Extract for wards within Vale of Clwyd parliamentary constituency
AgeRhyl South EastRhyl South WestRhyl WestSt Asaph EastSt Asaph WestTrefnantTremeirchion

Age 18

109

93

71

14

32

12

18

Age 19

86

91

74

13

16

10

19

Age 20

84

77

91

20

18

11

7

Age 21

65

84

71

14

20

24

23

Age 22

102

67

79

17

11

14

18

Age 23

85

70

82

16

28

12

11

Age 24

88

80

97

21

19

17

10

Age 25

94

62

70

12

11

16

23

Age 26

93

61

52

10

15

15

10

Age 27

85

60

58

14

20

11

14

Age 28

77

61

52

13

20

14

8

Age 29

91

62

48

18

15

17

13

Age 30

77

64

58

14

14

29

13

Age 31

76

80

61

20

19

20

18

Age 32

81

58

56

15

19

19

14

Age 33

71

59

43

17

13

16

14

Age 34

102

77

43

8

20

20

13

Age 35

84

54

40

17

17

17

21

Age 36

91

72

59

27

15

21

12

Age 37

91

71

43

18

21

15

15

Age 38

92

65

58

22

20

10

23

Age 39

109

68

65

18

23

22

27

Age 40

107

76

47

21

23

24

25

Age 41

128

75

55

21

24

32

16

Age 42

128

81

66

28

31

25

28

Age 43

101

71

63

19

20

16

31

Age 44

106

75

68

28

25

30

27

Age 45

114

58

52

17

26

31

32

Age 46

125

50

60

21

29

33

29

Age 47

127

72

63

16

37

36

26

Age 48

93

77

72

20

30

33

19

Age 49

104

69

63

24

23

38

15

Age 50

124

61

69

30

26

28

24

Age 51

103

60

59

23

20

36

25

Age 52

99

71

46

24

24

28

31

Age 53

89

49

60

26

15

18

16

Age 54

95

59

67

25

15

25

21

Age 55

87

43

55

27

15

26

17

Age 56

115

65

51

24

14

26

16

Age 57

114

56

55

21

26

22

22

Age 58

84

48

53

23

16

26

24

Age 59

91

50

58

17

18

35

25

Age 60

114

66

48

19

26

26

30

Age 61

95

52

54

29

29

45

46

Age 62

99

48

57

23

28

36

32

Age 63

107

66

69

32

24

39

34

Age 64

100

68

44

23

23

37

37

13 Mar 2013 : Column 263W

13 Mar 2013 : Column 264W

Age 65

78

48

32

24

13

24

24

Age 66

84

51

47

20

29

28

21

Age 67

62

41

34

24

25

28

21

Age 68

83

34

26

21

20

24

22

Age 69

74

39

33

20

18

33

20

Age 70

70

31

48

18

25

26

14

Age 71

63

30

32

19

15

20

13

Age 72

78

42

32

32

11

22

17

Age 73

59

29

20

23

20

25

27

Age 74

56

34

18

13

13

29

16

Age 75

57

34

19

18

15

15

10

Age 76

45

19

28

18

14

27

13

Age 77

45

27

14

10

14

23

7

Age 78

63

25

15

14

5

22

10

Age 79

50

31

9

17

14

17

9

Age 80

46

16

25

12

14

15

18

Age 81

39

18

18

6

7

12

7

Age 82

41

16

12

10

13

17

9

Age 83

28

17

12

11

4

16

6

Age 84

27

10

15

11

9

7

5

Age 85

25

14

9

12

7

11

6

Age 86

20

5

8

17

1

8

6

Age 87

22

5

9

9

11

7

5

Age 88

13

13

9

8

4

6

6

Age 89

19

7

5

2

4

7

3

Age 90

8

5

2

7

5

18

4

Age 91

15

7

2

7

6

5

1

Age 92

9

4

4

5

4

4

1

Age 93

2

2

3

3

1

5

0

Age 94

5

1

1

2

2

4

1

Age 95

1

0

2

1

0

3

1

Age 96

1

0

0

0

3

1

1

Age 97

0

1

0

1

2

0

0

Age 98

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

Age 99

0

0

0

0

2

2

1

Age 100 and over

0

1

1

0

0

1

0

Total aged 18 and over

5,870

3,759

3,369

1,356

1,343

1,626

1,317

Notes: Population: All usual residents Units: Persons Date: 2011 Source: Nomis—12 March 2013

Suicide

Mr Jamie Reed: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many recorded suicides there have been in each of the last 10 years, broken down by (a) age, (b) gender and (c) region. [147639]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking how many recorded suicides there have been in each of the last 10 years, broken down by (a) age, (b) gender and (c) region. (147639)

Table 1 provides the number of deaths where suicide was the underlying cause, by five year age group and sex, in England, Wales and regions of England, for deaths registered between 2002 and 2011 (the latest year available). A copy of Table 1 has been placed in the House of Commons library.

