USA

Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information his Department holds on whether the US bases at USAF Croughton and the Joint Analysis Center at RAF Molesworth are being used in connection with the US drone programme. [148608]

Mr Robathan: RAF Croughton is part of a worldwide US Defence communications network, and the base supports a variety of communications activity. The Ministry of Defence does not hold information on whether RAF Croughton or RAF Molesworth are used to support US operations.

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information his Department holds on whether the US Air Force is operating unmanned aerial vehicles from the UK. [148966]

Mr Robathan [holding answer 19 March 2013]: The US Air Force does not operate remotely piloted aircraft systems from the UK.

World War II: Military Decorations

Mr Mike Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what steps he is taking to ensure that all surviving former military personnel entitled to the Arctic Convoy medal receive notification of how they can receive it; [149543]

(2) by what date he expects to have contacted all surviving former military personnel involved in the Arctic Convoys to indicate their entitlement to the proposed medal. [149544]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence does not hold reliable records of all surviving Arctic Convoy veterans. However, we have established a clear application process that veterans need to follow in order to be assessed against the eligibility criteria for the award of the Arctic Star Medal. The Prime Minister presented the first medals to veterans at an awards ceremony on 19 March 2013. Forms have been sent to veterans who have inquired about the medal and these forms are also available from the Veterans UK website. The Ministry of Defence Medal Office, which is responsible for the application process, is fast tracking those applications from surviving veterans and widows in order to get medals to veterans as soon as we can.

25 Mar 2013 : Column 941W

Northern Ireland

Bridges

Ms Ritchie: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what discussions she has had with the First Minister, Deputy First Minister and Minister for Finance in the Northern Ireland Executive on the provision of the required funding for the construction of Narrow Water bridge between Warrenpoint in County Down and Cooley in County Louth in the Republic of Ireland; and if she will make a statement. [149726]

Mike Penning: The hon. Member will be aware that these are transferred matters that are wholly the responsibility of Northern Ireland Executive Ministers who have not raised them with me or the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, my right hon. Friend the Member for Chipping Barnet (Mrs Villiers).

Women and Equalities

Civil Partnerships

Stephen Doughty: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities (1) what advice she has received on the financial effect of the extension of civil partnerships to opposite sex couples; [148656]

(2) whether any of the submissions to her equal civil marriage consultation analysed the financial effect of the extension of civil partnerships to opposite sex couples; [148664]

(3) whether the Government have conducted an assessment of the potential effects of extending civil partnerships to opposite sex couples. [148716]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 18 March 2013]: The Government do not have a policy to extend civil partnerships to opposite sex couples and therefore no assessment of the effect, financial or otherwise, of the extension of civil partnerships to opposite sex couples has been conducted.

Tourette's Syndrome

Mr Stewart Jackson: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what her policy is on ensuring that those issued with identity cards by the registered charity Tourette Syndrome (UK) Association following receipt of medical evidence from a recognised specialist are accepted as being disabled for the purposes of the Equality Act 2010; what guidance (a) has been given and (b) will be given to organisations subject to the public sector equality duty to ensure that those so identified are presumed to be and accepted as being disabled; and if she will make a statement. [147930]

Mrs Grant: To qualify for protection under the Equality Act 2010 someone must meet the Act's definition of a disabled person. Disability within the Act is not defined through each specific condition, but rather in general terms. The general definition of disability for the purposes of the Act is

“a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on a person's ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities”.

25 Mar 2013 : Column 942W

Under both the Equality Act and the public sector Equality Duty, public bodies are required to consider the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity, and foster good relations between people with different characteristics, including people who are disabled. The Government produced a series of ‘quick start’ guides to help public bodies understand the legal requirements under the Equality Duty.

Energy and Climate Change

Energy: Housing

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the average energy performance certificate score of (a) housing in off the gas grid areas and (b) housing in gas grid areas. [149300]

Gregory Barker [holding answer 21 March 2013]:The Department does not currently hold this information. Data from energy performance certificates (EPCs), which is the responsibility of the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), is not held in a way which allows the information requested to be calculated.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many and what proportion of households are off grid for gas supply in each (a) local authority area and (b) region. [149342]

Mr Hayes: The exact number and proportion of households who are off the gas grid is not held centrally.

Estimates have been produced based on information held from two administrative sources; these are the Gemserv database on the location of electricity meters, and data from xoserve and independent gas transporters on the location of gas meters. Subtracting the number of gas meters from the number of electricity meters produces a broad estimate of the number of off grid properties. However some households can have more than one electricity meter associated with their property (for instance, a supply for communal facilities such as-stairwell lighting or a lift). Additionally, the standard gas industry definition of domestic use uses a consumption threshold, with any consumer using less than 73,200 kWh of gas per year being classed as a domestic user; it is estimated that—Great Britain wide—this definition allocates around 2 million small business users as domestic. Furthermore a small number of meters (less than one third of 1%) do not have sufficient information associated with them to be able to allocate them to a specific area. The underlying data on the number of gas and electricity meters in each local authority is available on the Department’s website at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/regional-and-local-authority-electricity-consumption-statistics-2005-to-2011

and

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/gas-sales-and-numbers-of-customers-by-region-and-local-authority

A table showing, for 2011, the number of domestic electricity meter points, the number of gas meter points where consumption was less than 73,200 kWh, the difference between the two figures (which forms an

25 Mar 2013 : Column 943W

estimate of the number of households off the gas grid), and derived from this, the estimated proportion of households off the gas grid in each local authority and region in Great Britain, has been placed in the Libraries of the House.

