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Gurkhas: Redundancy

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel are liable for redundancy under tranche 3 from the Brigade of Gurkhas; and at what rank such service personnel are. [142690]

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Mr Francois [holding answer 11 February 2013]: The army redundancy programme tranche 3 announcement in January 2013 highlighted the requirement for up to 5,300 personnel to be made redundant. Based on current planning assumptions, this figure includes 304 personnel from the Brigade of Gurkhas. A breakdown by rank is as follows:

 Number

Captain

1

Staff Sergeant

1

Sergeant

9

Corporal

43

Lance Corporal

96

Private

154

These numbers may change in response to changing operational requirements, other emerging business needs, and to maximise the number of applicants. This applies to all redundancy figures under the requirement for tranche 3.

Joint Strike Fighter Aircraft

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost was of the decision to cancel orders for the F-35B joint strike fighter and order the F-35C and then reversing the decision. [142455]

Mr Dunne: There have been no cancellations of orders for the F-35B, or any cancelled orders of the F-35C on the UK F-35 programme as a result of the 2010 strategic defence and security review (SDSR) decision or the subsequent reversal of this decision.

Before the SDSR, the Ministry of Defence had ordered three F-35B aircraft. Two have been delivered and the third will be delivered this year.

Military Aid

Mr Russell Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what partnerships are in place for UK forces to train overseas with other nations. [142987]

Mr Robathan: The UK has a large number of agreements with allies and partners which permit training for military personnel overseas. This ranges from large-scale exercises to individuals participating on military academic training programmes. Regular programmes include both multi-lateral arrangements under the auspices of NATO and bilateral agreements with, for example, US, Canada and Kenya.

Military Bases: USA

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the last time a prosecution was brought using the military land byelaws on the US bases (a) Menwith Hill, (b) Lakenheath, (c) Mildenhall, (d) Molesworth and (e) RAF Fylingdales; and when the last successful prosecution was in each such case. [142279]

Mr Francois: The information in the following table reflects the data held by the Ministry of Defence police:

12 Feb 2013 : Column 633W

StationLast time prosecution broughtSuccessful prosecutions

Menwith Hill

*1

0

Lakenheath

0

n/a

Mildenhall

0

n/a

Molesworth

0

n/a

RAF Fylingdales

0

n/a

* In 2003

The data have been collated from the Ministry of Defence Police Crime and Intelligence recording system which dates back to 1999.

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reasons military land byelaws are being introduced at the American base at RAF Croughton; and what assessment he has made of the use of the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005 as an alternative to such byelaws. [142281]

Mr Francois: Military land byelaws are proposed to be introduced at RAF Croughton to enable controlled public access to military land, where access would otherwise not be permitted due to safety and security concerns. Croughton is already a designated site under the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act 2005, but this prohibits all public access to the designated area and is designed to protect the site against criminal trespass.

The proposed byelaws will dovetail with the Serious Organised Crime and Police Act designation to provide layered protection for the site while allowing access under controlled conditions.

Nuclear Weapons

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether a cost analysis has been done of deferral of the main gate decision on the nuclear deterrent. [143024]

Mr Philip Hammond: As part of the 2010 strategic defence and security review (Cm 7948), the MOD undertook a value-for-money study of the nuclear deterrent. To drive value for money, it was concluded, along with other decisions, that we should extend the life of the current Vanguard class submarines and re-profile the programme to build replacement submarines. It was also concluded that, to deliver the first Successor submarine in 2028, a main gate decision was required around 2016. The changes identified by the value for money review delivered £3.2 billion of savings and deferrals over the subsequent 10 years.

Porton Down: Animal Experiments

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many of the experiments currently being conducted in collaboration with the US at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down would be unlicensed if they took place in the US. [142217]

Mr Dunne: None. It is MOD policy that we will not undertake any work involving the use of animals that could not be undertaken in any other country under their regulatory and legal framework for experimentation on animals.

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Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reasons the research being conducted at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down facility is being shared with the US. [142218]

Mr Dunne: The White Paper, National Security through Technology, (Cmd 8278) recognises that working with another nation allows us to maximise our capabilities, and that collaboration with the US offers access to cutting-edge research and technologies and improved interoperability with our major ally.

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many of the animals which are subjects of research at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down facility have been part of more than (a) one experiment and (b) three experiments. [142219]

Mr Dunne: Of all animals used in experiments during 2011 (the latest year for which Home Office figures are complete), 12 non-human primates were used in more than one experiment but not in more than three experiments.

An additional four non-human primates were used in a single experiment in 2011. These same four animals had previously been used in three experiments in 2010 (four experiments in total). No other species were used in more than one experiment during 2011.

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the origin was of the primates being experimented on at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down. [142220]

Mr Dunne: Overall, a very significant proportion of the non-human primates used by DSTL at Porton Down are bred within the DSTL colony or what was the DSTL colony and now is owned by the Health Protection Agency. This reflects our commitment to animal welfare by ensuring that we take responsibility for the breeding and husbandry of these animals rather than having them transported from around the world. In turn, we can then maximise their environmental enrichment and general care and know that the animals to be used in experimentation are of the highest quality and produced under ethical regimes regulated by the Home Office.

However, in January 2011, and as a result of the closure of the Medical Research Council Unit in Edinburgh, DSTL accepted a total of 39 animals into its care at the DSTL Porton Down colony. Since January 2011, a total of 10 of these animals have been used in experiments conducted at DSTL Porton Down and appropriately returned as such under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 to date.

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many of the animals which are subjects of experiments at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory Porton Down facility have died as a result of those experiments; and how many such animals have been humanely put down in each of the last five years. [142221]

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Mr Dunne: DSTL does not hold a central record of this information as it is not required for submission to the Home Office under the Scientific (Animal Procedures) Act.

Public Expenditure

Mr Russell Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much and what proportion of his Department's budget is allocated to frontline tasks and spending. [142840]

Mr Philip Hammond: There is no standard definition of "front line". However, force elements, key enablers, and standing commitments total around 46% of the budget; another 40% is equipment and support.

Reserve Forces

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the strength is of the Territorial Army and Reserves; and what the projected strength is in January (a) 2014, (b) 2015, (c) 2016, (d) 2017 and (e) 2018. [140810]

Bridget Phillipson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the strength of the reserve forces. [141134]

Mr Francois [holding answers 1 and 5 February 2013]: The Navy's Maritime Reserves (Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Marines Reserve) were at a total strength (trained and untrained) of 2,570 at 1 April 2012 and will grow to a trained strength of 3,100 by 2018.

The Territorial Army was at a total (trained and untrained) strength of 26,640 at 1 April 2012 and will grow to a trained strength of 30,000 by 2018.

The Royal Auxiliary Air Force was at a total strength (trained and untrained) of 1,360 at 1 April 2012 and will grow to a trained strength of 1,800 by April 2018.

A comprehensive statistical breakdown of Reserve strength is provided through Tri-Service Publication (TSP) 7 which can be accessed at the following website:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk

Figures as at 1 April 2013 will be published on 23 May 2013.

Interim targets are subject to ongoing consideration in light of the recent Green Paper consultation.

Reserve Forces: Social Security Benefits

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will put in place measures to monitor the number of reservists who are claimants of Government benefits. [139851]

Mr Francois [holding answer 28 January 2013]: The claiming of benefits is a private matter on which the Ministry of Defence has no requirement to collect information. Where it is the case that policy with respect to a benefit potentially affects members of the armed forces, regular or reserve, the Department will discuss this with the relevant Government Department as necessary.

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Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers: Redundancy

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service personnel are liable for redundancy under tranche 3 from the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers; and at what rank such service personnel are. [142693]

Mr Francois [holding answer 11 February 2013]: The army redundancy programme tranche 3 announcement in January 2013 highlighted the requirement for up to 5,300 personnel to be made redundant. Based on current planning assumptions, this figure includes 461 personnel from the Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers. A breakdown by rank is as follows:

RankNumber of personnel

Lieutenant Colonel

2

Major

4

Warrant Officer Class 2

5

Staff Sergeant

69

Sergeant

87

Corporal

94

Lance Corporal

80

Private

120

These numbers may change in response to changing operational requirements, other emerging business needs, and to maximise the number of applicants. This applies to all redundancy figures under the requirement for tranche 3.

Royal Engineers: Redundancy

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many people are liable for redundancy under tranche 3 from the Corps of Royal Engineers; and at what rank such service personnel are. [142692]

Mr Francois [holding answer 11 February 2013]: The army redundancy programme tranche 3 announcement in January 2013 highlighted the requirement for up to 5,300 personnel to be made redundant. Based on current planning assumptions, this figure includes 804 personnel from the Corps of Royal Engineers. A breakdown by rank is as follows:

RankNumber of personnel

Lieutenant Colonel

8

Captain

18

Warrant Officer Class 1

2

Staff Sergeant

30

Sergeant

23

Corporal

72

Lance Corporal

132

Private

519

These numbers may change in response to changing operational requirements, other emerging business needs, and to maximise the number of applicants. This applies to all redundancy figures under the requirement for tranche 3.

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Staff

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the annual cost is to his Department of the Military Land Byelaws Review Team; how many people are employed in this team; and what the qualifications are of each such staff member. [142280]

Mr Francois: The Defence Infrastructure Organisation Byelaws Review Team consists of five staff at an annual cost of £160,000. There are no specific qualifications required for these positions. The team is additionally supported by Ministry of Defence legal advisers.

Trident

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will estimate the proportion of the new defence equipment budget which would be allocated to Trident replacement in the 2020s should a like-for-like deterrent be commissioned; and if he will make a statement. [141522]

Mr Dunne: The stated total costs for the replacement of nuclear deterrent published in the 2006 White Paper were: £11 billion to £14 billion for the submarine; £2 billion to £3 billion for the warhead; and £2 billion to £3 billion for infrastructure. This totals £15 billion to £20 billion with all costs at 2006-07 constant prices. Current forecast costs indicate that we remain within the 2006 White Paper estimates of £11 billion to £14 billion for the successor platform costs, assuming a four boat fleet. The warhead and infrastructure elements have not yet obtained initial gate approval.

On 18 May 2011, Official Report, column 351, the approval of the future deterrent submarine initial gate was announced. This has given the approval to commence with the assessment phase concluding with a main gate decision in 2016.

As stated in the White Paper, The Future of the United Kingdom's Nuclear Deterrent (Cm 6994) published in December 2006, we expect that once the new fleet of SSBNs comes into service that the in-service costs of the UK's nuclear deterrent, which will include AWE's costs, will be similar to today (around 5% to 6% of the defence budget).

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many meetings (a) he and (b) his Ministers have had on the Trident Alternatives Review. [142563]

Mr Philip Hammond [holding answer 11 February 2013]: The Alternatives Review was established to assist the Liberal Democrats in making the case for alternatives to the Government's policy of maintaining a continuous at-sea submarine-based nuclear deterrent, based on the Trident missile delivery system. The review is led by Cabinet Office officials and overseen by the Chief Secretary to the Treasury.

I have attended one formal meeting on the Alternatives Review. None of my current Ministers have attended any such meetings.

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Veterans: Higher Education

Mr Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the written ministerial statement of 22 January 2013, on armed forces redundancy scheme tranche 3, what support his Department will offer to personnel made redundant who wish to enter further or higher education. [139614]

Mr Francois [holding answer 25 January 2013]: All personnel being made redundant under tranche 3 are eligible to apply for the publicly funded Further and Higher Education (FE/HE) support scheme, subject to them meeting the published criteria, chief among which is being registered for the Enhanced Learning Credit (ELC) scheme.

The ELC scheme complements the existing Standard Learning Credit scheme which provides financial support to personnel while still serving. ELC assists eligible personnel with payment towards the cost of higher-level learning, level 3 or above on the National Qualifications Framework or Qualifications and Credit Framework. Personnel make a personal contribution of 20% of the total course fees and can receive a single payment, in each of a maximum of three separate financial years, of up to £1,000 or £2,000 depending on qualifying scheme membership to cover up to a maximum of 80% of course fees.

Service personnel can, and do, use this allowance to pursue university degree courses across a wide range of subjects. The ELC scheme is available to redundees for up to 10 years after they leave the armed forces.

Work and Pensions

Autism

Chris Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what representations he has received from disability charities on the effect of changes to universal credit on people with autism. [142375]

Mr Hoban: Ministers meet regularly with a wide range of disability organisations to discuss the impact of universal credit. However, there have been no meetings with organisations to specifically discuss the effect of universal credit on people with autism.

Chris Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what proportion of adults with autism claim out-of-work benefits. [142376]

Mr Hoban: The information as requested is not available.

Fracking: Industrial Health and Safety

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many (a) full-time and (b) part-time staff of the Health and Safety Executive are working on cases relating to shale gas; and if he will make a statement. [141732]

Mr Hoban: The Health and Safety Executive has six full-time specialist wells inspectors who have responsibility for regulating well engineering and operations activities.

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This work covers shale gas wells and all other types of wells drilled with a view to the extraction of petroleum, both onshore or offshore. Around 5% of this resource is currently being spent on shale gas issues.

Housing Benefit

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Birmingham, Selly Oak of 23 January 2013, Official Report, column 340W, on housing, what estimate he has made of the amount of supported and sheltered accommodation that falls outside the definition of supported exempt accommodation; for what reasons all supported and sheltered housing is not exempt from changes being applied to the under-occupancy penalty; and if he will make a statement. [142734]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

The most recent information on the number of people in supported “exempt accommodation” was in the DWP research report ‘“Exempt and supported accommodation” published in December 2010.

The consultation document “Housing Benefit Reform—Supported Housing” (Cm 8152, July 2011) explained the Government's approach to supporting housing costs in supported accommodation and proposals for reform.

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of whether there is a match between the number of available properties in the social housing sector (a) in Brighton and Hove local authority area and (b) nationally to enable tenants to move to accommodation of a smaller size within the social housing sector, if they are affected by the under-occupancy changes; and if he will make a statement. [142735]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

There are a number of options available to meet shortfalls in housing benefit below rent resulting from the social sector under-occupation measure. For example, this could include increasing working hours, taking in a lodger, or moving to smaller accommodation in either the social or private sector. It is for individual claimants to determine what is the best approach for them.

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to ensure that those who choose to move to smaller housing to avoid having to pay under-occupancy penalties will be able to find suitably sized accommodation. [142862]

Steve Webb: The size and availability of social housing stock varies across the country, as will demand for different sized property.

Most authorities have a mixture of different sized properties within their stock and they will inevitably have overcrowded households living in one and two- bedroom properties, people in temporary accommodation or families on the housing waiting list living in the private rented sector. All of that create pressures on local authorities that can be alleviated through more under-occupied households moving.

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This measure however is not about forcing people to move. We expect many households will prefer to remain where they are and will find a way of making up the shortfall, in the same way that those living in the private rented sector in properties that are too large do.

Housing Benefit: Brighton and Hove

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of the average reduction in housing benefit for recipients resident in (a) Brighton Pavilion constituency and (b) Brighton and Hove local authority area following the under-occupancy changes due to come into effect in April 2013. [142733]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

Regional figures were included in the impact assessment which can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Housing Benefit: Copeland

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many residents of Copeland constituency will be affected by the under-occupancy penalty for social housing tenants. [143063]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

Regional figures were included in the impact assessment which can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Housing: Bristol

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much of the £30 million discretionary housing payment funding in 2013-14 for those affected by the social size criteria will be allocated to Bristol City Council; and how this share was calculated. [143008]

Steve Webb: The total Government contribution towards discretionary housing payments for 2013-14 in Bristol is £1,137,227.

£213,441 of this relates to the additional £30 million allocated to the discretionary housing payment fund for those impacted by the size criteria in the social sector.

This was calculated by dividing the £30 million at a regional level in proportion to total forecast benefit savings from the social sector size criteria measure.

Allocations to local authorities within each region were based on 2011-12 housing benefit expenditure in relation to working age social rented sector claimants in each local authority.

Incapacity Benefit

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many incapacity benefit claimants in Stalybridge and Hyde constituency have been reassessed since 2010; [142881]

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(2) how many incapacity benefit claimants have been reassessed since May 2010; and how many such people have been placed in the support group or the work-related activity group of employment and support allowance. [142882]

Mr Hoban: The Department regularly publishes official statistics on the reassessment of incapacity benefit claimants for employment and support allowance. The latest publication was released in January 2013 and can be found here:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/workingage/index.php?page=esa_ibr

This publication includes all outcomes for Great Britain as a whole and also broken down by local authority. Constituency level information is not available.

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many incapacity benefit claimants who have been assessed for employment and support allowance have been placed in the work-related activity group; how many such claimants did not undergo a face-to-face assessment with an Atos Healthcare professional; how many have lodged an appeal; and how many have had their decision overturned. [143016]

Mr Hoban: The Department regularly publishes official statistics on the reassessment of incapacity benefit claimants for employment and support allowance. The latest publication was released in January 2013 and can be found here:

http://research.dwp.gov.uk/asd/workingage/index.php?page=esa_ibr

This publication shows all the available data on the number of support group and work related activity group decisions. It does not include the number of claimants who undergo a face-to-face assessment or those who are given a paper-based assessment. This information is not readily available and has not previously been published as official statistics.

When someone claiming incapacity benefits is reassessed for ESA, they will only have to undergo a face-to-face work capability assessment (WCA) if there is insufficient evidence for a paper-based WCA to be carried out.

Information on appeal outcomes for incapacity benefit reassessments is not yet available.

Jobseeker's Allowance

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) how many people over the age of 25 years have been claiming jobseeker's allowance for more than two years, by ethnicity; [142368]

(2) how many people aged 18 to 24 years have been claiming jobseeker's allowance for more than one year, by ethnicity. [142369]

Mr Hoban: Statistics on how many claimants were in receipt of jobseeker's allowance for more than one or two years, split by age and ethnicity can be found at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/default.asp

Guidance for users is available at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/home/newuser.asp

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Dame Tessa Jowell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will provide the data to the Library which will enable it to continue to calculate the number of jobseeker's allowance claimants per Jobcentre Plus vacancy, in the light of the unavailability of those data following the introduction of the new job search service, universal jobmatch, in November 2012. [142597]

Mr Hoban: The vacancy data required to calculate the number of jobseeker’s allowance claimants per Jobcentre Plus vacancy are not available and cannot be placed in the Library.

The replacement of the Jobcentre Plus system of vacancy-taking with the new universal jobmatch service inevitably meant that existing comparisons would no longer be available, since the series for unfilled Jobcentre Plus vacancies ceased to exist. Universal jobmatch is a major reform that brings significant benefits to jobseekers and employers alike. Headline statistics, which are already available via the Directgov website:

https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/Reports/Reports.aspx

show that nationally over 10,000 new vacancies a day are reported to universal jobmatch.

Headline figures on the total number of unfilled vacancies at a point in time are published by the Office for National Statistics, based on a regular survey of employers. The sample size of the survey is too small to allow information to be published below national level and does not identify which vacancies are held by Jobcentre Plus. Some users have previously attempted to fill these gaps using administrative data on the number of unfilled vacancies held by Jobcentre Plus. The Department recognises that there remains a demand for administrative data on unfilled vacancies. The intention has been and remains that broadly similar information to that available under the previous system will be introduced over time as resources allow.

It is important to note that comparisons of the number of people unemployed and the number of unfilled vacancies need to be interpreted carefully. Using a snapshot of vacancies at a point in time misses the dynamism of the labour market and the regular turnover of new vacancies being notified as existing opportunities are filled. Such snap-shots also typically miss the jobs that people can access in the wider labour market: for example those notified through other recruitment channels or filled by direct approaches to employers or word of mouth.

Natural Gas: Storage

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2013, Official Report, columns 711-12W, on natural gas: storage, what steps have been taken by the developers of the Stublach Gas storage project to (a) ensure and (b) demonstrate the integrity of the caverns. [142739]

Mr Hoban: The developers are required to make safety demonstrations during the development of the project in the form of safety reports. The HSE has just completed its review of the pre-operations report. Sufficient demonstrations have been made in relation to cavern integrity for operations to proceed. HSE will inspect the development to ensure that the precautions set out in the safety reports are actually implemented in practice.

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Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will direct the Health and Safety Executive to publish in full the safety and geotechnical reports on the Stublach Gas storage project. [142740]

Mr Hoban: I am satisfied that the Health and Safety Executive has made and will continue to make available all information that it is empowered to release in answering requests under the Environmental Information Regulations.

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the geology and safety aspects of the Stublach Gas storage project that are considered to constitute a risk to national security. [142741]

Mr Hoban: The responsibility to undertake geological surveys lies with the developer of the gas storage site. HSE's remit is the health and safety of those who may be affected by the project. HSE is not aware of any risk to national security arising from the development of a gas storage site at Stublach.

Mr O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what arrangements are in place to ensure that underground gas storage operators demonstrate and ensure their ability to meet all financial responsibilities should they be determined to be liable for an underground gas storage failure. [142742]

Mr Hoban: Employers are required by law to provide insurance cover to compensate their employees in the event of an accident. There is no similar formal requirement for the operator of a gas storage facility, or any other similar facility, to hold insurance or make any other financial arrangement to meet their responsibilities; financial liabilities in the event of an accident would be a matter for the civil courts.

Pensioners

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he is taking to improve pensioner wellbeing in (a) Glasgow North West constituency, (b) Glasgow, (c) Scotland and (d) the UK. [141981]

Steve Webb: Current pensioners are a priority for the Government and we have introduced the triple lock to ensure that the basic state pension rises by the highest of earnings, prices and 2.5% each year. As a result the basic state pension will increase by 2.5% in April 2013, subject to agreement in Parliament. This will take the value of the basic state pension higher relative to average earnings than at any time in the last 20 years. Our latest estimates are that the average person reaching state pension age in 2013 can expect to receive an additional £12,000 in basic state pension over their retirement than under previous policies of uprating by prices.

We have also protected key benefits for older people including: free eye tests, free prescription charges, free off-peak bus travel, free television licences for those aged over 75 and winter fuel payments. In winter 2011-12, the winter fuel payment helped over 12.6 million older people with their fuel bills, including around 1.1 million payments made to people in Scotland.

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In addition we have permanently increased cold weather payments from £8.50 to £25.00, which go to vulnerable people on income related benefits, including pensioners on pension credit. For winter 2011-12, 5.2 million cold weather payments were made, of which an estimated 72,500 were in Scotland.

We are also reforming pensions for today's working people. The single-tier pension will deliver a simple and fair state pension set above the basic level of means-tested support, providing clarity and confidence to better support saving for retirement. Providing this platform for saving also underpins private pension reform introduced from 1 October 2012. This makes automatic enrolment into a workplace pension mandatory, making the default decision a decision to save. We have abolished the default retirement age, meaning most people can now retire when the time is right for them, enabling people to work and save for longer.

Wellbeing is not just about money, though, and we have introduced a material deprivation indicator as an additional way of understanding more about the nature of older people's experience. This enables us to examine both financial and non financial elements such as social isolation and ill-health to complement the existing income-based measures of poverty.

Social Rented Housing

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many rented homes in the social sector are under-occupied in each local authority area. [142981]

Steve Webb: The information requested is not available.

Regional figures on under-occupation among working age housing benefit claimants in the social sector were included in the impact assessment which can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Social Security Benefits

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Communities and Local Government on the impact of public library closures on the access to computers needed for the implementation of his Department's proposed changes to benefits. [142465]

Mr Hoban: DWP and DCLG are working closely together to ensure the successful delivery of upcoming welfare reform.

We recognise that some claimants will not have access to the internet from home, so we are installing internet access devices in our jobcentres. Jobcentre staff will be available to provide claimants with any assistance required in using these devices.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many staff were employed by his Department in each of the last five years; and at what grade or pay band such staff were appointed. [142796]

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Mr Hoban: I have provided my hon. Friend with the total number of staff employed in DWP for the period year ending December 2008 to December 2012, and broken down by grade.

12 Feb 2013 : Column 646W

The figures are point in time at the end of December each year and in line with Office for National Statistics (ONS) definitions.

 31 December 200831 December 200931 December 201031 December 201131 December 2012

A/AA

4,778

4,652

3,861

3,222

2,899

B/AO

50,468

59,071

52,395

46,681

48,821

C/EO

37,229

44,602

42,190

39,087

42,047

D/HEO

6,933

8,033

8,179

7,489

7,596

E/SEO

2,544

2,845

2,882

2,569

2,660

F/Grade 7

1,395

1,637

1,659

1,432

1,502

G/Grade 6

545

667

699

612

599

SCS

271

290

273

219

226

Unknown

11

27

27

20

Other

137

Total

104,662

121,824

112,135

101,331

106,487

Notes: 1. December 2008 includes the Rent Service in the total but it is not included in the grade breakdown (488 head count). 2. December 2012 includes Child Maintenance Group which joined the Department from August 2012 (8,503 head count).

Travel and Subsistence Payments

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many chairs in his Department's arm's length bodies are paid on the basis that they are exempt from personally meeting any tax liability in respect of travel and subsistence payments for attending meetings at the offices of the arm's length body. [141185]

Mr Hoban: The Department for Work and Pensions does not hold this information centrally and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many senior officials of his Department's arm's length bodies are paid on the basis that they are exempt from personally meeting any tax liability in respect of travel and subsistence payments for attending meetings at the offices of the arm's length body. [141199]

Mr Hoban: The Department for Work and Pensions does not hold this information centrally and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Universal Credit

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent progress he has made on confirming the details of exceptional payments under universal credit. [141980]

Mr Hoban: A minority of universal credit claimants may require alternative payment arrangements to help them manage their money. These might include paying the rent directly to the landlord, making payments more frequently than monthly or splitting the payment within the household.

Alternative payment arrangements will be considered on a case-by-case basis, with each situation assessed on individually. These arrangements will be time-limited and delivered in conjunction with appropriate budgeting support to ensure claimants make a successful transition over time to monthly budgeting wherever possible.

Welfare Tax Credits

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent discussions he has had with HM Revenue and Customs about tax credit support for Work Programme participants entering self-employment. [142903]

Mr Hoban: Compliance with tax credit rules is a matter for HMRC.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether he will consider the case for an early check of the viability of the business plan of a Work Programme participant entering self-employment to guard against the risk of incurring a large working tax credit overpayment. [142904]

Mr Hoban: A core principle of the Work Programme is that providers offer the right support for individuals to enable them to enter work. This includes support and advice on becoming self employed. Work Programme providers support individuals to develop viable business plans.

Checks against business plans for the award of tax credits and any subsequent overpayment of tax credits are a matter for HMRC. The DWP is not involved in decisions relating to tax credits.

Work Capability Assessment

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions whether decision makers can send cases back to Atos Healthcare professionals when they believe that a face-to-face assessment or additional written evidence is needed. [143015]

Mr Hoban: The contract between DWP and Atos allows for decision makers to send cases back to Atos if they believe a face-to-face assessment is required and also to obtain written advice from an Atos Healthcare professional when necessary.

12 Feb 2013 : Column 647W

Sheila Gilmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidance his Department provides to (a) Atos Healthcare professionals and (b) decision makers on when to carry out work capability assessments without a face-to-face examination. [143017]

Mr Hoban: No guidance is provided to decision makers as it is primarily the responsibly of the ATOS Healthcare professional to consider the need for a face-to-face assessment.

Full guidance for Atos Healthcare professionals is contained in the ESA Filework Guidelines for Healthcare Professionals, and is summarised in the WCA Handbook

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/wca-handbook.pdf


Work Programme: West Midlands

Jack Dromey: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what reduction there has been in long-term unemployment since the start of the Work Programme in (a) Birmingham, Erdington constituency and (b) Birmingham. [140922]

Mr Hoban: Since June 2011 the number of people claiming jobseeker's allowance for more than a year has risen from 875 to 1,755 in Birmingham, Erdington and from 8,380 to 16,455 in Birmingham LAD. However, nationally the number of people unemployed for over 12 months on the broader ILO measure fell by 5,000 in the latest quarter.

House of Commons Commission

Core Statutory Obligations

Priti Patel: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the House of Commons Commission's core statutory obligations are; and what estimate he has of the annual cost of delivering each such obligation. [142764]

John Thurso: Under the House of Commons (Administration) Act 1978 the core functions of the House of Commons Commission are: to appoint the staff in the House Departments, and ensure that their terms and conditions are kept broadly in line with those in the Home Civil Service; each year to prepare and lay before the House of Commons an estimate for the cost of the House Departments and other costs incurred for the service of the House; and to appoint the accounting officer. These are administrative functions conducted as part of the routine management of the House and a separate cost cannot be assigned. Further information on the work of the Commission can be found in its annual report, published pursuant to section 1(3) of the Act:

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-commission/commission-annual-report-2011-12.pdf

or in the annual accounts.

Palace of Westminster: Emergency Services

Kate Hoey: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many times fire crews

12 Feb 2013 : Column 648W

from

(a)

Lambeth and

(b)

Westminster attended incidents at the Palace of Westminster in the last five years. [142372]

John Thurso: The number of attendances made by the London Fire Brigade to the parliamentary estate can be provided from 1 April 2010, when the responsibility for fire safety protection transferred from the Metropolitan Police Service to the House of Commons. There is no requirement for the parliamentary Fire Risk Management Team to record which fire station attends incidents on the parliamentary estate, although this information has been recorded in the 2012-13 financial year.

Number of attendances made by the London Fire Brigade to the Palace of Westminster
 Attendances

2010-11

5

2011-12

3

2012-13 to date

(1)2

(1) Lambeth 0; Westminster 1; other 1

Women and Equalities

Marriage

Mr Anderson: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities (1) what recent representations she has received on the adequacy of her proposed protections aimed at ensuring that churches and clergy who do not wish to carry out same-sex marriage ceremonies are not compelled to do so; [142402]

(2) what discussions she has had with representatives of the churches and clergy regarding protections for (a) churches and clergy who do not wish to carry out same-sex marriage ceremonies and (b) workers who have a conscientious objection to measures contained on the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill; [142403]

(3) if she will take steps to put robust measures in place to ensure that churches and clergy who do not wish to carry out same-sex marriage ceremonies are not compelled to do so; [142404]

(4) whether, in the light of views expressed by hon. Members in the debate on Second Reading of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill, she plans to bring forward further proposals to strengthen protection for churches and clergy who do not wish to carry out same-sex marriage ceremonies. [142405]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 11 February 2013]: We have always been clear that no religious organisation or individual minister will be forced to marry same-sex couples. The Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill, which had its Second Reading on 5 February, contains a quadruple lock of religious protections which deliver on this commitment. We have had detailed discussions with a wide range of religious organisations, including the Church of England, as we developed the Bill, and we are confident the religious protections are robust and effective. The Church of England has said:

“If the Bill proceeds into law it is essential that the various ‘locks’ in the Bill are preserved as drafted.”

When the Bill is in force, people will continue to be able to express their perfectly lawful views that marriage should be between a man and a woman, in the same

12 Feb 2013 : Column 649W

way as they already express views about a whole range of issues—such as that civil partnerships are contrary to religious teaching, or that people should not have children outside marriage. Same-sex marriage will not be treated any differently.

Margaret Curran: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what provisions in the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill will require a legislative consent motion in the Scottish Parliament and what the purpose of those provisions are. [142663]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 11 February 2013]: Paragraphs 17 and 18 of the explanatory notes to the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill set out information about the Bill's application to Scotland and provisions in respect of which a legislative consent motion may be required.

Leader of the House

Written Questions

Mr Watson: To ask the Leader of the House what guidance his Department issues to all Government Departments on providing answers to written parliamentary questions that refer hon. Members to websites or other published material; if he will place a copy of any such guidance in the Library; and if he will make a statement. [143002]

Mr Lansley: The Office of the Leader of the House provides guidance to all Departments on the practice of answering parliamentary questions by reference to Government websites.

The guidance advises that the answer should give the Member the factual information requested (including supplying paper copies of the website pages), with an additional line in the answer indicating that the information is already made readily available.

The full guide is available on the Cabinet Office website at

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/guide-parliamentary-work

A copy of the guidance relating to referring to websites has already been placed in the Library and the Office of the Leader of the House of Commons intends to review the guide to parliamentary work later this year.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Diplomatic Service

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs in which countries and embassies the UK has (a) increased the number of diplomats and (b) opened new diplomatic posts since May 2010. [141774]

Alistair Burt: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is strengthening its diplomatic network significantly, deploying more staff to the fastest growing regions, upgrading existing posts and opening new ones. Nine

12 Feb 2013 : Column 650W

new posts have been opened or upgraded since May 2010, in the following locations:

CountryPostChangeDate

Abidjan

Cote d'Ivoire

Political office upgraded to embassy

May 2012

Antananarivo

Madagascar

British interests section upgraded to embassy

October 2012

Bishkek

Kyrgyzstan

New embassy

July 2012

Calgary

Canada

Trade office upgraded to consulate general

September 2012

Hyderabad

India

Trade office upgraded to deputy high commission

June 2012

Juba

South Sudan

New embassy in new sovereign state

July 2011

Recife

Brazil

Trade office upgraded to consulate general

November 2011

San Salvador

El Salvador

New embassy

November 2012

Vientiane

Laos

New embassy

October 2012

In addition, we have announced plans to open the following UK diplomatic posts overseas by 2015:

PostCountryType

Asuncion

Paraguay

New embassy

Chandigarh

India

New deputy high commission

Mogadishu

Somalia

New embassy

Monrovia

Liberia

Upgrade political office to embassy

Port au Prince

Haiti

New embassy

Details of further posts will be announced once planning is finalised and formal approval has been granted by the host Governments.

We are also increasing our frontline diplomatic staff in the following countries:

Algeria;

Angola;

Argentina;

Bahrain;

Bosnia and Herzegovina;

Brazil;

Burma;

Chile;

China;

Colombia;

Egypt;

Ghana;

India;

Indonesia;

Israel;

Jordan;

Kenya;

Kosovo;

Libya;

Malaysia;

Mali;

Mexico;

Mongolia;

North Korea;

Nigeria;

Pakistan;

Panama;

12 Feb 2013 : Column 651W

Peru;

Philippines;

Qatar;

Saudi Arabia;

Seychelles;

South Africa;

South Korea;

Thailand;

Tunisia;

Turkey;

UAE;

Uganda;

Vietnam.

Mongolia

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps the Government are taking to encourage a stronger bilateral trading relationship with Mongolia. [142434]

Mr Swire: The Government are working hard to build a stronger bilateral trading relationship with Mongolia. UK Trade & Investment has recently opened an office in Ulaanbaatar. The Government have also increased the number and seniority of the British diplomats in our embassy in Ulaanbaatar to support trade and investment work.

I hosted the Mongolian Government for 'Round Table' talks in November 2012. A number of British and Mongolian companies also attended the talks. They were able both to network and make recommendations to the two Governments on how we can better support enhanced trade.

As my hon. Friend is aware, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of bilateral relations between the UK and Mongolia. We hope that this anniversary and the events that both Governments have planned to mark it will strengthen relations, including bilateral trade, still further.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the value was of (a) imports from and (b) exports to Mongolia in each of the last five years. [142440]

Mr Swire: The following table shows the value of imports from and exports to Mongolia in each of the last five years, according to data from HM Treasury:

£
 Export of goodsImport of goodsExport of servicesImport of services

2008

5,685,617

3,262,095

n/a

n/a

2009

4,166,984

4,749,047

n/a

n/a

2010

11,096,576

8,594,407

13,000,000

n/a

2011

19,377,799

7,937,482

12,000,000

n/a

January-November 2012

10,728,930

5,567,101

n/a

n/a

n/a = Not available

Figures for the export of services for 2008, 2009, and 2012 and the import of services for 2008-12 were not available as they were too small to capture.

12 Feb 2013 : Column 652W

Morocco

Mr Mark Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make representations to the Moroccan ambassador that the 24 Saharawi prisoners imprisoned since the dismantling of the Gdeim Izik protest camp should be tried in a civilian court. [142296]

Alistair Burt: We regularly discuss human rights issues with the Moroccan authorities and have urged them to ensure a fair trial in the Gdeim Izik case. I raised our concerns regarding this case with the Moroccan Justice Minister in June 2012.

North Korea

Chris Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received on the persecution of Christians in North Korea. [142377]

Mr Swire: The UN Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in North Korea highlighted the issue of religious persecution in his most recent report to the United Nations. The British embassy in Pyongyang brought this report to the attention of the North Korean Government.

Members of the public and Members of Parliament have also raised the persecution of Christians with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. For example, in the past year, we have received a number letters and answered two parliamentary questions on this issue. This issue was also raised in a debate in the other place on 21 January 2013 and in a Westminster Hall debate on 11 January 2012. During both debates. I and the senior Minister of State, my right hon. Friend Baroness Warsi, confirmed that the UK is extremely concerned about reports of religious persecution in North Korea.

Syria

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will condemn Israeli air attacks on targets in Syria. [141977]

Alistair Burt: We are aware of reports of an alleged Israeli air strike on Syria on 29 January but are not able to speculate further on this.

The Government have reiterated their concern over many months about the impact of the Syrian conflict on the region, including the hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees who have fled to neighbouring countries. We have also long-standing concerns about reports of weapons transfers from Syria and Iran to Hezbollah in Lebanon. Any such transfers would be in violation of UN Security Council resolution 1701 and pose a threat to Lebanese and regional stability.

Western Sahara

Mr Mark Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will instruct HM Ambassador to Morocco to send an observer to the trial of the 24 Saharawi political prisoners in Salé prison, imprisoned after the dismantling of the Gdeim Izik protest camp. [142091]

12 Feb 2013 : Column 653W

Alistair Burt: There are currently no plans to instruct the British ambassador to Morocco to send an observer to the trial. However, the British embassy in Rabat is following this case closely and will continue to emphasise to the Moroccan authorities the importance of full respect for human rights in dealing with this case. I raised our concerns with the Moroccan Justice Minister in June 2012.

Zimbabwe

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with (a) the Zimbabwean Government and (b) the World Bank about Zimbabwe's outstanding International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes award to Funnekotter and others in 2009. [142746]

Mark Simmonds: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office is aware of the Funnekotter and others case and continues to call upon the Government of Zimbabwe to uphold international court rulings. We note in this context the recent statements from Herbert Murerwa, Zimbabwean Minister for Land and Rural Resettlement confirming that, consistent with the ruling of the International Court for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), the seizure of foreign-owned farms protected under bilateral Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements (IPPA) will stop with immediate effect. While there is no UK-Zimbabwe IPPA, these recent ministerial statements represent a positive development.

The Department for International Development (DFID) has raised the ICSID ruling as part of ongoing discussions of the World Bank's support to Zimbabwe, where we have encouraged emphasis on the importance of safeguarding investment and observing the rule of law. The World Bank is considering how to respond. DFID officials have also discussed the ICSID ruling with other donors as part of talks on the development of a single programme for land reform. This programme encompasses many areas, including compensation.

Justice

Insolvency

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) whether his Department has had discussions with mortgage lenders on the provisions relating to receivership in the Law of Property Act 1925; [142604]

12 Feb 2013 : Column 654W

(2) whether his Department plans to review the provisions relating to receivership in the Law of Property Act 1925. [142605]

Mrs Grant: Officials at the Ministry of Justice have had discussions with members of staff at the Council of Mortgage Lenders ("CML") and employees of some mortgage lenders about Law of Property Act receivers ("LPA receivers") during the current Parliament. The discussions related to the Secured Lending Reform Bill introduced by my hon. Friend the Member for Camborne and Redruth (George Eustice), in 2010 and the guidance issued by the CML for its members on the role of LPA receivers in 2011. The Department has no current plans to change the law relating to LPA receivers but will continue to keep the situation under review.

Unpaid Fines

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the total (a) value and (b) proportion of unpaid criminal fines is which are (i) in an agreed payment plan with a balance outstanding and (ii) outstanding and in default. [142287]

Mrs Grant: As at 30 September 2012 (latest published data) the total value of outstanding fines was £589 million.

Of the £589 million, £218.8 million (37% by value) is compliant with their agreed payment plans or are not yet due for payment, the remaining £370.2 million (63% by value) is outstanding and in default. HMCTS systems cannot differentiate between those cases that are paying in accordance with an agreed payment plan and those that are not yet due for payment.

Young Offenders

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what sentences were handed down to those found guilty of an offence under the age of 14 between 1997 and 2011; [134351]

(2) how many people aged (a) 10, (b) 11, (c) 12 and (d) 13 were found guilty of an offence between 1997 and 2011. [134434]

Jeremy Wright: Defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts with sentence breakdown for those aged 10 to 14 for all offences, in England and Wales, from 1997 to 2011, can be viewed in the following table:

Defendants found guilty and sentence breakdown at all courts, by age for all offences, England and Wales, 1997 to 2011(1,2,3)
Age and outcome199719981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011

Age 10

               

Guilty

93

121

160

195

199

178

168

209

152

128

146

84

61

42

34

Sentenced

93

121

160

195

199

178

168

209

152

128

146

84

61

42

34

Absolute discharge

2

1

3

1

3

6

9

18

14

9

13

5

5

6

Conditional discharge

55

69

90

84

48

17

5

5

9

4

1

1

3

2

Fine

10

19

21

15

19

8

19

37

2

7

10

6

3

4

1

Community sentence

25

27

38

84

116

143

131

136

122

106

122

69

49

30

33

12 Feb 2013 : Column 655W

12 Feb 2013 : Column 656W

Immediate custody

1

2

1

1

1

Otherwise dealt with

5

8

9

13

4

4

12

4

2

2

1

                

Age 11

               

Guilty

330

488

748

759

727

724

714

670

703

591

630

580

381

261

209

Sentenced

330

489

748

759

727

724

714

670

704

592

630

580

381

261

209

Absolute discharge

3

7

8

12

10

38

48

37

46

38

38

47

18

23

10

Conditional discharge

197

293

426

309

169

72

56

43

42

30

18

23

16

12

11

Fine

16

24

33

41

32

18

14

13

11

9

12

7

3

3

3

Community sentence

102

156

242

360

453

562

562

529

590

503

551

491

335

212

179

Immediate custody

1

1

3

2

1

3

2

2

1

1

Otherwise dealt with

11

8

36

35

63

33

34

45

13

12

11

10

8

10

6

                

Age 12

               

Guilty

1,103

1,560

1,876

1,921

2,160

1,984

1,904

1,995

2,040

1,999

2,081

1,763

1,465

1,132

825

Sentenced

1,103

1,560

1,876

1,922

2,160

1,984

1,904

1,995

2,040

1,999

2,082

1,765

1,466

1,132

826

Absolute discharge

11

15

12

17

36

72

125

93

108

103

98

85

75

64

37

Conditional discharge

593

905

956

705

486

177

139

139

129

137

117

109

87

60

50

Fine

42

72

88

93

122

46

26

37

42

38

34

23

16

10

5

Community sentence

427

524

703

968

1,280

1,578

1,502

1,565

1,688

1,653

1,786

1,488

1,245

933

692

Immediate custody

10

10

17

45

67

36

28

33

26

18

17

18

16

11

8

Otherwise dealt with

20

34

100

94

169

75

84

128

47

50

30

42

27

54

34

                

Age 13

               

Guilty

3,005

3,653

4,245

4,501

4,826

4,738

4,612

5,066

5,277

4,985

5,260

4,660

3,830

3,326

2,529

Sentenced

3,005

3,655

4,249

4,501

4,825

4,739

4,612

5,067

5,283

4,987

5,253

4,659

3,828

3,327

2,529

Absolute discharge

27

31

40

44

51

143

219

275

220

187

168

184

131

138

100

Conditional discharge

1,516

1,770

1,973

1,561

1,082

463

359

407

389

316

368

292

248

220

174

Fine

160

208

257

304

265

155

108

135

131

126

110

66

67

52

27

Community sentence

1,221

1,514

1,665

2,226

2,923

3,617

3,588

3,821

4,296

4,139

4,410

3,924

3,239

2,708

2,094

Immediate custody

24

35

73

143

169

186

146

124

117

107

90

93

67

44

38

Otherwise dealt with

57

97

241

223

335

175

192

305

130

112

107

100

76

165

96

                

Age 14

               

Guilty

7,096

8,065

9,142

9,539

9,900

9,935

9,564

10,328

10,957

10,867

11,256

10,295

8,873

7,631

6,341

Sentenced

7,098

8,071

9,146

9,543

9,900

9,935

9,564

10,330

10,966

10,874

11,257

10,298

8,873

7,628

6,338

Absolute discharge

62

70

71

83

105

352

420

369

383

349

373

329

265

261

200

Conditional discharge

3,210

3,511

3,783

2,945

1,997

1,068

862

917

913

863

878

752

646

635

553

Fine

471

583

683

800

833

467

361

395

432

367

336

262

224

164

121

Community sentence

3,116

3,581

3,894

4,808

5,793

7,155

7,051

7,664

8,600

8,577

9,013

8,395

7,228

5,879

4,942

Immediate custody

94

145

223

458

544

508

448

439

381

447

406

321

267

213

206

12 Feb 2013 : Column 657W

12 Feb 2013 : Column 658W

Otherwise dealt with

145

181

492

449

628

385

422

546

257

271

251

239

243

476

316

(1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) The number of offenders sentenced can differ from those found guilty as it may be the case that a defendant found guilty in a particular year, and committed for sentence at the Crown court, may be sentenced in the following year. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice