Number of finished admission episodes (FAEs)(1) and mean and median time waited(2) (days) for providers within London Strategic Health Authority (SHA) of treatment, for knee replacement procedures(3) for 2011-12
  Days
Provider nameTotal FAEs (number)Mean time waitedMedian time waited

All provider trusts within London SHA

7,753

101.9

92

14 Jan 2013 : Column 619W

14 Jan 2013 : Column 620W

    

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

295

145.5

140

Barnet And Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

363

106.5

88

Barts and The London NHS Trust

225

108.9

102

BMI—Bishops Wood

17

BMI—Chelsfield Park Hospital

38

BMI—Shirley Oaks Hospital

17

BMI—The Blackheath Hospital

25

BMI—The Clementine Churchill Hospital

78

238.0

238

BMI—The Garden Hospital

6

BMI—The Kings Oak Hospital

*

BMI—The London Independent Hospital

15

BMI—The Sloane Hospital

17

BMI—The Cavell Hospital

27

83.4

42

Chelsea And Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

180

107.0

102

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

*

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

159

84.3

84

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,452

85.1

85

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

449

66.8

57

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

102

92.4

69

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

274

164.5

167

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

187

124.4

121

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

*

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

211

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

147

158.2

133

North East London Treatment Centre Care UK

388

53.2

42

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

190

123.4

112

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

331

132.5

144

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

172

152.7

162

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

492

84.5

79

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

773

130.8

122

Spire Roding Hospital

35

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

64

90.3

89

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

233

87.0

90

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

124

108.0

106

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

227

68.0

63

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

149

98.6

92

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

286

93.9

93

(1) Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) Time waited (days) Time waited (days) statistics from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are not the same as published referral to treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. (3) Main procedure The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (e.g. time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Notes: Total admissions with eligible time waited information The total number of eligible admissions from which the mean and median time waited are derived. This includes waiting list and booked admissions, but not planned admissions. A waiting list admission is one in which a patient has been admitted electively into hospital from a waiting list, having been given no date of admission at the time a decision to admit was made. Booked admissions are those in which the patient was admitted electively having been given a date at the time it was decided to admit. Planned admissions are excluded as they are usually part of a planned sequence of clinical care determined mainly on clinical criteria, which, for example, could require a series of events, perhaps taking place every three months, six months or annually. Because of this the number of episodes used to generate the mean and median time waited is likely to be lower than the number of FAEs reported in the table. 2. To protect patient confidentiality, figures between 1 and 5 have been replaced with “*” (an asterisk). Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Medicine: Education

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to the public purse of training provided to an undergraduate medical student who graduates in 2013 is. [134207]

Dr Poulter: The cost of training an undergraduate medical student varies widely across organisations and the Department does not collect information in this way. However, the Personal Social Services Research Unit at the University of Kent estimates that the average cost of training an undergraduate medical student in

14 Jan 2013 : Column 621W

2011 was £261,000. This figure reflects the total cost of training and therefore includes costs funded through the public purse and by the student.

This figure includes the costs of tuition; infrastructure costs (such as libraries); costs or benefits from clinical placement activities, and lost production costs during the period of training where staff are away from their posts, as follows:

£56,000 for tuition;

£57,000 for living expenses/lost production costs; and

£147,000 for clinical placements.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the over-supply of UK graduate medical students to the Foundation Programme in 2013. [134208]

Dr Poulter: The UK Foundation Programme Office, that manages recruitment to the Foundation Programme, has alerted the four UK Health Departments and Health Education England that it is likely the programmes available for August 2013 will be over-subscribed.

We are committed to ensuring that all graduates in the United Kingdom receive a place on a foundation training programme in 2013.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to manage any over-supply of UK graduate medical students to the Foundation Programme. [134209]

Dr Poulter: The four UK Health Departments and Health Education England are considering urgently how to manage any over-supply in advance of the receipt of accurate information on the numbers involved.

We are committed to ensuring that all graduates in the United Kingdom receive a place on a foundation training programme in 2013.