Energy: North Sea

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of the level of production of (a) oil and gas and (b) renewable energy sources in the North sea in each year up to 2019-20. [149489]

Mr Hayes: The Department does not estimate future levels of production from the North sea area alone but out-turn data on, and projections of, oil and gas production are published at for the entire United Kingdom and UK continental shelf:

https://www.gov.uk/oil-and-gas-uk-field-data

Out-turn data on renewable energy generation are published in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/renewable-sources-of-energy-chapter-6-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes

We publish energy demand projections (which include UK demand for renewable and waste energy) at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-of-energy-climate-change/series/energy-and-emissions-projections

Fracking

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change in which local authority areas shale gas has been discovered. [149358]

Mr Hayes: The Department classifies as a discovery any onshore gas well which flows gas at a rate of at least 0.2 million cubic feet per day. Although the presence of gas has been noted in a number of shales around the UK in the course of oil and gas drilling, the only discovery in the UK to meet this criterion is in Lancashire.

Fuel Poverty

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much funding his Department has made available for combating fuel poverty in each year for which figures are available. [149346]

Gregory Barker: Assistance to the fuel poor and those at risk of fuel poverty is provided through a number of DECC policies and programmes.

Funding for warm home discount, warm front and associated expenditure
 Budget (£ million)

2000-01

73

2001-02

197

2002-03

163

2003-04

152

2004-05

165

2005-06

190

2006-07

315

2007-08

350

2008-09

395

25 Mar 2013 : Column 944W

2009-10

369

2010-11

366

2011-12

382.5

2012-13

(1)388

(1) Of the £100 million made available in 2012-13, up to £31 million of this budget will be utilised for the local authority competition.

Assistance to the fuel poor and those at risk of fuel poverty has also been provided through the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) and Community Energy Savings Programme (CESP) schemes and, going forward, the Energy Company Obligation will provide assistance worth an estimated £540 million to low income, vulnerable households.

In addition, assistance is provided by the Department of Work and Pensions’ cold weather payments and winter fuel payments.

Renewables Obligation

Chris Heaton-Harris: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if his Department will take steps to amend the renewables obligation subsidies to renewables in proportion to the change in the wholesale price attributable to carbon price support. [R] [149639]

Mr Hayes: The impact of the carbon price floor on wholesale prices was taken account of in the analysis to inform the renewables obligation banding review, as detailed in the final stage impact assessment published in July 2012(1). The Chancellor of the Exchequer, my right hon. Friend the Member for Tatton (Mr Osborne), announced in the March Budget 2013 that the carbon price floor trajectory will remain as planned.

(1)https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/42847/5945-renewables-obligation-government-response-impact-a.pdf

Secondment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff from his Department were seconded to each of the top six energy suppliers to work on the development of energy policy in each year for which figures are available. [149349]

Gregory Barker: No people have been on secondment from the Department of Energy and Climate Change to any the top six energy suppliers within the last financial year.

Justice

Burglary

Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the number of victims of residential burglary of each ethnic group in (a) Dartford, (b) Kent and (c) the UK in the last five years. [149181]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 945W

Mr Hurd: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State for Justice for the number of victims of residential burglary of each ethnic group in (a) Dartford, (b) Kent and (c)the UK in the last five years (149181)

The two main sources of crime statistics are police recorded crime and the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW), and a breakdown by ethnic group is only provided by the CSEW. CSEW data are not available at the focal authority level so we are unable to provide any estimates for Dartford and Kent.

The number of victims of burglary, broken down by ethnic group as estimated by the CSEW are provided for the last five financial years (April to March) for England and Wales.

England and Wales
Adults aged 16 and over
Ethnic group2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12

White

854,261

924,970

817,580

977,860

816,376

Mixed

16,771

22,916

29,078

18,201

23,600

Asian or Asian British

72,594

62,130

82,605

87,130

100,942

Black or Black British

49,205

39,520

38,414

50,535

54,163

Chinese or Other Ethnic Group

28,415

24,914

19,769

23,922

31,493

Notes: 1. The Population Estimates by Ethnic Group are experimental statistics, and have not been shown to meet the standards required of National Statistics. Information on sources of uncertainty is prodded in the Quality and Methodology Information (QMI) document available from this link: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/quality/quality-information/index.html 2. Mid-year population estimates by ethnic group are not available after mid-2009 therefore the proportion of the mid-2009 ethnic estimates has been applied to the 16 and overpopulation estimate for mid-2010 and mid-2011. Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales and Mid-year population estimates by ethnic group

An additional table has also been provided which shows the proportion of the population who were victims of burglary broken down by ethnic group for England and Wales.

England and Wales
Percentage
Ethnic group2007/082008/092009/102010/112011/12

White

2.2

2.3

2.1

2.5

2.0

Mixed

3.4

4.4

5.3

3.3

4.3

Asian or Asian British

3.2

2.6

3.3

3.5

4.0

Black or Black British

4.4

3.4

3.2

4.2

4.4

Chinese or Other Ethnic Group

4.2

3.5

2.6

3.1

4.1

Source: Crime Survey for England and Wales

The crime statistics data published by the ONS cover England and Wales only. Crime data for Scotland are published at:

http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice

and data for Northern Ireland are published at:

http://www.psni.police.uk/index/updates/updates_statistics/update_crime_statistics.htm

25 Mar 2013 : Column 946W

Courts: Translation Services

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what estimate he has made of the savings to his Department as a result of the implementation of the ALS/Capita contract for court translation and interpreting services. [149942]

Mrs Grant: The estimate of savings under the language services call-off contract with Capita is based on the pre-contract spend of approximately £30 million each year. This covers courts, tribunals and the National Offender Management Service.

The savings in the first year of the contract's operation are estimated at £15 million.

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will review (a) how many people have been wrongly convicted and (b) the number of potentially guilty people acquitted as a result of errors by translators employed under the ALS/Capita contract; and if he will make a statement. [149949]

Mrs Grant: We have no plan at present to undertake any review of convictions or acquittals in interpreter court cases.

