27 Feb 2013 : Column 475W

Written Answers to Questions

Wednesday 27 February 2013

Communities and Local Government

Empty Property

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what discussions he has had with (a) banks and (b) other main mortgage providers on his policies on bringing empty homes back into use. [140702]

Mr Prisk: Details of Ministers' meetings with external organisations are routinely published on my Department's website.

Food Banks

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which local authorities in England had food bank collections on their premises on 1 February (a) 2010 and (b) 2013. [143646]

Brandon Lewis: This information is not centrally held.

I would note the Trussell Trust compile an online food bank network:

http://www.trusselltrust.org/map

Housing

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether his Department will take steps against local authorities which do not have a local plan and which possess a continuing shortfall in housing land supply; and if he will make a statement. [142282]

Nick Boles: The National Planning Policy Framework makes clear that local planning authorities should use their evidence base to ensure that their local plan meets the full, objectively assessed needs for market and affordable housing in the housing market area, as far as is consistent with the policies set out in the framework. In doing so, they should look to meet any unmet requirements from neighbouring authorities, where it is reasonable to do so and consistent with achieving sustainable development. The framework also makes clear that local planning authorities should identify a supply of specific deliverable sites sufficient to provide five years’ worth of housing against their housing requirements.

Where the development plan is absent or silent, or relevant policies are out-of-date—such as those for the supply of housing—then the framework indicates that permission for development should be granted unless any adverse impacts of doing so would significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in the framework taken as a whole, or

27 Feb 2013 : Column 476W

specific policies in the framework indicate development should be restricted, for example green belt policy.

69% of local planning authorities in England now have a local plan at the publication stage or beyond.

To place this progress in context, six years after the passage of the last Administration's Planning Act 2004, only 57 core strategies had been adopted out of 335 local planning authorities by May 2010.

Housing: Older People

Mr Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether his Department has advised local authorities that they are able to differentiate specialist housing for older people within their charging schedules under the community infrastructure levy; and which local authorities have done so to date. [144837]

Nick Boles: The Community Infrastructure Levy regulations and guidance are clear that charging authorities can set differential rates by reference to both zones and the categories of development within its area.

The guidance also states that charging schedules should not impact disproportionately on particular sectors or specialist forms of development.

Levy rates are set following consultation and independent examination and they must not undermine the viability of development in the area.

The Department is not collecting detailed information on individual authorities' levy rates.

Mr Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what analysis his Department has undertaken on the effect of the community infrastructure levy on specialist housing for older people. [144838]

Nick Boles: It is early days for implementation of the levy. As outlined in my answer of 28 January 2013, Official Report, column 583W, the Community Infrastructure Levy was a measure introduced under the last Administration, although we are taking a series of steps to improve and reform it.

Any rates set under the levy must be evidence based and viable. This position is reinforced in regulations and guidance and in the National Planning Policy Framework. Rates must be consulted on and are subject to an independent inquiry.

The Department is not collecting detailed information on individual authorities' levy rates.

Mayor of London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what plans he has for the devolution of additional powers to the Mayor of London; and if he will make a statement. [145239]

Brandon Lewis: The Localism Act 2011 conferred on the Mayor of London responsibility for housing, economic development and Olympic legacy in London, in addition to existing responsibilities over transport, planning and the police. As a consequence, London is now largely independent of national Government in a very significant range of policy areas.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 477W

On 6 February 2012, DCLG agreed with the Greater London Authority a funding settlement to accompany these new powers, which provides them with an extra circa £3 billion in unring-fenced grant from 2011-12 to 2014-15.

From April 2013 onwards, the Government will be allowing local government to keep a share of business rates. In London, the Greater London Authority and the London boroughs will split the local share of retained business rates. This funding replaces a series of grants that both the Greater London Authority and the boroughs previously received.

While there is clearly scope for more decentralisation, my Department has no immediate plans to devolve additional powers specifically to the Mayor of London. Devolution of power should also be to the lowest appropriate level—down to councils, to neighbourhoods, to community groups and to individuals. However, the Government will in the near future be publishing its response to the Heseltine review, which included a number of recommendations regarding London.

Public Expenditure

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what recent discussions he has had with (a) HM Treasury and (b) other Departments on the single funding pot model of regional spending allocation. [144801]

Mr Prisk: Since Lord Heseltine published his report ‘No Stone Unturned’ in October 2012, there have been a number of cross-departmental discussions of his recommendations, including the single pot model.

As announced at the Autumn Statement, the Government will publish a full response in the spring.

Social Rented Housing

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he has taken steps to encourage mortgage holders to allow the leasing of their properties to a third party which is a registered housing provider. [140713]

Mr Prisk [holding answer 31 January 2013]: Where there is a mortgage outstanding on an empty property, some lenders will allow the owner to grant a lease to a registered housing provider, but this is a commercial decision for lenders.

There are schemes in the hon. Member's constituency which have received some of our £160 million funding for delivering empty homes as affordable housing. They involve housing providers approaching owners of empty properties and offering to take on a lease for a specified period. The housing provider will pay for the upfront capital works, and receive the rent from the tenant, paying a proportion of that on to the property owner. The investment made by the housing provider will be secured by a second charge on the property behind the mortgage.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 478W

Wind Power: Planning Permission

Dan Rogerson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many planning applications for wind turbines have been overturned on appeal by the planning inspectorate in (a) Cornwall and (b) England in each of the last three years. [141847]

Nick Boles: The following tables show for (a) Cornwall and (b) England, in each of last five calendar years, the numbers of planning applications for wind turbines that have been decided on appeal by the planning inspectorate where the local authority refused the application.

(a) Cornwall
Calendar yearAllowedPercentage allowedDismissedPercentage dismissedTotal

2008

1

50

1

50

2

2009

1

50

1

50

2

2010

2

100

0

0

2

2011

1

100

0

0

1

2012

4

50

4

50

8

(b) England
Calendar yearAllowedPercentage allowedDismissedPercentage dismissedTotal

2008

17

43

23

58

40

2009

31

52

29

48

60

2010

35

58

25

42

60

2011

45

55

37

45

82

2012

70

51

66

49

136

Within these figures are a number of appeals for turbines on individual dwellings. The figures do not include appeals against a condition on a planning permission, the non-determination of a planning application by a local authority or for related development such as an anemometer mast for measuring wind speed. The figures do not include appeals decided by the Secretary of State.

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many planning applications for wind turbines have been overturned on appeal by the planning inspectorate in (a) Lancashire and (b) England in each of the last three years. [143682]

Nick Boles: The following tables show for (a) Lancashire and (b) England, in each of last five calendar years, the numbers of planning applications for wind turbines that have been decided on appeal by the planning inspectorate where the local authority refused the application.