Meningitis: Vaccination

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what consideration of (a) medical, (b) educational and (c) societal costs are made in cost-benefit analyses of the funding of meningococcal B vaccinations. [136047]

Anna Soubry: A study on the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal B vaccination strategies is in preparation to support consideration about a possible meningococcal B vaccination programme by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI)—the independent expert committee that provides advice to Government on immunisation.

Development of the study will include assessment of evidence on the epidemiology and carriage of different meningococcal serogroup B strains, the possible efficacy of the vaccine and its coverage against serogroup B strains, the safety of the vaccine, the costs of treating meningococcal serogroup B disease, the costs of treating the long-term conditions that result from this disease, as well as the quality and length of life of affected individuals.

14 Jan 2013 : Column 622W

When assessing cost-effectiveness, JCVI follows the criteria and methodology of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Assessment of cost-effectiveness is based on the impact on the quality and length of life of those affected by the disease and the impact on national health service resources. Hence, it includes the costs of health and social care for the affected individual as well as reductions in their quality of life. However, wider societal costs are not considered.

Mental Health Services

Paul Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 7 January 2013, Official Report, column 105W, on mental health services, if he will place in the Library the figures for each primary care trust of the investment in adult mental health for 2010-11 and 2011-12 per weighted head; and if he will make a statement. [136368]

Norman Lamb: This information is not held by the Department. The National Survey of Investment in Mental Health Services, although commissioned by the Department, is produced by the company, Mental Health Strategies. You may wish to approach them directly for the information.

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Health which Minister in his Department has responsibility for the provision of couples therapy under the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme. [136501]

Norman Lamb: The provision of couple therapy for depression under the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme is within my area of responsibility.

Neurogenesis

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research his Department has commissioned or evaluated on the effects of (a) environmental factors, (b) learning and (c) stress on neurogenesis. [136226]

Dr Poulter: The Department has not commissioned or evaluated research specifically on the effects of environmental factors, learning and stress on neurogenesis.

The Department's National Institute for Health Research welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including applied health research on factors impacting on neurogenesis. These applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the scientific quality of the proposals made.

Current research relevant to neurogenesis funded by the Research Councils includes a £1.5 million grant awarded by the Medical Research Council for research on genomic imprinting and the epigenetic control of developmental processes.

NHS Foundation Trusts: Dorset

Mr Chope: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the total cost was to (a) the Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and (b) Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust of the application to merge the two hospital trusts, to 31 December

14 Jan 2013 : Column 623W

2012; and what estimate he has made of any additional costs to be incurred by each trust before the merger application is determined by the Competition Commission. [136968]

Dr Poulter: The information is not held by the Department.

This is a matter for the Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust.

We have written to the trusts' chairs, Jane Stichbury and Angela Schofield, informing them of your enquiry. They will reply shortly and copies of the letters will be placed in the Library.

Nutrition

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has made an assessment of the Which? report entitled A Taste for Change: Food Companies assessed for action to enable healthier choices, published in December 2012; and if he will make it his policy to implement the report's recommendations through clear and measurable targets in the Responsibility Deal and by bringing forward legislative proposals where insufficient action is taken voluntarily. [135949]

Anna Soubry: We have noted the Which? report. Our policy is clear—to take wide-ranging action to create a food environment which helps people make healthier food choices and eat more healthily. This includes action through Change4Life and through the Responsibility Deal. We are committed to working through voluntary action with business. Business is already taking action and the forward work programme of the RD Food Network covers many of the areas highlighted by Which? We have made clear that while we believe the current approach is the right way forward we have not ruled out legislation, where appropriate.

Pain

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 December 2012, Official Report, column 891W, on chronic illnesses, (a) how many and (b) what proportion of people live with chronic pain in each region. [136221]

Norman Lamb: Estimates of the number and proportion of people living with chronic pain for each strategic health authority (SHA) in England are given in the following table, based on the prevalence estimates from the 2011 Health Survey for England. Differences in prevalence between SHA populations are not statistically significant after adjusting for differences in age profile.