The judiciary is responsible for ensuring that defendants get a fair hearing. If there are any issues with interpretation the judge will stop the proceedings and resolve those issues. The Ministry of Justice monitors performance under the contract, which has an associated complaints system. Only a very small proportion of complaints relate to the quality of the interpreter. We have received no complaints that wrong convictions have been made as a result of problems with interpreters.

Driving: Eyesight

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many drivers were prosecuted for failing to meet the requirement for visual recognition of a vehicle registration number plate in each police authority area in each of the last five years. [149877]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database holds information on defendants proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for criminal offences in England and Wales. However, not all offences are individually recorded within the centrally held data. Offences of Driving a motor vehicle on a road with eyesight which did not comply with requirements under section 96(1) of the Road Traffic Act 1988 are reported as part of a miscellaneous group of offences, and it is not possible to separately identify prosecutions for this specific offence.

Employment Tribunals Service

Chris Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) employment tribunal and (b) employment appeal tribunal cases in each year since 2000-01 concerned complaints about the application of (i) transfer of undertakings and (ii) protection of employment regulations in the bus industry. [149229]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 947W

Mrs Grant: Data on the number of claims made in relation to complaints about Transfer of Undertakings and Protection of Employment Regulations in the bus industry in particular are not collated centrally. This information could be provided only at a disproportionate cost by manually checking hard copy tribunal files or judgments. Data which relate to the transfer of an undertaking—failure to inform and consult generally is collected. These data are published annually and quarterly and are available on the Ministry of Justice website:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/tribunals

Gender Recognition

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many people have obtained (a) a full and (b) an interim gender recognition certificate since the coming into force of the Gender Recognition Act 2004; how many people in category (b) subsequently dissolved their marriage in order to obtain a full gender recognition certificate; and of those, how many subsequently (i) formed a civil partnership with the person to whom they were formerly married and (ii) are known through tax or benefit records still to have co-habited with the person to whom they were formerly married. [149890]

Mrs Grant: Since the Gender Recognition Act 2004 was introduced on 4 April 2005 the number of interim and full gender recognition certificates issued by the Gender Recognition Panel up to 30 September 2012 is as follows:

Full certificates: 3,230

Interim certificates: 151.

Figures are published quarterly in the Gender Recognition Bulletin on the Ministry of Justice website at the following link:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/tribunals/gender-recognition-certificate-statistics

The next update showing figures up to end of December 2012 will be published on 4 April 2013 on the same site.

We do not formally capture data on the number of people who have ended their marriage due to the issue of a Gender Recognition Certificate and reliable estimates are not currently available.

There is no information available on the number of people who were previously married and either subsequently entered into a civil partnership or continue to cohabit with their former spouse.


Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will estimate what the (a) total and (b) average annual savings of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 has been. [148947]

Jeremy Wright: Estimates of savings, expected from the reforms contained in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012, can be found in the Impact Assessments carried out at Royal Assent. These Impact Assessments have been published on the Ministry of Justice website at:

www.justice.gov.uk/legislation/bills-and-acts/acts/legal-aid-and-sentencing-act/laspo-background-information

25 Mar 2013 : Column 948W

Offenders: Fines

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice in what proportion of sentences involving fines a deduction from benefits order was issued in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [148437]

Mrs Grant: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to Lord Touhig by my noble Friend, Lord McNally on 12 March 2013, Official Report, House of Lords, column WA52.

Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) systems do not identify how many fines have been or are being paid by deduction from benefits orders.

HMCTS is only able to identify how many applications for deductions from benefits orders are made to the Department of Work and Pensions each year, but this does not indicate how many of these applications were successful or how many fines this relates to. Fines can only be deducted from certain benefits and only if there are not already too many other third-party deductions being taken from the benefits claim, so not all applications for a deduction from benefits orders are successful. Offenders who are claiming benefits often start and stop claiming benefits a number of times, which results in the deduction from benefits order ceasing and needing to be re-applied for when the offender is claiming the relevant benefit again. This means that some fine accounts will have multiple applications for deduction from benefits and that the number of applications for deductions orders does not correlate to the number of fines being paid by this method.

HMCTS takes the issue of fine enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on fine defaulters is a continued priority nationwide. HMCTS is always looking at ways to improve the collection of fines. The use of the deduction from benefits order is an automatic sanction for offenders who are in default and are known to be claiming benefits.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice in what proportion of sentences involving fines the offender was living in relative income poverty in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [148438]

Mrs Grant: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to Lord Touhig by my noble Friend, Lord McNally on 12 March 2013, Official Report, House of Lords, column WA52:

Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) does not know how many offenders are living in income poverty at the time of sentence.

The information HMCTS holds on offenders is provided by the prosecuting authorities, by the offenders themselves, and by using the tracing tools HMCTS has at its disposal, such as the Experian credit reference agency and the Department for Work and Pensions customer information system. The means form that defendants are instructed to complete asks them to provide details of their income and expenditure so that the court is aware of their financial circumstances at the time of sentence and can therefore set an appropriate sentence. Many defendants, however, do not provide financial means information to the court, so HMCTS does not know what level of financial income they have.

25 Mar 2013 : Column 949W

HMCTS takes the issue of fine enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on fine defaulters is a continued priority nationwide.

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what assessment his Department has made of the effect of court imposed fines on the dependent children of offenders in (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11 and (c) 2011-12. [148440]

Mrs Grant: Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) does not have any way of identifying offenders who have dependant children.

The information HMCTS holds on offenders is provided by the prosecuting authorities, the offenders themselves and by using the tracing tools HMCTS has at its disposal such as the Experian credit reference agency and the Department for Work and Pensions customer information system. The means form which defendants are asked to complete asks them to provide details of how many dependant children they have and how much they have to pay out in child maintenance but as many defendants do not provide financial means information to the court HMCTS does not know what commitments they have regarding children.