(a) Lancashire
Calendar yearAllowedPercentage allowedDismissedPercentage dismissedTotal

2008

2

67

1

33

3

2009

1

100

0

0

1

2010

2

100

0

0

2

2011

0

0

1

100

1

2012

2

29

5

71

7

27 Feb 2013 : Column 479W

(b) England
Calendar yearAllowedPercentage allowedDismissedPercentage dismissedTotal

2008

17

43

23

58

40

2009

31

52

29

48

60

2010

35

58

25

42

60

2011

45

55

37

45

82

2012

70

51

66

49

136

Within these figures are a number of appeals for turbines on individual dwellings. The figures do not include appeals against a condition on a planning permission, the non-determination of a planning application by a local authority or for related development such as an anemometer mast for measuring wind speed. The figures do not include appeals decided by the Secretary of State.

Attorney-General

Frances Andrade

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what recent discussions he has had with the Director of Public Prosecutions in respect of the case of Frances Andrade. [144704]

The Attorney-General: As I set out in the House on the 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 706, in response to the hon. Member for Feltham and Heston (Seema Malhotra), I meet the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) regularly to discuss a wide range of issues, including the circumstances surrounding the tragic case of Frances Andrade. The DPP is reviewing what happened in this case.

Both I and the DPP take very seriously any suggestion that victims have not received the support to which they are entitled.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for the Home Department in respect of the case of Frances Andrade. [144705]

The Attorney-General: I meet regularly with my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department and other criminal justice Ministers to discuss a wide range of issues, including the performance of the criminal justice system. The Secretary of State for the Home Department has set out that the police will review their role in this matter.

Northern Ireland

Budget March 2013

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what discussions she has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the potential effect of the 2013 Budget on Northern Ireland. [143576]

Mrs Villiers: I have regular discussions with my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer and other Treasury Ministers on a range of fiscal and economic matters relating to Northern Ireland.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 480W

National Crime Agency

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what representations she has received from political parties in Northern Ireland on the operation of the National Crime Agency in Northern Ireland. [143630]

Mike Penning: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has not received any formal representations from political parties in Northern Ireland on the operation of the National Crime Agency.

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for the Home Department on the operation of the National Crime Agency in Northern Ireland. [143631]

Mike Penning: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has spoken frequently to my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department about the National Crime Agency. Northern Ireland Office and Home Office officials are in contact on a daily basis with each other, and with the Department of Justice in Northern Ireland, and the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland is updated regularly on progress. The Government remains committed to delivering a UK-wide crime fighting agency focused on tackling serious, organised and complex crime.

Ian Paisley: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) what steps she is taking to persuade the Northern Ireland Executive to allow the implementation of the National Crime Agency; [143690]

(2) what discussions she has had with Sinn Fein on the National Crime Agency operating in Northern Ireland; [143764]

(3) what information her Department holds on the reasons Sinn Fein have blocked the National Crime Agency from operating in Northern Ireland. [143765]

Mike Penning: The Northern Ireland Justice Minister, David Ford, has been leading discussions with Northern Ireland political parties about the National Crime Agency. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has not discussed the matter in detail with Sinn Fein.

It is disappointing that despite extensive negotiation and a number of significant amendments to reflect the specific policing and accountability arrangements that exist in Northern Ireland, the Northern Ireland Executive have not chosen to take forward the legislative consent motion for the National Crime Agency.

Although time is now very limited, my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and the Secretary of State for the Home Department remain willing to consider proposals by the Executive, which would amend the Crime and Courts Bill to reflect Northern Ireland's specific circumstances. Both the Northern Ireland Office and the Home Office are in close contact with the Department of Justice as plans are developed for the implementation of the National Crime Agency in Northern Ireland.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 481W

Wales

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what occupation costs of each type are incurred for each property used by his Department. [143302]

Stephen Crabb: The Wales Office is based in two locations, London and Cardiff. The types of occupation costs the Office pays for these properties are business rates, utilities and rent for the Cardiff office (which is a leased property).

In the current financial year to date, we have paid £95,600 rates for our London office and £6,893.40 for utilities.

The Wales Office has recently moved into a new office in Cardiff and the business rates have yet to be set by Cardiff city council. The rent for the property in Cardiff is £89,958 per annum and the utilities will be charged before the end of the financial year.

Food: Waste

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how much surplus food was thrown away by his Department in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [143462]

Stephen Crabb: The Wales Office does not have any in-house catering but does host receptions on an ad hoc basis at which food is served. We keep no records of surplus food.

Public Appointments

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales how many people he appointed to public bodies in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; (i) how many and (ii) what proportion of those appointees were (A) black or from an ethnic minority, (B) Hindu, (C) Muslim and (D) Chinese in each of those years; and if he will make a statement. [144116]

Stephen Crabb: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Wales does not make public appointments.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will estimate his Department's total staffing requirement in full-time equivalent posts for fulfilling its minimum statutory obligations. [143344]

Stephen Crabb: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 13 February 2013, Official Report, column 722W.

The Wales Office's total staffing requirement for fulfilling the Secretary of State for Wales’s statutory obligations could be estimated only at disproportionate cost.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 482W

Home Department

Asylum

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) average, (b) range and (c) maximum length of time is for which asylum seekers in receipt of section 95 support had been receiving that type of support in the last 12 months. [134459]

Mr Harper [holding answer 18 December 2012]:We do not hold data on the amount of time people stay on section 95 support in a format that is compatible with National Statistics protocols. It is possible to provide an indication of the average time by taking a snapshot of the management information available about the current section 95 population. The average time is 525 days and more than half of these cases have been supported for less than one year.

Buildings

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) total floor space and (b) floor space measured in square metres per full-time equivalent post is of properties used by her Department. [143358]

James Brokenshire: The information requested is as follows:

(a) The total for disclosable properties and excluding those operated by contractors is 366,583 square metres (12 February 2013).

(b) This information is only held for administrative offices.

The Department's office space held for each full-time equivalent staff (at such administrative offices) was 12.4 square metres on 31 March 2012 when it was last calculated under the GPU's annual benchmarking system. Current projection is that this will reduce to 10.4 square metres by 2015 and options to achieve 10.00 square metres or less are being considered.

Communications Data Bill (Draft)

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the revised Communications Data Bill will be published. [144243]

James Brokenshire: The Government are committed to legislating to ensure the law enforcement and intelligence agencies continue to have access to the communications data they need. The Joint Committee that scrutinised the draft Bill recognised the importance of communications data as an investigative tool and accepted that there was

'a case for legislation which will provide the law enforcement authorities with some further access to communications data.'

A revised Communications Data Bill, incorporating the recommendations of the Joint Committee, will be introduced at the earliest possible opportunity.

Crimestoppers

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she expects to announce allocations of any financial support to Crimestoppers in 2013-14. [144009]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 483W

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Home Office will provide funding for Crimestoppers of £900,000 for 2013-14.

Entry Clearances: Fees and Charges

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the target time is for refunding visa fees to the public where these are owed by her Department; [144127]

(2) what estimate she has made of the amount owed to members of the public by her Department in refundable visa fees; [144128]

(3) what estimate she has made of the (a) average and (b) longest time taken by her Department to refund fees owed to members of the public in relation to visas in the latest period for which figures are available. [144129]

Mr Harper: There is no target time for refunding visa fees, as our policy is only to issue refunds on an exceptional basis. Visa decisions are made at decision making hubs, outside the UK (with the exceptions of the two visa sections that are in the UK, in Sheffield and Croydon). Refunds are only issued:

where a customer has applied for a visa and paid the fee, but withdraws their application prior to submitting their biometric data—that is, where we have not begun to process their application (e.g.: if the customer changes their mind about travelling to the UK, or where a customer has applied and paid for the wrong visa, or where a customer has paid twice in error)

if it is apparent that there has been maladministration of the application.

Refunds are issued by the decision making hub that received the visa application.

No estimate is made of outstanding refunds.

The time taken to issue refunds relating to visa applications made outside the UK is not recorded as it not a regular business activity.

Foreign Workers: Sittingbourne

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many companies in Sittingbourne and Sheppey constituency are registered to employ foreign nationals. [145042]

Mr Harper: The information requested could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate she has made of the number of foreign nationals employed in Sittingbourne and Sheppey constituency. [145043]

Mr Harper: The UK Border Agency is unable to provide the number of foreign nationals employed in the Sittingbourne and Sheppey constituency because it does not record the employment status of every foreign national in the UK.

Hillsborough Stadium

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions she has had with the Independent Police Complaints Commission

27 Feb 2013 : Column 484W

(IPCC) on Hillsborough; and what assessment she has made of the adequacy of resources available to the IPCC for that investigation. [142556]

Damian Green: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of these meetings are published on the Cabinet Office website on a quarterly basis.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department has committed to ensuring that the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) (investigating the tragedy's aftermath) and Jon Stoddart (investigating the Hillsborough deaths) have the resource and powers necessary to investigate the findings of the Hillsborough Independent Panel thoroughly, transparently and exhaustively. The IPCC and Jon Stoddart are working with the Home Office on the level of personnel and resource they require, as their investigations progress.

Steve Rotheram: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what discussions she has had with the Independent Police Complaints Commission on ensuring a timely conclusion to the Hillsborough investigation; and when she expects the scoping exercise to conclude. [144165]

Damian Green [holding answer 25 February 2013]: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of these meetings are published on the Cabinet Office website on a quarterly basis.

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department has committed to ensuring that the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) (investigating the tragedy's aftermath) and Jon Stoddart (investigating the Hillsborough deaths) have the resource and powers necessary to investigate the findings of the Hillsborough Independent Panel thoroughly, transparently and in a timely fashion.

The IPCC is independent, so the exact timescale of the scoping exercise is a matter for them.

Human Trafficking

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers in each police authority have specific responsibility for tackling human trafficking; and what their names and rank are. [144745]

Damian Green: The allocation of officers' responsibilities is an operational matter for chief constables.

Illegal Immigrants: Foreign Workers

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many reports of employers allegedly hiring illegal foreign workers her Department has received in each of the last five years. [144631]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 485W

Mr Harper: The information requested is not available centrally covering the last five years. The national Allegations Management System (AMS) went live on 30 September 2012 and will enable us to track individual allegations from receipt to outcome and to have a comprehensive overview of the types of immigration and smuggling crimes which members of the public are reporting.

Immigration Controls

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for further leave to remain under tier 1 immigration remain outstanding (a) four weeks after biometrics were taken, (b) three months after biometrics were taken and (c) longer than three months after biometrics were taken. [143894]

Mr Harper: The following table show the numbers of Tier 1 postal applications with biometrics enrolled, pending decisions.

Applications work in progress (WIP)Number of cases

0 to 1 month (0 to 4 weeks)

2,409

1 to 3 months

1,733

Over 3 months

2,833

Total

6,975

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. Figures relate to main applicants only. 3. Figures relate to Tier 1 postal applications only. 4. Figures relate to Tier 1 cases in work in progress (WIP), pending a decision. 5. Time in WIP based on the average number of calendar months from biometric enrolment or case creation date to 14 February 2013.

Means-tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what means-tested (a) cash and (b) non-cash benefits are provided by her Department; what the means-testing rules are for each such benefit; and how much was spent on each means-tested benefit in 2011-12. [144779]

James Brokenshire: The Home Department does not provide means-tested cash and non-cash benefits.

Meetings

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she last met the Chief Executive Officer of (a) Serco, (b) Capita and (c) G4S. [141975]

James Brokenshire: Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of these meetings are published on the Cabinet Office website on a quarterly basis.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 486W

Metropolitan Police

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she last visited New Scotland Yard. [141973]

James Brokenshire: Home Office Ministers have regular meetings with ministerial colleagues and others as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

National Wildlife Crime Unit

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether she has had discussions with the Scottish Government on the future of the National Wildlife Crime Unit after March 2013. [130153]

George Freeman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent meetings she has had with representatives of the National Wildlife Crime Unit; and if she will make a statement. [130221]

Mr Jeremy Browne: Home Office Ministers have regular meetings with ministerial colleagues and others as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As was the case with previous Administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

Offenders: Deportation

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign national offenders have left prison and currently reside within the UK awaiting deportation. [145000]

Mr Harper: In December 2012, 3,350 foreign national offenders were in the community, while being considered for deportation from the UK. In addition a further 752 were classified as absconders. These average figures are based on internal management information and are subject to change.

The majority of foreign national offenders living in the community prior to deportation are released by an Immigration Judge on bail. The UK Border Agency must also release those where we have been unable to maintain detention because deportation is not possible within a reasonable period of time. These individuals are assessed according to level of risk wherever possible those released are placed on restrictions while the Agency continues to pursue deportation.

Overtime

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was to the public purse of overtime incurred by staff at the UK Border Agency in 2012. [144999]

Mr Harper: The cost of overtime in the UK Border Agency in calendar year 2012 was £7.6 million.

The figure for 2012 is higher than in previous years. This is due to increased levels of overtime required as a

27 Feb 2013 : Column 487W

result of providing contingency support to Border Force leading up to the Queen's jubilee and leading up to, during and after the Olympic Games.

The information provided is for staff at Grade 6 and below in the UK Border Agency. Senior civil servants are not entitled to overtime payments.


Passports

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many passports are issued annually by (a) each regional passport office and (b) age range of the applicant; and if she will make a statement. [144545]

Mr Harper: The information is provided as follows:

(a) The number of passports issued by each regional passport office for the calendar year 2012 is shown in the following table. Passport applications are distributed across regional offices based on capacity and resources in each office.

Office2012

Belfast

426,752

Durham

2,037,716

Glasgow

170,423

Liverpool

1,269,945

London

206,391

Newport

62,709

Peterborough

1,130,313

Total

5,304,249

(b) The number of passports issued in the UK by age range for the calendar year 2012 is shown in the following table:

Applicant age band2012

0 to 5

700,828

6 to 10

435,946

11 to 15

474,775

16 to 20

556,256

21 to 25

201,353

26 to 30

346,358

31 to 35

263,514

36 to 40

313,074

41 to 45

322,749

46 to 50

369,265

51 to 55

299,640

56 to 60

265,687

61 to 65

274,368

66 to 70

201,397

71 to 75

137,020

76 to 80

83,164

81 to 90

55,734

91 +

3,121

Total

5,304,249

Pay

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many senior members of staff at the (a) UK Border Force, (b) UK Border Agency and (c) Identity and Passport Service she expects will receive bonuses in 2012. [144997]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 488W

Mr Harper: As was the policy under the previous Government, the Home Office follows Cabinet Office guidelines to assess the performance of its senior members of staff. This assessment takes place after the performance year, which runs from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013, ends; we expect the assessment therefore for the 2012-13 performance year to take place in late spring.

Police ICT Company

Mr Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department by what date she expects the proposed police IT company to be fully operational. [138681]

Damian Green: The decision to make the company fully operational is a commercial decision that can only be made by the independent Police ICT Company Board once the long term ownership group is in place and Board has approved the Company business plan. As an interim measure the Police ICT Company Directorate within the Home Office continues to deliver essential frontline services including the police national database.

Police: Complaints

Robert Halfon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions the Independent Police Complaints Commission has found against the police since the formation of that body. [143581]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not hold this information. The Independent Police Complaints Commission will write to my hon. Friend about this question in due course.

Sickness Absence

Mr Marcus Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many days of paid sickness leave per individual member of staff are authorised in her Department on an annual basis; [144489]

(2) what steps she is taking to reduce sickness absence in her Department. [144503]

James Brokenshire: Between 1 February 2012 to 31 January 2013, the number of paid days sickness per individual member of staff is 6.89.

The Home Office sickness policy was revised in March 2012. Line managers record sickness absences in the Adelphi management information system and receive monthly information on absence levels within their business areas.

Managers use this to monitor sickness data, to proactively manage absence and take action to support good health, safety and wellbeing for staff.

Training

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much her Department spent on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if she will make a statement. [144089]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 489W

James Brokenshire: The total amounts recorded as having been spent on training and education provided to the Home Office by external suppliers in the years in question was:

 £

2010-11

13,690,081

2011-12

14,946,948

These figures also include the departmental payment of £630,000 in 2010-11 and in 2011-12 to Civil Service Learning to cover their service costs.

UK Border Force

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what bonus arrangements have been made in respect of the new Director General of UK Border Force. [144998]

Mr Harper: The new Director General of UK Border Force will be a member of the Department's senior civil service (SCS). As such, he may be eligible for a non-consolidated annual bonus payment, subject to successful performance, in line with the Department's SCS pay arrangements. These are set annually within the guidelines laid down by Cabinet Office.

Transport

Means-tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what means-tested (a) cash and (b) non-cash benefits are provided by his Department; what the means-testing rules are for each such benefit; and how much was spent on each means-tested benefit in 2011-12. [144780]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport does not apply means-testing in assessing an applicant's eligibility for a particular benefit, such as a disabled person's concessionary bus travel pass, or exemption from Vehicle Excise Duty (VED). The Department provides guidance which takes account of the applicant's receipt of other relevant state benefits. For example, a disabled person would be eligible for a bus pass and exempt from VED if in receipt of certain mobility allowances, such as the higher rate mobility component of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) or War Pensioners Mobility Supplement (WPMS), provided through the Department for Work and Pensions.

Pedestrian Crossings: Schools

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many school crossing patrol officers were employed by local authorities in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; [145001]

(2) how many school crossing patrol officers were funded by each local authority in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; [145002]

(3) what funding was given to each local authority for school crossing patrol officers in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012. [145003]

27 Feb 2013 : Column 490W

Stephen Hammond: The figures requested on the numbers of school crossing patrol officers and their funding are not kept centrally but individually by each borough.

Public Expenditure

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent discussions he has had with (a) HM Treasury and (b) other departments on the single funding pot model of regional spending allocation. [144800]

Norman Baker: Since Lord Heseltine published his report 'No Stone Unturned' in October 2012, there have been a number of cross-Departmental discussions of his recommendations, including the single pot model.

As announced at the Autumn Statement, the Government will publish a full response in the Spring.

Railways: Fares

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he is taking to simplify fares across the rail network. [145185]

Norman Baker: Passengers benefit from being able to choose from a range of fares, which enable them to choose a cheaper or a more flexible fare according to the circumstances of their journey.

However, we recognise that, the options presented can sometimes appear complex to passengers. The Rail Fares and Ticketing Review is considering a range of issues, including how to help passengers better understand the options available and be confident that they are getting the best deal for their journey.

Railways: Standards

Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what consideration he has given to requiring train operating companies to compensate passengers for delays of 15 minutes or more. [145337]

Norman Baker: Under the Delay/Repay compensation system, all passengers are entitled to receive compensation for delays of more than 30 minutes whatever the cause. Train Operating Companies are also required to consider compensating season ticket holders over and above this in the event of sustained poor peak performance.

There are no plans to reduce the 30 minute threshold of delay to 15 minutes.

Roads: Safety

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what steps his Department is taking to promote an awareness of road safety amongst school children; [145004]

(2) how much funding his Department allocated to promote awareness of road safety for school children in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012. [145005]

Stephen Hammond: Overall, road deaths are at a record low and child casualties (aged 0-15) have fallen considerably (child fatalities in 2011 were 53% below the 2005-09 average; killed/seriously injured down 21%).

27 Feb 2013 : Column 491W

Recent published figures also show that child KSIs fell by 1% between the year ending September 2011 and 2012. However, we know that one death is one too many, which is why we are focusing our THINK! campaigns where they will have the greatest impact.

We are working closely with local authorities and other partners who engage with children directly to ensure our road safety messages are reaching children and teenagers in schools as well as providing educational resources to allow these important messages to be incorporated into the curriculum. We are enhancing the resources provided to schools—both at primary and secondary level—to make them easier to use in the classroom and will be engaging with teachers to encourage greater use of road safety examples in core curriculum subjects such as maths, science and citizenship. We also intend to make THINK! resources available to other groups who engage with children and young people.

Expenditure on the THINK! road safety campaign and the sums allocated to promoting child/teen road safety is shown below by fiscal year spend.

£
Fiscal yearTHINK! campaignChild/teen expenditure

2009-10

18,602,057

3,783,253

2010-11

2,342,563

1,285,509

2011-12

3,995,586

705,600

2012-13

(1)3,570.000

(1)78,000

(1) Provisional out-turn

The current major areas of spend for the THINK! campaign are motorcycling safety, where accident rates are highest and drink driving, where people continue to flout the law.

Our THINK! campaigns are only one part of our road safety work. We are also investing in infrastructure to make our roads safer and more efficient; taking steps to make it easier for the police to enforce against drivers who break the law; and we have streamlined the process for councils to implement 20 mph zones and limits on their roads.

Roads: Torbay

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what recent representations he has received from Torbay Council on funding for road maintenance; [143913]

(2) what steps he is taking to enable local authorities to (a) share best practice on efficient road maintenance and (b) secure funds for long-term investment in local road networks; [143915]

(3) how much funding his Department provided to Torbay Council for road maintenance in each of the last five years; and how much such funding will be provided in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15. [143916]

Norman Baker: The Department for Transport has received no recent representations from Torbay Council in respect of funding for road maintenance.

A breakdown of the capital funding allocated to Torbay Council for highways maintenance over the last five years, as well as what we expect to fund in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 is set out in the table below:

27 Feb 2013 : Column 492W

Financial YearAmount (£ million)

2008-09 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.019

2009-10 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.035

2010-11 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.120

May 2010 Additional funding provided for pothole damage

0.129

March 2011 Additional funding provided for pothole damage

0.363

2011-12 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.346

2012-13 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.288

2013-14 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.161

2013-14-Additional Funding announced in December 2012

0.211

2014-15 Highways Maintenance Block Funding

1.094

2014-15 Additional funding announced in December 2012

0.113

Local authorities are also able to use revenue funding, allocated by the Department of Communities and Local Government through the Revenue Support Grant for maintaining their local highways.

Neither revenue or capital highways maintenance block funding is ring-fenced and it is for local highway authorities to decide upon their spending priorities across the whole range of services that they provide.

The Government believes there is scope to maximise returns from highways investment and deliver efficient and effective services. The Department for Transport is supporting the sector by providing £6 million for the Highways Maintenance Efficiency Programme. Further information including the work that the Programme is delivering is available at the following weblink:

http://www.dft.gov.uk/hmep/

Transport: Merseyside

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much has been (a) committed and (b) spent by his Department on transport-related expenditure in the Merseyside region in (i) 2010, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2012 and (iv) 2013 to date. [144732]

Norman Baker: The most recent data available for regional expenditure is the National Statistics Public Expenditure Statistical Analyses for 2011-12. This is identifiable expenditure on services, including transport, by function, country and region.

In 2009-10, spend on the transport element of economic affairs for the North West was £2,432 million, in 2010-11 it was £2,169 million and £1,967 million in 2011-12. Spend is not broken down below regional level.

The Department for Transport is not the only public body responsible for transport and a large proportion of expenditure is covered by local government bodies.

Committed spend is not analysed at a regional level.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 493W

Energy and Climate Change

Biofuels

Graham Stringer: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Thirsk and Melton of 12 July 2012, Official Report, column 439, on biomass based generation, what the evidential basis is for the statement that there is a significant immediate carbon gain when coal-fired generation is moved to biomass generation. [144703]

Mr Hayes: The evidential basis can be found in the UK Bioenergy Strategy and supporting Bioenergy Strategy Analytical Annex, published in April 2012. This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-bioenergy-strategy

Carbon Emissions

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 451W, on carbon emissions: industries, when the Government will announce the details of their relief package for energy intensive industries. [145012]

Gregory Barker: The Government's consultation on proposals for the eligibility and design of the compensation package closed in December. It provided an opportunity for all those interested in the package to comment on the proposals.

Following detailed consideration of the responses, the Government plan to announce the final compensation scheme design later this year, subject to state aid approval from the European Commission.

Energy Supply

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with consumer groups on the CIBSE Annual Lecture 2012, Will GB's lights stay on and will the gas keep flowing: a look at the next decade? [144917]

Mr Hayes: My officials have frequent discussions with a number of consumer groups on the issues raised in this lecture.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what recent discussions he has had with Ofgem on the CIBSE Annual Lecture 2012, Will GB's lights stay on and will the gas keep flowing: a look at the next decade? [144919]

Mr Hayes: I have had no particular discussions with Ofgem on this lecture.

I discuss gas and electricity issues with Ofgem regularly. In November 2012 they produced a Gas Security of Supply Report at my request, which the lecture reflects . In the same month we published our response to their October 2012 Electricity Capacity Assessment:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/statutory-security-of-supply-report-2012

27 Feb 2013 : Column 494W

Energy: Billing

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change pursuant to the answer by the Prime Minister to the hon. Member for Inverclyde on 13 February 2013, Official Report, column 857, which clause of the Energy Bill is intended to force companies to give people the lowest energy tariff. [145036]

Gregory Barker: Clauses 121 to 124 of the Energy Bill provide the Secretary of State with the powers for ensuring that consumers are on the cheapest tariff that meets their preferences.

Energy: Imports

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the UK's likely dependence on foreign imports of energy in (a) 2013, (b) 2015 and (c) 2018. [144726]

Mr Hayes: The Department does not routinely assess import dependence for all energy sources. In the case of oil and gas, we do publish projections of both UK demand and UK production, from which implied import dependence ratios can be derived. The central projections of both published in October 2012 now at:

https://www.gov.uk/oil-and-gas-uk-field-data

imply the following import dependence ratios:

Percentage
 OilGasOil and Gas

(a) 2013

35

46

40

(b) 2015

35

45

40

(c) 2018

38

49

43

Means-tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what means-tested (a) cash and (b) non-cash benefits are provided by his Department; what the means-testing rules are for each such benefit; and how much was spent on each means-tested benefit in 2011-12. [144777]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change does not provide means-tested cash or non-cash benefits.

In 2011-12, a range of policies operated that provided assistance to households or individuals in receipt of certain means-tested benefits. In terms of energy efficiency, the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) and the Warm Front scheme were the main Government policies in operation (in Great Britain and England respectively) to help vulnerable customers keep their homes warmer and reduce their energy bills.

Under the Priority Group and Super Priority Group CERT sub-targets, obligated energy suppliers were required to meet a proportion of their CERT obligation by promoting energy efficiency measures to vulnerable customers meeting specified criteria. Commonly these measures were offered at a subsidised rate or for free. The energy companies were not required to provide information on the costs of delivery under CERT and

27 Feb 2013 : Column 495W

this information has never been made publicly available. The eligibility criteria are set out in the relevant legislation: The Electricity and Gas (Carbon Emissions Reduction) Order 2008 and The Electricity and Gas (Carbon Emissions Reduction) (Amendment) Order 2010.

The Warm Front scheme provided support to qualifying households in England to cover the cost of heating and insulation measures. The total amount spent under Warm Front in 2011-12 was £108.6 million. The eligibility rules in operation at the time are set out in The Home Energy Efficiency Scheme (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2011.

In terms of direct support to reduce bills, the Warm Home Discount offered additional assistance, including by way of a rebate off electricity bills worth £120. In 2011-12 the scheme supported 2 million households, including more than 700,000 of the poorest pensioners. Total spending by energy suppliers under the scheme was £237.5 million in 2011-12. The annual report published by Ofgem provides further information, including on eligibility criteria for the different elements of the scheme:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Sustainability/Environment/WHDS/Documents1/WHD_AR_08_Oct_2012.pdf

The legal basis for the scheme is provided by The Warm Home Discount Regulations 2011.

Nuclear Power Stations

Dan Byles: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what steps his Department is taking to provide early certainty via the Final Investment Decision Enabling Process for shovel ready projects other than that at Hinkley Point C. [144739]

Mr Hayes: The Government remain committed to working actively with relevant parties (including developers of renewables, CCS and nuclear projects) to enable investment decisions to progress to timetable wherever possible ahead of the full implementation of Electricity Market Reform.

The Final Investment Decision (FID) Enabling process was established to deliver on this commitment. Projects which meet the characteristics set out in the EMR Technical Update (published in December 2011) have already been invited to contact the Department to discuss what form of comfort might be offered to them and the FID Enabling process remains open to developers. Following discussions with a number of interested project sponsors, my Department intends to publish in March new details of how the FID Enabling process will work for renewables projects.

Nuclear Power: Accidents

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the level of the nuclear industry's liability is in the event of a nuclear accident; what criteria are used in setting the level of such liability; at what intervals reviews are conducted of the level of nuclear industry liability in respect of a nuclear accident; and when the next such review will take place. [144970]

Mr Hayes: The UK is a Contracting Party to the Paris Convention on nuclear third party liability in the field of nuclear energy of 29 July 1960 (“the Paris

27 Feb 2013 : Column 496W

Convention”). This convention sets out the framework for dealing with compensation following a nuclear incident including the liability levels to impose on nuclear operators. The UK implements the Paris Convention through the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (as amended) (“the 1965 Act”).

At present operator liability in the UK is set at £140 million per incident for standard sites and £10 million per incident for certain lower risk sites. Significantly higher liability levels have been agreed by the contracting parties in the 2004 Protocol to the Paris Convention and DECC is working on amendments to the 1965 Act to implement these changes. Government carried out a consultation on this and published our response last year:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/compensating-victims-of-nuclear-accidents

In the UK, when the 2004 Protocol comes into force and subject to parliamentary approval, nuclear operators’ liability will rise to €1200 million per incident for standard sites (introduced at €700 million and rising to €1200 million over five years). The limits for lower risk sites and transport, will be €70 million and €80 million respectively.

The framework for setting nuclear operators' liability levels laid down in the Paris Convention is decided by the contracting parties to the convention. The Paris Convention has been amended by additional Protocols adopted in 1964, 1982 and 2004. Article 22(d) of the Paris Convention sets out when a review can take place—the actual timing and scope of any review will be determined by the Contracting Parties.

Treasury

Digital Economy Act 2010

Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what estimate he has made of revenue lost to the Exchequer as a result of the delay in the implementation of the Digital Economy Act 2010. [144862]

Danny Alexander: The provisions in the Digital Economy Act 2010 are designed to ensure that charges for providing the service simply recover the full cost of those services. There has therefore been no loss of revenue to the Exchequer.

Economic Situation: Birmingham

Steve McCabe: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the trends in economic activity in Birmingham since 2010. [144854]

Sajid Javid: The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes annual estimates for regional and sub-regional gross value added (GVA); on 12 December 2012 they published provisional estimates for 2011. Table 1 shows local GVA in Birmingham and annual growth rates. All estimates are presented in current prices; volume measures that take account of price changes are not available at this level of geography.

27 Feb 2013 : Column 497W

The ONS also produces quarterly estimates of employment and unemployment in Birmingham; on 23 January 2013 they published estimates for the 12-month period October 2011 to September 2012. Table 2 compares these estimates of employment and unemployment with those for the 12-month period October 2010 to September 2011.

EU Budget

Chris Leslie: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the percentage increase is in the overall level of administration expenditure agreed at the European Council on 8 February 2013 for the Multi-Annual Financial Framework of 2014 to 2020 compared to the preceding Multi-Annual Financial Framework. [144031]

Greg Clark: Compared to the current period for 2007-13, the level of spending set out in Council conclusions for administration represents a 9% increase, from €56.5 billion in 2007-13 to €61.6 billion in 2014-20.

The level of administrative spending agreed in heading five is disappointing. The Government believe that reform of pay, benefits and other administrative spending is possible and necessary and will press for reductions in annual budgets under the new Multi-Annual Funding Framework.

This is part of an overall deal in which the UK delivered a real-terms cut in multi-year EU Budget frameworks for the first time in history. In total, the deal agreed (€908 billion payments) was €80 billion lower than the original Commission proposal; €35 billion lower than the deal agreed by the last Government which is still in operation today; and €60 billion lower than the emergency arrangements that would have come into place if there were no seven-year deal.

Excise Duties: Fuels

Jim Sheridan: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2013, Official Report, column 668W, on excise duties: fuels, what steps his Department is taking to make fuel more affordable for people on low incomes; [145252]

(2) what recent discussions his Department has had with fuel companies regarding making fuel more affordable for people on low incomes. [145260]

Sajid Javid: As a result of the repeated action by the Government, average pump prices will remain at least 10p per litre lower than if we had stuck with the previous Government's plans for the remainder of this Parliament.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings and discussions with a wide variety of organisations as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

The Treasury publishes a list of ministerial meetings with external organisations, available at:

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/minister_hospitality.htm

Means-Tested Benefits

Mr Byrne: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what means-tested (a) cash and (b) non-cash benefits are provided by his Department; what the means-

27 Feb 2013 : Column 498W

testing rules are for each such benefit; and how much was spent on each means-tested benefit in 2011-12. [144781]

Sajid Javid: HMRC are responsible for the administration of tax credits. Information about the rules on tax credits can be found on the HMRC website at

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/leaflets/wtc2.pdf

Information about payments can be found on the website at:

http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/statistics/receipts/receipts-stats.xls

This indicates that cash expenditure on tax credits was around £30 billion in 2011-12. Statistics on total tax credit entitlement for 2011-12 will be published in May 2013.

Oil: Prices

Steve McCabe: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent discussions he has had with his international counterparts on the economic effects of global oil prices. [144849]

Sajid Javid: Over recent months the Chancellor has discussed a wide range of issues relevant to the global economy with his international counterparts, including energy prices, in international forums. HM Treasury officials also frequently discuss these issues with their international counterparts. G20 Finance Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to more transparent and better functioning energy markets at their meeting on 15-16 February.

Revenue and Customs

Catherine McKinnell: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many staff were employed in each HM Revenue and Customs office in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of the number of staff employed in each such office in each of the next three years. [144985]

Sajid Javid: The number of staff, by headcount, employed in HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) in each of the last five years is shown in the following table. For operational reasons and to make the information easier to use, office locations have been grouped by town.

HMRC is not able to provide a detailed view of the estimated staff needed in each HMRC office in each of the next three years. The Department is currently reviewing its staffing needs for the next three years but does not intend to publish the number of staff required by each location. This is because the plans will be subject to further change, for example HMRC may decide to deploy resources flexibly to deal with work which is not location specific. HMRC has published figures for staffing projections by line of business for the spending review period.

Town1 April 200931 March 201031 March 201131 March 201231 January 2013

Aberdeen

183

163

154

151

143

Aberystwyth

24

20

4

3

3

27 Feb 2013 : Column 499W

Ace ring ton

99

75

9

8

6

Alfreton

39

12

4

4

2

Alnwick

17

7

1

1

1

Altrincham

47

12

3

3

3

Andover

13

12

6

6

5

Antrim

2

2

2

1

1

Ashford

42

36

4

4

4

Ashton-under-Lyne

43

2

2

1

1

Avonmouth

70

42

41

40

46

Aylesbury

41

31

5

5

Ayr

58

24

8

8

3

Ballymena

62

52

10

9

3

Banbridge

12

6

1

Banbury

35

30

6

5

7

Bangor

75

70

30

7

4

Barnsley

183

175

179

170

158

Barnstaple

91

94

95

91

88

Barrow in Furness

33

21

6

6

4

Basildon

32

Basingstoke

4

5

4

3

3

Bath

59

16

5

4

3

Bathgate

1,318

1,136

1,182

1,088

1,015

Bedford

132

100

91

87

74

Belfast

1,559

1,419

1,400

1,368

1,325

Bideford

23

5

1

1

1

Biggin Hill

1

Birkenhead

97

29

11

8

5

Birmingham

1,279

1,254

1,247

1,223

1,225

Bishop Auckland

32

16

4

3

3

Bishops Stortford

80

80

85

81

63

Blackburn

114

105

134

126

117

Blackpool

345

348

345

329

303

Bognor Regis

5

5

6

5

5

Bolton

169

147

133

130

125

Bootle

2,073

2,287

2,225

2,519

2,946

Boston

40

23

4

4

4

Bournemouth

407

381

360

333

313

Bradford

1,175

1,205

1,167

1,392

1,368

Brecon

26

14

1

1

1

Bridgend

38

23

4

3

4

Bridgwater

44

19

3

3

2

Bridlington

35

22

4

3

3

Brierley Hill

797

584

590

527

449

Brighton

183

214

230

206

204

Bristol

907

900

893

860

823

Bromley

44

11

9

8

8

Buckie

14

13

2

2

2

Burnley

43

46

11

11

10

Burnt Oak

5

4

4

Burton upon Trent

62

21

5

5

5

Bury

23

5

5

5

4

27 Feb 2013 : Column 500W

Bury St Edmunds

44

25

9

6

4

Cambridge

153

164

159

168

163

Cannock

39

8

4

4

4

Canterbury

129

107

118

125

131

Cardiff

3,007

2,783

2,781

2,989

2,880

Carlisle

77

96

101

99

93

Carmarthen

104

99

96

96

90

Castle Donington

29

2

Chadwell Heath

20

Chatham

177

141

131

120

111

Cheadle

111

Chelmsford

99

83

94

95

87

Cheltenham

65

19

6

5

4

Chester

87

39

4

4

4

Chesterfield

105

108

110

105

102

Chichester

45

31

12

6

4

Chippenham

24

13

1

1

1

Chorley

66

38

6

3

3

Clacton on Sea

31

16

4

4

Coatbridge

22

4

4

4

4

Colchester

147

151

145

138

113

Coleraine

68

63

64

65

71

Colwyn Bay

42

42

68

89

90

Coventry

527

415

403

400

384

Craigavon

83

60

59

72

70

Crawley

42

37

53

61

63

Crewe

74

36

5

5

6

Croydon

442

655

672

666

671

Cullompton

41

Cumbernauld

1,531

1,489

1,411

1,323

1,252

Darlington

48

3

Dartford

1

1

Derby

330

253

247

233

216

Dereham

3

3

Dewsbury

32

4

3

3

3

Doncaster

114

81

13

7

6

Dorchester

17

9

3

2

2

Dover

1190

189

191

176

164

Droitwich

4

Dumbarton

7

4

3

3

3

Dumfries

37

19

2

2

2

Dundee

958

843

924

807

760

Dunfermline

26

14

3

3

4

Dunoon

9

6

4

3

3

Durham

59

8

6

4

4

Ealing Broadway

227

227

214

213

East Dereham

28

25

6

1

East Kilbride

2,788

2,610

2,522

2,775

2,707

Eastbourne

7

8

8

9

7

Edgeware

3

Edinburgh

1,645

1,424

1,391

1,481

1,410

Elgin

1

1

Enniskillen

73

70

68

67

66

Erith

32

34

33

33

28

27 Feb 2013 : Column 501W

Evesham

38

30

5

5

5

Exeter

279

263

263

246

231

Falkirk

11

7

4

2

2

Falmouth

17

Farnham

43

31

4

3

Felixstowe

257

9

9

5

7

Feltham

58

1

Finchley

136

123

121

113

Folkestone

3

1

1

1

Frame

35

28

4

4

2

Gainsborough

14

11

4

4

2

Galashiels

19

15

5

6

5

Gatwick

279

7

1

Gillingham

5

5

5

Glasgow

1,176

1,157

1,226

1,189

1,154

Glenrothes

102

99

96

99

89

Gloucester

145

179

185

179

179

Goole

4

3

3

3

3

Gosforth

168

60

60

54

Grangemouth

25

19

1

Grantham

43

19

3

3

3

Gravesend

127

48

48

39

41

Grays

16

15

5

5

Great Yarmouth

119

76

10

7

5

Greenock

93

26

7

5

6

Grimsby

237

213

211

196

190

Guildford

5

5

5

5

4

Halifax

137

23

8

6

4

Hamilton

21

4

3

3

2

Hammersmith

11

9

12

Harlow

59

29

8

5

4

Harrogate

42

60

54

52

49

Harrow

179

169

168

165

Harwich

164

81

85

88

85

Hatfield

18

17

5

2

2

Haverfordwest

37

26

4

4

3

Hawick

6

5

2

1

1

Haywards Heath

9

3

4

3

Hemel Hempstead

36

26

4

4

4

Hereford

82

61

6

5

5

Hertford

28

9

5

5

5

Hexham

14

12

5

3

2

High Wycombe

12

6

6

6

4

Hitchin

5

5

5

5

4

Holyhead

13

Horsham

50

39

2

2

1

Hounslow

758

27

11

9

Hove

49

Huddersfield

86

22

5

5

4

Hull

365

270

274

274

267

Huntingdon

33

5

5

3

3

Ilford

1

Immingham

88

9

6

4

4

Inverness

89

84

85

83

77

Ipswich

589

590

601

583

598

Irvine

27

43

50

47

50

27 Feb 2013 : Column 502W

Isle of Grain

1

Keighley

29

16

5

5

5

Kendal

42

33

4

3

2

Kettering

72

31

3

2

2

Kings Lynn

103

105

102

97

86

Kingston upon Thames

69

8

6

6

6

Kirkcaldy

6

5

4

4

3

Lancaster

37

31

9

9

7

Launceston

39

29

7

4

3

Leamington Spa

8

6

2

4

Leeds

981

1,087

1,074

1,037

1,048

Leek

19

8

3

3

3

Leicester

1,118

957

910

905

866

Leigh

51

18

16

5

2

Lerwick

3

1

1

Lewes

53

35

5

5

5

Lincoln

207

224

232

226

208

Lisburn

73

98

97

98

94

Liverpool

3,378

2,773

2,760

2,580

2,048

Livingston

663

609

575

557

469

Llanelli

23

1

1

London

7,752

5,771

5,600

5,477

5,417

Londonderry

159

161

156

153

144

Louth

13

6

3

2

2

Ludlow

19

20

2

2

2

Luton

272

237

236

220

197

Macclesfield

37

11

4

3

3

Maidenhead

31

Maidstone

262

228

222

220

221

Manchester

947

957

984

921

902

Mansfield

25

15

7

6

4

Margate

33

24

7

7

2

Melton Mowbray

23

13

2

2

2

Merthyr Tydfil

67

92

91

95

97

Middlesbrough

578

325

304

297

289

Milton Keynes

113

95

97

96

107

Morpeth

23

10

10

7

4

Motherwell

14

4

3

2

2

Newark

26

16

4

4

4

Newbury

23

7

4

3

3

Newcastle upon Tyne

7,715

7,254

6,864

7,643

7,412

Newhaven

12

Newport

101

54

8

6

6

Newport Isle of Wight

37

36

9

8

8

Newry

166

158

155

143

136

Newton Abbot

76

59

10

8

5

Northampton

302

369

378

369

358

Northwich

19

22

7

6

4

Norwich

305

317

317

301

301

Nottingham

1,874

1,933

1,902

1,857

1,854

27 Feb 2013 : Column 503W

Nuneaton

22

10

5

5

5

Oban

1

1

Oldham

81

12

6

6

5

Oswestry

32

22

8

4

4

Oxford

190

181

175

165

153

Paisley

227

144

155

169

160

Pembroke

14

11

11

9

8

Penrith

23

5

2

2

2

Penzance

41

15

3

3

3

Perth

20

10

3

3

2

Peterborough

393

408

390

385

369

Peterhead

10

8

2

2

1

Peterlee

792

667

738

705

647

Plymouth

266

205

202

185

183

Pontefract

34

17

5

3

2

Pontypool

30

23

6

6

5

Pontypridd

43

15

5

4

5

Poole

99

67

68

76

73

Porthmadog

33

29

25

28

26

Portsmouth

1,480

1,342

1,291

1,481

1,340

Preston

2,517

2,433

2,398

2,320

2,364

Prestwick

4

Pudsey

12

Purfleet

1

1

Ramsgate

1

1

1

Rayleigh

9

12

12

11

9

Reading

309

340

327

315

299

Redditch

40

19

11

10

4

Redhill

83

74

82

77

74

Redruth

78

109

113

112

114

Retford

30

23

4

5

2

Rhyl

51

35

6

3

3

Ripon

20

12

4

3

4

Rochdale

26

2

2

2

2

Romford

194

181

125

95

102

Rotherham

10

10

10

10

10

Rothesay

7

9

1

Rugby

16

5

3

3

3

Salford

2,940

2,859

2,755

3,040

3,041

Salisbury

25

14

3

3

3

Scarborough

40

31

6

6

5

Scunthorpe

32

17

7

7

11

Sheffield

495

478

487

487

481

Shipley

1,436

1,350

1,307

1,246

1,111

Shoeburyness

7

Shoreham

9

Shrewsbury

26

17

6

5

3

Skipton

33

25

4

3

3

Slough

112

91

98

95

79

Solihull

135

184

183

194

204

Southampton

659

423

411

394

396

Southend on Sea

1,820

1,647

1,605

1,575

1,491

Southport

65

40

9

8

7

Spalding

19

11

7

7

5

St Albans

32

23

5

3

3

St Annes

29

St Austell

446

403

421

373

336

St Helens

127

119

118

116

108

27 Feb 2013 : Column 504W

St Leonards on Sea

139

126

121

115

108

Stafford

46

21

4

2

2

Staines

323

233

237

249

264

Stansted

44

1

Stevenage

121

107

99

95

90

Stirling

14

10

6

3

3

Stockport

382

401

362

341

315

Stockton on Tees

339

511

483

552

555

Stoke on Trent

292

313

321

302

297

Stratford

261

305

299

282

Stratford on Avon

78

23

3

2

3

Stroud

66

50

49

43

37

Sudbury

29

13

3

3

Sunderland

908

870

835

820

821

Surbiton

82

124

126

119

121

Sutton

34

6

5

5

4

Swansea

290

295

297

297

283

Swindon

129

117

112

109

101

Taunton

164

191

192

186

180

Telford

764

782

721

639

610

Tilbury

153

20

20

20

20

Tonbridge

36

32

2

2

Torquay

45

30

6

5

4

Truro

66

56

49

45

43

Tufnell Park

4

5

3

3

Tunbridge Wells

56

43

4

4

Twickenham

76

54

49

44

37

Ullapool

1

1

1

1

1

Uxbridge

115

129

125

122

122

Wakefield

44

5

1

1

1

Walsall

184

136

110

104

101

Walthamstow

11

10

11

11

Warrington

139

177

193

199

208

Washington

2,803

2,739

2,632

2,850

2,806

Watford

110

134

152

151

147

Wellingborough

53

6

4

4

3

Wells

17

15

4

4

4

Welshpool

30

25

4

3

3

Wembley

163

135

130

125

115

Weston Super Mare

50

31

9

7

3

Whitehaven

49

4

4

4

4

Wick

24

20

20

13

15

Widnes

72

5

5

5

3

Wigan

117

93

92

90

74

Winchester

24

6

4

3

2

Winchmore Hill

 

185

173

174

166

Witham

37

16

Woking

160

141

138

126

119

Wolverhampton

582

622

583

568

572

Woolwich

183

179

172

168

Worcester

134

134

144

142

138

Workington

345

335

307

281

236

27 Feb 2013 : Column 505W

Worthing

992

955

853

806

759

Wrexham

490

483

447

428

423

Yeovil

41

31

5

5

4

York

166

146

141

128

94

Others

257

31

41

48

48

Total

88,875

78,057

74,380

74,983

72,462