Employment: Young People

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate he has made of the average number of hours a week spent in employment by people under 18 years old in each of the last 30 years. [144273]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking what estimate has been made of the average number of hours a week spent in employment by people under 18 years old in each of the last 30 years. (144273)

Estimates of average hours worked are derived from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). The information requested is shown in the following table. Estimates prior to 1993 are not available.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Four quarter annual averages, 1993 to 2012—United Kingdom
 Total in employment (thousand)Average actual weekly hours worked (hours)

1993

576

18.5

1994

580

18.8

1995

624

19.3

1996

666

18.9

1997

709

19.0

1998

699

19.3

1999

670

18.7

2000

662

18.0

2001

668

18.5

2002

659

17.8

2003

652

17.8

2004

642

17.7

2005

607

17.4

2006

559

16.2

25 Feb 2013 : Column 205W

2007

535

16.5

2008

524

16.0

2009

430

14.1

2010

377

13.6

2011

347

14.0

2012

346

13.6

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS)

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many and what proportion of teenagers under 18 years old were in work in each constituency in each of the last 30 years. [144274]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many and what proportion of teenagers under 18 years of age were in work in each constituency in each of the last 30 years. (144274)

The ONS compiles Labour Market Statistics for areas below the UK following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions using the Annual Population Survey (APS). Unfortunately, due to small sample sizes, the requested estimates are not sufficiently reliable and therefore not available at constituency level from this source. However, we can produce the data you require at a regional level. Please follow this link to our website.

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/subnational-labour/regional-labour-market-statistics/february-2013/rft-lfs-reg-x01-february-2013.xls

A wide range of other labour market data for parliamentary constituencies and local authorities are also published on the Office for National Statistics' Nomis website:

www.nomisweb.co.uk

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143446]

Mr Maude: I refer the hon. Lady to the answers I gave to the hon. Member for Bristol East (Kerry McCarthy) on 14 May 2012, Official Report, column 23W, 11 June 2012, Official Report, column 216W, and on 17 January 2013, Official Report, column 939W.

Married People: Working Hours

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many hours were worked on average by married couples in each of the last 30 years. [144271]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many hours were worked on average by married couples in each of the last 30 years (144271).

25 Feb 2013 : Column 206W

Estimates have been provided from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) household datasets. They show the average combined hours per week of couples where at least one of the couple was in work in April to June of each year since 1996. It covers hours worked in main job and second job where applicable. Data is not available prior to 1996.

The estimates are derived from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and are not seasonally adjusted. As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Average number of hours(1) worked by married couples, April-June 1996 to 2012, United Kingdom
 Average numbers of hours worked

2012

58

2011

59

2010

60

2009

59

2008

60

2007

60

2006

60

2005

61

2004

60

2003

60

2002

60

2001

61

2000

61

1999

61

1998

62

1997

62

1996

62

(1) Hours worked refers to the total actual hours worked per week by both partners in main and second job. Note: Those in employment are aged 16 and over. Source: Labour Force Survey household datasets

Older Workers: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate he has made of the number of people aged over 65 in the working population in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years. [143657]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking for the number of people aged over 65 in the working population in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and The Humber in each of the last 5 years.(143657)

Labour Market Statistics for geographic areas within the UK are produced from the Annual Population Survey (APS), following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions.

The term working population has been interpreted as those who were in employment in the week prior to interview, during the relevant reference periods. Estimates have been provided from the APS for the 12 month period October 2011 to September 2012, the latest available period, and for the 12 month periods ending in December for 2008 to 2011.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 207W

Estimates of people aged 65 and over have been provided, rather than over 65, as the former is the standard size-banding used for labour market analyses. Due to its small sample size, an estimate at Parliamentary Constituency level is not available for Brigg and Goole Constituency.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of. uncertainty. A guide to the quality of the estimates is given in the table.

A wide range of other labour market data for parliamentary constituencies and local authorities are also published on the Office for National Statistics' Nomis website:

www.nomisweb.co.uk

Number of people aged 65 and over in employment resident in Yorkshire and The Humber
 Thousand

12 months ending:

 

December 2008

47

December 2009

52

December 2010

58

December 2011

59

September 2012(1)

*56

(1) Coefficients of Variation have been calculated for the latest period as an indication of the quality of the estimates. See Guide to Quality. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: * 0 ≤ CV <5%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered precise ** 5 ≤ CV <10%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered reasonably precise *** 10 ≤ CV <20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered acceptable **** CV ≥ 20%—Statistical Robustness: Estimates are considered too unreliable for practical purposes Source: Annual Population Survey

Olympic Games 2012: Voluntary Work

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office which body now owns the database of London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games volunteers; and if he will make a statement. [143606]

Mr Hurd: The database is currently owned by LOCOG. An announcement on its future ownership will be made imminently.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 208W

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what estimate he has made of the total cost of the volunteering programme up to and after the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic games; and if he will make a statement. [143607]

Mr Hurd: Over the two years 2011-12 and 2012-13, over £30 million was spent on supporting social action initiatives and innovation in giving, including the giving of time, through the Social Action Fund and Innovation in Giving Fund. A further £40 million will be spent supporting social action over the next two financial years.

Personal Income

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the (a) national average income per head and (b) regional average income per head in England was in each month since May 2010; and what the average income per head is in Barnsley Central constituency. [143426]

Mr Hurd [holding answer 14 February 2013]:The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the (a) national average income per head and (b) regional average income per head in England is in each month since May 2010; and what the average income per head is in Barnsley Central constituency (143426).

Estimates of average income per head are not available, but estimates of average earnings for employee jobs are. Average levels of weekly earnings are estimated from the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), and are provided for all employees on adult rates of pay whose pay for the survey period was not affected by absence. ASHE, carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. Estimates are not available on a monthly basis.

The following table shows the median and mean gross weekly earnings for employee jobs in (a) the UK, (b) the English regions, and (c) Barnsley Central constituency for April in each year from 2010 to 2012.

Median and mean gross weekly earnings (£)—for all employee jobs(1) in the UK, the English regions and Barnsley Central constituency for April in each year from 2010 to 2012
 2010(2)2011(2)2011(3)2012(3)
 MedianMeanMedianMeanMedianMeanMedianMean

United Kingdom

403.8

487.6

403.9

491.4

400.0

487.2

405.0

490.3

         

North East

367.7

427.8

370.4

435.8

366.6

432.4

372.0

434.9

North West

377.4

449.4

373.7

445.9

370.8

442.0

378.0

448.3

Yorkshire and The Humber

375.2

435.4

374.1

437.8

369.7

433.1

376.6

440.4

East Midlands

379.6

447.5

378.1

443.9

373.7

439.3

378.3

444.8

West Midlands

376.7

445.4

375.6

444.6

370.0

439.1

378.5

445.4

East

389.8

462.0

392.3

463.5

387.4

458.1

387.5

455.1

London

564.3

688.4

566.5

708.0

562.6

702.1

572.8

696.9

South East

418.4

502.3

422.0

505.9

421.3

504.7

430.5

516.0

South West

371.6

437.6

366.5

432.0

362.8

428.2

366.5

431.2

         

25 Feb 2013 : Column 209W

25 Feb 2013 : Column 210W

Barnsley Central(4)

*391.7

431.2

*388.6

441.2

*384.8

436.6

*399.7

451.6

(1) Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. (2) Results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000. (3) Results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2010. (4) Parliamentary constituency. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of a figure, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5%, we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key: CV ≤ 5% * CV >5% and =10% CV = Coefficient of Variation Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics.