HMCTS takes the issue of fine enforcement very seriously and is working to ensure that clamping down on fine defaulters is a continued priority nationwide. HMCTS are always looking at ways to improve the collection of fines. As a part of the future strategy HMCTS will be considering numerous ways in which performance can be improved, this could include offender profiling.

Parole

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many offenders released on licence under the supervision of the Probation Service were identified as (a) low risk, (b) medium risk or (c) high risk between 1997 and 2012; [149289]

(2) how many offenders were released on licence under the supervision of the Probation Service in each year between 1997 and 2012. [149290]

Jeremy Wright: Table 1 as follows shows the number of prisoners released on licence from determinate sentences in each year since 1999. Data for 1997 and 1998 are not readily accessible in this format and the latest full year for which we have published information is 2011.

Information held centrally on prison discharges does not currently include an assessment of risk.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Table 1: Prisoners discharged on licence from determinate sentences(1, 2), England and Wales
 Total

1999

44,100

2000

43,200

2001

41,400

2002

42,800

2003

42,100

2004

41,800

25 Mar 2013 : Column 950W

2005

41,800

2006

40,300

2007

42,600

2008

45,500

2009

44,700

2010

49,312

2011

47,530

(1) Includes discharges from determinate sentences of 12 months or more, and all young offenders discharged from determinate sentences of less than 12 months. (2 )Figures from 2001 to 2009 have been rounded to the nearest 100.

Prisoners: Criminal Records

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what measures are in place to ensure prisoners do not access or retain inappropriate images of their victims from case files in the (a) secure adult male estate, (b) secure adult female estate and (c) secure youth estate; [148783]

(2) what the rules are governing access to case files for people convicted where (a) there is an ongoing appeal and (b) all avenues of appeal have been exhausted; [148784]

(3) what plans his Department has to reform prisoners' access to their case files including indecent or offensive images of their victims. [148785]

Jeremy Wright: The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice, my right hon. Friend the Member for Epsom and Ewell (Chris Grayling), is extremely concerned about prisoners possessing materials such as photos of victims of crime scenes as part of their legal papers. He has decided that restrictions must be placed on this material urgently and has instructed the Prison Service to take this forward.

The Crown Prosecution Service must disclose all material to prisoners' defence teams. In order to help them prepare their defence or appeal, prisoners may keep in their possession legal material provided to them by the CPS or by their lawyer. This is an important aspect of ensuring that prisoners are able to properly prepare for their defence or their appeal. This material is protected under the principle of legal professional privilege (LPP) which is defined in the Freedom of Information Act as

“a rule of law that protects the confidentiality of communications made between a lawyer and his or her client”.

The privilege belongs to the client and may be waved only by the client.

This material is subject to confidentially privileged handling arrangements under rule 39 of the prison rules and cannot be stopped, opened or read by prison staff unless the governor has reasonable cause to believe that its contents could endanger prison security, the safety of others or is otherwise criminal in nature. The same privilege is extended to cover material which is handed over during the course of a legal visit and which is covered under rule 38 of the prison rules.

Where legally privileged material is discovered that would be inappropriate for prisoners to keep in their possession, or there is evidence that prisoners are misusing such material, Governors may remove and secure it

25 Mar 2013 : Column 951W

while making alternative arrangements to allow the prisoner to view the material in private so as not to jeopardise their legal right to a fair trial.

The National Offender Management Service policy documents relating to this can be found in Prison Service Instruction (PSI) 49/2011 (Prisoner Communications Services) and PSI 16/2011 (Providing Visits and Services to Visitors), both of which are available in the House of Commons Library.

Prisoners: Mental Illness

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health about the transfer of prisoners to hospital under the Mental Health Act 1983, and steps to speed up admissions to and discharges from secure hospitals. [148385]

Jeremy Wright: Officials from both Departments have discussed and agreed the contents of a Department of Health Best Practice Guide for prison transfers alongside Prison Service Instructions. These have recently been revised to reflect the new NHS structures and will be published shortly.

Prisons: Gyms

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the turn over cost was of procuring gymnasium equipment in prisons in each of the last five years. [147924]

Jeremy Wright: The net cost of procuring gymnasium equipment within the HM Prison Service in each of the last five years is as follows:

 £

2008-09

2,454,923

2009-10

1,854,022

2010-11

1,864,129

2011-12

1,437,929

2012-13

(1)682,388

(1 )Quarters 1 and 2.

Expenditure within this spend area has significantly reduced as a direct result of budget reduction and the move towards purchasing remanufactured gymnasium equipment across the estate to reduce cost.

Physical exercise continues to play an important part in a prison regime by providing purposeful activity and engagement with prisoners. In addition, PE can make a major contribution to the physical, mental and social well being of prisoners.

Prisons: Television

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice which prisons award in-cell television privileges for inmates; and what the cost to the public purse has been of such privileges in each of the last five years. [147832]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 952W

Jeremy Wright: I want to ensure that the public have confidence in the prison system. It is crucial that they are assured that any privileges earned in prison are gained through hard work and appropriate behaviour. I am therefore looking closely at the policy around the incentives scheme for prisoners as I want to be clear that these incentives and privileges, including access to in cell television, are pitched at the right level and that they have credibility with the public. The outcome of the review will be announced in due course.

Under the current system, access to in-cell television is available as a key earnable privilege under the incentives and earned privileges (IEP) scheme in all establishments across England and Wales. Prison Service Instruction 11/2011 refers, a copy of which is available in the House of Commons Library. The IEP scheme must consist of at least three tiers (basic, standard and enhanced). Access to in-cell television is restricted to prisoners who have earned standard or enhanced level, is a forfeitable privilege, and prisoners are charged for use. The provision of in-cell television is self-financing from the rental payments made by prisoners.

Probation

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what proportion of offenders completed approved programmes in each probation trust area in (a) 2009-10 and (b) 2010-11; [144229]

(2) what the cost was of approved programmes in each probation trust area in each year since 2007. [144230]

Jeremy Wright: I have interpreted the questions as relating to accredited offending behaviour programmes.

Not all offenders serving a community sentence will have a requirement to attend an accredited programme as part of the sentence made by the court. The sentencer's decision to include a programme requirement will be informed in each case by the likely positive effect that a specific programme can achieve in terms of addressing an individual's offending behaviour.

In order to monitor the extent to which offenders who commence a programme requirement go on to complete it, NOMS measures completion rates for accredited programmes. These are set out in the table at probation trust level for the years requested. These are the combined completion rates for sex offender treatment programmes, domestic violence programmes and other offending behaviour programmes.

The direct cost to NOMS of accredited programmes run in 2011-12 is shown in the table. This is the first year for which sufficiently robust data are available. These costs reflect differing types and volumes of programmes for each Trust.

The figures used in the answer have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Table 1: Accredited programme completion rates by probation trust 2009-10 and 2010-11
 2009-102010-11
Probation trustCommencedCompletedPercentageCommencedCompletedPercentage

Avon and Somerset

507

369

73

457

336

74

25 Mar 2013 : Column 953W

25 Mar 2013 : Column 954W

Bedfordshire

272

192

71

255

181

71

Cambridgeshire

287

210

73

262

197

75

Cheshire

806

520

65

590

385

65

Cumbria

238

161

68

240

155

65

Derbyshire

461

335

73

465

335

72

Devon and Cornwall

718

493

69

517

344

67

Dorset

297

213

72

273

189

69

Durham Tees Valley

673

500

74

660

488

74

Essex

950

641

67

819

585

71

Gloucestershire

242

174

72

226

172

76

Greater Manchester

3,017

1,889

63

1,491

871

58

Hampshire

779

606

78

685

528

77

Hertfordshire

481

346

72

452

326

72

Humberside

349

268

77

412

291

71

Kent

577

420

73

423

314

74

Lancashire

795

564

71

767

536

70

Leicestershire

517

399

77

546

390

71

Lincolnshire

323

237

73

271

193

71

London

3,011

2,233

74

2,881

2,106

73

Merseyside

1,078

647

60

1,001

697

70

Norfolk and Suffolk

743

554

75

653

516

79

North Yorkshire

424

272

64

346

239

69

Northamptonshire

316

191

60

295

189

64

Northumbria

796

557

70

1,001

711

71

Nottinghamshire

648

465

72

593

419

71

South Yorkshire

935

616

66

803

492

61

Staffordshire and West Midlands

2,543

1,674

66

2,194

1,461

67

Surrey and Sussex

778

573

74

713

542

76

Thames Valley

742

554

75

738

531

72

Wales

1,844

1,147

62

1,555

968

62

Warwickshire

198

132

67

183

121

66

West Mercia

509

335

66

502

346

69

West Yorkshire

1,301

821

63

1,012

680

67

Wiltshire

232

159

69

185

144

78

England and Wales total

28,387

19,467

69

24,466

16,978

69

Table 2: Direct costs to NOMS of probation accredited programmes 2011-12
Probation trustDirect cost (£ million)

Avon and Somerset

1.1

Bedfordshire

0.4

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

0.8

Cheshire

0.8

Cumbria

0.4

Derbyshire

0.9

Devon and Cornwall

1.0

Dorset

0.5

Durham Tees Valley

0.8

Essex

1.5

Gloucestershire

0.5

Greater Manchester

2.7

Hampshire

1.4

Hertfordshire

0.8

Humberside

0.7

Kent

0.7

Lancashire

1.6

Leicestershire and Rutland

0.7

Lincolnshire

0.5

London

4.5

Merseyside

1.7

Norfolk and Suffolk

1.6

Northamptonshire

0.5

Northumbria

1.6

Nottinghamshire

1.0

South Yorkshire

1.1

Staffordshire and West Midlands

3.6

Surrey and Sussex

0.9

Thames Valley

1.0

Wales

3.4

Warwickshire

0.5

West Mercia

1.8

West Yorkshire

1.9

Wiltshire

0.5

York and North Yorkshire

0.6

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with reference to ‘Transforming Rehabilitation’, whether probation trusts will be excluded from bidding to run services under his plans for the Probation Service. [149341]

Jeremy Wright: We remain committed to facilitating an open competition which allows a range of bidders to take part in the new probation services market.

As set out in our consultation document ‘Transforming Rehabilitation—a revolution in the way we manage offenders’, it remains open for probation staff to put

25 Mar 2013 : Column 955W

together proposals for potential mutuals and other alternative delivery vehicles to bid to deliver probation services as part of future competitions.

These employee-led entities or partnerships will only be formally set up following the conclusion of the competition, if they have won a bid or are part of a winning bid. This is to guarantee continuity of service in probation during the transition to new arrangements, and also to ensure that those public sector probation professionals who do come together to enter the bidding process are not disadvantaged if they are not successful.

Under our proposals we will only contract with entities capable of bearing the financial and operational risks associated with Payment by Results and delivering offender services in the community. Therefore, public sector entities will not be able to bid, as they will not be able to carry the financial risk. Instead staff groups within trusts can work on proposals for alternative delivery vehicles and mutuals. The Cabinet Office's Mutual Support Programme is available to support probation staff to explore their options.

The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. We will respond to the consultation and bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Recruitment

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many officials were recruited to (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies in each of the last five years. [147973]

Damian Green: The number of officials recruited into the Ministry of Justice (Ministry of Justice Headquarters, National Offender Management Service, HM Courts and Tribunals Service and Office of the Public Guardian) is shown in the following table.

