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Written Answers to Questions

Monday 25 February 2013

Wales

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and at what cost to the public purse. [143082]

Stephen Crabb: None.

Attorney-General

Arrest Warrants

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the EU arrest warrant in enabling the Crown Prosecution Service to pursue suspected criminals who have absconded overseas. [144246]

The Solicitor-General: The European Arrest Warrant (EAW) came into force on 1 January 2004, and has been a very effective tool for prosecutors to return accused or convicted criminals to the United Kingdom. Last year, the United Kingdom issued 221 EAW requests and 86 individuals were extradited back to the UK. Between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2012, a total of 652 individuals were extradited to the United Kingdom.

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Attorney-General what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by the Law Officers' Departments. [143284]

The Solicitor-General: The Serious Fraud Office's total occupancy costs in 2011-12 were £4,353,584. This includes rent, rates, service charge, maintenance, security, cleaning and utilities.

The Attorney-General's Office occupy one building, 20 Victoria Street. This office is shared with The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) who occupy 21.38% of the building.

The AGO's total occupancy costs are £831,003. This includes rent, rates, maintenance, security guards, cleaning and utilities.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has a total estate of 79 premises of which 68 are occupied and 11 vacant or sublet. A table containing the occupancy costs incurred in each building by the CPS has been deposited in the Library of the House. A small number of CPS staff also use space in other premises such as police stations and courts and where no commercial agreement is held by the CPS. Such properties are not included in the table.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 2W

In 2011-12 the total net occupation costs for each property leased by TSol and HMCPSI were as follows, calculated as the sum of rent, rates, service charge, repair and maintenance, security, cleaning and utilities:

 £

One Kemble Street, London

4,569,891

Southern House, Croydon

120,175

United House, York

0

In addition, TSol is also the inherited landlord on a building in Taunton although no TSol staff use the premises. The net occupation costs are as follows:

 £

Riverside Chambers, Taunton

295,565

 £

Priti Patel: To ask the Attorney-General what the (a) total floor space and (b) floor space measured in square metres per full-time equivalent post is of properties used by the Law Officers' Departments. [143347]

The Solicitor-General: The information requested is contained in the following table:

DepartmentFloor space m(2)Floor space per full-time equivalent (FTE) post m(2)

Attorney-General's Office

909.80

21.72

Serious Fraud Office

3,196

9.64

Crown Prosecution Service

118,873

15.73

Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol)(1)

7,731

9.60

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate

286

8.17

(1) TSol also occupy 507.25 m(2) of Southern House, Croydon, at 8.45 m(2) per FTE. A number of TSol staff are also located in other Government buildings where they provide legal advice to Departments based there. This response does not cover these buildings.

Priti Patel: To ask the Attorney-General what the names and locations are of all properties used by officials of the Law Officers' Departments; whether those properties are (a) owned by the Law Officers' Departments, (b) leased by the Law Officers' Departments and (c) subject to a private finance initiative agreement; when existing lease agreements relating to such properties are due to expire; and what the total floor space is of each property. [143368]

The Solicitor-General: The Attorney-General's Office are based at 20 Victoria Street, London. The property is leased. The lease expires on 25 December 2016. The total floor space for the building is 1157.2 m(2).

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) currently uses part of one building in Cockspur Street, London. The SFO leases the second, third and fourth floors and some basement areas only. The lease ends on 24 March 2017. The total floor space occupied by the SFO is 3,196 m(2).

Officials of TSol use the following buildings.

One Kemble Street London WC2B 4TS

25 Feb 2013 : Column 3W

1 Horse Guards Road London SW1A 2HQ

2-4 Cockspur Street London SW1Y 5DH

9 Millbank c/o 17 Smith Square London SW1P 3JR

Great Smith Street London SW1P 3BT

Southern House Wellesley Grove, Croydon, Surrey, CR9 1DY

TSol leases Floors 4-15 of CAA House (One Kemble Street), from the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and a part floor (507.25 sq metres) of Southern House, Croydon. Neither building is subject to a Private Finance Initiative agreement. Floor 4 of CAA House is also sub-let to HMCPSI under a Memorandum of Terms of Occupation (MOTO) agreement. The existing lease agreement with CAA is due to expire in 24 December 2019 and the total floor space is 11,117.52 sq metres. The existing lease agreement for Southern House is due to expire on 23 July 2020 and the total floor space occupied by is 18,019 sq metres.

A number of TSol staff are co-located at 1 Horse Guards Road, 2-4 Cockspur Street, 9 Millbank and Great Smith Street where they provide legal advice to Departments based there. The total floor space for these properties is not included in this response.

TSol is also the inherited landlord of a building in Taunton although no TSol staff use these premises. The lease expires in March 2016 and the total floor space is 2,801 sq metres.

Officials from HMCPSI also occupy United House, Piccadilly, York, North Yorkshire YO1 9PQ, details of which are covered in the data provided by the CPS.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) occupies 68 premises. Of these three are owned, 57 are commercial leases and nine are MOTO/Licences with other public bodies (one property is subject to both a lease and a MOTO). The full details are contained in a table that has been deposited in the Library of the House.

In addition to properties owned and leased by the CPS the Schedule details those properties that are vacant and those used by the CPS via an agreement with another Government Department or public body. Such arrangements are covered by MOTO agreements and licences. The CPS has seven MOTO agreements in place and two licences with other public sector bodies. The CPS has no property holdings under a private finance initiative agreement. However, some properties held under a MOTO or license may be subject to a private finance initiative agreement where these have been agreed by the major occupying Department or public body.

Where the lease has expired on a property but the CPS is still occupying it, the terms of occupation are recorded as “holding over”.

The floor space for each property held via a commercial agreement is calculated using the Agents Letting Area (ALA) unless otherwise stated. ALA depicts the space occupied under terms of the lease agreement and as such usually excludes any common areas such as lift lobbies and any shared facilities such as reception space.

Child Abuse

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General pursuant to the answer of 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 696W, on children: abuse, what estimate he has made of the cost of implementing the Director of

25 Feb 2013 : Column 4W

Public Prosecution's recommendations in his responses to the Rochdale and Jimmy Savile child abuse cases; and how that cost will be met. [144245]

The Solicitor-General: The Director of Public Prosecution's recommendations in his responses to the Rochdale and Jimmy Savile child abuse cases have been incorporated into the Department's operational business plans. The current estimate for any additional costs is minimal.

