Communities and Local Government

Computer Software

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what his policy is on open source software. [146881]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 622W

Brandon Lewis: My Department is committed to supporting the Government's ICT plans and is adopting the relevant key components of the common ICT infrastructure that includes the greater use of open source, as laid out in the April 2012 Cabinet Office policy document.

www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/sites/default/files/resources/All_About_Open_Source_v2_0.pdf

In line with this, we are taking forward our applications roadmap and where appropriate we will recommend the use of open source products to replace our existing applications.

The new gov.uk website which DCLG uses is built on open source software. The single domain is built using ruby on rails

www.rubyonrails.org/

and the micro sites that sit beneath the main platform are based on Wordpress content management.

www.wordpress.org

Further information can be found at the following link:

http://digital.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/2012/10/12/coding-in-the-open/

In my Department, we also utilise several free system administrator tools, including spice works and wall watcher.

In my Department's publication “50 Ways to Save”, we have encouraged the use of open source software as a cost-effective option for local authorities.

Derelict Land: Suffolk

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what estimate he has made of the potential capacity for new housing on brownfield sites which are currently unconsented for in (a) Bury St Edmunds constituency and (b) Suffolk in each of the last three years. [148080]

Mr Prisk: Information on the potential capacity of brownfield land is available from the National Land Use Database of Previously-Developed Land. This is not collected at constituency level. However, the returns for the last three years currently available for Suffolk and the local authorities of St Edmundsbury and Mid Suffolk are set out in the following tables. The data refer to the area of brownfield land without planning permission or allocation which local authorities judged to have the capacity to deliver the housing numbers quoted.

Area (Hectares)
 200720082009

St Edmundsbury

7

7

9

Mid Suffolk

22

23

23

Suffolk

141

166

171

Potential housing capacity
 200720082009

St Edmundsbury

159

168

245

Mid Suffolk

691

708

708

Suffolk

3638

4524

4667

19 Mar 2013 : Column 623W

Further information can be found for published reports from 2007 to 2009 at:

http://www.homesandcommunities.co.uk/nlud-pdl-results-and-analysis

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110218193442/homesandcommunities.co.uk/nlud

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110218193442/http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/corporate/statistics/previouslydevelopedland2007

Domestic Visits: Prime Minister

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the average cost to a local authority was of hosting a constituency visit from the Prime Minister in the last year for which figures are available. [149049]

Brandon Lewis: The information requested is not held by the Department.

Housing: Sustainable Development

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many homes designed to meet level 6 of the code for sustainable homes have been (a) started and (b) completed since May 2010. [148288]

Mr Foster: Statistical information about the Code for Sustainable Homes and the energy performance of buildings is published quarterly on the:

www.gov.uk

website. Code level 6 is the highest standard, and is both expensive and difficult to achieve. It also goes beyond the Government's zero carbon definition.

The last quarterly Statistical Release provided information up to December 2012. For code level 6, between May 2010 and December 2012, 264 design stage certificates and 221 post-construction stage certificates were issued. For the entire period of the code's existence up to May 2010, 105 design stage certificates and seven post-construction stage certificates were issued.

Local Audit Bill (Draft)

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he plans to carry out a fresh financial impact assessment on the measures in the proposed Local Audit Bill prior to its publication. [146767]

Brandon Lewis: The Government will publish an updated impact assessment alongside the final Bill, incorporating the most up-to-date figures on the Audit Commission's costs. The impact assessment assesses the costs and benefits of the whole package of reforms and shows all costs and savings each year, over a 10-year period from 2009-10 (the last full year of the Audit Commission's operation before the Government's programme of reform began in 2010) to 2019-20. It shows all costs and savings in the run-up to and after the closure of the residual Audit Commission. It shows that the programme to end routine inspection and assessment, disband the Audit Commission and introduce a new local audit framework will save £650 million of taxpayers' money over a five-year period.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 624W

Local Government Finance

Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many representations from non-metropolitan counties he has received following the publication of the draft local government finance settlement 2013/14. [138910]

Brandon Lewis: Consultation on the provisional local government finance settlement for 2013-14 ended on 15 January 2013. 26 responses were received from 21 non-metropolitan counties, including four from county councils that have the functions of district councils.

Local Government Finance: Merseyside

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much local authority grant has been given to the five local authorities in the Merseyside region in (a) 2010, (b) 2011, (c) 2012 and (d) 2013 to date. [144722]

Brandon Lewis: Local figures on local authority financing can be found on my Department's website:

Revenue account budget 2012-13:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2012-to-2013-individual-local-authority-data

Revenue outturn 2011-12:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2011-to-2012-individual-local-authority-data--2

Revenue outturn 2010-11:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/local-authority-revenue-expenditure-and-financing-england-2010-to-2011-individual-local-authority-data--5

2013-14 figures are not currently available.

Localism Act 2011

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he plans to collect data on the average number of community plans in each constituency as a result of the Localism Act 2011. [148453]

Nick Boles: This information is not collected centrally. However, informal monitoring of local planning authority websites tells us that as of 15 March, 430 communities have taken the first formal step in the process of producing a neighbourhood plan by applying to formally designate their neighbourhood planning area.

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he plans to collect data on the average contract length for social housing following the coming into force of the Localism Act 2011. [148454]

Mr Prisk: Data on the length of fixed-term tenancies are being collected through CORE (the Continuous Recording of Lettings and Sales in Social Housing in England). This question was introduced for the 2012-13 data collection and the annual publication is due in autumn 2013.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 625W

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he plans to collect data on the average number of pieces of property which are being bought by communities in each constituency as a result of the Localism Act 2011. [148456]

Mr Foster: The Department does not formally collect data on the number of assets which have been sold to communities using the assets of community value provisions in the Localism Act 2011.

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether he plans to collect data on the average number of pieces of property in each constituency which local councils are reserving so communities can buy them as a result of the Localism Act 2011. [148457]

Mr Foster: Local authorities are responsible for maintaining a list which contains their assets of community value. The scheme known as the Community Right to Bid does not require the owner to sell to a community group, but improves the opportunity for this outcome. My Department has asked local authorities who administer the scheme to provide an update on how the scheme is operating in their area. To date I am aware that at least 252 assets of community value have been listed in England.

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if he will estimate what the (a) total and (b) average annual savings of the Localism Act 2011 has been. [148945]

Mr Foster: The Summary Impact Assessment for the Bill was published on 31 January 2011 and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/localism-bill-summary-impact-assessment

However, it is too early to provide a meaningful estimate of savings arising from the Act's implementation as a whole. Cabinet Office guidance requires the post-legislative scrutiny of Acts to be carried out between three and five years after Royal Assent.

Official Hospitality

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what costs his Department incurred in providing refreshments for Ministers since May 2010. [135267]

Brandon Lewis: We do not routinely incur expenditure on refreshments for Ministers other than de minimis expenditure on tea and coffee for Ministers' meetings with external visitors, or on occasion when Ministers undertake overnight stays on official business outside London.