Numbers of officials recruited to the Ministry of Justice (including officials transferred from other Government Departments and non-departmental public bodies)
 Ministry of Justice (Department and Agencies)

2007-08

8,095

2008-09

8,254

2009-10

4,136

2010-11

3,769

2011-12

2,085

This information is not centrally held for non-departmental public bodies. This information has been requested from the Department's non-departmental public bodies and when available will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

Reoffenders

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what further offences were committed by offenders released on licence between 1997 and 2012 and classed as low risk during their licence period; [149288]

(2) what further offences were committed by offenders released on licence between 1997 and 2012 and classed as medium risk during their licence period. [149291]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 956W

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice produces proven reoffending data for adult offenders released from prison on licence, by probation trust. However, these statistics only count offences committed over a one year follow-up period and cannot be broken down further by low and medium risk offenders.

Termination of Employment

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its non-departmental public bodies have left that body due to (i) resignation, (ii) retirement, (iii) redundancy, (iv) transferral to another public sector post and (v) another reason in each of the last five years. [147954]

Damian Green: The number of officials who have left the Ministry of Justice (Ministry of Justice Headquarters, National Offender Management Service, HM Courts and Tribunals Service and the Office of the Public Guardian) along with their reason for leaving, is in the following table.

'Other' reasons for officials leaving include the conclusion of fixed term contracts, dismissals, voluntary exits and transfers to non-public sector organisations.

This information is not centrally held for non-departmental public bodies. This information has been requested from the Department's non-departmental public bodies and when available will be placed in the House of Commons Library.

Ministry of Justice (Department and Agencies)
Reason2007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

(i) Resignation

3,765

3,424

2,192

1,987

1,838

(ii) Retirement

1,356

1,412

1,955

2,217

1,297

(iii) Redundancy

3

32

1

1

6

(iv) Transfer to other Government Departments

313

265

280

151

265

(v) Other

2,004

2,332

1,742

1,444

3,244

Total

7,441

7,465

6,170

5,800

6,650

Victim Support Schemes

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what meetings (a) he has and (b) Ministers in his Department have had with other organisations on the new Victims Code since September 2012. [148431]

Mrs Grant: I have held two meetings with external organisations about the Victims Code since September 2012: a roundtable meeting on 30 January 2013 with victims groups and stakeholders to canvass views on the revised code, and a roundtable meeting on 13 February 2013 with criminal justice agencies and advocacy organisations to consider how the system supports victims of sexual violence, and what role the Victims Code can play in that support.

As Victims Minister I meet regularly with victims groups and other stakeholders. I have discussed the Victims Code with these groups, alongside a range of other issues, since September 2012. I will be launching a public consultation on a revised Victims Code shortly and I intend to engage with stakeholders further during the consultation period.

25 Mar 2013 : Column 957W

Young Offenders

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will make it his policy that probation trusts extend youth offending support to 18 to 20-year-old offenders. [148539]

Jeremy Wright: Youth Offending Teams are tailored specifically to meet the needs of younger offenders.

We are committed to opening up rehabilitative services to a range of new providers, who will be paid by results to help offenders turn their lives around. Under these proposals, 18 to 20-year-old offenders will have a package of rehabilitation support in the community which addresses their particular needs as they transition to adulthood.

As a part of this we expect to see more use of innovative approaches, such as mentoring, and for offenders to receive targeted support to tackle the root causes of offending.

The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. We will respond to the consultation and bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Young Offenders: Sentencing

Kate Green: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) how many children of each ethnicity were given a prison sentence for breach of a community sentence in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011; [148459]

(2) how many children of each age, were given a prison sentence for breach of a community sentence in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011. [148460]

Jeremy Wright: Tables 1 and 2 show the number of episodes of custody started, broken down by ethnicity and age, for young people aged under 18 years and imposed for a breach of a community sentence in (a) 2009, (b) 2010 and (c) 2011.

The Youth Justice Board does not count the number of individual young people starting custody, but does count the number of individual episodes. An episode refers to a period a young person has spent in custody and it is possible that one young person can start more than one custodial episode at different points of each year for different offences or for a change in the legal basis for detention, such as when a young person previously remanded is sentenced to custody. The data include those sentenced to custody for breaching the community part of a detention and training order and for breach of an antisocial behaviour order.

Table 1: Number of episodes of custody started for young people under 18 years and imposed for a breach of community sentence, by ethnicity and year
Ethnicity200920102011

Asian

25

33

36

Black

58

54

64

Mixed

62

36

39

Other

0

0

0

White

654

663

567

Not Known

29

24

47

Total

828

810

753

Source: Youth Justice Board's Secure Accommodation Clearing House System (SACHS).

25 Mar 2013 : Column 958W

Table 2: Number of episodes of custody started for young people under 18 years and imposed for a breach of community sentence by age and year
Age200920102011

10

0

0

0

11

0

0

0

12

5

3

4

13

20

10

8

14

61

66

60

15

161

141

116

16

211

238

233

17

370

352

332

Total

828

810

753

Source: Youth Justice Board's Secure Accommodation Clearing House System (SACHS).

Transport

Driving: Eyesight

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the number of road traffic accidents each year which involve drivers whose eyesight is below the minimum distance eyesight requirement to read a vehicle number plate. [149878]

Stephen Hammond: The following table gives the number of accidents for which the police officer recorded “uncorrected, defective eyesight” as a contributory factor in each of the last five years.

 Number of accidents

2007

207

2008

225

2009

191

2010

234

2011

250

Freight

Dr Offord: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what research his Department has conducted on the effectiveness of current technology to jam Global System for Mobile Communications triggers in freight vehicles; [149860]

(2) what assessment his Department has made of the availability of technology for the detection of Global System for Mobile Communications triggers in freight containers. [149861]

Stephen Hammond: The Department has not conducted any assessment or research that meets these descriptions.