Figures presented in Table 1 are for deaths registered rather than deaths occurring in each calendar year. Due to the length of time it takes to hold an inquest, it can take months for a suicide to be registered. The latest statistical bulletin showed that the median registration delay for suicides was 158 days in England and Wales in 2011. More information on registration delays for other causes can be found on the ONS website:

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/user-guidance/health-and-life-events/impact-of-registration-delays-on-mortality-statistics/index.html

The number of suicides and age-standardised suicide rates for the United Kingdom, England and Wales, and regions of England are published annually on the ONS website:

13 Mar 2013 : Column 265W

www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/all-releases.html?definition=tcm%3A77-29400

Due to the size of the table, it will be stored in Library of the House.

Justice

Alcoholic Drinks: Designated Public Places Orders

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people were (a) prosecuted, (b) convicted and (c) received the maximum fine available for the offence of not obeying an instruction to stop drinking in a designated public place in each of the last three years. [146983]

Jeremy Wright: The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and offenders found guilty and sentenced to a fine at all courts for not obeying an instruction to stop drinking in a designated public place, in England and Wales, from 2009 to 2011, can be viewed in the following table. There were no incidences of an offender being sentenced to the maximum fine of £500.

Court proceedings data for 2012 are planned for publication in May 2013.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts, and offenders found guilty and sentenced to a fine at all courts for not obeying an instruction to stop drinking in a designated public place(1), England and Wales, 2009-11(2, 3)
Outcome200920102011

Proceeded against

179

122

138

Found guilty

135

102

110

Sentenced to a fine

93

63

64

Of which:

   

Maximum fine issued

0

0

0

(1) An offence under Section 12 of the Criminal Justice and Police Act 2001, which came into force on 1 September 2001. (2) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (3) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice.

Bail

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the highest number of offences committed by an individual remanded on bail was in each year since 1997; [139639]

(2) how many people remanded on bail went on to commit (a) no offences, (b) one offence, (c) between two and five offences, (d) between six and 10 offences and (e) more than 10 offences in each of the last three years. [139642]

13 Mar 2013 : Column 266W

Jeremy Wright: In 2011, the number of offences committed by those on bail was at its lowest level for the last five years.

Table 1 shows the highest number of offences committed by an individual whilst remanded on bail in each year from 2000 (the earliest available) to June 2012.

Table 1: Highest number of offences committed by an individual whilst remanded on bail(1) in each year from 2000 to June 2012(2), England and Wales(3)
 Highest number of offences by an offender

2000

66

2001

40

2002

34

2003

63

2004

53

2005

60

2006

34

2007

59

2008

125

2009

56

2010

45

2011

35

2012(2)

29

(1) Includes people remanded on both police and court bail. (2) 2012 only includes January to June in line with published information. (3) Offences are based on data held about convictions and cautions. Source: Ministry of Justice

The numbers presented above represent a count of the total number of offences committed whilst on bail by these individuals in each year. Due to the way the information is stored, it is not possible to identify the highest number of offences committed during an individual bail occasion.

Table 2 shows the number of people committing offences whilst on bail in each year from 2007 to June 2012, by the number of these offences that they committed.

Table 2: Number of people committing offences whilst on bail(1) in each year from 2007 to June 2012(2), by the number of offences committed, England and Wales(3)
Number of offences(3)
 12-56-10Over 10

2007

39,274

32,886

4,285

703

2008

39,881

31,830

3,728

615

2009

40,555

30,470

3,433

579

2010

40,100

29,527

3,392

637

2011

36,536

27,735

3,330

589

2012(2)

20,332

13,425

1,175

167

(1) Includes people remanded on both police and court bail. (2) 2012 only includes January to June in line with published information. (3) Offences are based on data held about convictions and cautions. Source: Ministry of Justice

As above, these figures are based on counts of the total number of offences committed by individuals whilst on bail in each year. Due to the way the information is stored, it is not possible to group offenders by the number of offences committed during individual bail occasions.