Prevalence of chronic pain by strategic health authority in England, 2011
Persons, age 16 and over
 Estimated prevalence
 PercentageMillion

North East

37

0.8

North West

34

1.9

Yorkshire and the Humber

37

1.6

East Midlands

37

1.4

West Midlands

37

1.7

East of England

36

1.7

14 Jan 2013 : Column 624W

London

28

1.8

South East Coast

33

1.2

South Central

33

1.1

Southwest

34

1.5

   

England

34

14.7

Chronic pain is defined as pain or discomfort which currently troubles an individual either all of the time or on and off, and which has lasted for more than three months.

Sources:

1. Mid-year 2011 population figures from ‘GP registered populations by SHA’, Health and Social Care Information Centre, derived from 2001 census data.

2. Prevalence estimates from the Health Survey for England 2011, Chapter 9 Table 9.2.

Phenytoin

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effects of the increase in cost of the Epanutin form of phenytoin sodium. [136375]

Norman Lamb: The Department has estimated the additional cost to the national health service, from the repricing of the Epanutin form of phenytoin sodium, to be around £44 million per annum. We have considered this cost in the context of the overall drugs bill, the dynamics of the medicines market, with prices rising and falling in response to supply and demand, and the potential additional costs to the NHS through adverse reactions and reduced patient outcomes if supply is interrupted.

Radiotherapy

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) which NHS organisation he proposes will be responsible for commissioning the workforce for radiotherapy services; [135954]

(2) what funding the Government plan to make available for the purchase of new linear accelerators up to 2016. [135955]

Anna Soubry: “Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer”, published on 12 January 2011 set out a commitment to expand radiotherapy capacity by investing over £150 million in additional funding up to 2014-15. The Government has yet to set spending plans beyond 2014-15 and these will be subject to a future spending review.

This money is provided to commissioners through baseline allocations, and commissioners can use this funding to purchase additional radiotherapy services from providers through locally negotiated tariffs or other payment mechanisms. Providers may use this income to purchase additional radiotherapy equipment to meet the increased demand.

14 Jan 2013 : Column 625W

To encourage the national health service to update the existing medical technology infrastructure, the Department also established a £300 million fund in March 2012 to bulk purchase medical equipment, such as radiotherapy equipment, and achieve better prices for the NHS. The fund is operated by NHS Supply Chain.

At present, strategic health authorities plan the workforce required to deliver health care services, including radiotherapy services. From April 2013, Health Education England (HEE) assumes national leadership for a new system of planning and developing the entire health and care workforce. HEE, supported by local education and training boards (LETBs), will ensure that the shape and skills of the future health and care workforce evolves to sustain high quality health outcomes for patients. All LETBs will commission the workforce for such services.

Respiratory Disease

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what reason respiratory disease was not included in the NHS Commissioning Board's list of strategic clinical networks; and what consideration he has given to assigning to an individual responsibility for strategic oversight of improvements in outcomes for respiratory patients in the NHS. [136304]

Dr Poulter: The first strategic clinical networks were chosen by the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB) using criteria developed with input from a broad range of stakeholders. In summary, the chosen conditions and patient groups are ones where:

a large scale change is required across complex pathways of care involving many professional groups and organisations and strategic clinical networks are the best approach to planning and delivering services; and

a co-ordinated, combined improvement approach is needed to overcome certain health challenges, which have not responded previously to other improvement efforts.

The NHS CB has made it clear that as priorities change, or when the work of one of the initial strategic clinical networks concludes, the board will identify new conditions or patient groups that would benefit from a strategic clinical network approach.

In addition to strategic clinical networks, the NHS CB expects that some local clinical networks will also be established in the new health system. These are likely to be supported by clinical commissioning groups and providers and established to support the delivery of local priorities and ways of working.

The NHS CB is currently in the process of recruiting a National Clinical Director for respiratory diseases.