Child abuse prosecutions are not separately funded but form part of the overall resource allocation process. This expenditure will remain a priority in the future.

In accordance with best practice the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) Board will continue to regularly review operational and financial plans and, where there is need, adjust resource allocation to deal with new pressures and priorities.

Crown Prosecution Service: Information Officers

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General how many press officers are employed by the Crown Prosecution Service in (a) each region and (b) its London headquarters. [144139]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) employs six press officers in its London Headquarters and one press officer in its London Area. There are also a number of other communications staff in the Areas, of which 15 members of staff have some responsibility for press work as part of their wider communications work including internal and corporate communication and community engagement.

The following table shows the locations of press officers and staff with some responsibility for press work among other communication and engagement work. A number of these staff are employed as part of job shares, or on a part-time basis so the figures should not be read as full-time posts. The figures do not include those on long-term secondment elsewhere or those on maternity leave at the time of counting.

31 December 2012
AreaPress officerCommunication staff with some regional responsibility for press work among other communication and engagement work

HQ

6

0

London

1

1

Wales

0

1

East Midlands

0

1

Eastern

0

2

Mersey Cheshire

0

1

North East

0

1

North West

0

1

South East

0

1

South West

0

1

Thames and Chiltern

0

1

Wessex

0

1

West Midlands

0

1

Yorkshire and Humberside

0

2

Total

7

15

25 Feb 2013 : Column 5W

Crown Prosecution Service: Interpreters

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what proportion of interpreters used by Crown Prosecution Service witness care units in (a) Lancashire, (b) Staffordshire, (c) West Yorkshire and (d) the West Midlands were provided by Capita TI since September 2012. [144249]

The Solicitor-General: Records held by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) are not sufficiently detailed to calculate the proportion of interpreters used by witness care units in Lancashire, Staffordshire, West Yorkshire and the West Midlands provided by Capita TI since September 2012.

However, the proportion of interpreters used by the CPS between September 2012 and December 2012 in North West area, West Midlands area and Yorkshire and Humberside area provided by Capita TI was 56%.

Departmental Responsibilities

Priti Patel: To ask the Attorney-General (1) what the Law Officers' Departments' core statutory obligations are; and what estimate he has of the annual cost of delivering each such obligation; [142753]

(2) if he will estimate the Law Officers' Departments total staffing requirement in full-time equivalent posts for fulfilling its minimum statutory obligations. [143326]

The Solicitor-General: The Attorney-General has many functions, not all of which are statutory. One such function is as the principal legal adviser to the Government and Parliament. Core statutory obligations include the superintendence of the Crown Prosecution Service, Serious Fraud Office and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate. He has numerous other statutory obligations of a public interest nature, such as consents to the prosecution of certain offences, intervention in certain kinds of civil cases and references to the Court of Appeal. He also holds office as Advocate-General for Northern Ireland.

The Treasury Solicitor's Departments principal functions are to conduct litigation on behalf of the Crown (in its executive capacity as the Government) and to advise the Government on legal issues. In addition TSol also acts as the Queen's Proctor and is empowered to Act for the Crown in bona vacantia matters.

The Crown Prosecution Service's (CPS) core statutory obligation is to prosecute criminal cases investigated by the police and other law enforcement agencies in England and Wales.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) was constituted by the Criminal Justice Act (1987) which sets out its core functions. The Act has been amended by other legislation, notably the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act (2008),

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate's core statutory obligation is to inspect or arrange for the inspection of the operation of the Crown Prosecution Service, report to the Attorney-General on any matter connected with the operation of the Service which the Attorney-General refers to him, and submit an annual report to the Attorney-General on the operation of the Service.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 6W

All staff in the Law Officers' Departments are directly involved in fulfilling their Departments’ minimum statutory obligations.

The Law Officers' Departments accounting systems do not hold financial data by statutory obligation and such information could not be provided within the disproportionate costs threshold. Information on outturn and spending plans for all Departments is outlined in Departmental Annual Report and Accounts for 2011-12 which have all been laid before Parliament and are available in the Library of the House.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Attorney-General how much surplus food was thrown away by the Law Officers' Departments in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143445]

The Solicitor-General: None of the Law Officers Departments keep any records of how much surplus food is wasted, although offices try to keep waste to a minimum where there are onsite catering facilities.

GPT

Mr Sanders: To ask the Attorney-General when he expects the Serious Fraud Office to conclude its investigation into allegations concerning GPT Special Project Management Ltd. [143918]

The Solicitor-General: The director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) decided to open a criminal investigation into allegations concerning GPT and aspects of the conduct of their business in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on 7 August 2012. This was announced on that day on the SFO website at:

http://www.sfo.gov.uk/our-work/our-cases/case-progress/gpt-special-project-management-ltd.aspx

The investigation continues, and the SFO are actively pursuing a number of lines of inquiry. As with all cases involving allegations of serious or complex fraud, it will inevitably take some time for the investigation to conclude, and the precise length cannot be estimated.

Information Officers

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General how many press officers were employed by the Law Officers’ Departments in each year since 2010. [143220]

The Solicitor-General: The following table shows the number of press officers employed by the Law Officers’ Departments for the previous three financial years, with an update as of December 2012.

 201020112012December 2012

Attorney-General's Office

3

3

3

3

Treasury Solicitor's Department

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate

1

1

(1)

(1)

Crown Prosecution Service(2)

9

7

6

7

Serious Fraud Office

2

2

3

2

(1) Shared with AGO. (2) The CPS data do not include 15 regional communications staff with some local responsibility for press work among other communication and engagement work.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 7W

Islam

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Attorney-General what assessment he has made of the draft guidelines issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions on social media crimes in preventing Islamophobia online; and if he will make a statement. [144625]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) views all religious and racist crime seriously as it has a real and lasting effect on individuals, communities and society as a whole. Interim guidelines on prosecuting cases involving communications sent via social media were issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) in December 2012, and they are intended to help prosecutors when considering cases referred to them by the police for a prosecution decision. The religiously aggravated element of any offence is a relevant consideration in the interim guidelines and prosecutors should follow the approach set out in the guidelines when dealing with such cases.