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

13 Mar 2013 : Column 267W

In particular the recording of information on whether or not the offence was committed while the offender was on bail is known to be incomplete. This is because the police have available to them a number of ways of recording the bail status of an offender of which the ‘offence committed on bail’ field on the PNC is one. For operational purposes police forces make differing use of these various sources and as a result figures derived purely from the PNC do not provide a complete picture of these offences, and therefore changes over time.

Legal Aid Scheme

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what assessment he has made of which areas of the UK will see the largest decrease in legal aid funded face-to-face advice services between 2012-13 and 2013-14; [143265]

(2) which areas of the country he anticipates will have no access to legal aid funded face-to-face advice services from April 2013-14. [143608]

Jeremy Wright: We have not made an assessment of which parts of the country will see the largest decrease in legal aid advice services in the next year. However, we anticipate that no area in England and Wales will be without access to legal aid funded face-to-face advice services from April 2013.

Justice is a devolved matter in Northern Ireland and Scotland.

Offences against Children

Lisa Nandy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many child sex offenders were released from prisons in England and Wales in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [146159]

Jeremy Wright: From the data held centrally, it is not possible to separately identify those offenders convicted of sexual offences against children, because the prisoner offence details held centrally do not include information on the age of the victim. Such offenders are included with other sexual offences.

Offenders: Rehabilitation

Mr Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the estimated cost is of the provision of supervision in the community for persons sentenced to less than 12 months in custody and subsequently released into community supervision. [147030]

Jeremy Wright: There are currently few rehabilitative services that are provided through the criminal justice system to offenders released from custodial sentences of less than 12 months.

On 22 February the Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed.

Our proposed reforms will help reduce reoffending by opening up rehabilitation services to a more diverse market, using payment by results to encourage providers to focus on outcomes, and by making the whole system

13 Mar 2013 : Column 268W

more efficient, so that we can extend rehabilitative provision to offenders released from short custodial sentences of less than 12 months.

We need to achieve this in a way that is affordable within the context of the Ministry of Justice's commitment to deliver annual savings of over £2 billion by 2014-15.

We have consulted on how best to structure the system so it is organised in the most efficient manner and we are looking carefully at responses to the consultation to ensure we get the details right. The response to the consultation will be published in due course.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what steps he is taking to ensure that every prisoner under 24 years old is assigned an individual mentor on completion of their sentence. [147356]

Jeremy Wright: We are committed to opening up rehabilitative services to a range of new providers, who will be paid by results to help offenders turn their lives around. As a part of this we expect to see more use of innovative approaches, such as mentoring, and for offenders to receive targeted support to tackle the root causes of offending.

The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. We will respond to the consultation and bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Personal Injury: Compensation

Mr George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what representations were (a) sought and (b) received from representatives of (i) the insurance industry and (ii) the legal services industry in formulating the proposals in the Consultation on arrangements concerning whiplash injuries in England and Wales. [146936]

Mrs Grant: In formulating the proposals to be included in the ‘reducing the number and cost of whiplash claims' consultation document, no organisations were asked to make submissions. However, Ministry of Justice officials did hold specific discussion meetings with representatives from a number of key stakeholder groups including;

Association of British Insurers

Forum of Insurance Lawyers

Motor Accident Solicitors Society

Association of Personal Injury Lawyers

Consumer Justice Alliance

Access to Justice Action Group

Association of Medical Reporting Organisations

British Orthopaedic Association

Royal Society of General Practitioners

Officials also discussed the proposals with the Law Society as part of a meeting on the wider civil justice reform agenda.

Mr George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment he has made of Professor Paul Fenn's report Evaluating the low value Road Traffic Accident process. [146937]

13 Mar 2013 : Column 269W

Mrs Grant: Professor Fenn's report was considered in the development of the Government's decisions on the extension of the Road Traffic Accident Personal Injury scheme and the associated fixed recoverable costs. These were published on 27 February 2013 and have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Prisoners on Remand

Ms Harman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many prisoners on remand in (a) HM Prison Holloway and (b) HM Prison Pentonville are (i) UK nationals, (ii) EEA nationals excluding the UK and (iii) nationals from countries outside the EEA. [147531]

Jeremy Wright: The following table provides information on the remand prisoner population as at 31 December 2012 in (a) HMP Holloway and (b) HMP Pentonville and the numbers that are (i) UK nationals, (ii) EEA nationals excluding the UK and (iii) nationals from countries outside the EEA.