Personal Income: Tees Valley

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the average (a) personal and (b) household (i) gross and (ii) net income is in the Tees Valley. [143924]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the average (a) personal and (b) household (i) gross and (ii) net income is in the Tees Valley. (143924).

The Tees Valley is defined as the boroughs of Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland, Stockton-on-Tees and Darlington. The Middle Super Output Areas covering these five boroughs have been used to produce the income estimates. Table 1 shows the average gross and net weekly household income for the Tees Valley area, for 2007/08, the latest year for which data is available at this geographic level. It is anticipated that the next published set of estimates, for 2010/11, will be produced later this year. These figures are based on small area income estimates published by the ONS.

Personal gross and net income are unavailable from the small area income estimates. Gross income includes earnings (gross); self-employment; investments; disability benefits; retirement pensions and income support; other benefits (including tax credits); other pensions; and other/remaining sources. These estimates, as with any involving sample surveys, are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

Table 1: Average gross and net weekly household income in the Tees Valley, 2007/08(1,2)
£ per week
 Mean gross(3) household income (unequivalised)Mean net(4) household income (unequivalised)

2007/08

570

470

(1) Incomes are presented unequivalised and before housing costs. (2) Figures are rounded to the nearest £10. (3) The sum of the gross income of every household member plus income from taxes and benefits. (4) Net income is gross income minus income tax payments, national insurance contributions, council tax, contributions to occupational pension schemes and some inter-household payments. Source: ONS.

Population

Geoffrey Clifton-Brown: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will calculate from the 2011 census the number of adult citizens over 18 years of age residing in the UK from (a) the Commonwealth, (b) the Republic of Ireland and (c) EU countries excluding the Republic of Ireland. [142745]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking, from the 2011 Census, the number of adult citizens over 18 years of age residing in the UK from (a) the Commonwealth, (b) the Republic of Ireland and (c) EU countries excluding the Republic of Ireland. 142745

ONS has published “Country of Birth” estimates, but not “Country of Birth by age” and we are therefore unable to answer your question. However, the data you request is scheduled to be published between April and June this year, the next major release of Census statistics for England and Wales.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) how many and which regulations his Department has repealed between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what estimate he has made of the savings which will accrue to those affected by each such regulation as a result of its repeal; [142349]

(2) how many regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; if he will list those regulations; and what estimate he has made of the total cost of their introduction. [144693]

Mr Maude: Information regarding regulation introduced (INs) and repealed (OUTs) by the Cabinet Office is published on a six-monthly basis in its Statement of New Regulation (SNR). The period 1 June 2012 to 31 January 2013 is covered by Statements:

SNR3—1 January to 30 June 2012

SNR4—1 July 2012 to 31 December 2012, and

SNR5—1 January 2013 to 30 June 2013

All statements are available on the Cabinet website at:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/content/statement-new-regulation

25 Feb 2013 : Column 211W

Theft: Motor Vehicles

Andrew Percy: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many thefts of motor vehicles were recorded in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years. [143803]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many thefts of motor vehicles were recorded in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five years (143803).

Police recorded crime figures are provided for the last five financial years (April to March) for East Riding of Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire local authority areas combined and for Yorkshire and Humber. Crime data are not available at parliamentary constituency level; in this instance Brigg and Goole constituency spans two local authority areas. A combined figure for these two local authority areas is given. It should be noted that this combined area will cover a much larger area than Brigg and Goole constituency itself.

The table includes crimes recorded as either ‘Aggravated vehicle taking’ or ‘Theft or unauthorised taking of motor vehicle’.

 2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12

East Riding of Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire

1,144

1,163

781

696

584

Yorkshire and the Humber Region

19,466

17,875

12,962

10,766

8,900

National Statistics published by ONS on police recorded crime at local authority level are only available for aggregated offence groups. Therefore the data provided above, which refer to more specific offences, have been extracted from ‘Police recorded crime open data Community Safety Partnership tables from 2007-8 to 2010-11’ and ‘Police recorded crime open data Community Safety Partnership tables from 2011-12’, available at:

25 Feb 2013 : Column 212W

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/prc-open-data-tables/

Diana Johnson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many thefts of motor vehicles were recorded in (a) Hull and (b) Kingston upon Hull North constituency in each of the last five years. [144538]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated February 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many thefts of motor vehicles were recorded in (a) Hull and (b) Kingston upon Hull North constituency in each of the last five years [144538]

Police recorded crime figures are provided for the last five financial years (April to March) for the Hull local. authority area. Crime data are not available at parliamentary constituency level. The table includes crimes recorded as either ‘aggravated vehicle taking’ or ‘theft or unauthorised taking of motor vehicle’.

Kingston upon Hull2007/082008/09 2009/102010/112011/12

Theft of a motor vehicle

1,195

1,016 741

601

508

National Statistics published by ONS on police recorded crime at local authority level is only available for aggregated offence groups. Therefore the data provided above, which refer to more specific offences, have been extracted from ‘Police recorded crime open data Community Safety Partnership tables from 2007-8 to 2010-11’ and ‘Police recorded crime open data Community Safety Partnership tables from 2011-12’, available here:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/crime-research/prc-open-data-tables/

We would also recommend that you visit the ONS website for further information:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/crime-stats/crime-statistics/period-ending-march-2012/trends-in-crime--a-short-story.html

25 Feb 2013 : Column 213W

Written Answers to Questions

Monday 25 February 2013

Scotland

Corporate Services

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much his Department has paid to the Scottish Government for corporate services in each year since May 2010; and what services were provided for such payments. [143727]

Michael Moore: The Scotland Office paid the Scottish Government £121,934 in 2010-11, £114,915 in 2011-12 and £107,614 in 2012-13 for information communications and technology services.