Meat: Labelling

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Attorney-General how many prosecutions the Crown Prosecution Service made for offences related to the mislabelling of meat products in (a) 2011 and (b) 2012. [143926]

The Solicitor-General: Prosecutions for the mislabelling of meat products would fall within the remit of local authority environmental health or trading standards departments. As such, the CPS has not prosecuted any cases related to the mislabelling of meat products in either 2011 or 2012.

Minimum Wage: Prosecutions

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Attorney-General what the Crown Prosecution Service’s policy is on prosecuting employers who fail to pay the national minimum wage to their employees. [143868]

The Solicitor-General: The Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has responsibility for the law, compliance and enforcement policy in relation to the national minimum wage. BIS has appointed Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) to enforce the national minimum wage on their behalf. The current enforcement policy was published in June 2012.

Where a case is referred following a criminal investigation conducted by HMRC, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) decides whether to prosecute applying the tests in the Code for Crown Prosecutors: namely whether there is sufficient evidence to provide a realistic prospect of conviction; and if so, whether prosecution is needed in the public interest. In assessing where the public interest lies, the CPS would expect to consult HMRC and take into account any enforcement policy applied by HMRC among other relevant considerations.

Prosecutions

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General (1) for what reasons the Crown Prosecution Service does not record the numbers of cases referred to it by the police for offences other than rape and human trafficking; [144138]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 8W

(2) whether the Crown Prosecution Service plans to record the numbers of cases referred to it by the police for offences other than rape and human trafficking. [144054]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has no plans to record the numbers of cases referred to it by the police for offences other than rape and human trafficking.

Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) records identify the number of suspects referred to the CPS for a charging decision through its electronic Case Management System (CMS) and are extracted through the related Management Information Systems (MIS) database. It is not possible to disaggregate figures to show separately the volumes of charging decisions for each individual offence, but some limited information may be abstracted where a national monitoring flag has been applied by a member of staff. Monitoring flags for rape and human trafficking are applied to a range of individual statutory offences which the CPS categorise under those headings. It is not possible to disaggregate figures to show separately the volumes of charging decisions for each individual offence on these lists.

In addition to these monitoring flags, designed to capture and report statistics on specific sets of offences, there are a number of flags which indicate the type of criminality rather than the actual offence alleged to have been committed. These flags comprise:

Child abuse;

Crimes against an older person;

Disability hate crime;

Domestic violence;

Forced marriage;

Homophobic and transphobic hate crime;

Honour crime;

Racist hate crime;

Religious hate crime.

The CPS collects data to assist in the effective management of its prosecution functions. There has not previously been a business need to know the number of each separate offence referred to the CPS for advice by the police. The CPS does not collect data that constitute official statistics as defined in the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007. The official statistics relating to crime and policing are maintained by the Home Office (HO) and the official statistics relating to sentencing, criminal court proceedings, offenders brought to justice, the courts and the judiciary are maintained by the Ministry of Justice (MOJ).

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what the policy of the Crown Prosecution Service is on informing complainants of the judgment made following an application of no case to answer at the end of the Crown's case. [144393]

The Solicitor-General: The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is not directly responsible for informing complainants of judgments made by the court following an application of no case to answer. Complainants are, however, notified of the outcome of the case (whether or not the application is successful) by the joint police/CPS Witness Care Units.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 9W

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Attorney-General how many and which regulations the Law Officers’ Departments have repealed between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what estimate he has made of the savings which will accrue to those affected by each such regulation as a result of its repeal. [142347]

The Solicitor-General: None.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 10W

Gordon Banks: To ask the Attorney-General how many regulations the Law Officers' Departments introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; if he will list those regulations; and what estimate he has made of the total cost of their introduction. [144694]

The Solicitor-General: The information requested is contained in the following table:

DepartmentDate laid before ParliamentTitle of regulation/orderPublication cost (£ inc. VAT)

AGO

26 June 2012

The Prosecution of Offences Act 1985 (Specified Proceedings) (Amendment) Order 2012

316

AGO

10 August 2012

The Prosecution of Offences Act 1985 (Specified Proceedings) (Amendment No. 2) Order 2012

316

AGO

26 October 2012

The Prosecution of Offences Act 1985 (Specified Proceedings) (Amendment No. 3) Order 2012

316

No record is kept of the costs incurred by departmental officials in preparing these orders and such information could be provided only at a disproportionate cost.

Schengen Agreement

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what assessment he has made of the utility of the Schengen information database for UK prosecutors in bringing suspected criminals overseas to justice. [144247]

The Solicitor-General: When the Schengen Information System becomes operational in the UK it will be for the use of law enforcement officers. UK prosecutors will not have access to the database.

Sentencing: Females

Philip Davies: To ask the Attorney-General what proportion of the cases that he (a) was referred and (b) took up regarding unduly lenient sentences related to female offenders in the latest period for which figures are available. [143911]

The Solicitor-General: The total number of cases received in 2012 (by offender), that the Attorney-General and I considered was 344. Of those, 34 were female offenders, that is, 10%.

Five of the female offenders were referred to the Court of Appeal out of 88 offenders in total (including those subsequently withdrawn). Therefore, 5.7% of the total number of offenders whose sentences were referred to the Court were female.

Serious Fraud Office

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General on what dates (a) he and (b) the Solicitor-General discussed unauthorised payments made to members of staff at the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) with the director of the SFO in the last year; and what was discussed on each such occasion. [143076]

The Attorney-General: The current director, David Green CB QC, took up office at the end of April 2012. He learned of the payments in May and immediately notified my office. The Solicitor-General and I discussed the payments with the current director on 2 July, 1 August, 24 October, 28 November 2012 and 9 January 2013. These were occasions on which the director communicated to us the amounts, recipients and circumstances of the payments made; the steps taken by the SFO to investigate the circumstances of the payments and whether it would be possible to reclaim the money; and the treatment of those payments in the SFO's annual accounts. We also discussed the steps to be taken to disclose as much information as possible, and as quickly as possible, to Parliament.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General (1) how many legal opinions he has sought on the recoverability of the unauthorised payments made to staff leaving the Serious Fraud Office in 2012; [143077]

(2) on what basis and by whom was it decided that the unauthorised severance payout to the Serious Fraud Office's former chief operating officer, Christian Bailes, could not be recovered; and by which (a) Ministers and (b) officials in the Law Officers' Departments was that decision ratified. [143537]

The Attorney-General: As set out in my written statement of 4 December 2012, Official Report, columns 51-52WS, and as I told the House on 8 January 2013, Official Report, columns 152-53, the SFO's current director obtained clear legal advice that the agreements, while entered into without the necessary approvals, were binding on the SFO. The position is set out on page 31 of the Serious Fraud Office's (SFO's) annual accounts for 2011-12.