I also refer the hon. Member of my answer to him of 22 January 2013, Official Report, column 207W, outlining how we have saved taxpayers' money by tackling ministerial group spending on expensive restaurants.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 626W

Overtime Payments

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the (a) average cost per member of staff and (b) total cost was of overtime payments in (i) his Department and (ii) each of its arm's length bodies in (A) 2010-11, (B) 2011-12 and (C) 2012-13 to date. [141473]

Brandon Lewis: The information requested is as follows:

Median salaries

The median salary of departmental staff, excluding the Permanent Secretary, was £35,295 in 2010-11 and £36,022 in 2011-12. Such average figures were influenced by machinery of government changes and departmental restructuring.

Figures for 2012-13 will be published in our annual report in due course. Figures for the Department's arm’s length bodies are not held centrally.

Overtime

The following table shows how my Department has significantly reduced the cost of overtime:

Core DepartmentTotal cost of overtime payments (£)

2008-09

703,316

2009-10

542,906

2010-11

413,076

2011-12

399,543

2012-13 to date

273,635

To place this in context, total departmental staffing costs were £106 million in 2011-12, hence overtime represents 0.4% of the pay bill in that year.

Figures for our arm’s length bodies are:

Total cost of overtime payments2010-112011-122012-13 to date

Fire Service College

47,719.71

39,153.75

35,437.25

Ordnance Survey

274,779.66

75,333.94

n/a

Planning Inspectorate

33,13645

54,785.35

70,708.24

Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre

80,065.30

90,026.45

78,490.53

Community Development Foundation

0.00

n/a

n/a

Firebuy

0.00

n/a

n/a

Homes and Communities Agency

67,155.86

76,311.05

63,764.28

Independent Housing Ombudsman Ltd

548.14

0.00

344.18

Infrastructure Planning Commission

978.24

8,351.90

n/a

Leasehold Advisory Service

0.00

0.00

0.00

London Thames Gateway Development Corporation

0.00

0.00

0.00

Standards Board for England

0.00

1,932.99

n/a

Tenants Services Authority

16,084.00

13,308.79

n/a

Thurrock Development Corporation

2,258.55

1,273.11

n/a

Valuation Tribunal Service

0.00

0.00

0.00

West Northamptonshire Development Corporation

0.00

0.00

0.00

Ordnance Survey are no longer part of the Department. The Community Development Foundation, Firebuy, Infrastructure Planning Commission, Standards Board for England, Tenants Services Authority and Thurrock

19 Mar 2013 : Column 627W

Development Corporation have since closed. The Government offices for the regions, which are not included above, have also closed.

Based on current estimates (which reflect accounting consequences from machinery of government changes), the DCLG Group is reducing its annual running costs by 41% in real terms by 2014-15. This equates to net savings of at least £532 million over this spending review period.

Planning Permission

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many local authorities in England have drawn up local development plans that have been judged by the Planning Inspectorate to be compliant with the National Planning Policy Framework; and how many have now adopted that plan. [149063]

Nick Boles: The Planning Inspectorate has completed 17 examinations on plans that have been submitted to it post 27 March 2012 and found them, with main modifications, to be compliant with the National Planning Policy Framework. 10 of those plans have now proceeded to adoption.

For the purposes of decision-making, policies in local plans should not be considered out of date simply because they were adopted prior to the publication of the National Planning Policy Framework. Due weight should be given to relevant policies in existing plans according to their degree of consistency with this framework (the closer the policies in the plan to the policies in the framework, the greater the weight that may be given). Decision-takers may also give weight to relevant policies in emerging plans.

71% of local planning authorities in England now have a local plan at the publication stage or beyond. To place this progress in context, six years after the passage of the last Administration's Planning Act 2004, only 57 Core Strategies had been adopted out of 335 local planning authorities by May 2010.

Hilary Benn: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many (a) cases before and (b) decisions by the Planning Inspectorate on appeal there have been since 27 March 2012, by (i) appeals following refusal by the local authority and (ii) non-determination by the local authority. [149065]

Nick Boles: The following table shows the number of planning appeals (including Householder Appeals Service cases) decided over a comparative period, split by the incoming appeal being due to non-determination and refusal.

Appeals decidedNon-determinationRefusal

2009-10

391

16,908

2010-11

398

15,436

2011-12

420

14,093

April 2012 to December 2012

310

9,353

These figures refute the suggestion that the National Planning Policy Framework would lead to “planning by appeal”.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 628W

More broadly, the number of planning applications has risen under this Government, as have approval rates. Our planning reforms are promoting more sustainable development and more local decision-making.

Regional Planning and Development

Jeremy Lefroy: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what his policy is on planning and ribbon development along transport arteries; [147926]

(2) what his policy is on planning and ribbon development adjacent to the proposed route of High Speed 2. [147927]

Nick Boles: National planning policy for development along transport arteries is set out in the National Planning Policy Framework. This provides guidance for local planning authorities and decision-takers in drawing up plans and as a material consideration in determining applications.

Senior Civil Servants

Mr Kevan Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government pursuant to the answer of 9 January 2013, Official Report, columns 278-79W, on senior civil servants, how much his Department has spent on compensation packages for senior staff who have been made redundant in each year since 2010. [137381]

Brandon Lewis [holding answer 15 January 2013]: As outlined in the answer of 28 April 2011, Official Report, column 552W, as part of the coalition Government's ambition of a more decentralised state, we have restructured the departmental group, reducing staffing levels, including reducing the number of senior civil servants.

Consequently, the expenditure information requested for departmental exits, under the prevailing December 2010 exit arrangements, in 2011-12 was £2,463,312 and £657,461 in 2012-13 (to end December 2012).

To place this in context, based on current estimates, the DCLG Group is reducing its annual running costs by 41% in real terms by 2014-15. This equates to net savings of at least £532 million over this spending review period.

Moreover, our departmental audited annual accounts for the core Department show that total staff costs fell from £216 million in 2009-10 to £109 million in 2011-12; this is an annual saving of £107,000,000.

Training

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much his Department spent on training and education for civil servants in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; and if he will make a statement. [144081]

Brandon Lewis: There is a business case for staff to maintain and build their specialist skills and further their professional development to help them do their jobs better.

Notwithstanding, the following table, based on information contained in our departmental audited annual accounts for the core Department, shows how

19 Mar 2013 : Column 629W

administrative spending on the category “training and conferences” has fallen. It also illustrates total staff costs.

 Spending on “training and conferences”Staff costs

2009-10

£6.2 million

£216 million

2010-11

£3.2 million

£184 million

2011-12

£408,000

£109 million

I would add that Civil Service Learning was established in April 2011 in response to a wide-ranging review of the delivery of training in the civil service. The new model recognises the need for the civil service to get better value out of its investment in training, reduce duplication in the procurement of learning solutions and make greater use of the external market to provide the training which the civil service requires. These reforms will save taxpayers' money and improve the overall quality of training provision.