Housing Benefit

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what estimate he has made of the number of people in Scotland who will receive housing benefit that is (a) less than £5, (b) £5 to £10, (c) £10 to £15, (d) £15 to £20, (e) £20 to £25 and (f) £25 and over per week lower than their current housing benefit following the introduction of the size criteria for housing benefit. [143728]

Michael Moore: The Department for Work and Pensions impact assessment, published on 28 June 2012, provides estimates of the number of people affected and the reduction in housing benefit they may experience. The impact assessment can be found at:

http://www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/social-sector-housing-under-occupation-wr2011-ia.pdf

Official Cars

Margaret Curran: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what the cost to the Exchequer has been of his ministerial car in each of the last three years. [143729]

Michael Moore: I refer the hon. Lady to the answer given to the hon. Member for Harrow West (Mr Thomas) on 13 February 2013, Official Report, column 744W.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and at what cost to the public purse. [143085]

David Mundell: Each year, the Scotland Office takes forward a programme of Orders under the Scotland Act 1998. Generally, Scotland Act Orders make changes to the law in England and Wales, Northern Ireland or the reserved law of the UK which are outwith the legislative competence of the Scottish Parliament, and many of these changes are consequential to provisions

25 Feb 2013 : Column 214W

made in Acts of the Scottish Parliament. Between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013 the following Orders came in to force:

The Glasgow Commonwealth Games Act 2008 (Ticket Touting Offence) (England and Wales and Northern Ireland) Order 2012 (S.I. 2012/1852); and

The Forestry Commissioners (Climate Change Functions) (Scotland) Order 2012 (Consequential Modifications) Order 2012 (S.I. 2012/2855).

There were no implementation costs associated with these Orders.

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Biofuels

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the answer of 4 February 2013, Official Report, column 7W, on biomass, if he will assess the potential social effects of fine particles estimated to arise from the combustion of biomass. [142653]

Richard Benyon: I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave him on 4 February 2012, Official Report, column 7W. Further to this, we have no current plans to carry out analysis of the potential social effects of fine particle emissions beyond the monetisation of the health impacts.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the extent to which TB- infected cattle sent for slaughter may enter the UK food chain; and if he will make a statement. [143404]

Mr Heath: It has always been the case that meat passed as fit for human consumption from TB test positive cattle (reactors) can enter the human food chain subject to the outcome of post-mortem inspection. Stringent post-mortem controls, which adhere to requirements set out in EU food hygiene legislation, operate in British slaughterhouses.

All cattle slaughtered for human consumption are examined ante- and post-mortem for evidence of disease (including TB) by Food Standards Agency (FSA) meat inspectors under the supervision of an official veterinarian. Where signs of generalised TB infection are present, or TB lesions are discovered in more than one organ or region of the carcase, the entire carcase and offal are seized and disposed of. If no visible lesions (or a single lesion) of TB are found, only the affected part of the carcase is destroyed. This judgement rule applies across the EU.

A good deal of research and risk assessments have been carried out in this area. The FSA's own independent expert advisory panel (the Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food) has concluded that the risk, if any, from consuming meat from TB reactors sold as fresh meat for human consumption is very low. TB is not typically an infection of the muscle tissue, but any bovine TB bacteria that might be found in the meat of infected cattle after post-mortem inspection should be killed by thorough cooking.

For more information see:

http://acmsf.food.gov.uk/acmsfmeets/acmsf2010/acmsf250310/acmsfagenda250310

25 Feb 2013 : Column 215W

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by his Department. [143292]

Richard Benyon: Details of property occupation costs for the Department are provided on the HM Government transparency website at:

http://www.data.gov.uk/dataset/epims/resource/fd9c00c8-48e1-4231-ada6-283f29a7c4ab

Coastal Erosion: Dorset

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of any sea level rises which will affect the Dorset coastline over the next (a) 10, (b) 30 and (c) 50 years; and if he will make a statement. [143586]

Richard Benyon: Coastal erosion risk mapping data were published on the Environment Agency website in April 2012, covering many parts of England and Wales, including the Dorset coastline. These data show erosion predicted over the short term (to about 2030), medium term (to about 2060) and long term (to about 2100).

Floods

Julian Sturdy: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the response to the recent floods. [138857]

Richard Benyon: The Government are grateful for the response from our front-line emergency services, which were deployed around the clock, including during public holidays. The staff of the fire, ambulance, police and other rescue services, local authorities, the Environment Agency, the voluntary sector and local communities worked tirelessly in response to the floods. The Flood Forecasting Centre consistently provided high-quality forecasting and was able to predict risks accurately, which enabled timely action to be taken on the ground.

The Environment Agency estimates that over 22,000 properties were protected in England and Wales which would otherwise have flooded in December, through a combination of flood defences, maintenance work, storage basins and temporary defence measures. This is in addition to 183,000 between April and November. In the course of the flooding events last year, nationally held flood rescue assets were successfully deployed to support local partners across the country, including high-volume pumps, boats and urban search and rescue assets.

Currently more than 97% of existing defences in high consequence areas are at or above their target condition and are expected to remain so within current budgets. The Environment Agency targets its maintenance to ensure that it meets any legal requirements and maximises the outcome in terms of reducing the risk of flooding.

Food: Waste

Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what proportion of food waste from the commercial catering sector was sent to landfill in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [143091]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 216W

Richard Benyon: DEFRA does not currently hold these data. The Government-funded Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has a study under way, however, which will include the figures for 2012. The results are expected this spring and will be available on WRAP’s website.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143452]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA occupies sites in London, York, Alnwick and Bristol. Catering is provided by a third-party contractor at Nobel House in London and Kings Pool in York. There is no catering provision at Lion House in Alnwick and core DEFRA is a minor occupier at Temple Quay House in Bristol, with no responsibility for the services in that building.

Data are available for food waste collected from the catering facility in London and staff composting caddies in both London and York. Data on food waste from the York site catering facility are not available. All food waste collected is sent for composting or anaerobic digestion.

The amount sent for composting or anaerobic digestion by core DEFRA in each of the last two financial years is shown in the following table. Data are not yet available for 2012-13.

 Tonnes

2010-11

31.04

2011-12

13.63

Horses: Animal Welfare

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if he will consider banning dry-branding of wild ponies. [142386]

Mr Heath: There are no proposals to ban either freeze branding or hot branding of semi-wild moorland ponies as these methods provide a useful way of visually identifying such animals. However, we have asked the relevant moorland pony societies to draft a code of practice on hot branding and they are also committed to looking at suitable alternative methods of identification. Dry-branding is not a term generally used in this context.

Meat: Contamination

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many laboratories in the UK are able to conduct the DNA tests necessary to identify adulterated horsemeat. [142942]

Mr Heath: There are seven laboratories in the UK that are able to conduct the DNA tests necessary to identify adulterated horsemeat.

Meat: Imports

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much processed and frozen meat has been imported from (a) EU countries and (b) other countries in the last month. [143221]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 217W

Mr Heath: The most recent month for which figures are available is November 2012.

The following table shows UK imports of prepared or preserved meat, and of frozen meat where distinguishable from the figures available, as recorded in Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs overseas trade statistics.