High Speed 2 Railway Line

Mrs Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) whether he plans to meet or take advice from High Speed 2 Action Alliance members before reissuing the compensation consultation on High Speed 2; [149652]

(2) how many (a) officials of his Department and (b) employees of High Speed 2 Limited at each grade are working on the re-run of the consultation on compensation for people adversely affected by High Speed 2. [149653]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 959W

Mr Simon Burns: We are still considering the implications of the recent judgment on our proposals for discretionary compensation.

Litter

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the litter code of practice specifies response times for each grade of litter. [149376]

Stephen Hammond: The code of practice on litter and refuse does not give specific response times by grade of litter other than where acceptable standards have not been met. Part 1, section 9 sets down that,

“As a last resort, if acceptable standards of litter and refuse are not met, response times have been set for each of the four categories by which land must be returned to an acceptable standard.”

The times that have been set are:

High intensity of useMedium intensity of useLow intensity of useSpecial circumstances

Half a day This means by 6 pm if reported before 1 pm or by 1 pm the next duty day if reported between 1 pm and 6 pm on the previous day

One day This means by 6 pm the following evening

14 days

28 days or as soon as reasonably practicable

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether the response times set for each category of land in the litter code are only to be applied as a last resort if acceptable standards are not met. [149377]

Stephen Hammond: The response times set for each category of land in the code of practice on litter and refuse are to be used as a last resort if acceptable standards are not met. These standards and response times are applied under the Highways Agency's maintenance contracts.

Railways: Concessions

Thomas Docherty: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many senior citizen railcards have been issued in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [149932]

Norman Baker: The Department does not hold this information, as the sale of senior railcards is a matter for the train operators. However, the Association of Train Operating Companies recently advised that over one million senior railcards were sold in 2012.

Shrewsbury-Crewe Railway Line

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the reasons are for the time taken to implement the Crewe to Shrewsbury modular signalling scheme; and when he now expects the scheme to be completed. [149985]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 960W

Mr Simon Burns: As explained in my previous answers of 14 March 2013, Official Report, columns 285-86W, this scheme is an operational matter for Network Rail and any questions should be directed to the chief executive at the following address:

Network Rail

Kings Place

90 York Way

London

N1 9AG.

Sunderland Port

Grahame M. Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much inter-modal freight was handled at the Port of Sunderland in each of the last five years; what his most recent estimate was of inter-modal freight capacity at the port; and when that estimate was made. [149502]

Stephen Hammond: The Department does not hold information on the movement of freight containers or vehicles using multiple modes of transportation.

The Port of Sunderland is a municipal port. Further information on their facilities can be found at:

http://www.portofsunderland.org.uk/

Transport: North West

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 27 February 2013, Official Report, column 492W, on regional and local transport, which projects in the north west have received funding from his Department; and how much each such project has received. [149450]

Norman Baker: Government block grant funding to local authorities for integrated transport and highways maintenance is not ring fenced, and there is no requirement on local authorities to report on the individual projects these grants are used for. Therefore a complete picture is not available.

Details of funding provided for specific local authority major schemes to local authorities in the north west can be provided, as follows:

Of the programme of local authority major schemes approved by this Government, two schemes have been fully approved and are now receiving funding:

£ million
SchemeTotal costDFT funding

Rochdale Interchange

11.5

7.0

Manchester Cross City Bus

43.2

2.5

Other schemes in the north west which were already under construction at the last election, and on which this Government have continued to provide funding, are as follows:

£ million
SchemeTotal costDFT funding

A34 Alderley Edge Bypass

61.9

48.2

Hall Lane (Liverpool)

16.8

15.3

GM Urban Traffic Control

13.5

13.5

Blackpool Tram Upgrade

100.3

66.9

25 Mar 2013 : Column 961W

GM Highway Retaining Walls

45.3

40.5

Edge Lane (Liverpool)

20.0

18.8

Metrolink Extensions

744.0

396.4

The local authorities major schemes budget has also contributed some funding to the Highways Agency maintenance scheme at Bidston Moss Viaduct, Wirral.

Funding being provided to north west local authorities for Local Sustainable Transport Fund projects over the period 2011 to 2015 is as follows:

Local authorityLSTF projectFunding (£ million)

Blackburn with Darwen

BwD CONNECT Project

1.452

Cheshire East

Growing Smarter Travel Choices in Crewe

3.509

Cheshire West & Chester

Connect to Jobs

4.578

Cumbria

Lake District Sustainable Visitor Transport Beacon Area

4.890

Lancashire

Targeting Key Growth Corridors

5.000

Merseyside ITA

Supporting Sustainable Access to Opportunity in Merseyside

24.867

Sefton

Sefton & West Lancashire Visitor Economy Project

1.550

Cabinet Office

Charities

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps the Government are taking to strengthen the charitable sector. [149224]

Mr Hurd: Although we recognise that these are tough times for the charitable sector, the Government are taking a range of steps to strengthen the sector. These include the £600 million Big Society Capital and the £20 million Investment and Contract Readiness Fund. We are also helping, ambitious voluntary and community organisations to access the capital they need to expand their services. Our £10 million Innovation in Giving Fund provides funding to support ideas that have the potential to create a step change in giving and the £20 million Social Action Fund supports the development of proven models of social action. Following Lord Hodgson's report Unshackling Good Neighbours we are addressing the burden of regulation that hampers charities and the recently announced Charitable Incorporated Organisation will introduce a new simple legal structure designed solely for charities.

