Carbon Monoxide: Alarms

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the proportion of domestic premises which have carbon monoxide alarms fitted. [144254]

Gregory Barker: No such estimate has been made.

Centrica

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with Centrica on its decision to forfeit its 20% option on four planned nuclear plants. [144626]

Mr Hayes: Government meet regularly with companies involved in the development of new nuclear power stations to discuss progress and the UK's nuclear policy. Centrica's decision to withdraw reflects the company's investment priorities and is not a reflection on UK Government policy.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of Centrica's decision to forfeit its 20 per cent option on four planned nuclear plants. [144627]

Mr Hayes: This Government are determined to make the UK a leading destination for investment in new nuclear by putting in place a framework to make this possible. Centrica's decision to withdraw reflects the company's investment priorities and is not a reflection on UK Government policy. We are continuing to see a high level of interest in the UK nuclear market, including from a diverse range of potential new entrants. We welcome EDF Energy's continued commitment to taking forward the Hinkley Point C project. Furthermore, the recent purchase of Horizon Nuclear Power by Hitachi is clear evidence of the attractiveness of the new nuclear market in the UK.

Cycling

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change who his Department's cycling champion is. [144437]

Gregory Barker: DECC does not have a cycling champion.

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what progress his Department has made on implementing the Cycle to Work guarantee. [144455]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has signed up to a Cycle to Work scheme with Cyclescheme Ltd. To date, 70 members of staff have registered with this scheme to purchase a cycle through this facility in order to get to work.

DECC provides a range of facilities to encourage and support staff who cycle to work on all of its sites. These include bike racks, changing rooms, lockers, drying cabinets and showers.

Mr Bradshaw: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change whether his Department has signed up to the Government's Cycle to Work scheme. [144468]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has signed up to a Cycle to Work scheme with Cyclescheme Ltd. To date, 70 members of staff have registered with this scheme to purchase a cycle through this facility in order to get to work.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 237W

Departmental Responsibilities

Chris Heaton-Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when his Department plans to publish the latest edition of Estimated Impacts of Energy and Climate Change Policies. [143804]

Mr Hayes: DECC's assessment of the impacts of energy and climate change policies on gas and electricity prices and bills is being updated to reflect recent developments including the 23 November announcement of the HMT Levy Control Framework for low carbon electricity up to 2020-21, and will be published shortly.

Electricity: EU Law

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department has taken to transpose Article 37, section 1(i) and (j) of the Electricity Directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 2003/54/EC into UK law. [143669]

Mr Hayes: Article 37 (i) and (j) of the Electricity Directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity were transposed by Regulation 31 of the Electricity and Gas (Internal Markets) Regulations 2011, which amends section 47 of the Electricity Act 1989.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department has taken to transpose Article 40 of the Electricity Directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing Directive 2003/54/EC into UK law. [143670]

Mr Hayes: Article 40 of the Electricity Directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity was transposed by Part 4 of Schedule 8 to the Electricity and Gas (Internal Markets) Regulations 2011, which introduces new conditions 5.5 to 5.8 in the electricity supply licence standard conditions.

Energy

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment his Department has made of the levels of transparency in the wholesale energy market. [143767]

Mr Hayes: Transparency is an important component of a well functioning market. It provides operational and investment signals and helps build consumer trust. Recent market-led developments have contributed to greater transparency. Trading on day-ahead exchanges represented 40% of total GB demand in the month of January—this represents a two-fold year on year increase in volumes. Still there is more that can be done especially to increase transparency in the forward markets.

The independent regulator is responsible for market functioning and improved liquidity is important in driving greater transparency. Ofgem is currently taking forward proposals to improve liquidity in the wholesale market and has stated it expects to make a decision on these reforms before the summer of 2013. We want to see swift and ambitious action from the regulator.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 238W

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment he has made of the level of competition in the wholesale energy market. [143768]

Mr Hayes: There are important issues that need to be addressed in order to further improve competition and protect consumers. Through the Energy Bill, we will ensure that consumers are on the cheapest tariff offered by their supplier that meets their preferences. We are also seeking backstop powers in the Energy Bill to allow the Government to act to improve liquidity in the wholesale electricity market if industry and Ofgem actions do not go far enough. These steps will strengthen competition in the marketplace and give consumers the opportunity to reduce their energy costs.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment his Department has made of the level of liquidity in the wholesale energy market. [143769]

Mr Hayes: Liquidity in the Great British wholesale energy market remains low in comparison to a number of other European markets, although there have been some improvements in near-term markets thanks to voluntary commitments from industry to trade greater volumes on day-ahead platforms.

However, the lack of liquidity in forward markets remains a problem, with a lack of robust prices along the trading curve and limited availability of products in the forward market. This continues to present a barrier to entry for independent supply and generation businesses.

Ofgem is currently consulting on proposals to increase liquidity and has stated it now has a firm preference for intervention. We expect to see a decision from Ofgem before the summer. The Government are seeking powers in the Energy Bill to intervene if that is necessary.

Energy: EU Law

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what progress has been made on the implementation of EU Regulation 1227/2011 on wholesale energy market integrity and transparency; and if he will make a statement; [143666]

(2) what steps his Department has taken to transpose EU Regulation 1227/2011, on wholesale energy market integrity and transparency into UK law. [143671]

Mr Hayes: The UK has taken a leading role in the development of the EU regulation on wholesale energy market integrity and transparency (REMIT) and aims to be one of the first member states to implement REMIT in full.

The core provisions of REMIT that need to be implemented are investigatory and enforcement powers for national regulatory authorities, including a framework for penalties. The UK intends to have these powers in place by 28 June deadline.

The Government will update Parliament on the UK’s regime when the regulations have been made.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 239W

EU Emissions Trading System

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the risk of carbon leakage if he does not provide the maximum level of compensation allowable to energy intensive industries under Phase III of the EU Emissions Trading System. [143910]

Gregory Barker: The Government are keen to ensure that UK industry is competitive and we continue to monitor and evaluate the risk of carbon leakage. Published research(1) suggests that the risk of carbon leakage to outside the EU is limited to a small number of sectors. The Department has recently commissioned a research project that will report later this year(2).

The best way to address carbon leakage is a legally binding international climate agreement. In the interim, under the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) industrial sectors at significant risk of carbon leakage receive an increased allocation of free allowances. Alongside this member states may choose to compensate a defined list of sectors deemed to be at significant risk of carbon leakage as a result of EU ETS related increases in electricity prices.

The European Commission published state aid guidelines last summer, which provided a clear methodology and formula for maximum levels of compensation for this purpose. The Government recently published a consultation on our proposals for the compensation package for energy intensive industries which closed in December. We are currently analysing responses and are exploring issues further, including with stakeholders.