Tonnes
TypeEUNon EUNovember 2012 Total

Prepared or preserved Meat or Offal of all types

44,659

20,396

65,054

Beef and veal—frozen

4,244

900

5,144

Sheep and goat meat, frozen

445

3,124

3,569

Pork, frozen

6,883

140

7,024

Poultrymeat and offal, frozen(1)

11,262

1,994

13,256

Edible offal and other meat (e.g. game etc.), fresh, chilled or frozen

4,604

605

5,210

(1) Includes 33 tonnes of guinea fowl meat from EU which cannot be split between fresh, chilled or frozen. Note: 2012 data are subject to amendments. Source: HM Revenue and Customs

Milk

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government to assess the potential effect on milk supplies of the reduction in the options for control of flukicides; [143007]

(2) what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the European Commission's implementing regulations allowing for the establishment of maximum residue levels for milk in respect of the majority of flukicides. [143009]

Mr Heath [holding answer 12 February 2013]: The Veterinary Medicines Directorate regularly engages with the Scottish Government on Veterinary Medicines issues.

The decision to change the labelling on veterinary medicines containing certain flukicides to contra-indicate their use in lactating cows was made at the European level. The European Commission's series of implementing regulations permit the establishment of maximum residue limits (MRLs) in milk and will ensure the safety of milk and milk products from treated dairy cattle for consumers. As a result of the recently established MRLs for some flukicides, the Veterinary Medicines Directorate is encouraging manufacturers of these veterinary medicinal products authorised for use in the UK to apply for milk withdrawal periods by submitting residue depletion studies.

The availability of veterinary medicines is controlled by European law, and the Veterinary Medicines Directorate, as the competent authority for the United Kingdom, has contributed to the discussions held by the European

25 Feb 2013 : Column 218W

Medicines Agency Committee for Medicinal Products for Veterinary Use. This issue affects dairy producers in all member states, including the whole of the United Kingdom.

Advice on alternative veterinary medicinal products is available on request from the Veterinary Medicines Directorate.

National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) what recent discussions he has had with the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations on its representation of foreign fishing vessels; [143393]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations on increasing transparency of its (a) fishermen's associations and (b) vessel members. [143521]

Richard Benyon: I meet fishermen and members of their various representative bodies regularly to discuss a wide range of matters of interest.

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent discussions he has had with the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations on its continued representation of the vessel O Genita. [143520]

Richard Benyon: I have not met the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations to discuss the vessel O Genita.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many and which regulations his Department has repealed between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what estimate he has made of the savings which will accrue to those affected by each such regulation as a result of its repeal. [142025]

Richard Benyon: The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs revoked 24 statutory instruments between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013. A table of the instruments revoked is set out as follows. The Department did not repeal any primary legislation in this period. Any information that is available on estimated costs and savings to business is set out in individual Impact Assessments. These are available electronically from the Better Regulation Executive's Impact Assessment Library:

http://www.ialibrary.bis.gov.uk/

or

http://www.legislation.gov.uk

where they are linked to the legislation.

 Regulation

The Plant Protection Products (Sustainable Use) Regulations 2012

 

Regulations Revoked

The Plant Protection Products (Basic Conditions) Regulations 1997

 

The Plant Protection Products (Basic Conditions) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 1997

25 Feb 2013 : Column 219W

25 Feb 2013 : Column 220W

The British Waterways Board (Transfer of Functions) Order 2012

 

Regulation Revoked

The Regulatory Reform (British Waterways Board) Order 2003

The Volatile Organic Compounds in Paints, Varnishes and Vehicle Refinishing Products Regulations(1)

 

Regulations Revoked

The Volatile Organic Compounds in Paints, Varnishes and Vehicle Refinishing Products Regulations 2005

 

The Volatile Organic Compounds in Paints, Varnishes and Vehicle Refinishing Products (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2009

 

The Volatile Organic Compounds in Paints, Varnishes and Vehicle Refinishing Products (Amendment) Regulations 2010

The Conservation of Habitats and Species (Amendment) Regulations 2012

 

Regulations Revoked

Regulations 20 and 22 of the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010

The Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances (Abolition) Order 2012(1)

 

Regulations Revoked

The Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances Order 1991

 

The Advisory Committee on Hazardous Substances (Terms of Office) Regulations 1991

The Smoke Control Areas (Authorised Fuels) (England) (No. 2) Regulations 2012(1)

 

Regulation Revoked

The Smoke Control Areas (Authorised Fuels) (England) Regulations 2012

The Smoke Control Areas (Exempted Fireplaces) (England) (No. 2) Order 2012(1)

 

Regulation Revoked

The Smoke Control Areas (Exempted Fireplaces) (England) Order 2012

The Scallop Fishing (England) Order 2012

 

Regulation Revoked

The Scallop Fishing Order 2004

The Agricultural Holdings (Units of Production) (England) Order 2012(1)

 

Regulation Revoked

The Agricultural Holdings (Units of Production) (England) Order 2011

The Zootechnical Standards (England) Regulations 2012

 

Regulations Revoked

The Zootechnical Standards Regulations 1992 in relation to England

 

The Zootechnical Standards (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2007

The Common Agricultural Policy Single Payment and Support Schemes (Amendment) Regulations 2012(1)

 

Regulations Revoked

The Common Agricultural Policy Single Payment and Support Schemes (Reductions from Payments) (England) Regulations 2006

The Uplands Transitional Payment Regulations 2013(1)

 

Regulations Revoked

The Hill Farm Allowance Regulations 2006

 

The Hill Farm Allowance (Amendment) Regulations 2006

 

The Hill Farm Allowance Regulations 2007

 

The Hill Farm Allowance Regulations 2008

The Pollution Prevention and Control (Designation of Directives) (England and Wales) Order 2013(1)

 

Regulation Revoked

The Pollution Prevention and Control (Designation of Directives) (England and Wales) Order 2011

The Waste and Emissions Trading Act 2003 (Amendment etc.) Regulations 2013

 

Regulations Revoked

The Landfill Allowances and Trading Scheme (England) Regulations 2004

 

The Landfill Allowances and Trading Scheme (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2005

(1) Denotes that the measure did not require an impact assessment.

Slaughterhouses

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to European Council Regulation No. 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing, what steps he plans to take to comply with Article 3 of that regulation and ensure that animals shall be spared any avoidable pain, distress or suffering during their killing and related operations. [141888]

Mr Heath: The Government expect the highest standards of animal welfare at slaughter and any cruelty towards animals is unacceptable. Official veterinarians of the Food Standards Agency (FSA) are present at every licensed slaughterhouse (approved premises) in Great Britain and will investigate any alleged infringement of domestic or EU regulations.

We have consulted on proposals to implement Council Regulation (EC) 1099/2009 on the protection of animals at the time of killing in England and we are currently considering the responses received. Until new domestic

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implementing legislation is in place to replace existing domestic regulations (the Welfare of Animals (Slaughter or Killing) Regulations 1995) cases where it is alleged animals have suffered avoidable pain, distress or suffering at the time of killing will be investigated with a view to prosecution under section 4 of the Animal Welfare Act 2006. All FSA official veterinarians have been authorised to act on behalf of the Secretary of State in this capacity.