Royal Bournemouth Hospital

Mr Chope: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the cost has been of reconfiguring the maternity unit at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital so that it can accommodate women's health patients; and what the estimated cost will be of restoring the previous layout after three months as planned under current arrangements; [136969]

(2) how many first-time mothers of babies born at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital (a) left hospital on

14 Jan 2013 : Column 626W

the day of birth,

(b)

left hospital on the second day following birth,

(c)

stayed in the hospital for more than two days and

(d)

were transferred to Poole General Hospital in 2012; [136970]

(3) how many mothers received post-natal support at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital in 2012; and how many mothers are expected to receive that support in 2013; [137138]

(4) when the decision was taken to remove six of the eight post natal beds at the Royal Bournemouth Hospital; and what consultation on this decision was carried out in advance with (a) staff, (b) governors and (c) patient groups. [137139]

Dr Poulter: This is a matter for the Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

We have written to the trust's Chair, Jane Stichbury, informing her of your inquiries. She will reply shortly and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library.

Schizophrenia

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to improve physical care arrangements for people suffering from schizophrenia; and if he will make a statement. [136031]

Norman Lamb: The NHS Outcomes Framework sets out how the NHS will be held to account for the outcomes it delivers. The framework includes an indicator (indicator 1.5) of the excess under-75 mortality rate in adults with serious mental illness.

Improvements to this indicator will only be possible by improving the care which people with severe mental illness receive to improve their physical health, and to treat physical health problems.

This indicator is also included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework.

The Government have also made clear, through the Secretary of State's Mandate to the NHS Commissioning Board, that we expect mental and physical conditions to be treated in a co-ordinated way, and with equal priority. The mandate sets the NHS Commissioning Board the objective of putting mental health on a par with physical health and closing the health gap between people with mental health problems and the population as a whole.

Improving the physical health of people with mental health problems, including severe mental illness, is one of the six objectives of the Government's mental health strategy. The strategy's Implementation Framework (published in July 2012) sets out specific actions which a wide range of local organisations can take to improve the physical health of people with mental health problems.

Further to this, on 18 December, following reports from the Schizophrenia Commission and the National Audit of Schizophrenia, I convened a roundtable meeting with a number of leading stakeholders from health, social care and third sectors to establish how to improve care for people with schizophrenia, including the issue of how to improve their physical health. The group will be reconvening again later this year in order to update on progress.

14 Jan 2013 : Column 627W

Sick Leave

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 12 December 2012, Official Report, column 361W, on sick leave, if he will make an assessment of the contribution mindfulness-based practice can make to reducing workplace stress and staff absences in his Department. [136204]

Dr Poulter: The Department has not yet made any formal assessment of the contribution mindfulness-based practice can make to reducing work place stress and staff absences in the Department.

However, the Department has signed up to both the Responsibility Deal and Time to Change pledges on mental health. Plans are under way to pilot and evaluate a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction programme across two Directorates in the Department over the course of the coming months as one of the proposed measures for delivering against these pledges.

The evaluation will inform decisions about further roll out. The Department's health and well-being strategy and programme of activities for staff includes a mental health policy and a variety of activities to aid emotional well-being. The Employee Assistance Programme offers counselling support, which draws on cognitive behavioural techniques closely related to mindfulness-based methods.

Social Services: Fees and Charges

Liz Kendall: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the costs to the public purse of capping an individual's lifetime contribution towards their social care costs at (a) £25,000, (b) £35,000, (c) £50,000, (d) £60,000 and (e) £75,000. [136823]

Norman Lamb: The “Caring for our future: progress report on funding reform” published in July 2012 sets out the cost to Government of different levels of the cap. A copy of the document is available in the Library. Pages 33 and 34 demonstrate the costs of caps set at £25,000 with a £7,000 contribution to general living costs and caps of £35,000, £50,000, £75,000 and £100,000 with a £10,000 contribution to general living costs.

Information on a cap of £60,000 is not available.

Liz Kendall: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many individuals would benefit from capping an individual's lifetime contribution towards their social care costs at (a) £25,000, (b) £35,000, (c) £50,000, (d) £60,000 and (e) £75,000; and what assessment he has made of the distribution of individuals in each income decile. [136824]

Norman Lamb: The “Caring for our Future: progress report on funding reform” was published in July 2012, a copy of which is available in the Library. It sets out the effect of different levels of the cap. Everyone would benefit from a cap, as it provides certainty on the maximum people could pay for their care, enabling them to plan and prepare. The care costs that people face is set out on page 3.