The director informed me of the legal advice he had received on 2 July 2012 and of his decision not to seek retrospective approval for the payments which had not been properly authorised.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General (1) which consultancies with a relationship with the Serious Fraud Office were the subject of Sir Alex Allan's review; [143086]

(2) whether members of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) staff were (a) criticised and (b) faced disciplinary proceedings as a result of Sir Alex Allan's review of the SFO's use of consultants; [143087]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 11W

(3) pursuant to the answer of 17 December 2012, Official Report, column 510W, on Serious Fraud Office, what the nature was of the allegations made by some members of staff referred to in the answer; [143536]

(4) when he will publish (a) the independent report commissioned by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) director, David Green, into unauthorised severance payments for staff departing from that agency and (b) Sir Alex Allan's report on the SFO's use of consultants. [144044]

The Attorney-General: As I have already made clear, all of these questions raise legal issues. I accept that there is a clear public interest in the content of both reports being made fully available to Parliament as soon as possible, and I am taking steps to enable me to do so.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General whether the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has contracts with any of the consultancies whose relationships with the SFO were the subject of Sir Alex Allan's review. [143088]

The Attorney-General: The SFO has not engaged any of the consultancies mentioned in the report in this financial year.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General if he will give public notification of each occasion on which the Serious Fraud Office requests additional funding from HM Treasury. [144244]

The Attorney-General: It would not be possible to do this without the risk of prejudice to the success of the Office's operations.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General pursuant to the answer of 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 696W, on Serious Fraud Office: funding, how exceptionally large Serious Fraud Office cases can be resourced in instances where HM Treasury declines a request for funding from the Reserve. [144250]

The Attorney-General: The Government are clear that the Serious Fraud Office must not be in a position that lack of resources prevents it from conducting an investigation where the public interest, which is determined by the Director of the Serious Fraud Office, demands one.

Sexual Offences: Counselling

Robert Flello: To ask the Attorney-General how many (a) victims and (b) witnesses in sexual assault cases who gave evidence in court in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011 and (iii) 2012 were advised by the Crown Prosecution Service not to receive counselling. [143937]

The Solicitor-General: Advice by the Crown Prosecution Service on the decision whether witnesses receive counselling has been available since 2001. The guidance: “Provision of therapy for Vulnerable or Intimidated Adult Witnesses prior to a criminal trial” and “Provision of therapy for Child Witnesses prior to a criminal trial”, was endorsed

25 Feb 2013 : Column 12W

by the Home Office, Department of Health and the Attorney-General’s Office and is available on the CPS website at:

www.cps.gov.uk

Whether a victim or witness should receive therapy before a criminal trial is not a decision for the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). Such decisions can only be taken by the victim or witness or his or her carer, in conjunction with the professionals from the agencies providing a service to the victim or witness or with responsibility for the victim or witness’s welfare. The best interests of the victim or witness, whether an adult or child, are paramount in decisions about the provision of therapy before the criminal trial.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Attorney-General how many staff were employed by the Law Officers' Departments in each of the last five years; and at what grade or pay band such staff were appointed. [142776]

The Solicitor-General: The following tables contain details of the number of staff in post in the Law Officers' Departments at each grade during the past five years on 31 March.

Serious Fraud Office
Grade20122011201020092008

AO

30

31

32

31

42

EO

80

79

94

89

82

HEO

53

55

44

54

46

SEO

47

42

48

40

36

Grade 7

58

54

49

53

56

Grade 6

26

31

34

29

32

SCS

12

9

11

12

13

Total

306

301

312

308

307

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate
Grade120122011201020092008

AO

3

3

5

6

6

EO

6

7

7

8

10

HEO

3

3

4

3

4

SEO

2

2

1

2

1

Grade 7

9

7

10

5

8

Grade 6

8

10

9

11

12

SCS

3

2

4

3

3

Total

34

34

40

38

44

Treasury Solicitor's Department (TSol)(1)
Grade2012201120102009

AA/AO

108

101

119

114

EO

138

131

107

116

HEO/SEO

98

104

127

107

Grade 6/7

614

533

510

451

SCS

76

70

80

82

Total

(2)1,034

939

943

870

(1) TSol data also cover staff at the Attorney-General's Office. Data are not available in this form for 2008 and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. (2) The DEFRA legal team was absorbed into TSol in September 2011.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 13W

25 Feb 2013 : Column 14W

Crown Prosecution Service
CPS gradeCS equivalent grade20122011201020092008

A1

AA

126

179

260

335

755

A2

AO

1,726

1,864

2,280

2,256

1,914

Paralegal Assistant

AO

235

240

B1

EO

825

1,000

1,849

1,777

1,809

Paralegal Officer

EO

775

720

Legal Trainee

EO

1

4

0

0

0

B2

HEO

270

339

447

411

837

Paralegal Business Manager

HEO

70

74

Associate Prosecutor

HEO

435

452

466

447

B3

SEO

136

161

186

157

127

Crown Prosecutor

SEO

21

55

80

107

120

Senior Crown Prosecutor

G7

1,639

1,608

1,643

1,662

1,855

Crown Advocate

G7

651

876

880

853

538

Senior Legal Advisor

G7

Specialist Prosecutor

G7

127

Band D

G7

336

415

453

426

467

Band E

G6

155

171

199

146

146

Senior Crown Advocate

G6

39

36

42

28

10

Principal Crown Advocate

G6

14

15

10

6

5

Chief Crown Prosecutor and SLM

SCS

54

54

50

49

52

SCS (inc. G1 Perm Secretary)

SCS

13

19

37

33

30

Total

 

7,648

8,282

8,882

8,693

8,665

Training

Mr Thomas: To ask the Attorney-General how much the Law Officers' Departments spent on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [144079]

The Solicitor-General: The information requested is contained in the following table:

£
Department2010-112011-12

Treasury Solicitor's Department(1)

521,379

371,115

Attorney-General's Office(1)

10,572

6,149

HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate(1)

15,293

4,597

Crown Prosecution Service

1,978,841

948,749

Serious Fraud Office

248,412

191,284

(1) These figures cover expenditure on training and education by external suppliers only. Staff costs relating to TSol internal training is not recorded centrally and could be obtained only at a disproportionate cost.