(1 )Climate Strategies (UK) Reports (2007-2009) on: Tackling Leakage in a world of unequal carbon prices:

http://www.climatestrategies.org/research/our-reports/category/32.html

Hourcade et al (2001) Differentiation and Dynamics of EU ETS Industrial Competitiveness Impacts, Climate Strategies:

http://climatestrategies.org/research/our-reports/category/6/37.html

Oko-Institut (Germany), Fraunhofer ISI, DIW (September 2008) Impacts of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme on the industrial competitiveness in Germany:

http://www.umweltdaten.de/publikationen/fpdf-l/3625.pdf

DECC commissioned Cambridge Econometrics report 2010:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/47920/471-carbon-leakage-ce-report.pdf

(2) https://online.contractsfinder.businesslink.gov.uk/Common/View%20Notice.aspx?site=1000&lang=en&NoticeId=826481

EU Law

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) how many investigations Ofgem has undertaken under the provisions of article 40 of the electricity directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing directive 2003/54/EC in the latest period for which figures are available; [143662]

(2) how many investigations Ofgem has undertaken under the provisions of article 44 of the gas directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing directive 2003/55/EC in the latest period for which figures are available; [143663]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 240W

(3) how many requests for data Ofgem has made under article 40 of the electricity directive 2009/72/EC on common rules for the internal market in electricity and repealing directive 2003/54/EC in the latest period for which figures are available; [143664]

(4) how many requests for data Ofgem has made under article 44 of the gas directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing directive 2003/55/EC in the latest period for which figures are available. [143665]

Mr Hayes: The information requested is a matter for Ofgem. I have asked the chief executive of Ofgem to write to the right hon. Member and we will place a copy of his letter in the Libraries of the House.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143451]

Gregory Barker: DECC fully occupies two main sites in London (3 Whitehall Place and 55 Whitehall) and catering is provided by a third party contractor. The Department does not hold figures on how much surplus food is thrown away by its catering contractor but does collate data on food waste collections. This includes, for example plate waste and therefore the data are not just on surplus food.

Food waste data from these two sites are as follows and are based on our reporting year which runs from 1 April to 31 March.

 Tonnes

2010-11

8.77

2011-12

8.57

2012-13

(1)

(1) Data is not yet available

DECC also occupies space in Atholl House, Aberdeen, where there is no catering provision and space in the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) building in London (1 Victoria Street) but is a minor occupier and has no responsibilities for the services in that building.

Green Deal Scheme

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which hon. Members have been invited by his Department to be Green Deal parliamentary ambassadors; and which have (a) accepted and (b) declined that invitation. [143722]

Gregory Barker: Hon. Members who chaired or participated in the Green Deal policy development working groups and those who played a significant role in developing the Green Deal from a concept to a fully-fledged programme were invited to become parliamentary ambassadors for the Green Deal.

The hon. Members for Winchester (Steve Brine), East Londonderry (Mr Campbell), Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport (Oliver Colvile), Heywood and Middleton (Jim Dobbin), Richmond Park (Zac Goldsmith), Ipswich (Ben Gummer), Cheltenham (Martin Horwood), Truro

25 Feb 2013 : Column 241W

and Falmouth (Sarah Newton), Devizes (Claire Perry), Worcester (Mr Walker), the noble Lord Lindsay, the noble Baroness Parminter and the noble Lord Teverson have so far accepted the invitation. The hon. Members for Sittingbourne and Sheppey (Gordon Henderson), East Hampshire (Damian Hinds), Bracknell (Dr Lee), and the noble Lord Best declined the invitation. Seventeen members have not so far responded.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the number of households which have been prevented from taking out a Green Deal package because they have failed a credit check. [143724]

Gregory Barker: It is for lenders, including those providing Green Deal finance, to set their own credit policies. It is our understanding that The Green Deal Finance Company have set their credit scoring requirements low enough to ensure that Green Deal finance is accessible to over 80% of the population.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much of the funding of his Department's Green Deal communications campaign has been spent by (a) Freud PR, (b) the St Ives Group and (c) Carrot PR on each organisation's administration costs. [143725]

Gregory Barker: The agencies supporting DECC on the Green Deal (Freud Communications, St Luke's and CARAT) were procured by DECC by competition under the Government Procurement Service's frameworks to provide specified services. Each agency provided costs for delivery of the services but do not detail administration costs separately.

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change which publications will run Green Deal advertisements as part of his Department's Green Deal communications campaign. [143726]

Gregory Barker: In the period 29 January to 17 February, Green Deal advertisements will have appeared in the following titles:

Sun, Daily Mirror, Daily Star, Sun on Sunday, Sunday Mirror, People, Daily Star Sunday, Daily Express, Daily Mail, Sunday Express, Mail on Sunday, Times, Independent, Independent “I”, Guardian, Daily Telegraph, Sunday Times, Independent on Sunday, Observer, Sunday Telegraph, Metro, Evening Standard, Daily Record, Aberdeen Press & Journal, Glasgow Evening Times, Dundee Courier, Edinburgh Evening News, South Wales Echo, South Wales Evening Post, Wales on Sunday, Western Mail, Daily Post, South Wales Argus, Golwg(1).

(1) Publication date tbc.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what arrangements he has made with local authorities to allow funding for Green Deal pilot projects that were not spent in the financial year 2012-13 to be carried over into the next financial year. [144030]

Gregory Barker: All the Green Deal pilot project work is due to end on 31 March 2013. However, in recognition of delivery issues, for example inclement

25 Feb 2013 : Column 242W

weather conditions, we have offered all of the eight DECC funded core cities pilots (including Bristol) flexibility to carry over 5% of their total funding allocation up to 31 May 2013.

ICT

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the (a) start date, (b) original planned completion date, (c) expected completion date, (d) planned cost and (e) expected cost is for each information technology project over £1 million undertaken by his Department and its executive agencies since 1 April 2010; and if he will make a statement. [143956]

Gregory Barker: We have one information technology project over £1 million that is being, or has been, undertaken by the Department since 2010. The details are as follows:

(a) Start date August 2011;

(b) Original planned completion date of March 2014;

(c) Expected completion date of March 2014;

(d) Planned cost £46 million;

(e) Expected cost £41 million.

Inspections

Derek Twigg: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 6 February 2013, Official Report, column 241W, on inspections, what other priority work the Inspector has been occupied with that has caused a delay of about seven months. [143653]

Gregory Barker: The priority work undertaken by the Inspector during this time has included conducting one public inquiry and one hearing for new 132kV overhead line applications, writing his reports and recommendations to the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, and ensuring gas and electricity supply resilience before and during the London 2012 Olympics period.

Natural Gas: EU Law

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department has taken to transpose Article 41, section 1(i) and (j) of the Gas Directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 2003/55/EC into UK law. [143667]

Mr Hayes: Article 41, section l(i) and (j) of the Gas Directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas were transposed by Regulation 30 of the Electricity and Gas (Internal Markets) Regulations 2011, which amends section 34 of the Gas Act 1986.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department has taken to transpose Article 44 of the Gas Directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas and repealing Directive 2003/55/EC into UK law. [143668]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 243W

Mr Hayes: Article 44 of the Gas Directive 2009/73/EC on common rules for the internal market in natural gas was transposed by Part 3 of Schedule 7 to the Electricity and Gas (Internal Markets) Regulations 2011, which introduces new conditions 5.5 to 5.8 in the gas supply licence standard conditions.

Natural Gas: Price Fixing

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with (a) Ofgem and (b) the Financial Services Authority on price fixing in the gas market. [143720]

Mr Hayes: The Department has been in regular contact with Ofgem and the Financial Services Authority (FSA) since being informed in November of allegations of manipulation of the UK gas market. Ofgem is continuing its analysis—which includes close co-operation with FSA—with high priority. This analysis is being conducted independently of Government in accordance with the regulator’s established procedures.

Nuclear Power

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much (a) research and development funding and (b) other state support for nuclear fission was provided by his Department in each year since 2005, broken down by (i) technology and (ii) support scheme. [143872]

Mr Hayes: The latest confirmed information on UK research and development spend on nuclear fission is available for the period 2008 until 2010 and is broken down as follows: £4.254 million for 2008, £16.092 million for 2009 and £17.554 million for 2010. Note that the data are not broken down by Department or scheme as this level of detail is not available centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Furthermore, there are a number of staff across Whitehall and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority to ensure the right skills are available to operate and decommission existing nuclear power plants and to ensure we can maximise UK economic benefit from any future new build programme.