Based on current estimates (which reflect accounting consequences from machinery of government changes), the DCLG Group is reducing its annual running costs by 41% in real terms by 2014-15. This equates to net savings of at least £532 million over this spending review period.

Travel

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how much his Department spent on (a) the Government Car Service and (b) other taxi or car services for ministerial travel in each year since 2009-10; and if he will make a statement. [142631]

Brandon Lewis: This Government have taken a series of steps to reduce the cost of ministerial travel. Our departmental spend with the Government Car and Despatch Agency on ministerial travel has fallen by 58% from 2009-10 to 2011-12.

Details for the cost of ministerial cars are published in the annual written ministerial statement (28 October 2010, Official Report, column 23WS; 16 January 2012, Official Report, column 30WS; 20 December 2012, Official Report, column 127WS). Details of the costs for 2012-13 will be published in the normal way later this year.

Use of a hackney carriage taxi is often cheaper and more cost-effective than using the pool car arrangements provided by the Government Car Service. From 2008-09 to 2009-10, expenditure by ministerial offices was £3,751; comparative spending from 2010-11 to 2011-12 was £3,248. This figure includes travel by staff within ministerial offices—it is not a figure solely for travel by Ministers.

Ministers have made occasional use of private hire vehicles when making official visits to different parts of the country; total expenditure on such vehicles for the period in question is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Attorney-General

Horsemeat

Mary Creagh: To ask the Attorney-General whether the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has sought legal advice from the Law Officers' Departments on (a) police investigations into the

19 Mar 2013 : Column 630W

horsemeat scandal and

(b)

with regard to the naming of companies possibly implicated in the illegal adulteration of meat products with horsemeat. [149069]

The Attorney-General: By long-standing convention, observed by successive Administrations, the fact of, and the substance of, advice from the Law Officers is not disclosed outside Government. The convention against disclosure is also set out in paragraph 2.13 of the Ministerial Code.

Human Trafficking: Illegal Immigrants

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what information is held by the Crown Prosecution Service on the number of victims of human trafficking who have been prosecuted for illegal immigration offences since 2010. [148282]

The Solicitor-General: I am unable to provide data on the number of victims of human trafficking who have been prosecuted for immigration offences. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) Case Management System (CMS) cannot identify if a defendant who has been charged with an immigration offence is also a victim of human trafficking. The CPS is committed to bringing the perpetrators of human trafficking and criminal gangs exploiting people in the first place to justice.

Serious Fraud Office

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General with reference to paragraph 1.56 of Sir Alex Allan's report on the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), published on 4 March 2013, whether the internal investigation into the circumstances of the SFO and police raid has concluded; and what the findings of that investigation have been. [148280]

The Solicitor-General: Available records show that an informal internal investigation concluded that SFO staff had not informed the press about the searches before they took place.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General whether any current members of Serious Fraud Office staff occupy posts that were (a) not publicly advertised and (b) not subject to open competition. [148281]

The Attorney-General: As at the end of February 2013 the SFO employed 303 staff (293.46 FTE). 288 (278.9 FTE) of those staff were recruited either directly in to the SFO through fair and open competition or were existing civil servants transferring in from other Government Departments.

15 (14.56) staff on fixed-term contracts were recruited as permitted exceptions to fair and open competition. These appointments are all appropriately documented as exceptions. All other posts were advertised on the civil service jobs website.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what the value was of the five largest entries in the Serious Fraud Office's gifts and hospitality register in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12 and (d) 2012-13 to date. [148284]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 631W

The Solicitor-General: The information requested is shown in the following table:

£
 2009-102010-112011-122012-13

1

225

40

120

225

2

225

35

104

170

3

70

25

95

80

4

30

20

71

80

5

25

15

65

80

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General what the total value was of (a) gifts and (b) hospitality received by Serious Fraud Office staff in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11, (iii) 2011-12 and (iv) 2012-13 to date. [148285]

The Attorney-General: The Serious Fraud Office has a gifts and hospitality register. Information compiled from this is shown in the following table. By its nature, information about the value of gifts and hospitality can be inaccurate as this often has to be estimated. Not all entries in the register have an estimated value for the gift or hospitality received.

 Value (£)

2009-10

738

2010-11

195

2011-12

1,053

2012-13

1,344

The apparent increase in the two latter years is in part attributable to a greater number of entries having an estimated value.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General when the Serious Fraud Office most recently prosecuted a cartel offence. [148287]

The Attorney-General: The Serious Fraud Office has not prosecuted any cartel offences under section 188 of the Enterprise Act 2002.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General how many compromise agreements have been entered into by departing Serious Fraud Office staff since 2010; and whether any of these agreements contained gagging clauses. [148292]

The Attorney-General: Compromise agreements have been signed with five departing civil servants and the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) since 2010. Four of those contained confidentiality clauses.

However, all civil servants leaving the SFO are required to sign a form which includes a clause that they agree to keep confidential and not disclose any information relating to the SFO and/or its business without authority from a member of the department.

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Attorney-General whether the Serious Fraud Office meets the cost of damages claims awarded against it from its own budget. [148743]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 632W

The Attorney-General: The SFO meets the cost of damages claims from its own budget wherever possible. With some large claims and non-fault case liabilities, discussions may take place with HM Treasury as to whether a call can be made on the reserve.

Health

Ambulance Services: East Midlands

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent discussions he has had with the East Midlands Ambulance Service regarding response times. [148272]

Anna Soubry: There have been no recent ministerial discussions with the East Midlands Ambulance Service National Health Service Trust about response times. However, I met the Trust on 21 January 2013 about response times in my capacity as the local Member of Parliament for Broxtowe.

The Department monitors ambulance trust performance closely, and may discuss with strategic health authorities, as in this case, what action may be needed to improve performance where a trust is operating below standard. However, it is for ambulance trusts and their commissioners to plan, develop and improve services.

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the East Midlands Ambulance Service “Being the Best” review. [148274]

Anna Soubry: The Department has not assessed the East Midlands Ambulance Service National Health Service Trust “Being the Best” review.

The local national health service is responsible for reviewing the provision of local health services. The Department expects that proposals for local health service changes meet strengthened criteria to demonstrate:

support from general practice commissioners;

strengthened public and patient engagement;

sound clinical evidence base underpinning, proposals; and

that proposals support patient choice.

Anorexia: North West

Andrew Stephenson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of the availability of facilities for force-feeding children and young adults suffering from anorexia in (a) the North West and (b) Lancashire; [148116]

(2) what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the NHS in tackling the non-physical causes of anorexia; [148117]

(3) what steps he is taking to ensure that care for anorexia sufferers continues to meet their needs once they reach adulthood; [148118]

(4) how many eating disorders were diagnosed in each NHS region by (a) age group and (b) sex of patient in 2012. [148119]

Norman Lamb: No assessment has been made or is currently planned of the availability of facilities for force-feeding children and young adults suffering from anorexia in the North West and Lancashire.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 633W

Eating disorders are characterised by an abnormal attitude towards food that causes someone to change their eating habits and behaviour. They include a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially. The causes are complex and eating disorder services manage the different aspects of an individual's condition according to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines. NICE produced a guideline on the core interventions in the treatment and management of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and related eating disorders in 2004 and this will be updated in 2014.

