200

100

700

1,700

Enfield

200

300

200

100

200

900

1,900

Greenwich

100

100

*

*

*

100

500

Hackney

300

100

200

*

*

400 ¦

1,200

Hammersmith and Fulham

100

*

*

*

*

300

700

Haringey

100

100

200

*

*

500

1,100

Harrow

*

*

*

*

*

300

700

Havering

*

*

*

*

*

*

300

Hillingdon

100

*

*

100

*

300

700

Hounslow

100

*

*

*

*

200

600

Islington

200

200

*

*

*

300

800

Kensington and Chelsea

*

200

*

*

*

300

700

17 Dec 2012 : Column 655W

17 Dec 2012 : Column 656W

Kingston upon Thames

*

*

*

*

*

*

200

Lambeth

100

*

100

*

*

200

700

Lewisham

100

100

100

*

*

300

700

Merton

*

*

*

*

*

*

300

Newham

300

200

200

200

100

600

1,600

Redbridge

100

200

*

100

*

400

1,000

Richmond upon Thames

*

*

*

*

*

*

100

Southwark

*

*

*

*

*

100

500

Sutton

*

*

*

*

*

*

200

Tower Hamlets

200

200

200

100

*

500

1,300

Waltham Forest

100

100

*

100

*

300

800

Wandsworth

100

100

100

*

*

400

900

Westminster

200

500

*

*

200

800

1,700

Total

4,300

4,700

3,000

2,600

2,300

10,800

27,600

Note: Rounded to the nearest 100. Areas with fewer than 100 households affected are denoted by "*", as additional disclosure control has been applied to these areas. For this reason, figures may not round to the total number of households affected in London.

The figures presented above are consistent with the recent Impact Assessment published on 16 July 2012. In making these estimates we assume that the situation of these households will go unchanged, and they will not take any steps to either work enough hours to qualify for working tax credit, renegotiate their rent in situ, or find alternative accommodation. In all cases the Department is working to support households through this transition, using existing provision through Jobcentre Plus and the Work Programme to move as many into work as possible. Therefore, please note that these figures are subject to change prior to the policy being implemented in April 2013.

The recent disregarding of housing costs for those in supported exempt accommodation announced in the autumn statement of 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-882, cannot be allocated geographically therefore this has not been removed from the estimates presented here. This will reduce the figures in local authorities based on where these households are.

Social Security Benefits: Uprating

Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he expects to bring forward primary legislation to change the method of benefit uprating; and if he will make a statement. [133269]

Steve Webb: The Chancellor of the Exchequer, the right hon. Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), announced in his autumn statement of 5 December 2012, Official Report, columns 871-82, that the main rates of the majority of working age benefits and tax credits would increase by 1% in 2013-14. This will be achieved under existing legislation. A Bill to extend this for a further two years will be introduced shortly.

Unemployment

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he has made an assessment of the number of people who are currently underemployed in (a) Coventry, (b) the West Midlands and (c) England. [132920]

Mr Hoban: The number of people in the specified areas who want to work more hours either in their current job, or by taking a new or additional job, are shown in the table. This group represents a minority of the work force, with nine out of 10 people saying they do not want additional hours.

The figures include people who say they would accept longer hours in their current job if the opportunity arose, in addition to those who are actively seeking extra hours. They also include people already working full-time (up to 47 hours per week) who still express a preference for more hours.

The UK has a flexible labour market in which six million to seven million people start a new job or change jobs every year and the range of new jobs coming up is very wide. This dynamism and diversity ensures most people can find a job that suits their particular needs. A job that does not initially provide as many hours as a person wants can provide valuable skills and experience and be a stepping stone to more hours when their employer is able to offer them, or by using the experience gained to move to a different job.

Number in employment willing to work more hours(1)
 Number (Thousand)

England

2,246

West Midlands

227

Coventry

13

(1) Workers are defined as underemployed if willing to work more hours, either by working in an additional job, working more hours in their current job, or switching to a replacement job. They must also be available to start working longer hours within two weeks, and their current weekly hours must be below 40 hours if they are aged between 16 and 18 and below 48 hours if they are aged over 18. Notes: 1. Estimates are based on small sample sizes and should be treated with caution. 2. Estimates have been rounded to the nearest thousand. Source: ONS, Annual Population Survey dataset, October 2010 to September 2011.

Unemployment Benefits

Mr David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people have been in receipt of out-of-work benefits for (a) one year, (b) two years and (c) three years in (i) Haltemprice and Howden constituency, (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber and (iii) England. [134021]

17 Dec 2012 : Column 657W

Mr Hoban: The following table shows the number of people in receipt of out of work benefit in Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency, Yorkshire and the Humber and England by duration:

AreaAllUp to 1 year1 to 2 years2 to 3 years

England

2,550,210

1,799,170

500,540

250,500

Jobseekers Allowance

1,332,520

1,071,420

213,080

48,020

Incapacity Benefits

823,290

531,760

168,960

122,570

Lone Parents

302,400

139,460

96,390

66,550

Carers

52,400

24,960

16,480

10,960

Other Income Related Benefits

39,580

31,570

5,620

2,390

     

Yorkshire and the Humber

300,050

214,330

57,970

27,750

Jobseekers Allowance

166,300

132,410

27,600

6,290

Incapacity Benefits

89,990

59,240

17,720

13,030

Lone Parents

32,590

15,610

10,140

6,840

Carers

6,350

3,090

1,880

1,380

Other Income Related Benefits

4,830

4,000

620

210

     

Haltemprice and Howden parliamentary constituency

2,230

1,640

400

190

Jobseekers Allowance

1,340

1,090

210

40

Incapacity Benefits

660

420

120

120

Lone Parents

180

90

60

30

Carers

40

20

10

10

Other Income Related Benefits

20

20

Notes: 1. Caseload figures are rounded to the nearest 10 and totals may not sum due to rounding. “—” Denotes nil or negligible. 2. Statistical Group is a hierarchical variable. A person who fits into more than one category will only appear in the top-most. 3. Out of work benefits which are included in this analysis are: Jobseekers Allowance Employment and Support Allowance Incapacity Benefit and Severe Disablement Allowance Income Support 4. Incapacity benefit was replaced by employment and support allowance (ESA) for new claims from October 2008. 5. Durations shown are the longest claim duration of the benefits of interest. 6. The duration of claim reflects the longest out-of-work benefit claim for each person: For the Jobseekers statistical group this will be the length of the JSA claim. For the lone parent, carer, and others on income related benefit statistical groups this will be the length of the IS claim. For the ESA and incapacity benefits claim this will be the length of the IB/SDA or ESA claim if the person is only claiming that benefit, or the oldest of either the IB/SDA/ESA and IS claim if the person is claiming a combination of these benefits. Source: DWP Information, Governance and Security Directorate: Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study.

Universal Credit

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions with reference to paragraph 2.66 of the Autumn Statement 2012, what estimate he has made of the number of households that will be exempt from the household benefit cap as a result of the decision to disregard housing payments for those in supported exempt accommodation for the purpose of the benefit cap. [133481]

Mr Hoban: Figures approved by the Office for Budget Responsibility estimate that this change will reduce the

17 Dec 2012 : Column 658W

total amount of households affected by the cap by around 2,000 to 54,000 and reduce the savings by around £10 million to £265 million. While disregarding housing costs for these households does not exempt them per se, there will be very few who remain affected by the cap.

This estimate is on a consistent basis to the existing impact assessment published 16 July 2012:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/benefit-cap-wr2011-ia.pdf