Ofgem

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what new monitoring duties have been placed on Ofgem since 2010; and what new information gathering powers have been given to Ofgem in that period. [143698]

Mr Hayes: Under the Gas and Electricity (Internal Markets) Regulations 2011, Ofgem was given new monitoring duties and information gathering powers with respect to ensuring that transmission and distribution system operators are effectively unbundled or separated from generation, production and supply interests.

The Warm Home Discount Regulations 2011 set out the detailed powers and duties the Authority has in relation to scheme verification, monitoring and compliance.

The Feed In Tariffs Order 2010 (now updated as the Feed In Tariffs Order 2012) provides Ofgem with powers to administer the GB Feed-In Tariff Scheme. Ofgem is required to monitor compliance with the scheme and has information seeking powers.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 244W

The Renewable Heat Incentive Regulations 2011 (as amended) set out the information gathering powers and monitoring duties that Ofgem has as the RHI scheme administrator. Ofgem is required to monitor compliance with the scheme and has information seeking powers.

The Renewables Obligation (Amendment) Order 2011 imposed sustainability requirements for bioliquids and additional reporting requirements for solid biomass, biogas and bioliquids, which Ofgem must be satisfied are met in order to issue renewables obligation certificates.

Through the Energy Companies Obligation (ECO) Order 2012, DECC have specified that obligated energy suppliers must notify Ofgem (as the scheme Administrator) of a completed energy efficiency measure installed under the scheme. Ofgem in turn is obliged to report to the Secretary of State on a monthly basis. Additionally, through the ECO Order a supplier must provide to the Administrator (Ofgem) such information as the Administrator may require relating to the cost to the supplier of achieving its obligations under the Order.

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many full-time staff are employed at Ofgem for the purposes of (a) monitoring the level of transparency, including of wholesale prices, and ensuring compliance of electricity undertakings with transparency obligations and (b) monitoring the level and effectiveness of market opening and competition at wholesale and retail levels. [143699]

Mr Hayes: The information requested is a matter for Ofgem. I have asked the chief executive of Ofgem to write to the hon. Member and we will place a copy of his letter in the Libraries of the House.

Power Failures: Brigg

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households in Brigg and Goole constituency experienced electricity supply failure in (a) 2012 and (b) 2013 to date; and what steps were taken to restore supply in each case. [143658]

Mr Hayes: DECC collects data for supply interruptions that are reportable under the Electricity Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations (ESQCR) 2002. Electricity transmission and distribution companies have a statutory duty to report certain interruptions to supply under regulation 32 of the ESQCR, as follows:

Interruptions of 20 MW or more for three minutes or longer.

Interruptions of 5 MW or more for one hour or longer.

Interruptions of 5,000 consumers or more for one hour or longer.

It is not possible to determine households affected in the Brigg and Goole constituency from the data. My officials can provide further information if details of specific incidents are provided.

Public Appointments

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many people he appointed to public bodies in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; (i) how many and (ii) what proportion of those appointees

25 Feb 2013 : Column 245W

were (A) black or from an ethnic minority, (B) Hindu, (C) Muslim and (D) Chinese in each of those years; and if he will make a statement. [144105]

Gregory Barker: In 2010-11, the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change made two new public appointments to DECC's public bodies, both were regulated by the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments (OCPA). The successful applicants were declared as being neither black, Hindu, Muslim, Chinese, nor from an ethnic minority.

In 2011-12, the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change made five new regulated public appointments. Of these five, three declared themselves as neither black, Hindu, Muslim, Chinese nor from an ethnic minority, and two did not declare their ethnic background.

DECC's public appointments are made in accordance with the OCPA Code of Practice. The overriding principle of the OCPA Code is that selection must be on merit and from a strong and diverse field of candidates. My Department is committed to ensuring that the advertising process and job specifications for public appointment vacancies encourage a fully representative field.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many and which regulations his Department has repealed between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what estimate he has made of the savings which will accrue to those affected by each such regulation as a result of its repeal. [142024]

Gregory Barker: The information requested is not held centrally and is currently being compiled. I will write to the hon. Member as soon the information is available and a copy of my letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and what the anticipated cost is of each. [144200]

Gregory Barker: The information requested is not held in the required format and is currently being compiled. I will write to the hon. Gentleman as soon the information is available and a copy of my letter will be placed in the Libraries of the House.

Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme

Graham Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the Renewable Heat Incentive on the price of wood. [143709]

Mr Hayes: DECC uses a range of assumptions for prices of biomass feedstocks given the range of current prices and uncertainty over future trends. Prices assumed in the heat sector were published alongside the Renewable Heat Incentive Impact Assessment in 2011:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/48044/1385-analytical-annex-rhi-ia.pdf

25 Feb 2013 : Column 246W

The Government's Bioenergy Strategy, published in April 2012 includes analysis of the potential areas where biomass for heating could make a cost effective contribution in a carbon constrained world:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/48337/5142-bioenergy-strategy-.pdf

It concludes that bioenergy is expected to play an important but relatively marginal role in the heat sector (ie its contribution focusing on filling the energy needs of vital segments that could be hard to decarbonise in other ways, such as high temperature industrial processes). This suggests that biomass heat deployment is unlikely to be the driving force for changes in market prices.

The full potential impact of the RHI on the demand and prices for biomass feedstocks is very difficult to estimate. Given the limited expected impact of the RHI on the demand for these products for heat compared to other energy uses it is expected that RHI will not be the driving force for changes in market prices, for further information see the RHI Impact Assessment (Annex 6):

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/48241/3775-renewable-heat-incentive-impact-assessment-dec-20.pdf

DECC recently consulted on proposals for biomass sustainability criteria for biomass installations supported under the RHI. In the impact assessment of those proposals, we requested any relevant evidence available be submitted as part of responses to consultation:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachement_data/file/43167/5885-ia-biomass-rhi-cons.pdf

We aim to publish a response to this consultation shortly.

Road Haulage Forum

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) when he last met the Road Haulage Forum; and who attended that meeting; [143982]

(2) when he met the Road Haulage Forum in the last year; and who attended each such meeting. [143984]

Gregory Barker: The Department publishes a list of ministerial meetings with external organisations, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-of-energy-climate-change&publication_type=transparency-data

Sickness Absence

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many days of paid sickness leave per individual member of staff are authorised in his Department on an annual basis. [144486]

Gregory Barker: In the annual period ending 31 December 2012, departmental records show that a total of 3,371 days were recorded as paid sickness leave.

This equates to 2.7 average working days Lost per staff year.

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to reduce sickness absence in his Department. [144500]

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Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change has taken a wide range of steps to reduce sickness absence, including promoting good health to the workforce though various health interventions and health information campaigns.

DECC has one of the lowest sickness absence rates in Whitehall and over the past 12 months our average working days lost has reduced from 4.7 to 2.7 per year.

Some examples of promoting good health include:

Wellbeing Days where a variety of health topics are covered, such as 'Back Awareness' and 'Healthy Eating and Nutritional advice'

Self service health kiosk where staff gain key health metrics, including weight, body mass index, body fat content, heart rate, blood pressure. Results from the kiosk have allowed previously unknown potential health concerns to be followed up by staff with their GP and review their progress on known concerns

Free of charge flu vaccinations for staff to help reduce the likelihood of this cause of absence

E-learning training courses on Stress Awareness and on correct use of Display Screen Equipment.

Information is regularly provided on various health related topics including how to lower the risk of contracting the Norovirus and Department of Health campaigns such as 'Quit Kit' for stopping smoking.

Line Managers hold back to work interviews with staff returning from sickness absence. The interview will be used to discuss any necessary interventions such as a medical referral, adjustments to work station, work pattern, duties etc. to ensure their return is successful.