Page 23 sets out the impact of different levels of a cap on individuals by their wealth. This includes the effect on people by quintile.

14 Jan 2013 : Column 628W

We do not have information on the distribution of individuals in each income decile.

South Central Strategic Health Authority: Redundancy

Dr Julian Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) board members, (b) executives and (c) other employees of the South Central Strategic Health Authority have received or will be receiving redundancy packages in excess of (i) £100,000, (ii) £150,000, (iii) £200,000 and (iv) £250,000; if he will list the names or positions of the 20 people receiving the largest payments, together with the sums paid to each; and whether any of those 20 individuals have been or are to be re-employed by the NHS as staff or consultants. [136181]

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not held centrally. I would advise the hon. Member to write to Andrea Young, Chief Operating Officer at NHS South of England for this information.

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

Jim Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what instructions he has given to Ipsos/MORI on its role in compiling the final report of the Trust Special Administrator for the South London Healthcare Trust; and how much Ipsos/MORI is being paid for that work. [135945]

Anna Soubry: The Secretary of State has not given any instructions to Ipsos/MORI with regard to any content within the final report of the Trust Special Administrator (TSA) laid before Parliament and published on 8 January 2013. The report can be found at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2013/01/south-london-healthcare/

The TSA appointed to South London Healthcare NHS Trust has worked independently of the Government in developing recommendations for the Secretary of State for a clinically and financially sustainable solution to the financial challenges faced by South London Healthcare NHS Trust. Ipsos/MORI were appointed to support the TSA's consultation process.

Funding to support the work of the TSA has been provided centrally by the Department. How it is used has been a matter for the TSA. Final costs are being confirmed but we are informed by the Office of the TSA that the cost of Ipsos/MORI's work for the TSA is expected to be in the region of £225,000.

Streptococcus

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what evidence the National Screening Committee used to support its decision not to introduce routine screening for group B streptococcus carriage in pregnant women; [136016]

(2) what assessment he has made of the reasons for the rise in reported cases of group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies; [136017]

(3) what target his Department has set for reducing group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies; [136018]

14 Jan 2013 : Column 629W

(4) what steps his Department plans to take to reduce the incidence of group B streptococcus infection in newborn babies. [136019]

Dr Poulter: The UK National Screening Committee (UK NSC) advises Ministers and the national health service in all four United Kingdom countries about all aspects of screening policy, including screening policy for group B streptococcus (GBS) carriage in pregnancy. On 13 November 2012 the UK NSC recommended that a national screening programme to test for GBS carriage in pregnancy using the enriched culture medium test should not be offered. This is because there is insufficient evidence to demonstrate that the benefits to be gained from screening all pregnant women and treating those carrying the organism with intravenous antibiotics during labour would outweigh the harms. A copy of the UK NSC's review, ‘Screening for Group B Streptococcal infection in pregnancy’, has been placed in the Library. A copy of the evidence assessed by the UK NSC is referenced in the review.

No assessment has been made by the Department of trends in early onset disease rates, although the latest figures show a drop in disease rates between 2010 and 2011. Laboratories across England, Wales and Northern Ireland submit data to the Health Protection Agency on GBS infection. Submission of data is voluntary, therefore completeness of reporting has varied over time and across different parts of the country.

No target has been set by the Department on GBS infection in newborn babies but we are clear about the importance of taking the right steps to prevent GBS infection at the start of life.

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) published their updated guidelines on prevention of GBS on incidence of GBS infection in neonates in July 2012. The updated guideline took into account new evidence on the prevention of early-onset neonatal GBS disease. It is important that services undertake local clinical audits to ensure the effective use of intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis recommended by the guideline.

14 Jan 2013 : Column 630W

In 2012 the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence published two clinical audit tools which include clinical audit standards, a data collection form and an action plan template for use by services that care for women in labour or for babies at risk of, or being treated for, early on-set neonatal infection.