EstablishmentUK nationalsEEA nationalsNon-EEA nationalsNationality not recordedAll

Holloway

71

14

16

2

103

Pentonville

274

65

90

20

449

All

345

79

106

22

552

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Prisoners: Dartford

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many people resident in Dartford constituency are currently being held in (a) prisons and (b) young offender institutions; and in which establishment such people are held; [145870]

(2) what proportion of prisoners resident in Dartford constituency are (a) women and (b) men; and what comparable figures were in (i) 2008 and (ii) 2003; [145871]

(3) how many female young offenders resident in Dartford constituency are currently held in prisons or secure accommodation; [145872]

(4) how many prisoners originally resident in Dartford are currently serving sentences of more than four years; [146438]

(5) how many prisoners resident in Dartford constituency are (a) under 18 years old, (b) between 18 and 21 years old, (c) between 45 and 60 years old and (d) over 60 years old. [145873]

Jeremy Wright: Table 1 shows the number of male and female prisoners held in a prison, young offender institution and female prison and with a recorded residential address in Dartford constituency area as at 31 December 2012.

If no address is given, an offender's committal court address is used as a proxy for the area in which they are resident. These figures are also included in the answer. No address has been recorded and no court information is available for around 3% of all offenders, these figures

13 Mar 2013 : Column 270W

are excluded from the answer above. Information on offenders' residences is provided by offenders on reception into prison and recorded on a central IT system. Addresses can include a home address, an address to which offenders intend to return on discharge or next of kin address and these figures are provided in the answer above.

Comparable data on what proportion of prisoners resident in Dartford constituency are (a) women and (b) men in 2003 and 2008 are not available as the National Offender Management Service did not record constituency level data until 2010.

As at 31 December 2012 there were no female offenders aged between 15 and 21 with a recorded residential address in Dartford constituency held in young offender institutions. Data on those held in secure training centres and secure children's homes are not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by a manual check of records.

Table 2 shows the number of prisoners serving a determinate sentence of four years or more, those serving an indeterminate sentence for public protection, those serving as life sentence and those recalled to custody who had an original sentence of four years or more with a recorded residential address in Dartford constituency as at 31 December 2012.

Table 3 shows the numbers of prisoners with a recorded residential address in Dartford constituency as at 31 December 2012 who are (a) under 18 years old, (b) between 18 and 21 years old, (c) between 45 and 60 years old and (d) over 60 years old.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible error with data entry and processing.

Table 1: Number of prisoners and their location with a recorded residential address in the Dartford constituency area as at 31 December 2012
Predominant FunctionPrisonFemaleMaleTotal

Adult

Bedford

 

<5

<5

 

Belmarsh

 

8

8

 

Birmingham

 

<5

<5

 

Blantyre House

 

<5

<5

 

Brixton

 

<5

<5

 

Bullingdon

 

<5

<5

 

Rye Hill

 

<5

<5

 

Standford Hill

 

5

5

 

Swaleside

 

5

5

 

Thameside

 

<5

<5

 

Wandsworth

 

<5

<5

 

Wayland

 

<5

<5

 

Wormwood Scrubs

 

<5

<5

 

Elmley

 

19

19

 

Ford

 

<5

<5

 

Grendon/Spring Hill

 

<5

<5

 

High Down

 

<5

<5

 

High point

 

<5

<5

13 Mar 2013 : Column 271W

 

Isle of Wight

 

<5

<5

 

Kingston

 

<5

<5

 

Maidstone

 

<5

<5

 

The Mount

 

<5

<5

     

Young Offender Institution

Cookham Wood

 

<5

<5

 

Rochester

 

5

5

     

Female Prisons

Downview

<5

<5

Table 2: Number of prisoners with a recorded residential address in the Dartford constituency area serving a sentence of four years or more as at 31 December 2012
Sentence StatusTotal

Determinate sentence of four years or more

17

Indeterminate Sentence for Pubic Protection

<5

Life Sentence

<5

Recall (Original sentence of four years or more)

<5

Table 3: Number of prisoners with a recorded residential address in the Dartford constituency area as at 31 December 2012
Age BreakdownFemaleMale

15 to 17

<5

18 to 21

11

22 to 44

<5

44

45 to 60

17

Over 60

<5

Note: To prevent the possible identification of prisoners, where there are fewer than five in a category, this is shown as less than five, in line with the principles of the Data Protection Act.