Solar Power: Manufacturing Industries

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) whether his Department has assessed the potential effect of the EU Commission investigation into anti-dumping complaints against China on employment in the UK solar photovoltaic installation industry; [143565]

(2) what representations the Government has made to the EU Commission on its solar PV anti-dumping and anti-subsidy investigations; and if he will make a statement. [143566]

Gregory Barker: The UK Government examine each anti-dumping and anti-subsidy case on its merits, based on evidence presented by the Commission and representations received from interested parties, including producers, importers, retailers and consumers.

We submitted a number of technical questions to the Commission before it opened its investigations. The investigations are ongoing, and we will assess the Commission’s proposals very carefully (once we receive them).

We will continue to engage with all interested parties as the investigations continue.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff were employed by his Department in each of the last five years; and at what grade or pay band such staff were appointed. [142783]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 248W

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) was created in October 2008. Therefore there is no data prior to that date.

The data in the following table show the number of civil servants, by grade, working in DECC at 31 March for each year.

Grade2009201020112012

AA

2

1

AO

68.47

72.56

75.6

EO

111.39

108.49

110.83

HEO

195.2

231.39

235.57

Faststream

51.1

66.03

69

SEO

119.57

139.57

161.13

Grade 7

265.7

311.23

367.94

Grade 6

128.77

144.71

170.74

SCSPB1

60.29

63

68.12

SCSPB2

15.33

20.08

23.08

SCSPB3

3

3

3

Permanent Secretary

1

1

1

Total

768.1

1021.82

1162.06

1286.01

The data above shows staff in full time equivalent (fte).

The total number of staff shown for 2009 is the average number of staff used throughout the period as shown in the Department's Annual Report and Resource Account 2008-09 as a detailed grade breakdown of staff in March 2009 is not held.

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff are based in each property used by his Department. [143312]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change has staff based in four locations. The following table shows where they are located:

LocationNumbers of staff (full-time equivalent)

3 Whitehall Place, London

1,185.54

55 Whitehall, London

202.4

1 Victoria Street, London

112.47

Atholl House, Aberdeen

94.34

Total

1,594.78

The table gives the position as at 31 January 2013 and refers to the total number of people working on that site including civil servants and contingent workers.

Training

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department spent on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [144085]

Gregory Barker: The Department's expenditure on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 is £1.03 million and (b) in 2011-12 £2.16 million.

Travel

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much his Department spent on (a) the Government Car Service and (b) other taxi

25 Feb 2013 : Column 249W

or car services for ministerial travel in each year since 2009-10; and if he will make a statement. [142635]

Gregory Barker: Departmental spend on the Government Car Service is published in an annual written ministerial statement given by the Secretary of State for Transport, details of which can be found within the Libraries of both Houses.

A summary of the information for DECC is as follows:

 £

2009-10

303,129.83

2010-11

131,272.97

2011-12

36.687.79

Details of the costs for 2012-13 will be published in the normal way later this year.

Other car services
 £

2009-10

303.74

2010-11

20,999.89

2011-12

31,786.60

2012-13

(1)8,140.97

(1) To date.

Video Recordings

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what costs are borne by his Department arising from the production, filming and casting of the video entitled Arnold Schwarzenegger's Message for DECC's Energy Efficiency Mission; and by what category of expenditure. [143723]

Gregory Barker: The video message delivered by Governor Schwarzenegger in support of the DECC Energy Efficiency Strategy, which was shown at the DECC Energy Efficiency Mission Launch, was filmed at the Vienna R20 conference by a film crew working at the conference. The production, filming and casting of the video was done at no cost to DECC or the UK taxpayer.

Warm Home Discount Scheme

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the likely spend across suppliers for (a) core group and (b) broader group households for (i) Year two, (ii) Year three and (iii) Year four of the Warm Home Discount scheme. [144218]

Gregory Barker: Total spending under the Warm Home Discount across all suppliers is expected to be £288 million in year two (2012-13), £300 million in year three (2013-14) and £310 million in year four (2014-15).

Core group and non-core spending for each supplier is based on each supplier's share of domestic customers as at 31 December prior to each scheme year. Spending by suppliers is subsequently reported in Ofgem's annual reports published in autumn following the conclusion of each scheme year. Figures for spending by individual suppliers for years two to four of the scheme are not currently available.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 250W

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many (a) core group and (b) broader group households will receive rebates for (i) Year two, (ii) Year three and (iii) Year four of the Warm Home Discount scheme. [144219]

Gregory Barker: In year two, we estimate that around 1.16 million core group and 360,000 broader group rebates of £130 will be provided. The final numbers for year two will be published in Ofgem's annual report in autumn 2013.

On 14 February, I notified Ofgem of the non-core spending obligation for year three of the scheme. The non-core spending obligation, which includes the broader group, is £100 million, based on estimated core group spending of £200 million. Our figures suggest that in year three the scheme will provide around 1.48 million core group and at least 348,000 broader group rebates of £135.

We included an estimate of spending for year four in the original scheme impact assessment. This suggested that around 1.36 million core group and 643,000 broader group rebates of £140 would be provided in that year. However, the scale of year three core group spending indicates that there may be higher spending on the core group in year four than originally estimated, with a corresponding reduction in non-core spending.

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many (a) core group and (b) broader group households receiving rebates from the Warm Home Discount scheme are also beneficiaries of discounted tariffs or legacy rebates as part of the legacy spending transitional arrangements of the voluntary agreement post March 2011. [144220]

Gregory Barker: The energy suppliers participating in the Warm Home Discount scheme are not required to provide data on the number of customers who benefit both from core or broader group rebates and from legacy spending. Legacy spending in year one of the scheme was £102.9 million. This is due to fall in each year of the scheme with no legacy spending being permitted in year four. The fall in legacy spending will be offset by a rise in core group spending which provides more certain, more uniform and better targeted support to customers in or at risk of fuel poverty.

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households (a) received and (b) are estimated to receive rebates under the (i) core group and (ii) broader group elements of the Warm Home Discount scheme in (A) year one and (B) year two of the scheme. [144221]

Gregory Barker: In year one of the scheme, rebates under the warm home discount were worth £120. 701,746 electricity accounts were provided with a core group rebate and 234,297 with a broader group rebate. In year two, rebates are worth £130. We estimate that around 1.16 million core group and 360,000 broader group rebates will be provided. The final numbers for year two will be published in Ofgem’s annual report in autumn 2013.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 251W

Wind Power

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent estimate he has made of the amount of (a) onshore and (b) offshore wind power generated in each (i) region, (ii) county in England and (iii) local authority in England. [143562]

Mr Hayes: The following table shows the amount of electricity generated from wind power, by English region, in 2011. For reasons of disclosure, this cannot be disaggregated by onshore and offshore wind; for the same reason, DECC does not produce estimates of generation by English county or local authority.

Generation in 2011
English regionGWh

East Midlands

920.4

East

1,422.7

North East

323.1

North West

1,723.9

London

7.9

South East

1,270.2

South West

247.7

West Midlands

0.6

Yorkshire and the Humber

241.5

Total

6,158.1

Source: “Renewable electricity in Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and the regions of England in 2011”, Energy Trends September 2012, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/renewable-electricity-in-scotland-wales-northern-ireland-and-the-regions-of-england-in-2011

Glyn Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps he is taking to ensure that local authorities follow best practice guidelines on noise assessments for wind turbine applications. [144568]

Mr Hayes: The National Policy Statement for Renewable Energy (ENS 3) recommends that local authorities and others should use the method of assessing noise impacts from a wind farm as described in ‘ETSU-R-97’. DECC has asked the Institute of Acoustics to develop good practice guidance to supplement ETSU-R-97, and we expect this to be published in May.

Yorkshire and the Humber

Diana Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff of his Department are employed in (a) Hull and (b) East Yorkshire. [144415]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not have any staff employed in (a) Hull or (b) East Yorkshire.

Health

Abortion

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he plans to take to ensure that doctors and licensed abortion clinics do not intentionally misreport the reasons for which abortions are performed. [144148]

Anna Soubry: An abortion may only take place on grounds under the Abortion Act 1967, as amended. Anyone operating outside the Act is committing a criminal

25 Feb 2013 : Column 252W

offence and will be reported to the appropriate authorities. Ultimately, it is for the Crown Prosecution Service to decide whether to prosecute individuals and for the courts to determine whether there has been a breach of the law on abortion.

In February 2012, the Chief Medical Officer wrote to everyone involved in providing and commissioning treatment for the termination of pregnancy about the need to comply fully with all the requirements of the Abortion Act.

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department or the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists require an impartial translator to be present when doctors are consulted in relation to abortions by women who do not have a good command of English; and whether it is a requirement that any such consultations be undertaken without family members being present so as to avoid any coercion in respect of abortion of girls or disabled babies. [144151]

Anna Soubry: In their guidance ‘The Care of Women Requesting Induced Abortion’ (November 2011), the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists recommends that “Services should be culturally sensitive and professional interpreters should be available if required” and that “while women may choose to use family or friends as interpreters, in gaining consent to a procedure the provider needs to be absolutely certain that the woman is fully consenting. This can be guaranteed only if an independent professional interpretation services is used.”

The guideline also states that services should make sure that “written, objective, evidence-guided information is available for women considering abortion to take away before the procedure. Information should be available in a variety of languages and formats.” It also says that services should identify issues which make women particularly vulnerable including violence or abuse, in particular girls under the age of 16 should be given “the chance to disclose during a private moment when a parent or adult is not present”. In practice, most abortion services have a policy that all women should be seen on their own at some stage, without a partner or family member present, to ensure there is no coercion or other issue affecting the decision-making process.

Fiona Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether it would be a decision for his Department or for the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to require testing of aborted babies to ascertain (a) their gender and (b) the nature of any disability which they had. [144170]

Anna Soubry: The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists produced a report in June 2010 ‘Termination of Pregnancy for Fetal Abnormality in England, Scotland and Wales’. This report is intended to help doctors and other health professionals, within the law, to support women and their families when a fetal abnormality is diagnosed. It is designed to be explanatory rather than prescriptive. The report highlights that, following a termination performed for a fetal abnormality, pathological examination of the fetus may be undertaken in addition to that undertaken pre-procedure

25 Feb 2013 : Column 253W

as part of diagnostic testing. This might be at the request of the clinician, with parental consent, or the parents and is to ascertain the cause of the disability. Experience from fetal diagnosis is leading to a better understanding of the natural history of many fetal disorders and has improved prognostic information for parents in relation to future pregnancies.

We do not support the introduction of reporting the gender of aborted fetuses as we consider that this would have an effect not only on the woman in terms of causing undue distress but also on the medical profession.

Accident and Emergency Departments: Greater London

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many times the four hour waiting target was missed at each London accident and emergency department in quarter 1 and quarter 2 of 2012-13. [143808]

Anna Soubry: The information is not available in the format requested. Data are collected as a percentage of patients seen at trust level.

The following table gives an average percentage by quarter in 2012-13 for the trusts that did not meet the 95% standard.

Percentage of patients waiting less than four hours in NHS London trusts, 2012-13
 Percentage of patients seen in less than four hours (all accident and emergency departments) in 2012-13
Organisation nameQ1Q2Q3

Number of Trusts missing the 95% standard

4

1

6

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

88.4

92.0

88.9

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

94.3

95.0

96.1

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

94.1

96.9

94.5

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

95.9

96.1

93.8

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

97.0

97.0

93.4

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

96.6

96.7

94.7

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

97.3

98.0

96.3

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

94.7

95.4

95.3

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

95.8

96.7

94.1

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

97.6

98.3

97.5

Source: Department of Health Unify2 Data Collection WSitAE.

Dame Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many times ambulances waited more than 15 minutes to discharge their patients at accident and emergency departments at each of the hospitals in London in 2012. [143809]

Anna Soubry: The information is not available in the format requested.

Data on ambulance delays are collected as part of the Department’s winter pressures reporting at trust level.

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Ambulance handover delays are counted when they are over 30 minutes. The latest round of winter reporting began on 6 November 2012 and will continue to run through to the end of February 2013. The latest published data available is to week ending 3 February 2013 and is shown in the following table.

Winterwatch, (the Department’s dedicated website tool) provides regular weekly updates about how the NHS is coping with the increased demands on its services during the winter months. Data is collected on a rapid and daily turn-round basis from the NHS. The speed of the collection only permits minimal validation to be undertaken, but is considered ‘fit-for-purpose’.

Delays of over 30 minutes between ambulance arrival at accident and emergency and handover to accident and emergency staff
Organisation nameTotal delays over 30 minutes, 6 November 2012 to 3 February 2013

Barts Health NHS Trust

80

Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust

0

Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust

0

North Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

149

The Hillingdon Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

20

Kingston Hospital NHS Trust

0

Ealing Hospital NHS Trust

6

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

439

West Middlesex University Hospital NHS Trust

30

Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust

0

Lewisham Healthcare NHS Trust

159

Croydon Health Services NHS Trust

500

St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust

0

King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

0

The Whittington Hospital NHS Trust

0

Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Foundation Trust

0

Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

0

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

0

Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

1

Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

0

University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

0

Royal Brampton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

0

North West London Hospitals NHS Trust

711

Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals NHS Trust

127

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust

182

Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust

171

South London Healthcare NHS Trust

29

Source: Department of Health Unify2 Data Collection WSitAE.

Cancer

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the relationship between (a) cancer patient experience, (b) clinical effectiveness and (c) improvements in outcomes. [143734]

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Anna Soubry: Patient experience, and making the national health service more responsive to patients’ needs, is a key Government priority. We have committed to this in the NHS Mandate, the NHS Constitution and the NHS Outcomes Framework.

The Improving Outcomes in Cancer guidance published by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) sets out best practice treatment and support for patients in the provision of care for a range of cancer types.

To support a positive experience of care, the guidance highlights the importance of effective communication, providing good quality information to patients and supporting access to clinical nurse specialists (CNS). Good communication can reduce anxiety and give patients greater confidence, and discussions can increase the chance that each patient receives the treatment that is most appropriate for them.

The role of CNS is especially important in facilitating continuing good communication; for example, contact with a trained and experienced breast care nurse can reduce patients’ anxiety, depression and physical symptoms. The guidance recommends that cancer patients should have the name and contact number for a particular nurse, and should, whenever possible, see and speak to the same nurse.

We have said that the NICE Improving Outcomes Guidance will continue to be a feature of all commissioned cancer services from April 2013.

Through the 2010 and 2011-12 National Cancer Patient Experience Surveys, we have continued to monitor patients’ experience of NHS cancer care. Questions within the surveys have covered important issues such as access to CNS’, patient information and effective communication, as well as a range of other areas key to the delivery of high quality cancer care and improved outcomes.

Care Quality Commission: Redundancy Pay

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Secretary of State for Health with reference to the answer of 19 December 2011, Official Report, column 977W, on Care Quality Commission pay, how many special severance payments have been notified to HM Treasury by the Care Quality Commission since December 2011; and what the value is of each such payment. [143652]

Norman Lamb: The Department has been informed by the Care Quality Commission that no special severance payments were made in the time frame given.

Community Care

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether cost savings to the NHS resulting from the introduction of supervised community treatment under the Mental Health Act 2007 are on course to reach the level of £34 million per annum estimated in the regulatory impact assessment of that legislation. [144140]

Norman Lamb: The information requested is not available. The report of the Oxford Community Treatment Order Evaluation Trial (OCTET), due later this year, may provide information on the cost-effectiveness of Community Treatment Orders.

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Dental Services

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to collect data on the number of people who register with an NHS dentist each year. [143850]

Dr Poulter: These data are not held in the format requested.

Under the existing dental contract, patients do not register to receive national health service dental care. Access to dentistry is currently measured through the number of patients seen by an NHS dentist over a 24-month period. This information is published quarterly by the NHS Information Centre. The latest data cover the period ending 31 December 2012 and shows access to NHS dental services has increased by over 1.25 million since May 2010. They can be accessed at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB10217

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made on the development of a new NHS dentistry contract; and whether he has received feedback from clinical groups on the pilot scheme which is in progress. [144209]

Dr Poulter: The Government made a commitment to introducing a new dental contract and said there would be thorough preparation including piloting. Piloting intended to test key elements needed to design that contract began in 2011 and a second wave of pilots was announced in October 2012, to start from April 2013. The British Dental Association and a pilot practitioner have been closely involved on the National Steering Group for Dental Contract Reform and a wide range of other clinicians are engaged with the process.

Findings collected from the first wave of pilots were published on 5 October 2012, and are available on the Department's website at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/10/dental-contract-reform/

Dental Services: Children

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department has taken to improve access to NHS dentistry services for school-age children. [143549]

Dr Poulter: Access for children has increased by over 130,000 since May 2010. The Government are committed to increasing dental access. For the second year running the Government have made an additional in-year £30 million available to directly support increased dental access for adults and children.

Eyesight: Testing

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people applied for free NHS sight test vouchers in each of the last three years; and how many such applications were successful. [143598]

Dr Poulter: Free sight tests on the national health service are available to priority groups: people aged 60 and over, children under 16, those aged 16-18 in full-time education, people on low incomes and defined categories of people at particular risk of developing eye disease.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 257W

People who are eligible for a free NHS sight test may apply to any NHS General Ophthalmic Services contracted sight test provider rather than applying for a voucher. No records are kept of people who seek free NHS sight tests and are ineligible.

The following table shows the number of NHS sight tests for persons in England from 2009-10 to 2011-12. This information has been extracted from the report, “General Ophthalmic Services: Activity Statistics for England, Year ending 31 March 2012”.

NHS sight tests in England
 Number of free sight tests

2011-12

12,305,727

2010-11

11,938,529

2009-10

11,811,651

This report, published 12 July 2012, can be accessed here:

http://www.ic.nhs.uk/searchcatalogue?productid= 7880&topics=1%2fPrimary+care+services%2fEye+care +service&sort=Most+recent&soze=10&page=1#top

Food Standards Agency

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he plans to review the role of the Food Standards Agency. [143075]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) underwent a Capability Review in 2012, the report of which was published on 8 January 2013. A copy has been placed in the Library and is available on the FSA website at:

www.food.gov.uk/news-updates/news/2013/jan/capability-review

The review highlighted a number of strengths and capability gaps. The FSA has already developed a capability action plan to set out the steps the agency will take to address the gaps and ensure it is in a strong position to meet the challenges of the future.

The Department of Health, Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the FSA will be working closely together to consider and reflect upon the lessons learnt from the current horsemeat situation.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143454]

Dr Poulter: The Department does not keep specific records of waste or surplus food disposal, but samples to determine the composition of the waste have found that food waste makes up around 5%-10% of general waste. Food waste is sent for composting as part of the waste disposal service.

Health Services

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress he has made on the development and implementation of quality dashboards by the clinical reference groups on (a) neonatal critical care, (b) paediatric intensive care and (c) specialised maternity services; and if he will make a statement. [143189]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 258W

Dr Poulter: Quality dashboards have been produced for neonatal critical care and paediatric intensive care, but not specialised maternity services.

The quality dashboards are currently being piloted and an evaluation process to test the effectiveness of the dashboards is under way. An evaluation report will be provided to the NHS Commissioning Board in due course.

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he has taken in response to recent Care Quality Commission inspection reports on (a) the London Ambulance Service, (b) Chase Farm Hospital, (c) Croydon University Hospital, (d) Queen's Hospital, Romford and (e) Queen Mary's Hospital, London; and if he will make a statement. [144068]

Norman Lamb: It is for individual national health service trusts to respond directly to the findings of Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspections.

We expect trusts to take the necessary steps to meet all essential standards of quality and safety required for CQC registration.

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the implications of the census results from Islington, Camden and Haringey for the effect of the rising population on provision of health and social services in those areas. [144680]

Norman Lamb: The planning of health services is a matter for local national health service organisations. The hon. Member may wish to contact NHS North Central London or local clinical commissioning groups for further information.

Social care resources are currently allocated to local authorities using the relative needs formula, which takes account of demographic trends. The Department has commissioned independent experts to produce a new formula for allocating resources for adult social care to local authorities. This will take account of the latest evidence and information available. The formula review is at an early stage and further information is available at:

www.lgfutures.co.uk/adultsocialcarernf

Health Services: Disadvantaged

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the National Commissioning Board's fulfilment of its duty to reduce inequalities between patients with their ability to access health services under section 23 of the Health and Social Care Act 2012. [144655]

Anna Soubry: The Health and Social Care Act 2012 contains the first ever specific legal duties on health inequalities for national health service commissioners and the Secretary of State, including a requirement for the Secretary of State to conduct an assessment of how the NHS Commissioning Board has discharged their duty to have regard to the need to reduce health inequalities. This assessment is to be based on the Board's annual report.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 259W

The NHS Commissioning Board will take up its full statutory duties and responsibilities on 1 April 2013 and the Secretary of State's assessment will be conducted during the 2013-14 financial year. In addition to the formal annual assessment process, there will be an ongoing sponsorship relationship between the Department and the NHS Commissioning Board.

Hospitals: Admissions

Andrew Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in England and Wales aged (a) under 11 years, (b) 11 to 16 years, (c) under 18 years and (d) above 18 years were admitted to each hospital with (i) symptoms of alcohol poisoning, (ii) symptoms of substance abuse, (iii) stab wounds and (iv) gunshot wounds in each year for which figures are available. [144032]

Anna Soubry: Tables which show the number of finished admission episodes with a relevant diagnosis for all patients treated in England, by the hospital provider in which they were treated have been placed in the Library. The information is broken down into the following age groups:

Under 11 years

11 to 16 years

Under 18 years

18 years and over

Unknown.

These data are not a count of people as the same person may have been admitted on more than one occasion in any given time period.

Hyperkinetic Syndrome

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of a link between poor early infant attachment and hyperkinetic syndrome; [143100]

(2) whether his Department uses the term hyperkinetic syndrome to describe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); and what steps his Department is taking to address the early causes of ADHD in babyhood. [143106]

Norman Lamb: The Department of Health uses terms which are used by clinicians. The term hyperkinetic disorder, which is used by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) codes equates to the most severe cases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which is a term used by the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV).

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) provides advice to the national health service on clinical best practice. NICE published the clinical guideline “Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Diagnosis and management of ADHD in children, young people and adults” in September 2008. The guideline makes recommendations for the diagnosis and management of ADHD in children, young people and adults but does not include recommendations relevant to children aged under three. NICE routinely reviews its published guidance in order to take account of the latest available evidence.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 260W

The Department for Education announced on 27 December 2012 a package of reform measures aimed at improving adoption support. This includes commissioning NICE to develop guidance on evidence-based care and services for children with attachment disorders.

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

Mr Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will offer special assistance to Kettering General Hospital NHS Trust to help it meet NHS accident and emergency treatment time targets. [144683]

Anna Soubry: Delivery of the four hour Accident and Emergency Standard is the responsibility of the local national health service.

The Department has already provided £330 million in additional funding to the NHS to help it cope with winter pressures this year, so patients get the treatment they deserve.

Kettering General Hospital NHS Foundation Trust has received £1.4 million of that funding to help it meet some of the challenges it is currently facing.

The Department continues to maintain a tight focus on the operational activity of the NHS and continues to work with strategic health authorities to understand and actively respond to any potential rises in pressure.

Maternity Services

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many pregnant women in receipt of section 95 or section 4 support from the UK Border Agency throughout their pregnancy and birth attended (a) the same maternity service, (b) two different maternity services and (c) three or more different maternity services during their pregnancy and birth in (i) 2009, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2011 and (iv) 2012. [144660]

Dr Poulter: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Means-tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what cash and non-cash means-tested benefits are provided by his Department; what the rules are in respect of means-testing for each such benefit; and how much his Department spent on each in 2011-12. [144163]

Norman Lamb: The Department provides the following cash and non-cash means-tested benefits; Help with Health Costs, Social Care and Healthy Start.

Help with Health Costs provides: exemption from national health service charges for prescriptions, dental treatment, wigs and fabric supports, free sight tests, access to optical vouchers and assistance with the costs of travel to an NHS appointment on referral by a primary, care practitioner (e.g. doctor, dentist or optician).

This assistance is available to recipients (and partners and dependant children) of the following:

Income support

Income-related Employment and Support Allowance

Income-based Jobseeker's Allowance

Pension Credit Guarantee Credit

Child tax credit with gross annual income of £15, 276 or less or working tax credit which includes a disability or severe disability element and gross annual income of £15,276 or less.

25 Feb 2013 : Column 261W

In addition, assistance is available through the NHS Low Income Scheme (LIS) where the calculation of entitlement is based on income support regulations. The rules for Help with Health Costs is set out in the leaflet of the same name (HC11) available at:

www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthcosts/Documents/2012/HC11-oct12-approved.pdf

Information is not held by the Department on the total value of the assistance provided for NHS prescriptions, NHS dental treatment, assistance with costs of travel or wigs and fabric supports. Data on people who obtained NHS sight tests, NHS optical vouchers and help with the cost of a private sight test are contained in tables 1.2, 1.7 and Annex A, table 2.5 of the report, ‘General Ophthalmic Services: Activity Statistics for England, Year ending 31 March 2012’ available at:

www.ic.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB06889

People who need social care but cannot afford to pay for it can seek support from their local authority. Such people are expected to contribute towards the cost of their care. Regulations set out how local authorities assess a person's ability to pay for their care in a care home. For non-residential care, local authorities design their own charging policies within the scope of statutory guidance set out in Local Authority Circular LAC(DH)(2012)03, ‘Charging for Residential Accommodation and Non-Residential Care Services’, available at:

www.dh.gov.uk/health/2012/10/lac-fairercharging/

Copies of the above documents have been placed in the Library.

Social care funding is not ring-fenced. Local authorities are funded through council tax and central Government allocations but it is for individual local authorities to decide how much to spend on social care to meet local needs. Information is not held by the Department on the total value of assistance provided.

Healthy Start is a United Kingdom-wide welfare food scheme administered by the Department. It supports pregnant women and children under four in very low income families by providing vouchers to put towards the cost of milk, formula milk, fruit and vegetables, and free vitamin supplements. To qualify, families must be in receipt of one or more of the following:

Income Support

Income based Jobseeker’s Allowance

Income related Employment and Support Allowance

Child Tax Credit without Working Tax Credit (except Working Tax Credit run-on) and an annual income of £16,190 or less.

Families access the scheme by completing a short application form which is countersigned by a midwife or health visitor, who should use the opportunity to provide relevant information on breastfeeding and healthy diet. Guidance is available at:

www.healthystart.nhs.uk

In 2011-12, the total cost of providing Healthy Start throughout the UK was just over £100 million.

Meat: Contamination

Ms Ritchie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether he has received any representations from the Food Standards Agency regarding the potential contamination of meat products other than beef. [144173]

25 Feb 2013 : Column 262W

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has not made any representations to the Secretary of State for Health, regarding the potential contamination of meat products other than beef. The FSA has required the food industry to urgently carry out its own testing of processed meat products. The results from this activity are being published as they become available. It is also working with local authorities on a United Kingdom-wide survey of food authenticity in processed meat products, to be reported in April. The immediate focus of testing has been on minced beef products, for horse and other undeclared species. The FSA additionally runs a national sampling programme, which includes food authenticity and can be focused on emerging risks as new evidence and intelligence comes to light.

Ms Ritchie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his assessment is of the potential contamination of meat products other than beef. [144210]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standard Agency (FSA) has required industry to test meat products for horse and for other undeclared meat species and to report the results to them. Given the nature of the cases known to date, industry is prioritising testing on minced or comminuted beef products for horse. The first report of the results of this industry testing was published on the FSA website on 15 February, and an updated report published on 22 February. Copies of the reports have been placed in the Library. The results include 202 tests of non-beef meat products, all of which were negative for horse. A further update on industry test results for horse in beef products and in non-beef products will be published on 1 March.

In addition to this work, the FSA runs an annual £1.6 million national co-ordinated food sampling programme, under which local authorities carry out testing based on priorities put forward by FSA and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. A key part of the 2013-14 programme will be meat authenticity testing using DNA based methods to determine meat speciation, including testing for horse.

Meat: EU Law

Ms Ritchie: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effect of the ban on desinewed meat on the (a) food chain and (b) contamination of beef products. [144172]

Anna Soubry: The United Kingdom moratorium on the production and use of desinewed meat (DSM) implemented in spring 2012 prohibits the production of DSM obtained from ruminant bones (cattle, sheep and goats) or ruminant bone-in cuts and requires DSM obtained from non-ruminant bones (poultry and pigs) to be treated in all respects as mechanically separated meat (MSM) and labelled as such.

In order to comply with the moratorium, food businesses using ruminant DSM in their products will have needed to reformulate their products with alternative raw material or cease manufacture. Food businesses using non-ruminant DSM will have needed to change the consumer labelling

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of their products to reflect that they contain MSM, reformulate their products with alternative raw material or cease manufacture.

Investigations into the contamination of beef products with horsemeat are ongoing. But, regardless of any financial pressures that may have arisen from the moratorium, food businesses are required to ensure that products are produced legally, safe to eat and labelled accurately.

Medical Treatments

John Glen: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if his Department will recommend that individual commissioners implement National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) approved oesophageal Doppler monitoring and other fluid management technology at a place and scale in line with NICE guidance. [143745]

Norman Lamb: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published medical technologies guidance on the ‘CardioQ-ODM oesophageal doppler monitor’ in March 2011. The guidance is available on NICE'S website at:

www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/13312/52624/52624.pdf

It is for individual commissioners, working with their providers, to determine how best the benefits of new technology may be realised.

‘Innovation Health and Wealth’ sets out that from April 2013, compliance with six high impact innovations, including oesophageal Doppler monitoring, or similar fluid management monitoring technology, will become a pre-qualification requirement for Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN).

This means that providers will need to meet agreed implementation goals for these high impact innovations by March 2013 in order to qualify for CQUIN payments in 2013-14.

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what evaluation (a) his Department, (b) the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and (c) other NHS bodies have made of clinical evidence supporting (i) oesophageal Doppler monitoring and (ii) other fluid management monitoring technologies. [144156]

Dr Poulter: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published medical technologies guidance in March 2011 which states that the CardioQ-ODM oesophageal Doppler monitor should be considered for use in patients undergoing major or high-risk surgery or other surgical patients in whom a clinician would consider using invasive cardiovascular monitoring. The guidance is available on NICE's website at:

www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/13312/52624/52624.pdf

A comprehensive technology adoption pack has been produced by the NHS Technology Adoption Centre (NTAC) on behalf of the Department of Health, which contains reference to existing evidence for intra-operative fluid management. The adoption pack is available at:

www.ntac.nhs.uk/web/FILES/Intra_Operative_Fluid_Management/IOFM_Adoption_pack_final_140612.pdf

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Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if his Department will assess the effects of using oesophageal Doppler monitoring during surgery on (a) complications, (b) patient outcomes and (c) the length of hospital stay. [144157]

Dr Poulter: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) published medical technologies guidance in March 2011 on the CardioQ-ODM oesophageal Doppler monitor. NICE considered the available evidence on the clinical benefits of oesophageal Doppler monitoring in developing its guidance. The guidance is available at:

www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/13312/52624/52624.pdf

The NHS Technology Adoption Centre (NTAC) implemented oesophageal Doppler monitoring into clinical practice at three English hospitals and patient outcomes were compared in the 12 months before and after implementation. NTAC's case study “Oesophageal Doppler-guided fluid management during major surgery: reducing postoperative complications and bed days” is available at:

http://arms.evidence.nhs.uk/resources/qipp/645122/attachment

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the potential saving to the NHS of the oesophageal Doppler monitoring uptake programme recommended by his Department's Innovation Health and Wellbeing Report. [144158]

Dr Poulter: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence's costing template and report, which accompanies its medical technologies guidance on the CardioQ-ODM oesophageal Doppler monitor, estimates the net savings to the NHS in England through implementing its guidance to be £413 million per annum.

The costing template and report are available at:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/MTG3/CostingTemplate/xls/English

Sir Paul Beresford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate (a) his Department, (b) the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence and (c) the NHS Technology Adoption Centre have made of the number of patients who could benefit from oesophageal Doppler monitoring and similar fluid management monitoring technologies. [144159]

Dr Poulter: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)'s costing template and report, which accompanies its medical technologies guidance on the CardioQ-ODM oesophageal Doppler monitor, states that adoption of intra-operative fluid management across the NHS in England could benefit 10% of all surgical patients. Using figures for 2009-10 this equates to 837,145 people per year. The costing template and report are available at:

http://guidance.nice.org.uk/MTG3/CostingTemplate/xls/English

A comprehensive technology adoption pack has been produced by the NHS Technology Adoption Centre (NTAC) on behalf of the Department. This lists 77,560

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procedures carried out in England annually in which there is most evidence for the use of intra-operative fluid management. The adoption pack is available at:

www.ntac.nhs.uk/web/FILES/Intra_Operative_Fluid_Management/IOFM_Adoption_pack_final_140612.pdf

Myodil

Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate he has made of the number of people who have physical problems as a result of being injected with Myodil; and if he will make a statement. [143627]

Norman Lamb: We have made no estimate. The issues surrounding the use of Myodil in myelography and patients who received Myodil and who continue to experience physical problems are complex. Medical opinion indicates that the symptoms which some patients experience may be due to the original condition, degenerative back disease, or surgery or other medical procedure. Few cases of adhesive arachnoiditis, which is the condition associated with the use of Myodil, have been reported from the millions of myelograms that have been performed and the incidence of adhesive arachnoiditis due solely to the presence of Myodil or other contrast agent is not known.

NHS Direct

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department has conducted a full impact assessment on the decision to move Cumbria's out-of-hours telephone contact to the regional NHS Direct. [144698]

Anna Soubry: The commissioning of out-of-hours services is a matter for the local NHS.

The NHS 111 service will be rolled out nationally by June 2013. A full national impact assessment of NHS 111 is due to be published shortly, and the Department published a partial impact assessment on 15 December 2009. The information is contained in Impact Assessment of Three Digit Number (3DN), a copy of which has been placed in the Library. In Cumbria, NHS 111 is already live and is handling out of hours calls to improve responsiveness locally.

NHS: Property

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the total level of receipts was from the sale of non-trust NHS property in London in (a) each of the last three years and (b) 2013 to date; and if he will list all sources of that income. [144649]

Dr Poulter: The total receipts from the sale of non-national health service trust property i.e. that owned by the Department, in London, in the last three years and 2013, together with the sources of that income is set out in the following table. The cash released from the sale of surplus NHS properties is reinvested in upgrading and building new facilities to support the provision of high quality NHS care.

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 PropertyIncome (£)

2010

96 Harrowdene Road, Wembley

567,000

 

90 Capel Gardens, Pinner

460,000

 

Total for 2010

1,027,000

   

2011

No sales

0

   

2012

St James’ Court, Florence Way, Balham

1,570,000

   

2013

667-669 Garratt Lane, Wandsworth

200,000

NHS: Surveys

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to the public purse was of the most recent (a) in-patient, (b) outpatient, (c) accident and emergency, (d) maternity, (e) mental health and (f) cancer patient experience surveys. [143700]

Dr Poulter: To manage the National Cancer Patient Experience Survey 2011-12, the Department paid Quality Health, the Survey Provider, £398,090.58 (including VAT).

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is responsible for overseeing the national patient experience surveys programme, which comprises surveys of in-patient, out-patient, accident and emergency, maternity and mental health patient experience. The CQC provided the following information.

The CQC estimate that its own cost for providing national statistics for the year to 31 August 2012 is £1,882,000, but the total cost of each of these surveys is not quantifiable. This is due to the way in which patient experience surveys are commissioned. The national patient experience surveys programme operates a devolved model, whereby the CQC's role is limited to developing, designing and testing the surveys, and collating, analysing and publishing the results.

Individual national health service provider organisations are responsible for commissioning and funding these surveys. Some organisations choose to administer the surveys themselves, while others procure services from a group of five contractors approved by the CQC for running these surveys on behalf of the NHS.

Approved contractors may offer a variety of additional services (for example, increasing the sample size, adding extra questions, presenting the findings or developing action plans), the costs of which vary between each contractor. In addition, contractors may also offer discount packages for more than one survey or where groups of trusts use the same contractor. CQC is not party to these contracts and is not therefore able to state the total cost of each survey.

Regulation

Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what regulations his Department introduced between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013; and at what cost to the public purse. [143603]

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Dr Poulter: The Department introduced 19 sets of regulations and 15 Orders between 1 June 2012 and 31 January 2013.

A list of these has been placed in the Library.

Social Services: Kent

Tracey Crouch: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many and what proportion of adults are receiving social care in (a) Kent, (b) Medway and (c) Chatham and Aylesford constituency. [143738]

Norman Lamb: The number of adults receiving social care is collected by the health and social care information centre (HSCIC) as part of the referrals, assessments and packages of care (RAP) return. However, we are unable to provide data on the number of service users in Chatham and Aylesford as data are not collected at constituency level. Both Kent and Medway are local authority areas for which we are able to supply data.

Table 1 shows the number of and proportion of adults receiving social care in Kent and Medway local authority social service departments in 2011-12. Proportions of adults receiving social care are supplied as a percentage of all adults living within each area according to latest Office for National Statistics (ONS) population estimates.

Table 1: Number and proportion of adults receiving social care in Kent and Medway, 2011-12
 NumberProportion (expressed as a percentage)

Kent

42,820

3.7

Medway

6,195

3.0

Sources: RAP P1 proforma, HSCIC and ONS mid-year population estimates.