The Department aims to work together with the NHS, the RCOG, the Royal College of Midwives, the National Institute for Health Research Heath Technology Assessment and the pharmaceutical industry on a number of areas:

the topic of a “point of care” test so that high-risk women can be tested at the start of labour is currently in the Health Technology Assessment prioritisation process and will be worked up for discussion in terms of relative importance, feasibility and noting any other existing and on going research;

development of an implementation tool for use locally to audit current practice and improve implementation of the revised RCOG guideline on the prevention of early-onset neonatal GBS disease;

including GBS as a topic within education and continuing professional development programmes for clinicians and midwives; and

monitoring developments on vaccines against GBS infection.

Surgery: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 18 December 2012, Official Report, column 758W, on surgery: Greater London, how many finished admissions episodes there were and what the (a) mean and (b) median time waited was in days for cholecystectomy procedures in each NHS trust within the London Strategic Health Authority area in (i) 2010-11 and (ii) 2011-12. [135769]

Anna Soubry: The number of finished admission episodes and mean and median time waited (days) for each NHS hospital provider in the London Strategic Health Authority (SHA) area for cholecystectomy procedures during 2010-11 and 2011-12 is shown in the following table.

Number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs)(1) and mean and median time waited(2) (days) for cholecystectomy procedures(3) at each NHS hospital provider in London SHA, 2010-11 and 2011-12
  2010-112011-12
Procedure Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)

Cholecystectomy

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

379

95.2

84

496

115.3

111

 

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

331

59.8

54

308

68.4

62

 

Barts and The London NHS Trust

284

52.9

41

287

53.4

45

 

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

131

71.5

63

182

75.9

59

 

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

220

66.2

53

276

72.1

63

 

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

130

53.9

56

139

65.9

61

 

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

349

72.9

70

431

73.0

70

 

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

*

*

*

14 Jan 2013 : Column 631W

14 Jan 2013 : Column 632W

 

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

196

66.7

62

257

107.9

95

 

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

141

51.8

50

205

84.4

71

 

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

457

71.5

68

437

97.8

86

 

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

259

95.7

73

256

111.8

94

 

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

236

62.3

55

249

59.5

47

 

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

201

0

0

230

0

0

 

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

165

85.8

88

226

99.6

88

 

North East London Treatment Centre Care UK

164

40.0

35

199

33.1

32

 

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

171

116.2

117

203

102.1

97

 

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

327

79.8

77

368

111.6

132

 

Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

*

*

*

0

0

0

 

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

306

80.2

74

267

66.1

58

 

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

760

83.8

65

857

79.2

72

 

Spire Roding Hospital

18

0

0

37

0

0

 

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

198

126.0

126

362

102.8

80

 

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

220

50.4

42

264

51.5

49

 

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

13

17.8

16

6

21.0

23

 

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

178

54.4

45

187

55.0

52

 

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

161

71.3

57

139

66.5

61

 

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

234

62.7

62

220

63.2

56

 

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

208

79.1

73

251

73.9

60

‘*’ = To protect patient confidentiality, counts of between 1 and 5 have been suppressed along with any further figures required to support this suppression. (1) Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2) Time waited (days) Time waited (days) statistics from hospital episode statistics (HES) are not the same as published referral to treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. (3) Main procedure The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (eg time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Note: Total admissions with eligible time waited information The total number of eligible admissions from which the mean and median time waited are derived. This includes waiting list and booked admissions, but not planned admissions. A waiting list admission is one in which a patient has been admitted electively into hospital from a waiting list, having been given no date of admission at the time a decision to admit was made. Booked admissions are those in which the patient was admitted electively having been given a date at the time it was decided to admit. Planned admissions are excluded as they are usually part of a planned sequence of clinical care determined mainly on clinical criteria, which, for example, could require a series of events, perhaps taking place every three months, six months or annually. Because of this the number of episodes used to generate the mean and median time waited is likely to be lower than the number of FAEs reported in the table. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 18 December 2012, Official Report, column 760W, on surgery: Greater London, how many finished admissions episodes there were and what the (a) mean and (b) median time waited was in days for (i) hip replacement, (ii) hysterectomy and (iii) cataract removal procedures in each NHS trust within the London Strategic Health Authority area in (A) 2010-11 and (B) 2011-12. [135770]

14 Jan 2013 : Column 633W

Anna Soubry: The number of finished admission episodes and mean and median time waited (days) for each NHS hospital provider in the London strategic

14 Jan 2013 : Column 634W

health authority (SHA) area for hip replacement, hysterectomy and cataract removal procedures during 2010-11 and 2011-12 is shown in the following tables.