The guidelines give clear recommendations on the type of treatments that are available, and set out a structured pathway of care. NICE has also published information for the public that explains the guideline and sets out what people with eating disorders can expect from the national health service.

Responsibility for commissioning specialist in-patient eating disorders services (both adult and children) will transfer to the NHS Commissioning Board from April 2013 and the NHS Commissioning Board has consulted on a national service specification against which it will commission these services.

Getting the transition into adult services right for sufferers and families is addressed within this national service specification.

It is our expectation that this approach will result in better planning and co-ordination of specialised services, greater equity of access, care and outcomes for patients and a more pro-active and systematic approach to service development, research and innovation.

The Department does not hold information centrally on the numbers of eating disorders diagnosed in each NHS region by age group or sex of patient in 2012, but information published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre as part of its annual Mental Health Bulletin show that in England in 2011-12 there were 112,063 confirmed attendances with out-patient and community mental health teams providing services on eating disorders.

Antibiotics

Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 1 March 2013, Official Report, column 720W, on antibiotics, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policy of the German Bundestag's legislative proposal to amend regulations on the use of medications for livestock, to include stronger conditions for antibiotic use and more control over, and greater transparency on, their use. [147631]

Mr Heath: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.

The German Bundestag's legislative proposal should be viewed in the context of the Veterinary Medicinal Products Directive 2001/82/EC (as amended) which sets out the controls on the manufacture, authorisation, marketing, distribution and post-authorisation surveillance

19 Mar 2013 : Column 634W

of veterinary medicines applicable in all EU member states. The directive provides the basis for the UK controls on veterinary medicines, which are set out nationally in the veterinary medicines regulations.

The directive is currently under revision and the Commission's draft legislative proposal is expected later this year. The Government, other member states and the Commission are examining the need for additional controls for antibiotics used in animals, in particular those which are critically important for human health.

The Government recognise that the availability of veterinary medicines, including antibiotics, is essential to ensure the health of livestock, since in the same way as humans, animals suffer from disease which has to be treated. Nevertheless, the use of antibiotics should not replace effective biosecurity and good farm management and animal husbandry systems.

The Government will seek to ensure that these principles are reflected in the EU legislative framework in the forthcoming revisions of European legislation on animal health and welfare and on veterinary medicines.

Cancer

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in receipt of NHS Continuing Healthcare have a cancer diagnosis. [148552]

Norman Lamb: The Department does not collect information on the numbers of individuals in receipt of NHS Continuing Healthcare who have a diagnosis of cancer.

General Practitioners

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost was of setting up (a) the Greater Preston, Chorley and South Ribble Clinical Commissioning Group and (b) clinical commissioning groups in England as a whole. [148243]

Anna Soubry: Clinical commissioning groups will assume statutory responsibility for commissioning health services from April 2013 and, as such, the costs associated with the transition to the new health and care system are still to be determined.

Horses: Slaughterhouses

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many horses were slaughtered at each abattoir in the UK in each of the last five years. [149054]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency records the number of solipeds (a mammal having a single hoof on each foot, including horses, ninnies, mules and asses) slaughtered in the UK in the last five years in each abattoir. This information is detailed in the following table; the majority will be horses:

   Number of solipeds slaughtered in each abattoir in the United Kingdom
Establishment nameEstablishment no.Country20082009201020112012

G and GB Hewitt Ltd

4140

England

0

89

63

1

131

High Peak Meat Exports Ltd

4185

England

824

1,403

5,095

4,716

4,337

19 Mar 2013 : Column 635W

19 Mar 2013 : Column 636W

Peter Boddy

2163

England

0

0

0

0

44

Yorkshire Country Meats

2238

England

0

0

0

418

613

Stillmans (Somerset) Ltd

8231

England

2,988

3,608

2,761

2,977

3,301

Oakdale

9080

Northern Ireland

2

2

935

899

979

Notes: 1. Yorkshire Country Meats (2238) ceased processing solipeds in September 2012. 2. Oakdale (9080) ceased processing solipeds in January 2013.

Lead: Health Hazards

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what assessment he has made of the interim findings of the Surveillance of Lead in Children Study, published by the Health Protection Agency and the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit in November 2012 on the effects on human health of exposure to lead; [149057]

(2) how many incidents of chronic lead exposure the Health Protection Agency has responded to in each of the last three years; [149060]

(3) for what reasons the Health Protection Agency does not currently have plans to hold any chemical incident response workshops on lead; and if he will make a statement. [149061]

Anna Soubry: The Health Protection Agency (HPA) have advised that it would be premature to undertake an assessment of the published findings at this stage as the data presented are preliminary and have not yet been peer reviewed and accordingly definitive conclusions should not be drawn at this stage.

On the basis of available data held by the HPA's incident management systems the following incidents of chronic lead exposure have been responded to:

1 July 2010 to 31 December 2010: four

1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011: five

1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012: six

The HPA is considering holding a workshop on lead. The HPA last held operational lead training days in June and October 2010 in London, Leeds, Nottingham and Newcastle. Training on lead and chemical incident response for HPA staff and relevant partners is regularly undertaken as a component of continuing professional development updates which are dependent on local needs and priorities.

Online resources for paediatricians, environmental health and health protection professionals, as well as the public, have been developed to generate awareness and provide guidance about the clinical presentation and management of lead exposure. These are available at:

www.hpa.org.uk/ProductsServices/ChemicalsPoisons/ChemicalRiskAssessment/ChemicalIncidentManagement/LeadIncidents/

Maternity Services: North West

John Woodcock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health on how many occasions and for what duration the maternity units at (a) Royal Lancaster Infirmary, (b) Furness General Hospital, (c) Royal Preston Hospital and (d) West Cumberland Hospital have been unable to accept near admissions due to being over capacity in the last five years. [148470]

Dr Poulter: This information is not collected centrally.

Midwives: Insurance

Bob Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent assessment he has made of the willingness of insurance companies to offer affordable professional indemnity policies to private midwives. [149056]

Dr Poulter: The independent report commissioned by the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) and the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) into the “Feasibility and Insurability of Independent Midwives in England” (NMC, September 2011) acknowledged that midwives acting as individuals would not be able to secure insurance. The Department accepts this assessment. However, the Department is aware that midwives operating within a corporate entity model have been able to secure affordable indemnity cover for the whole maternity care pathway and without state intervention.

The Department is currently consulting on the draft Health Care and Associated Professions (Indemnity Arrangements) Order 2013. As part of the consultation, the Department is specifically seeking views to understand why midwives may be unable to change their governance model in order to secure affordable indemnity cover.

NHS Walk-in Centres

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what guidance he gives clinical commissioning groups on the retention of NHS walk-in centres; [148339]

(2) what guidance he gives clinical commissioning groups on consulting local people before taking a decision to discontinue funding for an NHS walk-in centre; [148341]

(3) what discussions he has had with hospital trusts in Birmingham about the effect on their services of a decision to discontinue the funding for walk-in centres; [148342]

(4) who in his Department is responsible for assessing the effect of a decision to close an NHS walk-in centre. [148461]

Anna Soubry: The Department expects that proposals for local health service changes meet strengthened criteria to demonstrate:

support from General Practice commissioners;

strengthened public and patient engagement;

sound clinical evidence base underpinning proposals; and

that proposals support patient choice.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 637W

There have been no discussions between Ministers and national health service trusts in Birmingham about funding of walk-in centres. The provision of walk-in centre services, including funding, is a matter for the local national health service.

National health service commissioners in Birmingham are currently reviewing acute services across the city, including services provided by walk-in centres. The local national health service is responsible for reviewing the provision of local health services and assessing the impact of these decisions on their health economies.

NHS: Reorganisation

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what account his Department takes of evidence of demand and need when considering major reconfiguration of health services; [148256]

NHS: Standards

(2) what guidance his Department has issued to (a) clinical commissioning groups, (b) hospital foundation trusts and (c) ambulance trusts on the importance of integrating reviews of future service provision. [148273]

Anna Soubry: The reconfiguration of local health services is a matter for the local national health service.

All service changes should be led by clinicians and be in the best interest of patients, not driven from the top down.

Any proposed significant changes to services must be subject to the four tests for service reconfiguration. These tests set out that proposals should demonstrate support from local commissioners, strengthened public and patient engagement, clarity on the clinical evidence base and support for patient choice.

Given the scale of the changes across the health system, it is important the transition to the new system is phased and carefully managed, and that local organisations are supported when redesigning services. Commissioners should work with provider organisations from the outset to enable them to plan for changes to services, and ensure they engage with local authorities, patients and the public. Where a provider wishes to bring forward proposals for change, it should discuss these with the relevant commissioners.

Prosthetics

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions he has had with charities for those who have lost a limb on commissioning a full scale review of children's prosthetic services in the 2013-14 financial year. [148480]

Dr Poulter: There have not been any recent discussions with charities for those who have lost a limb on commissioning a review of children's prosthetic services; the Secretary of State for Health will certainly consider any representations which relevant charities make. From 1 April 2013, the NHS Commissioning Board will be responsible for commissioning prosthetics for children.

Any service and technological improvements from the veterans' prosthetics programme—eg the introduction of gait analysis facilities—will also have benefits for all other prosthetic limb users, including children.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 638W

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what steps his Department is taking to ensure amputees treated in the NHS have access to the most appropriate, advanced prosthetic technology that will enable them to lead mobile and independent lives; [148485]

(2) what steps his Department is taking to ensure civilian amputees have access, where appropriate, to the same standard of prosthetic technology and care as military veterans; [148486]

(3) what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the recommendations in the Specialised Commissioning Draft Report on microprocessor knees can be met; [148487]

(4) how much has been spent on (a) prosthetic services and (b) prosthetic devices by the NHS in England in the last five years. [148488]

Norman Lamb: The Government have committed to assisting all people who have lost a limb or have a limb deficiency. Following the Health and Social Care Act 2012, the NHS Commissioning Board will become the commissioner of all NHS prosthetics services on 1 April 2013, commissioning services to a standard service specification. The specification sets out the national standards and quality of care to be provided to patients requiring prosthetic services.

The Government have allocated £11 million over the next two years to improve the prosthetic and rehabilitation care for veteran amputees. This includes making up to £6.7 million available for nine national health service facilities across England and investment of up to £3.3 million to ensure that veterans have access to high quality prosthetics, such as microprocessor knees. In addition there will be an improvement fund of up to £1 million to improve Other prosthetic services for veterans and civilians.

The following nine centres across the country were chosen to provide the enhanced services:

Bristol—Disablement Services Centre, North Bristol NHS Trust

Leicester—Leicester Specialist Mobility Centre, provided by Blatchford Clinical Services on behalf of primary care trusts

Sheffield—Mobility and Specialised Rehabilitation Centre, Northern General Hospital

Carlisle—Disablement Services Centre, Cumberland Infirmary, North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust

Preston—Specialist Mobility and Rehabilitation Centre, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Stanmore—Stanmore Prosthetic Rehabilitation Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital Trust

Portsmouth—Prosthetic Regional Rehabilitation Department, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust

Birmingham—West Midlands Rehabilitation Centre, Birmingham Community Healthcare NHS Trust

Cambridge—Addenbrooke's Rehabilitation Clinic, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

It is expected that civilian amputees will benefit from improved services in these NHS prosthetic centres. The additional funding will help to enhance both the knowledge and skills of our expert NHS staff and improve facilities for the benefit of all patients.

The service specification for prosthetic services states that microprocessor knees could be of benefit to transfemoral amputees from the “post 9/11” conflicts. Many of these amputees will have been prescribed these

19 Mar 2013 : Column 639W

units at Headley Court and will require them to be maintained and eventually replaced by the NHS. The Specialised Commissioning Draft Report recommended that the best way to establish whether transfemoral amputees could benefit from microprocessor knees is through the use of a trial unit. These are already available for patients through prosthetic services.

The Department does not keep information centrally on how much has been spent on prosthetic services and prosthetic devices by the NHS in England in the last five years.

School Milk

Graeme Morrice: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Stevenage of 6 March 2013, Official Report, column 1086W, on school milk, (1) if he will publish all correspondence relating to why his Department did not make any further claims because of the EU concerns that, as the Department cannot guarantee that the child care settings will be complying with the EU milk subsidy claim requirements, it should not make claims on their behalf; [148615]

(2) if he will publish all correspondence between his Department and the European Commission relating to (a) the return of £2,641,271.08 to the European Commission in European School Milk Subsidies in 2010 and (b) the concerns raised by the EU that, as his Department cannot guarantee that the child care settings will be complying with the EU milk subsidy claim requirements, it should not make claims on their behalf. [148616]

Dr Poulter: There was no direct correspondence between the Department and the European Commission (EC) about the EU School Milk Subsidy claim requirements, and about the return of money to the EC regarding European School Milk Subsidies. In the light of the child care settings non-compliance and concerns raised by the EC, the Department made the decision to repay money and not to make subsequent claims on behalf of the child care settings, as it could not guarantee that child care settings would comply with the EU School Milk Subsidy claim requirements.

Social Services

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to develop an end-of-life indicator for the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework. [148611]

Norman Lamb: The Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) is co-produced by the Department and local government and is updated annually. As part of the development of the ASCOF for 2014-15, work is ongoing to ensure that the framework best supports and reflects central and local government priorities for adult social care. End of life care is one of several priority areas under review for inclusion in a future framework.

In developing new measures, we remain mindful of the reporting burden on councils, and the need to retain a focus on measuring the success of the adult social care system in delivering high quality care and support.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 640W

Terminal Illnesses

Tom Blenkinsop: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in receipt of NHS Continuing Healthcare are classified as terminally ill. [148553]

Norman Lamb: The Department does not collect information on the numbers of individuals in receipt of NHS Continuing Healthcare who are classified as terminally ill.

Valium

Mark Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many prescriptions for valium were dispensed by NHS doctors for patients in (a) Lancashire and (b) England in 2012. [148242]

Norman Lamb: Valium, a brand name for diazepam, cannot be specified on an NHS prescription as regulations require that the generic name be used unless particular forms, such as injections or rectal tubes are required. These more unusual forms are not available under the brand name Valium.

The following tables provide figures for all forms of diazepam dispensed by national health service doctors, with the corresponding net ingredient cost. As most prescriptions will be dispensed by NHS pharmacists, additional information is provided for all prescriptions dispensed. Figures are for the latest available 12-month period, October 2011 to September 2012.

Number of diazepam prescription items written in England and dispensed by doctors, in the community, in the United Kingdom, with the net ingredient cost (NIC)(1,2)
 ItemsNIC (£)

Lancashire(3)

2,830

4,766

England

236,744

302,729

(1) Includes dispensing doctors and personal administration. (2) Does not include prescriptions written by nurses associated with the general practitioner practice but dispensed by the practice. (3) Lancashire is defined as including Blackburn with Darwen Care Trust Plus PCT, North Lancashire Teaching PCT, Blackpool PCT, Central Lancashire PCT and East Lancashire PCT. Source: The Prescribing Analysis and CosT tool (PACT) system. NHS Business Services Authority
Total number of all diazepam prescription items written in England and dispensed, in the community, in the UK, with the net ingredient cost (NIC)(1,2)
 ItemsNIC (£)

Lancashire(3)

147,940

245,526

England

5,134,108

6,940,691

(1) Does not include prescriptions written by dentists. (2) Does not include prescriptions written in hospitals but dispensed in the community. (3) Lancashire is defined as including Blackburn with Darwen Care Trust Plus PCT, North Lancashire Teaching PCT, Blackpool PCT, Central Lancashire PCT and East Lancashire PCT. Source: The Prescribing Analysis and CosT tool (PACT) system. NHS Business Services Authority

Defence

Afghanistan

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department is taking to (a) identify scrap metal waste prior to the withdrawal from Afghanistan and (b) assess whether it is beneficial to return such metal to the UK for sale. [148481]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 641W

Mr Robathan: Decisions on which equipment and material will be returned to the UK are taken on a case by case basis after considering the best value for money for the UK taxpayer. Scrap metal is identified in theatre as part of a routine disposals process. Some scrap metal comprises equipment that is damaged and beyond economical repair, which is subsequently demilitarised and valued for sale.

The most cost-effective method for disposal of the scrap metal is then identified, and if this is selling, it can be sold locally, or in some cases when the local price is significantly below the UK market value, returned to the UK for sale here.

The Ministry of Defence is taking a proactive and responsible approach to the recovery of equipment and material from Afghanistan.

Air Force: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Senior Aircraftman to Sergeant posts from the General Technicians (Mechanical) group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148181]

Mr Francois: No personnel in these ranks were selected in tranche 1. 34 were selected in tranche 2. The Royal Air Force is not making any redundancies in tranche 3.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Senior Aircraftman from the Aerial Erector group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148182]

Mr Francois: No personnel in this category were made redundant in tranche 1 or tranche 2. The Royal Air Force is not making any redundancies in tranche 3.

Armed Forces: Electoral Register

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he is taking to raise awareness amongst the military community of voting registration procedures. [149048]

Mr Francois: The Government are committed to members of the armed forces being able to take their full part in the democratic process, in accordance with the Armed Forces Covenant.

The Ministry of Defence works closely with the Cabinet Office and the Electoral Commission to raise awareness of voting registration procedures, including through an annual campaign to promote service voter registration. As part of this, a Defence Instruction notice is issued, and its key messages are reinforced at unit level through posted routine orders. In addition, Unit Registration Officers are expected to hold Service Registration Days at all units.

Armed Forces: Prosthetics

Joan Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much has been spent on (a) prosthetic services and (b) prosthetic devices by his Department in England in the last five years. [148484]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 642W

Mr Francois: From 1 April 2008 to 31 March 2013 the Ministry of Defence will have spent £4.36 million on prosthetics services and a further £10.69 million on prosthetics product purchases in England.

These figures do not include MOD management costs or any in-patient or out-patient costs incurred at the Defence Medical Rehabilitation Centre at Headley Court and the University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust such as, surgery and physiotherapy.

Armed Forces: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Medical Officers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148183]

Mr Francois: A total of six medical officers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2 and we expect to make a further three medical officers redundant in tranche 3. Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces’ redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Human Intelligence Operators have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148193]

(2) how many Intelligence Corps Linguists have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148197]

(3) how many Intelligence Corps Operator Military Intelligence posts have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148199]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces’ redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100& date=2012-08-24

There were no redundancies of Human Intelligence Operators, Intelligence Corps Linguists or Intelligence Corps Operator Military Intelligence during tranches 1 and 2 of the scheme.

As part of the January 2013 redundancy announcement for tranche 3 that earmarked 5,300 posts, 20 Intelligence Corps Operator Military Intelligence personnel are liable for selection for redundancy.

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many interrogators have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148198]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces’ redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100& date=2012-08-24

19 Mar 2013 : Column 643W

There is no trade or redundancy field in the armed forces classed as an interrogator. It is possible that personnel who have been trained in interrogation techniques will have been made redundant in tranches 1 or 2, or may be in tranche 3, depending on their main trade.

Armed Forces: Scotland

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Scottish service personnel have a lapsed registration as a service voter; [148971]

(2) how many Scottish service personnel have been able to re-register as a service voter after their previous such registration lapsed. [149047]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence provides a mechanism for service personnel to record their electoral registration status, but they are not required to do so, as registration remains a private matter.

Since only a proportion of personnel choose to record their registration status, and it may not always be kept up to date, no information can be provided on lapses of registrations or re-registrations.

Armoured Fighting Vehicles

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what recent improvements his Department has made to the underside of Warrior infantry vehicles to improve the safety of personnel inside during a mine explosion; [148328]

(2) what assessment he has made of the suitability of Warrior infantry fighting vehicles to withstand rocket propelled grenade and mine attacks. [148329]

Mr Dunne: In response to evolving threats in Afghanistan, the deployed Warrior armoured fighting vehicle fleet has undergone a series of modifications. In addition to increasing the armour protection in several locations on the vehicle, including armour specifically designed to counter rocket propelled grenade threats, blast attenuating seating has been fitted and fire suppression systems are in the process of being fitted. All of these modifications are designed to improve the safety of personnel inside the vehicle.

Army: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Warrant Officer Class 2 posts in the Infantry have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148189]

(2) how many Private to Corporal posts in the Infantry have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148190]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date =2012-08-24

19 Mar 2013 : Column 644W

During tranche 1 of the scheme, no Warrant Officer Class 2 posts—Infantry or Private to Corporal posts—Infantry were made redundant. During tranche 2, no Private to Corporal posts—Infantry were made redundant; however, 460 Private to Corporal posts—Infantry were made redundant.

As part of the January 2013 redundancy announcement for tranche 3 that earmarked 5,300 posts, 654 Infantry personnel between the ranks of Private and Corporal are liable for selection for redundancy.

Assets

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information his Department gives to HM Treasury for the whole of Government accounts regarding asset value. [148323]

Mr Francois: For the whole of Government accounts, the Ministry of Defence submits the information on asset values published previously in its annual report and accounts, details of which are available online at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-annual-report-and-accounts-2011-12

Defence: Procurement

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with reference to the Defence Equipment Plan 2012, which projects in the core equipment programme are uncommitted in the (a) combat air, (b) air support, (c) helicopters, (d) ISS, (e) ISTAR, (f) land equipment, (g) ships, (h) submarines and (i) deterrent and weapons sectors. [143275]

Mr Dunne: The majority of projects within the core equipment plan contain a mix of committed and uncommitted funding.

HMS Iron Duke

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of the potential strategic advantages of installing the Artisan surveillance system on HMS Iron Duke. [148326]

Mr Dunne: The Artisan surveillance system, Radar Type 997, will be brought into service as a direct replacement for the Radar Type 996 which is used to detect and track surface and airborne threats. This delivers area surveillance for situational awareness and integration with on board weapons systems. HMS Iron Duke has been selected to test the Artisan system before it is deployed on the wider fleet when Radar Type 996 is retired from service in 2016.

HMS Victory

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what assessment he has made of whether the televising of the excavation of the wreck of HMS Victory 1744 breaches the Deed of Gift of the wreck; [148610]

(2) whether his Department gave consent to the display on television of in situ human remains from the military grave of the wreck of HMS Victory 1744; and if he will make a statement. [148635]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 645W

Mr Francois: No consent was given for the display on television of in situ human remains from the military maritime grave of HMS Victory 1744.

However, the Deed of Gift, which was signed on 12 January 2012 between the Ministry of Defence and the Maritime Heritage Foundation, contains no restrictions on the televising of activity at the wreck site of HMS Victory 1744.

The Advisory Group established under the Deed of Gift, and the Expert Panel that was set up to support the Advisory Group, have agreed a set of key management principles that include a section on the treatment of human remains. The Maritime Heritage Foundation is considering its response to those key management principles.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 646W

Annual Leave

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies qualify for privilege days; and what the total cost to the public purse was of the number of privilege days utilised each year by such officials. [147735]

Mr Francois: The number of civilian officials in the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and each of its agencies who qualify for privilege days are shown in the following table:

 Number of employees entitled to privilege days

MOD Main Core

46,730

  

Trading funds

 

Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

3,850

Defence Support Group

2,510

Hydrographic Office

1,070

  

MOD total

54,160

Note: Figures are by headcount. This is a measure of the size of the work force that counts all people equally regardless of their hours of work. Where rounding has been used, totals and sub-totals have been rounded separately and so may not equal the sums of their rounded parts. When rounding to the nearest 10, numbers ending in “5” have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias.

We have made no calculation of the total cost to the public purse of privilege days. The cost is dependent on a number of factors including when privilege days fall, how many people take them on that day; and what work is re-prioritised or rescheduled as a result of the absence.

The MOD announced its changes, as part of the Civil Service Reform to its policy on privilege days on 14 March 2013. These changes come into effect from May 2013.

Middle East

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many times he has visited the Middle East in an official capacity since 2010. [147809]

Mr Philip Hammond: I have visited the Middle East in an official capacity nine times since being appointed as Secretary of State for Defence in October 2011.

The Ministry of Defence maintains an active programme of high level defence engagement in the Middle East, with ministerial visits forming a crucial element of this.

Military Corrective Training Centre Colchester

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many personnel have been detained in each of the last five years at the Military Corrective Training Centre; and what the average length of their sentence was. [148324]

Mr Francois: The number of personnel detained in each of the last five financial years at the Military Corrective Training Centre are shown in the following table. Figures for the current financial year are correct as at 14 March 2013.

Information about the average length of sentence is not held in the format requested.

 Financial year
Total length of service2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Under 60 days

630

610

620

490

320

61 to 112 days

130

140

120

130

80

113 days to 6 months

180

170

120

110

60

6 months to 1 year

60

60

80

50

40

1 year to 18 months

10

20

10

10

10

18 months to 2 years

(1)

10

(1)

10

10

Total detainees

1140

1170

1100

910

590

(1) Five people or less. Note: Totals and subtotals have been rounded separately; therefore the total for each year will not equal the sum of each subtotal.

19 Mar 2013 : Column 647W

Military Police: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Lance Corporal to Staff Sergeant posts in the Royal Military Police General Duties group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148185]

(2) how many Sergeant to Warrant Officer Class posts in the Military Provost Staff have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148195]

(3) how many Sergeant to Warrant Officer Class posts in the Royal Military Police Special Investigation Branch have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148196]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

No personnel between the ranks Lance Corporal to Staff Sergeant in the Royal Military Police (RMP) general duties group, and Sergeant to Warrant Officer Class in the RMP Special Investigation Branch were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2.

While no posts between Lance Corporal and Staff Sergeant in the RMP General Duties and Sergeant to Warrant Officer Class in the RMP Special Investigation Branch have been specifically earmarked in tranche 3, RMP personnel in these ranks are within scope, and may apply to be made redundant as part of larger fields. Following consideration of those applications, and manning requirements, the number required to be made redundant will be determined.

No personnel of Sergeant to Warrant Officer Class—Military Provost Staff were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Navy: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Sub Lieutenant to Commander posts in the Grey Sea King Group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148203]

(2) how many Petty Officer Diver Specialists have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148204]

(3) how many Leading Rate to Petty Officer Mine Warfare have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148205]

(4) how many Category A2 Nuclear Watchkeepers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148206]

(5) how many Corporal to Warrant Officer Class 2 Royal Marines have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148207]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 648W

(6) how many Leading Rate to Petty Officer Seamen Specialists have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148208]

(7) how many Leading Seamen General Service (Warfare) have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148209]

(8) how many Leading Rate Aircraft Controllers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148210]

(9) how many Anti-Submarine Warfare Aircrewmen have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148211]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services Agency (DASA) website, at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

The information requested is shown in the following table:

Branch/SpecialisationTranche 1 and 2 redundancies

Sub Lieutenant to Commander in the Grey Sea King Group(1)

0

Petty Officer Diver Specialist

0

Leading Rate to Petty Officer Mine Warfare

0

Category A2 Nuclear Watchkeepers(2)

0

Corporal to Warrant Officer Class 2 Royal Marines(3)

0

Leading Rate to Petty Officer Seaman Specialist

0

Leading Seaman General Service (Warfare)(4)

10

Leading Rate Aircraft Controller

0

Anti-Submarine Warfare Aircrewmen

0

(1) Personnel with a sub-requirement of Pilot Sea King 6 or Pilot Sea King W on their records. (2) Category A2 Nuclear Watchkeepers were exempt from both tranches of the Naval Service Redundancy Programme. (3) Royal Marines—All Ranks were exempt from both tranches of the Naval Service Redundancy Programme. (4) This figure includes all personnel at this rank in the Warfare Branch within the arm of General Service. The figure is rounded to the nearest 10 in accordance with DASA's rounding policy.

The Naval Service has not participated in tranche 3 of the redundancy programme although there is likely to be a need for redundancies from the medical and dental branches.

Plymouth Airport

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much it will cost his Department to build a heliport facility at HMS Raleigh, following the closure of Plymouth Airport; [148450]

(2) what assessment he has made of the financial implications for flag officer sea training of the closure of Plymouth Airport. [148451]

Mr Robathan: The Royal Navy is assessing options for a helicopter facility at HMS Raleigh to support flag officer sea training (FOST) activity only. The study is

19 Mar 2013 : Column 649W

considering the scope of any development work and takes account of local social and environmental impacts. It is too early to assess the costs of any option.

It is not possible to identify specific costs to FOST associated with the closure of Plymouth Airport.

Royal Army Medical Corps: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Corporal to Sergeant posts in the Royal Army Medical Corps Combat Medical Technician group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148194]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces’ redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date=2012-08-24

No personnel of Corporal to Sergeant in the Royal Army Medical Corps Combat Medical Technician group were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Royal Army Veterinary Corps: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Lance Corporal to Warrant Officer Class posts in the Royal Army Veterinary Corps Dog Handler have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148200]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

No personnel between the ranks Lance Corporal to Warrant Officer Class in the Royal Army Veterinary Corps who are classed as Dog Handlers were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Royal Artillery: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many Bombardier to Sergeant posts in the Royal Artillery Integrated Unmanned Air System Operator group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148186]

(2) how many Royal Artillery Fire Support Team Commanders have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148187]

(3) how many Observation Post Assistants in the Royal Artillery have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148188]

19 Mar 2013 : Column 650W

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

No personnel of Bombardier to Sergeant in the Royal Artillery Integrated Unmanned Air System Operator group, and Observation Post Assistants were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2.

While no posts between Bombardier to Sergeant in the Royal Artillery Integrated Unmanned Air System Operator group, or Observation Post Assistants have been specifically earmarked in tranche 3, personnel in these ranks are within scope, and may apply to be made redundant as part of larger fields. Following consideration of those applications, and manning requirements, the number required to be made redundant will be determined.

No Royal Artillery Fire Support Team Commanders were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many Lance Corporal to Corporal posts in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Armourer Class 1 have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148191]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces’ redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

No personnel of Lance Corporal to Corporal in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers Armourer Class 1 were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Royal Engineers: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many professionally qualified engineers in the Royal Engineers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3; [148184]

(2) how many Geospatial Engineer Corporals in the Royal Engineers have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148192]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

19 Mar 2013 : Column 651W

No Geospatial Engineer Corporals—Royal Engineers were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

As part of the January 2013 redundancy announcement for tranche 3 that earmarked 5,300 posts, one professionally qualified engineer is required to be made redundant.

Royal Signals: Redundancy

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many corporal to sergeant posts in the Royal Signals Systems Operator Electronic Warfare Group have been made redundant in tranches 1 and 2; and how many are liable for redundancy in tranche 3. [148201]

Mr Francois: Statistics for tranches 1 and 2 of the armed forces' redundancy scheme can be found on the Defence Analytical Services and Advice (DASA) website at the following address:

19 Mar 2013 : Column 652W

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/applications/newWeb/www/index.php?page=67&pubType=0&thiscontent=5100&date= 2012-08-24

No personnel between the ranks of Corporal to Sergeant in the Royal Signals Systems Operator Electronic Warfare Group were made redundant in tranches 1 or 2; and none are liable for redundancy in tranche 3.

Termination of Employment

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies have left that body due to (i) resignation, (ii) retirement, (iii) redundancy, (iv) transferral to another public sector post and (v) another reason in each of the last five years. [147946]

Mr Francois: The following table details the number of officials who have left the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the reason why in each of the last four financial years, and as at 31 January 2013.

Civilian leavers reasonsFY 2008-09FY 2009-10FY 2010-11FY 2011-12FY 2012-13 to 31 January 2013

MOD Main

     

Resignation

2,000

1,190

1,220

970

840

Retirement

820

720

1340

850

480

Voluntary Release and Redundancy

460

400

180

40

30

Voluntary Early Release Scheme (SDSR)

5,950

2,930

Transfer out of MOD

250

120

190

140

180

Other (Reasons recorded)

2,100

1,380

1,440

1,440

680

Other (Not recorded)

770

890

90

30

20

MOD Main total

6,420

4,710

4,470

9,420

5,160

      

Trading funds

     

Resignation

280

200

220

200

130

Retirement

150

120

80

60

30

Voluntary Release and Redundancy

40

80

150

470

20

Transfer out of MOD

60

30

20

1,910

20

Other (Reasons recorded)

280

310

240

280

180

Other (Not recorded)

120

100

100

30

30

Trading funds total

920

830

800

2,930

410

      

Overall total MOD leavers

7,340

5,540

5,270

12,360

5,570

Notes: 1. All people are counted equally regardless of their hours of work. 2. MOD total leavers include all permanent, casual and trading funds civilian personnel but excludes all Royal Fleet Auxiliary and locally engaged civilians. 3. Where rounding has been used, totals and sub-totals have been rounded separately and so may not equal the sums of their rounded parts. When rounding to the nearest 10, numbers ending in "5" have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias. A ‘—’ denotes 0 and a ‘~’ denotes numbers of 1 to 5. 4. The Voluntary Early Release Scheme (SDSR) is designed specifically to deliver the civilian reductions required under the strategic and defence security review from 1 July 2011 onwards and is therefore listed separately from exits due to alternative voluntary release or redundancy schemes.

A full breakdown of reasons categorised as other reason recorded is given in the Quarterly Civilian Personnel Report (QCPR) which can be found at:

www.dasa.mod.uk