House of Commons Commission

Drinking Water

Richard Burden: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, from which companies the House of Commons has procured water coolers in the last five years. [143981]

John Thurso: The House of Commons Service has held contracts for water coolers with the following suppliers: Culligan International UK Ltd, Eden Springs UK Ltd, Freshwater Coolers plc, Lomond Hills Water Co. trading as PowWow, Maestro International, Mountain Spring Ltd, Wild About Water and Wye Spring Water (Trading) Ltd. The only current contract to supply water coolers to the House of Commons Service is held by Maestro International utilising the ESPO (Eastern Shires Purchasing Organisation) framework contract 988. Individual Members' offices and third party users of the Estate may use alternative suppliers for their own water coolers. These arrangements would be a matter for those concerned.

Recruitment: Costs

Mr Spellar: To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross, representing the House of Commons Commission, how much the House of Commons Service paid Hays in the last 12 months; and how much was paid to Hays in that period to advertise for positions in the House Service. [143503]

John Thurso: For the period February 2012 to January 2013, Hays received payments totalling £312,166, to provide recruitment administration and a website for 84 recruitment campaigns. Of this £164,000 was spent on recruitment advertising.

Defence

Basing Decisions: Portsmouth

18. Penny Mordaunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the effects on local employment of the decision to base HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales in Portsmouth. [144322]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 15W

Mr Dunne: The baseporting of the Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers at Her Majesty’s Naval Base Portsmouth, along with other significant elements of the Surface Fleet, will sustain thousands of jobs providing direct support to the ships as well as infrastructure and engineering services at the Naval Base. These services include surface warship Fleet Time Engineering, waterfront and logistics support, estates management and management services.

Preparing Portsmouth for the arrival of the Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers will also involve significant new investment in the Naval Base, including the dredging of the harbour and its approach, the strengthening of jetties, installing new power supplies and other infrastructure changes. The contracting process for this infrastructure work is at an early stage and no tenders have yet been issued. It is therefore too early to say how many jobs this work will create or sustain in the Portsmouth area as this will be influenced by which company wins each contract. On current plans, we expect to begin the tendering process around the middle of this year.

The first of class, HMS Queen Elizabeth, is currently expected to arrive in Portsmouth in 2016.

Arctic Convoys: Medal

19. Graham Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what progress he has made on the awarding of an Arctic convoy Star medal to veterans of the second world war Arctic convoys. [144323]

Mr Francois: Considerable progress has been made since the Prime Minister’s announcement on the introduction of the Arctic Star. I hope to be able to make an announcement on the design, eligibility criteria and application process for this new award very shortly. Similarly, I also hope to make an announcement about the Bomber Command clasp at the same time.

Afghanistan: Equipment Recovery

20. Mark Pawsey: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the process will be for deciding which vehicles, equipment and other material will be recovered from Afghanistan in the run-up to the end of combat operations. [144324]

Mr Philip Hammond: Redeployment is occurring alongside transition of combat operations to the Afghan national security forces. Equipment and materiel will only be redeployed from Afghanistan once operational commanders are content that it is no longer required.

Planning assumes that equipment and materiel will be redeployed steadily and broadly correlated with the number of service personnel deployed to Afghanistan and with the needs of our allies.

We plan to return all undamaged vehicles and major equipments. Where other equipment and materiel is identified as surplus, a cross-defence committee will recommend whether to gift, sell, destroy or redeploy it while considering the best value for money for the UK taxpayer, operational priority and security.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 16W

Libya

21. Mr Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what support he is providing to sustain peace in Libya. [144325]

Dr Murrison: The UK regards Libya as a high priority in its Defence Engagement Strategy and stands ready to help in any way it can. We have already provided a great deal of assistance, ensuring that it is always driven by expressed Libyan needs, including, in the security field, a defence advisory team, a defence reform adviser, a border security adviser and a disarmament programme manager, together with military professional training and education in the UK.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service and civilian personnel are assigned to the defence advisory team in Libya; and what the cost of the defence advisory team to the public purse is. [143397]

Dr Murrison: There are currently seven military and three civilian advisors assigned to the Defence Advisory Team in Libya. The cost to the public purse to date for defence assistance has been approximately £2.0 million in this financial year.

Advisory Committee on Conscientious Objectors

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the cost of the Advisory Committee on Conscientious Objectors was in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [142986]

Mr Francois [holding answer 12 February 2013]: The cost of the Advisory Committee on Conscientious Objectors for 2010-11 was £669.97.

An appeal was heard on 17 December 2010 by the chairman and two ordinary members. The chairman did not receive any payment as he was a salaried judge. The members received £200 each, plus expenses totalling £269.97. The secretariat support was provided by staff from the Ministry of Defence's Central Legal Services at no extra cost.

There was no expenditure for 2011-12.

Gemma Doyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many cases were dealt with by the Advisory Committee on Conscientious Objectors in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [143121]

Mr Francois [holding answer 13 February 2013]:There was one case dealt with by the Advisory Committee on Conscientious Objectors (ACCO) in 2010-11, the hearing for which was held on 17 December 2010. The ACCO advised that the claim for conscientious objector status was not made out.

There were no cases dealt with in 2011-12.

Afghanistan

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the estimated cost of military operations in Afghanistan is in financial year 2013-14. [144258]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 17W

Mr Robathan: Estimates for the net additional cost of military operations in Afghanistan for financial year 2013-14 are currently being compiled, and will be published in the Ministry of Defence's Main Estimates for that year.

Air Force: Internet

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reason the RAF website has not published a monthly operational update of its work since September 2012; and if he will make a statement. [143635]

Mr Francois: The RAF website has been updated since September 2012. The most recent monthly operations update is 1 February 2013 and can be found at the following link:

http://www.raf.mod.uk/news/archive/ops-update-01-feb-2013-08022013

Armed Forces: Sexual Offences

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 26 October 2012 to the hon. Member for Kilmarnock and Loudoun (Cathy Jamieson), Official Report, columns 1074-5W, on armed forces: sexual offences, what investigations his Department has conducted into historic incidents of rape and sexual abuse since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [137343]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence does not treat historic incidents of rape and sexual assault as a separate category and this information is therefore, not available.