Number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs)(1) and mean and median time waited(2) (days) for hip replacement procedures(3) at each hospital provider in London SHA, 2010-11 and 2011-12, activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
 Procedure: Hip replacement
 2010-112011-12
 Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

435

112.7

114

501

120.3

115

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

591

84.0

70

571

89.0

78

Barts and The London NHS Trust

197

92.4

83

195

92.5

74

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

250

83.0

81

197

77.7

74

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

107

22.0

22

117

107.5

108

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

123

68.7

86

105

70.4

70

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,437

83.1

86

1,436

80.5

81

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

475

120.7

104

556

92.1

72

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

94

73.3

63

99

80.4

64

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

459

81.1

66

438

102.0

93

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

236

116.2

119

223

140.3

139

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

181

20.9

14

185

7.0

7

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

134

0

0

190

0

0

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

111

110.6

104

120

131.9

122

North East London Treatment Centre Care UK

178

44.7

38

231

49.3

40

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

162

120.4

107

170

130.5

117

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

390

95.6

88

299

116.9

111

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

218

111.4

117

224

128.5

139

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

517

69.6

61

590

89.4

77

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

1,026

114.5

114

1,051

126.1

117

Spire Roding Hospital

12

0

0

17

0

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

213

71.3

68

232

70.7

64

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

388

73.9

75

419

92.3

97

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

158

82.9

80

185

96.6

99

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

342

83.2

70

284

83.2

76

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

176

92.9

84

189

93.2

88

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

350

76.9

73

382

91.5

90

(1)Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2)Time waited (days) Time waited (days) statistics from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are not the same as published Referral to Treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. (3)Main procedure The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (e.g. time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Total admissions with eligible time waited information The total number of eligible admissions from which the mean and median time waited are derived. This includes waiting list and booked admissions, but not planned admissions. A waiting list admission is one in which a patient has been admitted electively into hospital from a waiting list, having been given no date of admission at the time a decision to admit was made. Booked admissions are those in which the patient was admitted electively having been given a date at the time it was decided to admit. Planned admissions are excluded as they are usually part of a planned sequence of clinical care determined mainly on clinical criteria, which, for example, could require a series of events, perhaps taking place every three months, six months or annually. Because of this the number of episodes used to generate the mean and median time waited is likely to be lower than the number of FAEs reported in the table. Note: To protect patient confidentiality, counts of between one and five have been suppressed along with any further figures required to support this suppression. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

14 Jan 2013 : Column 635W

14 Jan 2013 : Column 636W

Number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs)(1)and mean and median time waited(2 )(days) for hysterectomy procedures(3 )at each hospital provider in London SHA, 2010-11 and 2011-12, activity in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector
 Procedure: Hysterectomy
 2010-112011-12
 Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

266

85.2

85

245

100.7

106

Barnet And Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

166

57.9

56

153

61.0

53

Barts and The London NHS Trust

275

40.0

25

278

36.8

20

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

151

55.6

55

125

69.5

62

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

119

66.0

56

119

85.3

79

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

56

59.5

60

57

67.2

68

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

192

67.3

69

198

72.3

70

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

331

60.6

27

337

68.5

25

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

111

59.0

52

115

53.7

52

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

315

40.8

18

336

45.4

20

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

195

126.1

129

181

130.2

135

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

145

71.8

64

133

61.2

53

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

107

0

0

111

0

0

Newham University Hospital NHS Trust

80

64.5

53

103

76.6

64

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

123

80.3

72

118

58.3

54

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

183

83.2

80

210

92.7

86

Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

(4)

(4)

(4)

0

0

0

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

66

74.3

57

70

67.2

50

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

531

96.5

94

491

109.8

104

Spire Roding Hospital

25

0

0

25

0

0

St George's Healthcare NHS Trust

180

61.8

38

209

71.9

44

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

118

49.7

47

117

49.0

47

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

121

11.4

8

172

11.9

8

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

97

61.5

55

80

57.5

52

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

297

37.0

9

311

36.2

12

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

57

66.0

61

73

71.4

66

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

163

69.7

68

153

88.8

85

(1)Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year (2)Time waited (days) Time waited (days) statistics from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are not the same as published Referral to Treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. (3)Main procedure The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (e.g. time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. (4) To protect patient confidentiality, counts of between one and five have been suppressed along with any further figures required to support this suppression. Total admissions with eligible time waited information The total number of eligible admissions from which the mean and median time waited are derived. This includes waiting list and booked admissions, but not planned admissions. A waiting list admission is one in which a patient has been admitted electively into hospital from a waiting list, having been given no date of admission at the time a decision to admit was made. Booked admissions are those in which the patient was admitted electively having been given a date at the time it was decided to admit. Planned admissions are excluded as they are usually part of a planned sequence of clinical care determined mainly on clinical criteria, which, for example, could require a series of events, perhaps taking place every three months, six months or annually. Because of this the number of episodes used to generate the mean and median time waited is likely to be lower than the number of FAEs reported in the table. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre

14 Jan 2013 : Column 637W

14 Jan 2013 : Column 638W

Number of finished admissions episodes (FAEs)(1) and mean and median time waited(2) (days) for cataract removal procedures(3) at each NHS London Hospital provider, 2010-11 and 2011-12
 Procedure: Cataract removal
 Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)Total FAEs (number)Mean time waited (days)Median time waited (days)

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,572

87.1

90

2,091

96.2

107

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

523

27.5

22

599

26.6

22

Barts and The London NHS Trust

471

36.1

29

421

40.3

40

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

566

56.2

50

572

69.7

68

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

1,531

74.1

64

2,050

77.3

65

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

1,968

86.9

87

1,734

74.8

73

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust

139

35.5

26

145

31.4

23

Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

1,925

37.7

31

1,956

42.9

32

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

1,989

66.6

64

2,468

52.1

47

King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

2,042

37.4

37

1,889

64.3

61

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

1,791

36.3

31

1,795

50.8

48

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

14,442

64.4

62

14,295

68.3

65

North East London Treatment Centre Care UK

2,053

36.0

35

1,852

51.5

38

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

1,184

91.0

92

1,387

105.3

94

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

870

39.9

41

792

65.9

66

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

3,459

60.0

57

3,120

72.0

69

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

5,200

50.6

49

5,320

63.5

65

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

1,436

61.2

61

1,699

60.8

55

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

320

66.5

62

328

77.3

71

Whipps Cross University Hospital NHS Trust

2,785

46.9

46

2,416

67.0

64

(1)Finished admission episodes A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year. (2)Time waited (days) Time waited (days) statistics from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) are not the same as published Referral to Treatment (RTT) time waited statistics. HES provides counts and time waited for all patients between decision to admit and admission to hospital within a given period. Published RTT waiting statistics measure the time waited between referral and start of treatment. (3)Main procedure The first recorded procedure or intervention in each episode, usually the most resource intensive procedure or intervention performed during the episode. It is appropriate to use main procedure when looking at admission details, (e.g. time waited), but a more complete count of episodes with a particular procedure is obtained by looking at the main and the secondary procedures. Total admissions with eligible time waited information The total number of eligible admissions from which the mean and median time waited are derived. This includes waiting list and booked admissions, but not planned admissions. A waiting list admission is one in which a patient has been admitted electively into hospital from a waiting list, having been given no date of admission at the time a decision to admit was made. Booked admissions are those in which the patient was admitted electively having been given a date at the time it was decided to admit. Planned admissions are excluded as they are usually part of a planned sequence of clinical care determined mainly on clinical criteria, which, for example, could require a series of events, perhaps taking place every three months, six months or annually. Because of this the number of episodes used to generate the mean and median time waited is likely to be lower than the number of FAEs reported in the table. Note: To protect patient confidentiality, counts of between one and five have been suppressed along with any further figures required to support this suppression. Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre