Probation

John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice in the event that he outsources probation tasks, what training and experience staff employed by the private sector will have in supervising offenders who have exhibited sexual or violent behaviour. [144709]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice has recently consulted on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community. The consultation closed on 22 February and we are considering the responses received.

As set out in our consultation paper, we propose that offenders managed under Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) and others who are assessed as posing a high risk of serious harm will be managed directly by the public sector probation service.

Under our proposed reforms, we anticipate that existing probation professionals will work in the public, private and voluntary sectors. They will use their skills and experience to work with all offenders to reduce reoffending and protect the public. All providers in the new market will be required to sustain appropriate skills for these services. We have sought consultees' views on the best way of ensuring that professional standards are maintained and that the quality of training and accreditation is assured.

We will publish our response to the consultation in due course.

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John McDonnell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) in the event that he outsources probation tasks, what steps he plans to take to ensure proper and diligent departmental oversight of contracts; [144711]

(2) in the event that he outsources probation tasks, what steps he plans to take to ensure contract compliance. [144712]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice has recently consulted on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community. The consultation closed on 22 February and we are considering the responses received.

We will ensure we can identify good performance and reward this, and that we have robust measures in place to manage poor performance. We are consulting with providers, practitioners and wider stakeholders to build our understanding of how best to achieve this across these services. We are also looking at the best lessons from contract and performance management from across Government. These will be fed into the design of competition and contractual structures.

We will publish our response to the consultation in due course.

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Reoffenders

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of prisoners released from (a) HMP Holme House, (b) HMP Kirklevington Grange, (c) HMP Durham, (d) HMP Frankland, (e) HMP Low Newton and (f) HMYOI Deerbolt reoffend within (i) six months, (ii) 12 months and (iii) three years of their release. [145957]

Jeremy Wright: The following table presents the number of adult offenders who were released from HMP Holme House, HMP Kirklevington Grange, HMP Durham, HMP Frankland, HMP Low Newton and HMYOI Deerbolt in the 12 months ending March 2011, and the proportion that committed a proven reoffence within 12 months of release (the proven reoffending rate). These figures are published quarterly in the proven reoffending statistics bulletin on the Ministry of Justice website at:

www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/reoffending/proven-re-offending

We do not produce six month or three-year proven reoffending rates for offenders released from custody by individual prison.

Table 1: Proven reoffending rates for adult offenders released from custody in the 12 months ending March 2011, by individual prison and custodial sentence length
PrisonNumber of offenders in cohort(1)Proportion of offenders who reoffend (%)

Offenders given sentences of less than 12 months

  

Holme House

627

69.4

Kirklevington Grange

0

n/a

Durham

427

75.6

Frankland

0

n/a

Low Newton

192

65.6

Deerbolt

164

69.5

   

Offenders given sentences of 12 months or more

  

Holme House

538

52.0

Kirklevington Grange

99

7.1

Durham

253

47.8

Frankland

14

(2)

Low Newton

105

41.0

Deerbolt

309

48.5

n/a = not applicable. (1) This does not represent all proven offenders. Offenders who are released from custody are matched to the Police National Computer database. A certain proportion of these offenders cannot be matched and are, therefore, excluded from the offender cohort, i.e. the group of offenders for whom reoffending is measured. (2) Proportions based on less than 30 offenders are removed as they make data unreliable for interpretation.

A proven reoffence is defined as any offence committed in a one-year follow-up period and receiving a court conviction, caution, reprimand or warning in the one year follow-up. Following this one-year period, a further six-month waiting period is allowed for cases to progress through the courts.

Social Networking: Evidence

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have been convicted of offences using evidence obtained from social networking websites since 2011. [145783]

Jeremy Wright: Information held centrally by the Ministry of Justice on the court proceedings database does not contain information about the circumstances behind each case, beyond the description provided in the statute under which proceedings are brought. It is not possible to separately identify from this centrally held information whether or not an offender was convicted of an offence using evidence obtained from social networking websites.

Young Offenders

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what arrangements are in place for young offenders who have previously had an education health and care plan when they leave the criminal justice system and return to mainstream society. [144057]

Jeremy Wright: Proposals for education, health and care plans are one of the measures included in the Children and Families Bill. They are being trialled in a number of pathfinders across the country. Existing

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arrangements for those who have previously had a statement of special educational needs continue to apply to anyone leaving the criminal justice system.

Subject to the successful passage of the Children and Families Bill local authorities will have a duty to maintain

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and review a young person's education health and care plan when they are released from custody. This will ensure that the appropriate support and provision is in place for the young person after their release.