Trees

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many ash trees have been planted as part of the Big Tree Plant campaign since the launch of the scheme. [142366]

Mr Heath: Since its launch in December 2010, 239,514 trees have been planted as part of the Big Tree Plant campaign. These trees were planted during 2010-11 and 2011-12. I can confirm that at least 400 of these are ash trees. There will be many more, but applicants were not required to include detailed species breakdowns within their applications. The current application form requests greater detail on species, but retrospective information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Applicants are encouraged to plant United Kingdom- grown trees to avoid unknowingly importing pests and diseases and to buy their trees from reputable suppliers. To help prevent the spread of ash dieback disease we have also advised all applicants to replace any ash trees they were intending to plant during future planting seasons with alternative species.

Waste Management

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what recent progress he has made in implementing the principles of the waste hierarchy; and if he will make a statement. [143837]

Richard Benyon: In the 2011 Review of Waste Policy in England, DEFRA made a clear commitment to ensure that the waste hierarchy is embedded in all our major waste policies, such as the forthcoming Waste Prevention Programme and Waste Management Plan for England.

In the same year, we produced guidance to help industry understand and apply the waste hierarchy, along with in-depth supporting evidence. Last year, DEFRA officials and the Environment Agency ran a series of workshops across the country to familiarise waste producers with the concept and legal requirements of the waste hierarchy.

Yorkshire and the Humber

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many staff of his Department are employed in (a) Hull and (b) east Yorkshire. [144416]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA has no staff employed in either (a) Hull or (b) east Yorkshire.

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International Development

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by her Department. [143296]

Mr Duncan: DFID relocated in February 2013 to a new Government-owned London HQ in Whitehall.

In 2011-12 the amounts spent on UK estates were:

Financial 2011-12
£
Expenditure category1 Palace streetAbercrombie House

Rent

5,245,684

n/a

Rates

2,519,795

433,866

Contractual costs

902,944

451,501

Other costs

394,350

235,356

The move from Palace street to Whitehall is expected to reduce overall property costs by approximately £7 million per year.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the (a) total floor space and (b) floor space measured in square metres per full-time equivalent post is of properties used by her Department. [143359]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development has two UK properties occupied by officials.

Abercrombie House in East Kilbride has a total occupied floor space of 9,513 square metres and a floor space per full-time equivalent post of 17.02 square metres.

22 Whitehall has a total occupied floor space of 8,678 square metres and a floor space per full-time equivalent post of 11.15 square metres.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the names and locations are of all properties used by officials of her Department; whether those properties are (a) owned by the Department, (b) leased by the Department and (c) subject to a private finance initiative agreement; when existing lease agreements relating to such properties are due to expire; and what the total floor space is of each property. [143380]

Mr Duncan: DFID currently occupies two UK properties, as detailed in the table. The Department's London HQ has relocated to freehold property at 22 Whitehall, and has relinquished the lease on our former building (Palace St.).

PropertyLocationStatusTotal occupied floor space (sq m)

Abercrombie House

East Kilbride

Owned by HMG

9,513

22 Whitehall

London

Owned by HMG

8,678

The Department also has 30 overseas offices.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 223W

Burma

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what reports she has received on whether there is unrestricted access for the delivery of humanitarian access in Burma. [143110]

Mr Duncan: In 2011 British humanitarian aid reached over 86,000 people affected by conflict in Burma. However, access in some areas of Burma remains a concern.

In Kachin state, for example, international organisations, including the UN, struggle to receive access permission from both sides involved in the conflict. The UK, however, is able to deliver humanitarian aid there through an international non-government organisation, working closely with local organisations.

The UK regularly raises the urgent need for full and unfettered humanitarian access to all displaced people in Kachin state with the Burmese authorities, representatives of non-state armed groups and the UN. The Secretary of State for International Development, my right hon. Friend the Member for Putney (Justine Greening), discussed this with the UN's Emergency Relief Co-ordinator, Baroness Amos, recently.

Alex Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many children in Chin State, Burma will benefit from the work of the Myanmar Education Consortium. [143112]

Mr Duncan: Across eight townships in Chin State more than 7,500 children will benefit from Early Childhood Development and Primary Education support under the Myanmar Education Consortium.

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department spent on outside consultants working on Burma-related issues in each of the last two years. [143886]

Mr Duncan: In 2011-12, in Burma, DFID's expenditure on direct consultancy was £175,000. There has not been any spending on direct consultancy services in 2012-13. Details of DFID expenditure over £500 since April 2011 are available on the DFID website:

www.DFID.gov.uk

Valerie Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what funding her Department has provided for rehabilitation and counselling services for former political prisoners in Burma. [143887]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development has not provided funding for rehabilitation and counselling services for former political prisoners in Burma. The UK is, however, providing assistance through the British Council to help former political prisoners to develop the necessary skills, knowledge and confidence, including language skills, to take an active and effective role in the political process, perform more effectively within their organisations and communities, and engage with the diplomatic and international business community.

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Cycling

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development who her Department's cycling champion is. [144442]

Mr Duncan: DFID has three cyclists who champion an office-wide cycling group of over 80 members who disseminate information on cycling issues such as events, tips, cycling routes.

The cycling group have recently worked closely with the Facilities Management team on the accommodation move to a new office at Whitehall. We have ensured that the new cycling facilities meet all the cyclists' needs and help encourage more cycling. New features include secure cycle storage and improved shower and changing facilities.

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress her Department has made on implementing the Cycle to Work guarantee. [144460]

Mr Duncan: Although DFID is not formally signed up to the Cycle to Work guarantee, we do meet most of the requirements set out in this initiative. We have provided secure locker facilities, showers and changing facilities. We have also hosted bike repair sessions at our London office using the ‘Bike Doctor’ in the last few years. Due to the particularly wet weather at our Scottish office, we have also installed a drying room for our cyclists. The interests of our cyclists (in terms of facilities) were also taken into full account in the planning of our recent London HQ relocation.

We have also seen a significant increase in the number of DFID members joining the Cycle to Work scheme over the last few years. Our first member signed up in October 2008 and we now have a total of 145, over 11% of total staff. We actively promote the scheme through our internal website and we display information on cycle routes in our reception areas.

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether her Department has signed up to the Government's Cycle to Work scheme. [144473]

Mr Duncan: DFID is a member of the Government's Cycle to Work scheme.

Developing Countries: Climate Change

Guto Bebb: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what specific criteria on value for money must be satisfied before her Department allocates funds to the Green Climate Fund. [143674]

Lynne Featherstone: Delivering an effective Green Climate Fund (GCF) that provides excellent value for money for UK tax payers and for poor people in developing countries is a key UK objective. We are working to design a fund that can deliver at scale and at speed, is focused on results, and which incentivises action by the private sector.