Babcock International

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the monetary value is of each contract Babcock International has with his Department. [123927]

Mr Dunne: In line with the Government’s ‘Transparency’ agenda, since January 2011, the Ministry of Defence has published details of all new non-exempt contracts it has awarded with an expected value of over £10,000 on Contracts Finder, available at the following link:

https://online.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by his Department; [143288]

(2) how many staff are based in each property used by his Department; [143309]

(3) what the (a) total floor space and (b) floor space measured in square metres per full-time equivalent post is of properties used by his Department; [143351]

(4) what the names and locations are of all properties used by officials of his Department; whether those properties are (a) owned by the Department, (b) leased by the Department and (c) subject to a private finance initiative agreement; when existing lease agreements relating to such properties are due to expire; and what the total floor space is of each property. [143372]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 18W

Mr Francois: While the Ministry of Defence centrally maintains details of its many thousands of property assets in the UK and overseas, all of the requested information for each could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

An Infrastructure Management System is currently being developed by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation that will assist in the more effective management of the Defence estate by providing better information about built and infrastructure assets.

Consultants

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much his Department has spent on professional services in each of the last five years. [140089]

Mr Francois: Expenditure on professional fees is published each year in the Ministry of Defence annual report.

For ease of reference they are reproduced in the following table, which shows a 34% reduction in spend between 2007-08 and 2011-12.

£000
Financial yearAdministration costsProgramme costsTotal

2007-08

470,748

470,748

2008-09

171,851

219,096

390,947

2009-10

140,763

167,541

308,304

2010-11

104,336

211,280

315,616

2011-12(1)

18,316

290,144

308,460

(1) From financial year 2011-12 a revised split between administration costs and programme costs was agreed with HM Treasury.

Cycling

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) whether his Department is signed up to the Government's Cycle to Work scheme; [144390]

(2) who his Department's cycling champion is; [144434]

(3) what progress his Department has made on implementing the Cycle to Work guarantee. [144452]

Mr Francois: Although the Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not participate in the Cycle to Work (C2W) scheme, it encourages greater cycle use with equivalent schemes, one for service personnel and one for civilians.

Eligible service personnel can claim a non-taxable benefit in the form of Home to Duty travel allowance (pedal cycle) and civilian personnel can apply for interest free loans of up to £1,000 to enable them to purchase a bicycle.

The MOD is committed to promoting healthier lifestyles and reducing pollution wherever possible, and our policies to encourage this are kept under review. We have recently appointed a Health and Wellbeing Champion, but we do not have a specific champion for cycling.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 19W

Dalgety Bay

Mr Gordon Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) when he received the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment report on radiation at Dalgety Bay; [143226]

(2) what reports or evidence he has received of pollution by radiation particles at Dalgety Bay; [143227]

(3) whether he has reported any possible polluter of radiation particles at Dalgety Bay to the Scottish Environment Protection Agency. [143228]

Mr Francois: It is the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) and not the Ministry of Defence (MOD) that is charged, within the context of land that could be designated as contaminated with radioactivity, with determining who is responsible. Therefore the MOD has not made any such report to SEPA.

A number of reports on alleged pollution by radiation particles at Dalgety Bay have been examined by MOD.

The MOD is aware of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment report on radiation at Dalgety Bay which was commissioned for the Scottish Government and is available via their website.

Defence

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will place in the Library a copy of the most recent Memorandum of Understanding signed with (a) Canada, (b) Norway and (c) Denmark. [143399]

Dr Murrison: The most recent Memoranda of Understanding with Canada, Norway and Denmark came into effect on 6 August 2012, 6 March 2012 and 19 September 2012, respectively. The latter two seek to enhance bilateral defence cooperation, whereas the first specifically seeks to enhance defence materiel cooperation. In line with normal practice, such agreements are not made public as the details they contain are confidential between the UK and the nation concerned.

Deloitte

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many meetings Ministers and officials in his Department had with Deloitte in each month of (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012; [135980]

(2) how much his Department paid to Deloitte for consultancy services in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [135989]

Mr Dunne: In line with the Government's ‘Transparency’ agenda, since January 2011 the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has published details of all new non-exempt contracts it has awarded with an expected value of over £10,000 on Contracts Finder, available at the following link:

https://online.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/

Information about meetings that officials held with Deloitte could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 20W

Ministers meet with a range of defence contractors to discuss a wide range of issues. Details of all ministerial meetings with external organisations, including companies, are published in the MOD's transparency returns. Information can be found online at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/ministers-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143449]

Mr Francois: Data on the amount of surplus food disposed of by the Ministry of Defence are not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Exchange Officers: France

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what role is to be assigned to each strategic exchange officer post to be exchanged with France; and what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of such posts in each of the next five years. [143401]

Mr Dunne: The precise roles of the new exchange officer posts with France, being set up in support of the Lancaster House Treaty, have not been finalised but include four positions in the French High Readiness Headquarters, one in the operational HQ, four in the French Ministry of Defence and one in the French staff college.

As the posts are due to be established between now and 2015-16 it is not possible to estimate precise costs but typically they incur an additional 50% of the normal capitation costs of each individual to cover accommodation and overseas allowances.

Gurkhas

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reasons Gurkhas were historically not allowed to access pensions or social security benefits when made redundant. [144049]

Mr Francois: Before 1 July 1997, when the Brigade of Gurkhas moved permanently from Hong Kong to the United Kingdom, Department of Social Security rules excluded them from paying national insurance contributions, even if serving temporarily in the United Kingdom. For this reason they were ineligible for state benefits. However, those that qualified by length of service would have received payments from the Gurkha Pension Scheme at that time, if they were made redundant.

Since May 2009 all ex-Gurkhas with more than four years service may apply to settle in the United Kingdom. Once settled they are eligible for state benefits.

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence for what reason Gurkhas were classed as foreigners and mercenaries before 1997. [144053]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 21W

Mr Francois: On 1 July 1997, with the withdrawal from Hong Kong, the Brigade of Gurkhas became a United Kingdom based force. Previously they had been based mainly in the Far East.