Probation

Jackie Doyle-Price: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much was spent in each probation trust area on one-to-one work with offenders originally sentenced for (a) murder, (b) rape, (c) violence against a person, (d) burglary, (e) sexual offences against a minor, (f) theft and (g) criminal damage to property and who received probation of (i) 0-6 months, (ii) 7-12 months, (iii) 13-18 months, (iv) 19-24 months and (v) 25-36 months in (A) 2009-10 and (B) 2010-11. [144530]

Jeremy Wright: Central accounting systems do not record expenditure in the format requested. It would not be possible to provide the requested analysis without incurring disproportionate cost.

Small Claims

Mr George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the proposed increase in the small

13 Mar 2013 : Column 272W

claims limit under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 on claimants who lack the funds to access legal services in cases where liability has been accepted by a third party; [146935]

(2) what representations he has received from parties concerned that the proposed increase in the small claims limit under the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 will restrict access to justice for the vulnerable; and what steps his Department has taken to ensure that such concerns are not realised. [146938]

Mrs Grant: The reforms to be implemented in Part 2 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 on 1 April 2013 do not relate to the level of the small claims track threshold. However, following the publication of the ‘Solving Disputes in the County Court' consultation response in March 2012, the Ministry of Justice announced the small claims track financial threshold for general claims would be increased to £10,000 on 1 April 2013. A revised impact assessment was published alongside the consultation response and can be downloaded from the Ministry of Justice website at:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/county_court_disputes

In addition, the Government have just completed a consultation on measures to reduce the number and cost of whiplash claims. A proposal to amend the small claims threshold for damages for personal injury claims was included in this document, and an impact assessment—including an assessment of the impact of the proposals on the Road Traffic Accident Pre-action Protocol for claims where liability is accepted—was also published. Both documents can be downloaded from the Ministry of Justice website at:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/reducing-number-cost-whiplash

No decisions will be taken on whether to amend the small claims threshold in personal injury claims until all responses to the consultation have been considered. A revised impact assessment will consider the impact of any changes on affected parties and will be published alongside the Government response.

Supervision Orders

Kelvin Hopkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what the estimated cost to the public purse is of (a) a supervision order without a punishment element and (b) a supervision order with a punishment element; [147390]

(2) what estimate he has made of trends in the proportion of punitive and rehabilitative measures used by probation trusts over the next five years. [147391]

Jeremy Wright: Provisions in schedule 15 to the Crime and Courts Bill will require courts to include a punitive element as part of a community order. The Government published a full impact assessment for this and other policies taken forward as a result of the Punishment and Reform consultation on community sentencing. The impact assessment can be found at:

https://consult.justice.gov.uk/digital-communications/effective-community-services-1/results/community-sentences-response-ia.pdf

13 Mar 2013 : Column 273W

Young Offenders

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what support a young offender receives when their case is transferred from youth offending to adult probation teams. [146829]

Jeremy Wright: When the case of a young person is transferred from a youth offending team (YOT) to a probation trust, at or around the age of 18, the probation trust is expected to provide the level and type of support that is necessary to avoid future reoffending and to promote rehabilitation. At the same time, the probation trust must ensure that the young person meets the demands of the court order.

Depending on the needs of the young offender concerned, this could include support and advice on employment and training, housing, thinking skills and substance misuse. Such support will be provided either direct by the probation trust or by other agencies.

Work and Pensions

Employment: Bradford

Mr Ward: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps his Department is taking to increase employment opportunities in Bradford. [146643]

Mr Hoban: I refer to the reply given by the Minister of State for Business and Enterprise, my right hon. Friend the Member for Sevenoaks (Michael Fallon), on 11 March 2013, Official Report, column 118W.

Employment: North West

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent assessment he has made of under-employment in (a) Barrow and Furness constituency, (b) Cumbria and (c) the North West. [147295]

Mr Hoban: The number of people in the specified areas who want to work more hours either in their current job, or by taking a new or additional job, are shown in the table. This group represents a minority of the work force, with nine out of ten people saying they do not want additional hours.

The figures include people who say they would accept longer hours in their current job if the opportunity arose, in addition to those who are actively seeking extra hours. They also include people already working full-time (up to 47 hours per week) who still express a preference for more hours.