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We are confident that an organisation that performs well against the UK's Multilateral Aid Review (MAR) criteria is providing value for money for UK aid. We will therefore assess the GCF design against the MAR criteria.

Developing Countries: Financial Services

Guto Bebb: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many projects her Department is funding that involve (a) inclusive financial services and (b) reform of regulatory environments for inclusive financial services. [143672]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) is currently implementing 16 financial sector development programmes that are working to improve policy, develop market infrastructure, build sustainable institutions and develop products and services to increase the access of poor people and small firms to affordable, quality financial services. DFID also supports a number of other initiatives implemented by partners that contribute directly or indirectly to providing inclusive financial services.

Improving the regulatory environment is integral to increasing financial inclusion. DFID is working through the G20 Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion to ensure the global regulatory environment remains effective and proportionate, while enabling responsible access to financial services for poor people. DFID also jointly funds the Financial Sector Reform and Strengthening Initiative, which provides technical assistance across a range of regulatory areas, including inclusive finance.

Developing Countries: Health Services

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which countries her Department is supporting in the training, recruitment and retention of health workers. [143556]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK is strongly committed to strengthening health systems and to supporting health workers as part of this. Our commitment to help save the lives of at least 50,000 women during pregnancy and childbirth and 250,000 newborn babies needs skilled health workers in the right place at the right time. DFID's support in 28 countries includes assistance to strengthening the health work force, including increasing the number of posts filled by trained health workers, such as nurses, birth attendants and midwives trained in emergency obstetric care. In Ethiopia, DFID support is helping scale up access to health care through increasing the numbers of community health workers across the country, including in remote areas. In Nepal, DFID is working with the Government to develop a strategic plan guiding investment in the health work force.

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what support her Department provides to countries to help strengthen their health systems in a long-term and sustainable fashion. [143557]

Lynne Featherstone: The Department for International Development (DFID) is preparing a position paper that will set out its approach to supporting countries to

25 Feb 2013 : Column 226W

strengthen their health systems in a long-term and sustainable fashion. The paper is expected to be published in the first half of 2013. It explains DFID's public health approach, which combines investments that achieve targeted results with investments that strengthen broader health systems. This approach is rooted in the UK Government's commitment to improve the health and well-being of the world's poorest people. Working in tandem with other partners and in support of a prioritised national plan, the UK approach delivers gains that countries can sustain and build on.

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what support her Department provides to developing countries to help strengthen their health work forces in line with the World Health Organisation Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel. [143558]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK adheres to the 2010 World Health Organisation Global Code of Practice and is taking forward the recommendations of the Health Worker Migration Policy Initiative to promote the self-sufficiency, effective development assistance and innovative policies for health worker migration. The Department for International Development works with developing countries such as Ethiopia and Bangladesh to develop their health work forces, improving the numbers, skills and distribution of health professionals. Improving conditions for health workers in their own countries reduces incentives for emigration to other countries.

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether her Department is involved in preparations for the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health in 2013. [143559]

Lynne Featherstone: The Department for International Development (DFID) is involved in preparations for the Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health in 2013. As a member of the Forum Organising Committee, DFID is providing strategic guidance to the forum programme and will help ensure oversight of quality and relevance. DFID sees the forum as an excellent opportunity to better understand human resources for health as critical for universal health coverage and the post-2015 development agenda, and to inspire greater engagement in solutions to the health work force crisis.

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what measures she is taking in support of the World Health Organisation’s initiative to achieve universal health coverage in low-income countries. [143560]

Lynne Featherstone: The United Kingdom is providing support to the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) Department of Health Systems and Financing to enable it to work with more low-income countries that have chosen to speed up their progress towards universal health coverage. The UK is providing both four years of funding and a health financing expert, who is seconded to WHO for two years. In 2011, the first year, this enabled WHO to provide direct support to 19 countries.

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At country level the UK is working closely with WHO to ensure that our support to Governments on universal health coverage is well co-ordinated. More broadly, the UK is supporting countries to strengthen their health systems (public and private) to ensure that good-quality essential health services are provided and are used by everyone. This requires work both to increase the quality and quantity of the services provided and to remove the barriers that prevent people, especially poor people, from using services.

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to (a) reduce growing inequalities in health in developing countries and (b) show that UK aid is reaching the poorest and marginalised groups. [143713]

Lynne Featherstone: Improving health is at the heart of DFID's international development work and efforts to improve global health are focused on reaching the poorest people and supporting the poorest countries. The UK focuses on helping countries deliver high-quality health services accessible to the poorest and most marginalised people, and supported by targeted health interventions that are directly addressing health inequalities.

DFID partner countries account for a third of the world's population and, together, experience a disproportionate burden of disease, disability and premature death. Over 48% of the global burden of disease and more than 68% of the global burden of all communicable diseases are found in DFID focus countries.

All projects and programmes must now have a clear monitoring plan that sets the outputs and outcomes that will be delivered. The monitoring and evaluation data are disaggregated wherever possible to effectively track results for girls and women (ie by gender and age) and for the poorest and most vulnerable (ie by income quintile and defined vulnerable groups where relevant).

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to measure the effect of its support for health system strengthening in low-income countries. [143714]

Lynne Featherstone: The Department for International Development (DFID) measures the success of its support for health in terms of specific results and outcomes for poor people (such as reduced burden of disease, improved child survival and better maternal health). Isolating the impact of health systems strengthening investments on health outcomes is complicated because many other factors (social, political and economic) also influence outcomes. There is, however, growing evidence that health systems interventions, such as improved training of health workers or fairer health financing systems, can lead to more use of better quality services, which in turn contributes to better health outcomes. Countries with stronger health systems have been shown to have lower infant, child and maternal mortality rates.

DFID carries out monitoring and evaluation of its programmes to learn lessons about what works and where in health systems strengthening. DFID is also investing in research to improve the measurement of the effect of systems strengthening on health outcomes, for

25 Feb 2013 : Column 228W

example by supporting the World Health Organisation to develop indicators and methods to monitor and evaluate progress in health financing and universal health coverage.

Developing Countries: Insurance

Guto Bebb: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many projects involving (a) microinsurance and (b) other forms of insurance have been funded on a (i) bilateral and (ii) multilateral basis using funds from the UK's International Climate Fund; and by what means her Department measures the value for money of such projects. [143673]

Lynne Featherstone: The International Climate Fund (ICF) is funding a wide range of projects that cover aspects of microinsurance and other forms of insurance to help poor people manage the risks of climate change. Multilateral investments include projects within the Least Developed Countries Fund and the Pilot Programme for Climate Resilience. These projects are financing the design and introduction of index-based microinsurance products to farmers and livestock keepers in Sudan, Niger and Zambia.