Gurkhas have a long and historic connection to the United Kingdom. They serve under special and unique arrangements. We certainly do not consider them to be mercenaries. Gurkhas have always been recruited with the agreement and consent of the Government of Nepal. They are required under this agreement to remain Nepali citizens during their service in the Brigade of Gurkhas.

Gurkhas: Children

Mr Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information his Department has on children of Gurkhas despite being born in the UK being registered as being born in Hong Kong or Brunei. [144055]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence does not hold this information.

ICT

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the (a) start date, (b) planned completion date, (c) expected completion date, (d) planned cost and (e) expected cost was of each information technology project with a value in excess of £1 million undertaken by his Department and its executive agencies since 2010; and if he will make a statement. [142365]

Mr Dunne: The information will take time to collate. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as it is available.

Libya and Somalia

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the defence sections of the British Embassy in (a) Libya and (b) Somalia is to be opened. [143398]

Dr Murrison: A permanent defence section is due to be established in Libya in December 2013 with the appointment of a Defence Attaché and a support staff officer.

There is a defence section in the British Office for Somalia, which is currently based in Nairobi. Her Majesty's Government will establish the defence section in Mogadishu when the British embassy is opened in Mogadishu later this year.

Logistics

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the statement on page 17 of the annexes to his Department's Business Plan 2012-15, published on 31 May 2012, that his Department will publish a logistics sub-strategy, for what reason that sub-strategy has been classified as restricted. [140604]

Mr Dunne: The defence logistics sub-strategy contains, among other information, details of numbers of force elements, their readiness levels, and their reaction times that would be of material use to an enemy of the United Kingdom.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 22W

Mali

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the total cost to the Exchequer of the British deployment to Mali in support of French military intervention in that country. [144682]

Mr Robathan: This is an emerging operation which has been under way for only four weeks. Cost estimates are currently being compiled and they will be available in due course.

Medals

Mr Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence who the members are of the committee on the polar medal; and who that committee's chairman is. [143544]

Mr Francois: The UK Polar Medal Assessment Committee (UKPMAC) is an independent committee that makes recommendations for the award of the polar medal to Her Majesty the Queen by the Secretary of State for Defence. The Chairman of the UKPMAC is Rear Admiral Tom Karsten, UK National Hydrographer and Deputy Chief Executive (Hydrography), United Kingdom Hydrographic Office. The Secretary is Captain Stuart Lawrence MBE RD RNR polar medal and clasp. In addition, the UKPMAC consists of eight eminent persons of the polar profession, who are in their own right holders of the polar medal.

With the exception of the Chairman and Secretary the committee's membership is not in the public domain to protect the integrity of the selection process.

Mr Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what criteria are used to award the polar medal. [143545]

Mr Francois: Nominations are considered in accordance with the criteria clearly outlined in the Royal Warrant of 1998 which was published in the London Gazette No. 55252 dated 14 September 1998, which is available at the following link:

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/55252/notices/4SI/from=1998-09-13;to-1998-09-15;all=polar

The document will be placed in the Library of the House.

Mr Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish the recipients of the polar medal in each of the last 10 years, together with their citations. [143546]

Mr Francois: The recipients of the polar medal are kept in the polar medal roll, which is updated annually. Copies are held by:

The Deputy Ceremonial Officer, Ceremonial Branch, Cabinet Office;

The Polar Regions Unit, Overseas Territories Department, Foreign and Commonwealth Office;

The National Hydrographer;

The Keeper of Public Records; and

The Assistant Secretary Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 23W

The polar medal recipients are also announced each year in the London Gazette, available online at:

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/

Recipients over the last 10 years have been collated and are shown in the following list. Citations are not in the public domain and are destroyed upon investiture.

2012: Polar medal

Antarctic to 2012

Mr Steven Richard Colwell, Meteorologist—British Antarctic Survey

Antarctic to 2011

Mr John Cameron Withers, Dive Officer, Base Commander—British Antarctic Survey

Antarctic to 2012

Mr Simon Martin Garrod, Polar Field Leader—British Antarctic Survey/Antarctic, Logistics and Expeditions

Arctic to 2012

Professor Terrence Vincent Callaghan, Professor in Arctic Ecology, University of Sheffield. Director, Swedish Royal Academy of Science—Abisko Station

Antarctic to 2012

Mr Tudor Morgan, Field Operations Manager—British Antarctic Survey, Operations Manager—United Kingdom Antarctic Heritage Trust

Antarctic 1957-60

Mr Edward Christopher John Clapp MBE, Radio Operator, Base Commander

2011

Antarctic to 2011

Mr Paul William Cousens, Deputy Project Manager, British Antarctic Survey

Mr Benjamin Richard Norrish, Vehicle Engineer, British Antarctic Survey

Dr Michael Lance Curtis, Field Geologist, British Antarctic Survey

Professor Michael James Bentley, Professor in Quaternary Environmental Change, Durham University

Mr Christian Kevin David Jacobs, Field Facilities Manager, Antarctic Logistics and Expeditions

Arctic and Antarctic to 2011

Mr David Thomson Meldrum, Polar Sciences Support Technician, Scottish Association for Marine Science

Second Clasp to Polar medal

Arctic and Antarctic to 2011

Professor Michael John Hambrey, Professor of Glaciology, Aberystwyth University

2010

Antarctic to 2010

Mr Duncan Evan Anderson, Chief Engineer, Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross

Mr David John Maxfield, Electronics Engineer, British Antarctic Survey

Mr Andrew David McConnachie, Plant Technician, British Antarctic Survey

Dr Teal Richard Riley PhD, Geologist, British Antarctic Survey

Mr Peter Ward, Marine Research Scientist, British Antarctic Survey

Antarctic and Arctic to 2010

Captain Graham Phillip Chapman MN, Master, Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross

Professor Martyn Tranter PhD, Professor of Physical Geography, Bristol University

25 Feb 2013 : Column 24W

Arctic and Antarctic to 2010

Dr Jonathan Ralph Ineson PhD, Geologist, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland

Second Clasp to Polar medal

Antarctic and Arctic to 2009

Mr Douglas George Allan, Cameraman, BBC Natural History Unit

2009

Antarctic to 1999

Mr John Richard Westland Hanson, Personnel Officer, British Antarctic Survey

Antarctic to 2009

Dr Robert David Larter PhD, Marine Geologist, British Antarctic Survey

Captain Alan Peter Meredith, Chief Pilot, British Antarctic Survey

2008

Antarctic to 2007

Mr Derek Michael Forward, Chief Engineer, Royal Research Ship (RRS) Ernest Shackleton