The UK has a flexible labour market in which 6 million to 7 million people start a new job or change jobs every year and the range of new jobs coming up is very wide. This dynamism and diversity ensures most people can find a job that suits their particular needs. A job that does not initially provide as many hours as a person wants can provide valuable skills and experience and be a stepping stone to more hours when their employer is able to offer them, or by using the experience gained to move to a different job.

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 Number in employment willing to work more hours(1) (thousand)

North West

320

Cumbria

21

(1) Workers are defined as underemployed if willing to work more hours, either by working in an additional job, working more hours in their current job, or switching to a replacement job. They must also be available to start working longer hours within two weeks, and their current weekly hours must be below 40 hours if they are aged between 16 and 18 and below 48 hours if they are aged over 18. Notes: 1. Estimates are based on small sample sizes and should be treated with caution. 2. Estimates have been rounded to the nearest thousand. 3. Cumbria is made up of the following local authorities; Carlisle, Allerdale, South Lakeland, Eden, Barrow in Furness and Copeland 4. Sample sizes are too small to provide a reliable estimate for Barrow and Furness constituency for this period. Source: ONS, Annual Population Survey dataset, October 2011 to September 2012

Housing Benefit: Social Rented Housing

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what guidance he has issued to local authorities and housing associations about the classification of a bedroom under the under-occupation penalty to housing benefit; and what assessment he has made of the safe minimum size of a bedroom to be shared by two siblings. [147675]

Steve Webb: Together with the Department for Communities and Local Government we have worked with the Chartered Institute of Housing who have produced an online guide for social sector landlords "Making it Fit—a guide to preparing for the social size criteria". This was launched in June last year and is designed to help landlords to develop a strategic and operational approach to the size criteria, tailored to their local area.

Separate guidance has not been issued on the size of rooms or their suitability for use as a bedroom. Rent levels generally reflect the number of bedrooms in the property and may take into account their size, but it is for tenants to decide at the point of accepting the tenancy whether the rooms are of a suitable size for their needs.

The size criteria rules take account of the number of bedrooms as designated by the landlord and compare this with the composition of the household in order to establish whether or not to apply a reduction due to under-occupation.

Jobcentre Plus

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what steps he has taken to provide support in jobcentres to people lacking in digital skills. [147663]

Mr Hoban: If a claimant does not have access to the internet at home, jobcentre staff are able to advise of alternative access points in the community. Most jobcentres also have the facility to offer internet access on site where necessary.

Our new jobsearch site, Univeral Jobmatch, has modernised the support for jobseekers and employers. Should a jobseeker lack the necessary skills to navigate

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this service, there are staff in every Jobcentre who are able to coach them in registration and best use of the system.

As part of our support to jobseekers, we will also refer to specific programmes to help people to use the internet. Where there are gaps in external provision, jobcentres have the facility to contract directly with organisations to provide appropriate support and training.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department is spending on equipment that will be installed in jobcentres to assist digitally illiterate benefit claimants in each of the next five years. [147664]

Mr Hoban: Budgets have yet to be agreed for the next five years. The decision to install equipment is a local one depending on requirements. However, jobcentres will continue to provide internet access and support for digitally illiterate benefit claimants.

Means-tested Benefits

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when new applicants will cease to be awarded (a) means tested jobseeker's allowance, (b) means tested employment and support allowance and (c) tax credits. [147666]

Mr Hoban: Claims to universal credit start in our Pathfinder from 29 April 2013. This will focus on new single, unemployed people, with or without rented housing costs. Universal credit will replace means tested jobseeker's allowance for this group of claimants.

A progressive national roll-out to other new claimants will begin in October 2013. The final date on which all new applicants will claim universal credit instead of existing benefits will be announced in due course.

Pensioners: Poverty

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions (1) pursuant to the answer of 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 643W, on pensioners, what steps he is taking in response to the data generated by the material deprivation indicator; [144971]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with charities representing elderly people on the income and non-income-based aspects of pensioner poverty. [144972]

Steve Webb: As my answer on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 643W sets out, pensioner well-being is a priority for the Government. The triple lock ensures that the basic state pension will go up by the highest of earnings, prices or 2.5% and we have protected key benefits for older people including free eye tests, free prescription charges, free off-peak bus travel, free television licences for those aged over 75 and winter fuel payments.