Bilateral projects include the Africa Risk Capacity programme, which is designing a continental index-based weather risk insurance fund. The programme is expected to support 500,000 vulnerable people per year affected by severe drought and to leverage at least $18 million of African public finance per year to help people cope with drought.

All projects under the ICF are designed and appraised on their value for money and are monitored to assess which programmes deliver the best value for money. In addition, the Department for International Development is supporting a study on the cost-effectiveness of existing investments in risk reduction of microinsurance.

Developing Countries: Religion

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress she has made in documenting the effect of faith groups through systematic research; and what plans she has for such research in the future. [144659]

Lynne Featherstone: The DFID “Faith Partnership Principles Paper”, which aimed to strengthen and guide DFID’s future relationship and collaboration with faith groups, recommended that the Faith Working Group should establish a ‘Community of Learning’ to document the effect of faith groups. A coalition of faith groups, academia and civil society organisations has established a “Joint Learning Initiative” to map the work and document the effectiveness of faith groups. DFID has been supportive of this coalition, has met representatives of the Joint Learning Initiative and has arranged a meeting to discuss this and agree the next steps at the end of February.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress she has made in developing and implementing the Faith Partnership Principles; and if she will make a statement. [144661]

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Lynne Featherstone: Since the launch of DFID's “Faith Partnership Principles Paper” in June 2012, DFID officials have been focussing on agreed priority actions. These have been to:

Build a common understanding of the role of faith groups in development. Through consultations, DFID has identified a focal country to explore this further. This work will begin in Tanzania over the next few weeks. Further details of the planned work will be made available via the DFID website in March:

www.dfid.gov.uk

Document the impact of faith groups. The Faith Partnership Principles Paper recommended that the Faith Working Group should establish a “Community of Learning.” A coalition of faith groups, academia and civil society organisations established a “Joint Learning Initiative” to map the work and document the effectiveness of faith groups. DFID has supported this, met representatives of the Joint Learning Initiative and has arranged a seminar on 26 February to discuss this in more detail.

Discuss areas of difference between DFID and faith groups. DFID held a workshop in November 2012, at which I spoke, for representatives of a wide range of faith groups to discuss the implications of the Faith Partnership Principles. DFID has also hosted open and frank discussions through the Faith Working Group. The next meeting of the Group will take place on 6 March.

I continue to be extremely supportive of this work and look forward to further developments.

Developing Countries: Renewable Energy

Mr Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what her Department's (a) policy and (b) programme is on (i) micro-hydro power generation and (ii) micro-solar power generation. [143496]

Lynne Featherstone: The Department for International Development supports the expansion of electricity access to people in developing countries, with all the benefits that brings to both individual wellbeing and national prosperity. Currently there are 1.3 billion people without electricity access. In a world of volatile fossil fuel prices and climate change, the expanded use of renewable energies is core to the challenge of sustainably expanding energy supplies.

Micro-hydro and micro-solar power generation are good examples of the kinds of technologies that will play an important role in achieving the goals of sustainable energy for all by 2030, as set out by the UN Secretary-General. Several International Climate Fund programmes incorporate support to such sectors. These include the Results-Based Financing for Low Carbon Energy Access programme announced last year, which will encourage private sector investment in delivering off-grid energy products and services to at least 2.5 million people in poor countries.

Developing Countries: Vaccination

Sir Tony Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to ensure that UK support for immunisation reaches those children who are unimmunised. [143715]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK supports basic health service delivery in some of the poorest countries, which includes routine immunisation for all children. Some health systems supplement their routine services with periodic campaigns, including, most commonly, for polio and measles. Campaigns are designed to reach children

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who may not have been immunised through routine health services and these can be the poorest and most marginalised. The UK provides support to both polio and measles through global partnership arrangements.

UK support for the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisations (GAVI Alliance) means that children have the chance of protection with new and underused vaccines. UK support to GAVI will fund the vaccination of 80 million children and save 1.4 million lives by 2015. For example, GAVI support helps ensure that children are receiving pneumococcal vaccine, to prevent a severe form of pneumonia, in countries where the vaccine would otherwise be unavailable.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much surplus food was thrown away by her Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143456]

Mr Duncan: Mitie Facilities Management took over the operation of the staff restaurant facilities in the Department for International Development's joint headquarters in London and East Kilbride in December 2010.

Mitie has advised that it does not measure its food wastage and is therefore unable to provide figures for these periods. It can confirm however, that any food wastage is minimal, as it is not in its commercial interest in its line of business to have more than 3% food waste where possible.

Mali

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to alleviate and tackle the humanitarian situation in northern Mali. [143832]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK is closely monitoring the humanitarian situation in Mali to ensure that needs are being met effectively and efficiently and is liaising regularly with the United Nations, non-governmental organisations and others to ensure a comprehensive response.

Earlier this month, the UK announced a further contribution of £5 million for Mali to add to the £8 million in humanitarian support announced in December, which was itself part of a £15 million package of humanitarian assistance for the wider Sahel region. Our support to Mali will provide urgent humanitarian aid (food, health care and clean water) to some 440,000 people directly affected by the Mali crisis, including those internally displaced.

Should further unmet needs emerge, the UK stands ready to take further action, including lobbying other donor Governments to do more.

Nigeria

Mr Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether her Department is providing advice to aid workers from the UK who are in, or may be going to, Nigeria, following the recent killing of nine health workers. [144155]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 231W

Mr Duncan: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office provides advice for travel to Nigeria on its Travel Advice website at:

www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/sub-saharan-africa/nigeria

This is frequently updated in the light of our assessment of potential threats and dangers to British citizens.

In addition, DFID ensures that all programmes operating in northern Nigeria have their own capacity for managing security and taking appropriate measures to protect their staff. We also continually share information and analysis which could help inform their decisions.

Overseas Aid

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much and what proportion of (a) official development assistance and (b) her Department's budget was spent on (i) direct monitoring and evaluation, (ii) developing evaluation methodologies and (iii) developing outcome metrics in each of the last five years. [144071]

Lynne Featherstone: The Department for International Development (DFID) has increased its focus on evaluation and monitoring. Currently, around 140 DFID staff are accredited as evaluation specialists. In 2012-13 a budget of £7.446 million was allocated to the evaluation department. Between now and 2015-16 we expect 393 evaluations to take place across DFID.

However, within DFID's information system it is not possible to disaggregate spending on monitoring and evaluation or developing outcome metrics. It is therefore not possible to obtain this information without incurring disproportionate cost.

Procurement

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the answer of 18 January 2013, Official Report, columns 994-95W, on procurement, if she will publish a list of all contracts by her Department with suppliers and consultants let by country offices with a contract value in excess of £10,000. [143851]

Justine Greening: To provide a list of all contracts let by country offices with a contract value in excess of £10,000 would incur disproportionate costs.