Antarctic to 2008

Ms Penelope Granger BDS, Dental Officer, British Antarctic Survey

Professor Lloyd Samuel Peck, PhD, Biologist, British Antarctic Survey

Antarctic and Arctic to 2008

Mr Richard Atkinson, Field Assistant, Dog Driver and Polar Conservationist

Dr Adrian John Fox, PhD, Head of Mapping and Geographic Information Centre, British Antarctic Survey

Second Clasp to Polar medal

Antarctic and Arctic to 2008

Professor Andrew Charles Clarke, PhD, Head of Science Division and Research Scientist, British Antarctic Survey

2007

Antarctic to 1999

Dr Simon Brockington BSc, PhD, Marine Assistant and Biologist

Antarctic to 2006

Dr Peter Convey BA, PhD, Terrestrial Biologist

Mr Alan Michael Carroll, Base Leader, Ionosphericist, Polar Historian and Conservationist

Antarctic to 2007

Miss Victoria Jane Auld, Base Commander and Meteorologist

Mr Russell Scott Ladkin, Instrument Engineer

Dr Philip Timothy Leat BSc, PhD, Research Geologist

Captain David Francis Leatherdale, Line Pilot and Survey Pilot

Mr Peter Charles Denis Lens, Communications Manager and IT Support Specialist

Antarctic and Arctic to 2007

Mr Robert Crawford Paterson, Chief Officer, Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross

2006

Antarctic to 2005

Dr Michael George Richardson, PhD, Zoologist, Base Leader and Head of Polar Regions, Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Antarctic to 2006

Mr Patrick George Fielder, Plant Technician and Facilities Manager

Mr Stephen Victor Hinde, Field Assistant and Winter Base Commander

25 Feb 2013 : Column 25W

Mr Malcolm Inch, Marine Engineering Officer, Royal Research Ship (RRS) Ernest Shackleton

Captain Leslie Kitson, Aircraft Pilot and Training Captain BAS Flight

Dr Thomas Anthony Lachlan-Cope, PhD, Polar Meteorologist

Dr Jonathan Lowton Watkins, PhD, Marine Biologist and Ecologist

Antarctic and Arctic to 1988

Dr Geoffrey Francis Hattersley-Smith, PhD, Geologist, Glaciologist, Base Leader and Polar Toponomist

Arctic and Antarctic to 2006

Professor Tavi Murray, PhD, Glaciologist

2005

Antarctic to 2004

Mr Jonathan David Shanklin, Meteorologist

Antarctic to 2005

Mr Andrew Thomas Barker, Communications Manager and Winter Base Commander

Mr Hugh Francis Joseph Corr, Ice Radar Scientist

Captain Antonio Gatti, Chief Officer and Acting Master Royal Research Ship (RRS) Ernest Shackleton

2004

Antarctic to 2004

Mr Michael Edward Patrick Gloistein, Radio Officer and Electro-Technical Officer (Communications)

Mr Matthew Robert Jobson, Carpenter and Builder

Mr Steven Marshall, Plumber, Field Assistant and Base Commander

Captain Nigel Douglas Pearson, Aircraft Pilot

Mr Mark Stewart, Information Technology Support and Communications Manager

Mr Stephen George White, Head of Vehicles and Engineering Section

Second Clasp to Polar medal

Antarctic to 2001

Professor John Patrick Croxall, CBE, Head of Birds and Seals Section, Biological Sciences Division

Antarctic to 2004

Mr Douglas Gordon Bone, Marine Biologist

2003

Antarctic 1944-45

James Edward Butler Futtit Farrington, Senior Radio Officer (since deceased)

Antarctic to 2003

Mr Rodney John Arnold, Field Operations Manager

Dr Adrian Jenkins, Glaciologist

Dr Keith William Nicholls, Oceanographer

Dr David Glyn Vaughan, Glaciologist

Antarctic and Arctic to 2003

Mr Keith Makinson, Drilling Engineer

Professor Elizabeth Mary Morris OBE, Glaciologist

Second Clasp to Polar medal

Antarctic and Arctic to 1989

Mr Allan Gill, Polar Scientist and Explorer

Mr Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) polar explorers and (b) employees of the British Antarctic Survey have been awarded the polar medal in each of the last 25 years. [143547]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 26W

Mr Francois: Polar medals were awarded to these categories as follows:

 Polar explorersEmployees of British Antarctic Survey (BAS)

2012

0

5

2011

0

3

2010

0

6

2009

0

3

2008

0

4

2007

0

7

2006

0

9

2005

0

4

2004

0

7

2003

0

6

2002

0

1

2001

0

4

2000

0

5

1999

0

6

1998

0

5

1997

0

4

1996

0

4

1995

0

11

1994

0

5

1993

1

3

1992

0

14

1991

0

2

1990

0

3

1989

0

3

1988

0

2

1987

0

10

Notes: 1. Since the Trans-globe expedition 1980-82 and the Footsteps of Expedition 1985-86, Polar Exploration, without an outstanding contribution to the research of polar sciences or in technical support of the research of polar sciences, is excluded from the award of the polar medal. 2. This includes recipients who may have been employed by the British Antarctic Survey only for part of the qualifying service required for their award.

Military Bases: Radioactive Waste

Mr Gordon Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which of his Department’s bases where radiation particles have been located are now subject to remediation action plans. [143225]

Mr Francois: Ministry of Defence (MOD) land where radium-226 contamination has been identified by the MOD Estate-wide Land Quality Assessments Programme is subject to suitable management controls. As a result, no MOD owned land is currently subject to remediation action plans.

Mr Gordon Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the work started on the clean-up of Almondbank, Perth; and when he expects such work to be completed. [143229]

Mr Francois: Almondbank is no longer owned by the Ministry of Defence; it was sold to Vector Aerospace in 2008. The physical remediation of the localised areas of radium-226 contaminated soil at Almondbank is currently scheduled to commence in the week beginning 18 March 2013 in accordance with the contract of sale. The work should take approximately 12 weeks to complete. Some preliminary work has already commenced.