The material deprivation indicator provides valuable insights into older people's experience of poverty, arising for example from social isolation and ill health. It complements the income measure and underlines the need to enable people to have opportunities to work, save and provide for themselves and their families up to and beyond retirement. That is why the Coalition is

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reforming the welfare system to improve work and saving incentives, and provide more effective support to those out of work. It is also why we abolished the default retirement age, meaning most people can now retire when the time is right for them, enabling people to work and save for longer. Our plans for the single-tier pension, and for automatic enrolment into workplace pensions, will provide clarity and confidence to better support saving for retirement and make the default decision a decision to save.

The indicator also demonstrates the need to tackle non-financial issues which strongly affect people's experience of poverty and deprivation. For older people, many of these relate to isolation, and state of health. I most recently discussed this at the 6 March 2013 meeting of the UK Advisory Forum on Ageing, focusing on how Government and others can work together to learn more about the issues at local level, and what needs to be done to tackle them. Government and others are already working together in this respect in the context of the Age Action Alliance, an independent network of organisations focused on practical means to improve older people's lives whose membership has just reached 315—a testimony to its value not only to central and local Government, but also to commercial providers, delivery organisations, representative groups, and older people themselves.

On a bilateral basis, in recent months I have had several meetings with charities and representative organisations such as Age UK, and with older people themselves, including a visit to Abbeyfield care home. As plans for the single tier pension gather pace this year I will be engaging further with organisations with an interest in the welfare of older people.

Universal Credit

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many consultants were employed as part of the universal credit programme in each of the last three years; and what the total cost was of those consultants in each year. [147292]

Mr Hoban: The total cost of the consultants employed on the universal credit programme in each of the last three years is as follows: £5.6 million in 2011-12 and £2.2 million in 2012-13.

There was no consultancy expenditure in 2010-11 recorded against the universal credit programme.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people working on the universal credit programme are employees of (a) Accenture, (b) BT, (c) Capgemini, (d) Hewlett Packard and (e) IBM. [147640]

Mr Hoban: The Department contracts for services from its suppliers and the number of staff working on the programme at any one time is a matter for them to determine. It will vary considerably over the life of the programme.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department has spent on developing the IT system for universal credit to date. [147641]

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Mr Hoban: I refer the right hon. Member to the reply I gave to his previous question number 147121, on 11 March 2013, Official Report, column 145W.

Stephen Timms: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions when he expects applicants without bank accounts to be able to receive universal credit. [147643]

Mr Hoban: Universal credit claimants who do not have access to a bank account will be able to receive payments from the start of the pathfinder from April 2013. Claimants will need access to a bank account or Post Office card account to make an initial claim during the UC Pathfinder, but we will also have the facility to make payment by simple payment where necessary.

Through the personal budgeting support process we will also be taking steps to enable the majority of claimants to use a bank account to manage their UC payments.

Work Capability Assessment

Mr Crausby: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how much his Department has spent on the appeals process for work capability assessments in each year since 2009. [146801]

Mr Hoban: The following table shows the cost of appeals related to work capability assessment in respect of staff costs for employment support allowance and incapacity benefit reassessment appeals.

From April 2012, the Department recorded employment support allowance work capability assessments separately. The data provided prior to April 2012 are the full employment support allowance appeal cost of work capability assessments and non-work capability assessments.

Employment support allowance was rolled out within Jobcentre Plus in 2009-10 so the full year costs are not comparable year on year.

£ million
 Financial year
 2009-102010-112011-12April 2012 to January2013

ESA appeals

6.4

12.1

15.4

14.1

Of which:

    

ESA appeals—WCA

n/a

n/a

n/a

12.2

IB (IS) reassessment appeals

n/a

n/a

3.1

9.9

Total WCA

   

22.1

Source: Jobcentre Plus ABM Models 2009-10 and 2010-11 and DWP Ops ABM Models 2011-12 and 2012-13.

Andrew Stunell: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assessment he has made of the effect of the implementation of Professor Harrington's recommendations on the work capability assessment on the flexibility of decision-makers in considering additional medical evidence. [147015]

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Mr Hoban: A key aspect of our implementation of Professor Harrington's recommendations has been to empower decision makers and place them at the heart of the work capability assessment (WCA). As part of the decision-making process, decision makers must consider all of the evidence available to them, including any additional medical evidence provided.

Following the recommendations from Professor Harrington's Year 2 review, a regular audit of decision maker performance is now conducted via the Quality Assurance Framework, where checks are made on a sample of ESA and IB reassessment decisions. We also conduct twice yearly calibration exercises at a national level to ensure that there is a consistent application of the Quality Assurance Framework.

In his third independent review of the WCA Professor Harrington made a recommendation that:

“Decision Makers should actively consider the need to seek further documentary evidence in every claimant's case. The final decision must be justified where this is not sought.”

The Government provisionally accepted this recommendation, and are currently working to understand how best to implement it in the best and most cost-effective fashion.

International Development

Private Sector: Development

8. Mr Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to work more closely with the private sector for development aims. [147434]

Justine Greening: I want to see an end to aid dependency through jobs. On Monday I announced a step-change in how DFID works to drive economic development in developing countries. We will work with the Confederation of British Industry to see business and UK companies joining the development push with DFID.

Economic Development

9. Catherine McKinnell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what strategy her Department has for economic development; and if she will make a statement. [147435]

Justine Greening: On Monday I announced that my Department will work with the Confederation of British Industry to create a joint strategy for business to join the development effort.

My Department will also work in developing countries to remove trade barriers and unlock growth and jobs through supporting particularly small companies to grow successfully.

UN Aid Target

10. Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent progress has been made on the Government commitment to meet the UN aid target of 0.7 per cent of GDP. [147436]

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Mr Duncan: The Government will, as promised, meet their commitment to spend 0.7% of gross national income on Official Development Assistance from this year.

G8

11. Henry Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how her Department is supporting the UK’s presidency of the G8. [147437]

Justine Greening: The Prime Minister has said he wants to use the G8 to tackle the causes, not just the symptoms, of poverty, including work on tax, trade and transparency. My Department is working across Government and leading key elements of discussions that are relevant for developing countries.

Tax Avoidance: Developing Countries

12. Andrew Stunell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions she has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on tackling tax avoidance in developing countries. [147438]

Lynne Featherstone: The Secretary of State for International Development, the right hon. Member for Putney (Justine Greening), regularly has meetings with ministerial colleagues, including the Chancellor of the Exchequer. In these meetings, they discuss various issues of common interest, including tax avoidance.

Better Governance

14. Neil Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to promote better governance in fragile and conflict-affected states. [147440]

Mr Duncan: The UK will direct 30% of UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) to fragile and conflict- affected states by 2014-15. Improving governance is central to all DFID programmes, and to tackling the drivers of instability, in fragile and conflict affected countries.

Water

15. Dr Thérèse Coffey: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how she plans to support the International Year of Water Cooperation and events on World Water Day on 22 March 2013. [147441]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID will host events on World Water Day on how water impacts on girls and women, and our support to improving access to services and managing water resources. DFID will continue supporting international cooperation on water in Africa and Asia.

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Afghanistan

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what progress has been made in meeting her Department's target for female children attending primary school in Afghanistan. [147211][Official Report, 22 April 2013, Vol. 561, c. 3-4MC.]

Mr Duncan: DFID has made a large investment in improving education provision in Afghanistan for all children over the last decade. UK development funding through the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund has contributed to 5.9 million children attending school in 2011-12. This includes 2.3 million girls, compared with virtually none under the Taliban. We have therefore exceeded our Operational Plan target of contributing to 2.1 million girls attending primary school by 2013-14 and will be working with the Afghan Ministry of Education as they develop new targets.

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to ensure that the Afghan Government keep schools and hospitals open after Coalition forces leave that country. [147215]

Mr Duncan: Since 2002 the UK has contributed over £685 million to the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF), to support the delivery of basic services across Afghanistan, including health care and education. UK support to the ARTF will continue after the security transition.

In the Tokyo Mutual Accountability Framework (TMAF) agreed in July 2012, the Afghan Government committed to adequately resource health care and education to meet Millennium Development Goal targets. The UK, as co-chair of the first ministerial review of the TMAF in 2014, will play a leading role in ensuring this commitment is met.

Rwanda

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development in what circumstances she would restore aid to Rwanda. [147328]

Justine Greening: I refer the hon. Member to my written ministerial statement of 1 March 2013, Official Report, 47-48WS.

Telephone Services

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many (a) 0800, (b) 0808, (c) 0844, (d) 0845 and (e) 0870 telephone numbers for the public are in use by her Department. [147822]

Mr Duncan: DFID uses an 0845 number for the Public Inquiry Point. There are no other 08 numbers in use.