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2013, Official Report, column 645W, on procurement, whether the Procurement Group award all contracts to private sector suppliers, including those contracts led by country offices. [143853]

Justine Greening: The Department for International Development’s Procurement Group is responsible for contracts equal to or in excess of the EU Threshold (£113,000).

Public Appointments

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many people she appointed to public bodies in (a) 2010-11 and (b)

25 Feb 2013 : Column 232W

2011-12; (i) how many and (ii) what proportion of those appointees were (A) black or from an ethnic minority, (B) Hindu, (C) Muslim and (D) Chinese in each of those years; and if she will make a statement. [144110]

Mr Duncan: In 2010-11 four people were appointed by the Office of the Commissioner of Public Appointments (OCPA), and two were in 2011-12.

The OCPA collates and publishes information on the number of appointments of candidates from ethnic minority backgrounds. However, this information is not broken down by ethnic group. OCPA does not collect information regarding candidates' religion.

Copies of the 2010-11 and 2011-12 annual reports are available at:

http://publicappointmentscommissioner.independent.gov.uk

Copies are available in the House of Commons Library.

Public Expenditure

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2013, Official Report, columns 644-45W, on consultants, what proportion of her Department’s budget is spent via (a) non-governmental organisations, (b) multilateral organisations and (c) private consultants. [143852]

Justine Greening: A detailed breakdown of how the Department for International Development (DFID) spends its budget is available on the DFID website within the annual report at:

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/Site-search/?q=annual+report

This report is available for the last full financial year (2011-12).

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what regulations her Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and at what cost to the public purse. [143601]

Mr Duncan: None.

Sickness Absence

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many days of paid sickness leave per individual member of staff are authorised in her Department on an annual basis. [144488]

Mr Duncan: Figures for December 2012 show that staff on average have taken 4.3 days absence in the preceding 12 months, an improvement on the December 2011 figure of 4.7 days, and the December 2010 figure of 5.2 days.

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to reduce sickness absence in her Department. [144502]

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Mr Duncan: DFID monitors and provides targeted support, where appropriate, to its managers in dealing with staff sickness absence. We also work with employees absent due to ill-health to ensure they receive appropriate advice and support in order to minimize any absence.

Figures for December 2012 show that staff on average had taken 4.3 days absence in the preceding 12 months, an improvement on the December 2011 figure of 4.7 days, and the December 2010 figure of 5.2 days.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many staff are based in each property used by her Department. [143317]

Mr Duncan: DFID currently has 726 Home Civil Service (HCS) staff in post based in its London Office, plus 553 HCS staff in post based in its office in East Kilbride, near Glasgow. DFID also has 512 HCS staff and 918 Staff Appointed in Country working overseas, based in 53 countries. We do not publish numbers of staff in specific locations overseas, as to do so may represent a risk to such staff, especially those serving in fragile states or hostile environments.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if she will estimate her Department's total staffing requirement in full-time equivalent posts for fulfilling its minimum statutory obligations. [143338]

Mr Duncan: DFID does not classify staff numbers by minimum statutory obligations. We carry out work force planning exercises and have gathered forecasts of work force numbers from across the organisation. These projections indicate that during the 2014-15 financial year we will have 1,846 home civil service (HCS) posts, plus 1,010 staff appointed in country (SAIC) posts (total 2,856 posts).

Syria

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what safeguards are in place to prevent UK aid to tackle the humanitarian situation in Syria being used by the Syrian state. [144423]

Mr Duncan: DFID works through the UN and international non-governmental organisations to which our usual robust monitoring processes apply. All our aid is delivered in accordance with humanitarian principles of impartiality and neutrality and on the basis of need.

Training

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department spent on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if she will make a statement. [144090]

Mr Duncan: The Department for International Development (DFID) spent £3,140,519 in 2010-11 and £2,423,157 in 2011-12 on training and education for civil servants.

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These figures represent payments to training providers for staff training, further education and professional development for DFID staff, including staff appointed in country.

Yorkshire and the Humber

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many staff of her Department are employed in (a) Hull and (b) East Yorkshire. [144418]

Mr Duncan: None.

Zambia

Mr Ivan Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment she has made of the impact on the effectiveness of bilateral and multilateral aid to Zambia of the avoidance by UK companies of their tax liabilities in that country. [143825]

Justine Greening: DFID has a long history of support to the Zambian Revenue Authority (ZRA) to increase tax revenue and modernise tax processes. British support since 1994 has helped Zambia to double its tax-to-GDP ratio from only 10% in the early 1990s to over 21% in 2012. This support will continue over the next three years.

Tackling tax avoidance and illicit flows in developing countries is one of the coalition Government’s top priorities for this year’s UK presidency of the G8.

Energy and Climate Change

Alcoholic Drinks

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the level of alcohol-related absenteeism in his Department; whether his Department has an (a) internal alcohol policy and (b) occupational health strategy; and if he will publish such documents. [143964]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not record alcohol-related absence as a separate category of absence, and the Department does not have an alcohol abuse policy. Any instance of absence found to be connected to alcohol abuse would be confidentially managed and the individual supported as part of the relevant procedures, for example, attendance and/or performance management.

The misconduct procedure within the Department's Discipline policy should be used where an employee is found to be under the influence of alcohol on official premises.

Occupational health advice is available as part of the Department’s Health, Safety and Wellbeing strategy and guidance on referrals to the Occupational Health provider is published to staff on the Department's intranet. Line managers can consider a referral where they have concerns about the effects of a health problem on an employee's performance or attendance and work

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and medical advice can help determine the most appropriate course of action or support. A copy of the Occupational Health procedure will be deposited in the Libraries of the House.

British Nuclear Fuels

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much grant has been provided from the public purse to British Nuclear Fuels Limited in each year of its operation. [143469]

Mr Hayes: British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) was a self-financing public corporation. They did not receive any grant from the public purse.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 236W

BNFL's assets and liabilities were transferred to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority in 2005.

A shell company still exists in the name of BNFL, which is currently in the process of being wound up.

Accommodation

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by his Department. [143291]

Gregory Barker: The occupation costs for financial year 2011-12 for each property used by DECC are as follows:

    £
 3 Whitehall Place, London SW1A2AW55 Whitehall, London SW1A 2EHAtholl House, 86-88 Guild street Aberdeen AB116AR1 Victoria street, London SW1H 0ET(1)

Rent

4,314,196

(2)1

(3)319,515

Rates

1,308,357

156,860

111,003

Other costs(4)

1,152,002

202,257

252,722

Total

6,774,555

359,118

683,240

582,000

(1) Since I February 201 2, DECC have occupied space in 1 Victoria street (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills) on a short-term basis. DECC are not provided breakdown of occupation costs by type for this space. (2) Peppercorn rent—owned by Crown Estate. (3) Includes rent and rates for car park. (4 )Other costs cover core FM (including M&E repair and maintenance, cleaning, security) and utilities.