Electronic Government

Jon Trickett: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the implementation of the Government Digital Service (GDS); what discussions he has had with external organisations and individuals on the GDS in the last 12 months; and what steps he has taken to monitor the efficiency and effectiveness of the GDS. [149256]

25 Mar 2013 : Column 962W

Mr Hurd: Today 82% of adults in the UK are online and more and more of us are going online for shopping, banking, information and entertainment. But at the time of the last general election, government use of digital public services lagged far behind that of the private sector, despite the vast amounts of money poured into government technology.

This Government were determined to do better and set up the Government Digital Service in 2011, with the aim of transforming government services so they are digital by default and focused on user need,

In April 2012, we set up a Digital Advisory Board to support government deliver its commitment to provide high-quality public services online by default. Its role is to work with the Government Digital Service (GDS) and challenge Government to deliver better services for users.

GDS has also published the Government's Digital Strategy and Digital Efficiency Report. The strategy sets out how Government will redesign their digital services to make them straightforward and convenient so that all those who can use them prefer to do so. During the financial year 2012-13 GDS has saved at least £36 million by closing Directgov and BusinessLink and bringing Government services and information together under a single domain GOV.UK. Further estimated annual savings of at least £50 million are expected from the migration of departmental websites to GOV.UK. And in the first six months of this fiscal year GDS has enabled cross Government savings of at least £400 million by helping Government become a commissioner of IT instead of a buyer of IT. All of these changes could have been made by the last Administration.

In line with the practice of previous Administrations, details of internal discussions are not normally disclosed. External meetings by ministers and senior officials are disclosed here:

http://www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/resource-library/ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings-external-organisations

Engineering

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England were employed in the industrial engineering sector in the latest period for which figures are available. [149397]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England are employed in the industrial engineering sector in the latest period for which figures are available. (149397)

Annual employment statistics are available from the Business Register and Employment Survey (BRES). Table 1 contains the latest figures available, which show the number in employment in 2011 for industries considered to be in the industrial engineering sector.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

25 Mar 2013 : Column 963W

Table 1: Employment in Barnsley Central constituency, South Yorkshire and England in the industrial engineering sector in 2011
Industry (SIC 2007)Barnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEngland

Total

1,800

31,400

940,500

Notes: 1. South Yorkshire refers to the former metropolitan county of South Yorkshire. 2. The following industries have been considered to be part of the industrial engineering sector: Manufacture of other non-metallic mineral products; Manufacture of basic metals; Manufacture of fabricated metal products, except machinery and equipment; Manufacture of electrical equipment; Manufacture of machinery and equipment n.e.c; Manufacture of motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers; Manufacture of other transport equipment; Repair and installation of machinery and equipment.

Estate Agents

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England were employed in the real estate sector in the most recent period for which figures are available. [149396]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many people in (a) Barnsley Central constituency, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England are employed in the real estate sector in the most recent period for which figures are available. (149396)

Annual employment statistics are available from the Business Register and Employment Survey (BRES). Table 1 following contains the latest figures available, which show the number in employment in 2011 for the real estate sector.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Table 1: Employment in Barnsley Central constituency, South Yorkshire and England for real estate activities in 2011
Industry (SIC 2007)Barnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEngland

L: Real estate activities

700

7,300

408,100

Note: South Yorkshire refers to the former metropolitan county of South Yorkshire.

Government Departments: Location

Diana Johnson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 253W, on Government Departments: locations, which vanity properties were referred to in the original answer. [149659]

Miss Chloe Smith: This Government have exited several costly leases within central London which were entered into under the previous Government. In total this Government have saved the taxpayer a staggering £1 billion since the General Election by selling, exiting and getting out of unnecessary properties, leases and land. It would have been entirely possible for this to have happened under the previous Government.

This Government do not believe that taxpayers should foot the bill for unnecessary properties. That is why in February 2013 the Department for International Development exited its leasehold address at 1 Palace Street. Though the building was undeniably impressive,

25 Mar 2013 : Column 964W

the lease was expensive and unnecessary given the under-occupation of various properties in the area which the Government own outright. Exiting the lease has saved the taxpayer £62.5 million.

Diana Johnson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 253W, on Government Departments: locations, whether he has made an assessment of the potential benefits in (a) cost savings, (b) economic growth or (c) regeneration of moving staff of Government departments out of London to the regions. [149660]

Miss Chloe Smith: There have been numerous studies on the benefits of relocation, both by the previous Conservative Government and the Government of which the hon. Lady was a Member. We recognise that the number of civil servants in central London is higher than it needs to be. Relocation of staff out of expensive London offices to other regions continues to be high on the agenda, as an option to deliver the savings needed. However, the final location of posts in a Department is decided by its business and operational requirements.

The Government Property Unit, in the Cabinet Office, is managing a programme of estate rationalisation across central London in order to reduce the cost of offices and to make savings for the UK taxpayer. The Government's strategy is to consolidate its operations into freehold and PFI space where that is practical and cost-effective to do so. This has already resulted in the reduction of the Central Civil Estate in London by just over 432,900 sq m, or around 20% in the period from 1 May 2010 to 1 March 2013.

Internet

John Robertson: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 4 March 2013, Official Report, column 820W, on internet, what assessment he has made of the performance on his Department's work with (a) Go-ON:UK and (b) the eAccessibility Forum. [149225]

Mr Hurd: The focus of the Government Digital Strategy is in making services digital by default. The Government Digital Service (GDS) continues to work closely with Go ON UK and with the eAccessibilty Forum to ensure that appropriate assisted digital support is in place for people who are not online or who have limited digital skills. The Department is satisfied with the work undertaken to date.

Job Creation: Private Sector

Mr Russell Brown: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many and what proportion of jobs created in the private sector since May 2010 are (a) located in each area of the UK and (b) in each industrial sector; and how many are (i) in excess of 35 hours per week, (ii) between 20 and 35 hours per week, (iii) between 10 and 20 hours per week, (iv) up to 10 hours a week and (v) have no contracted hours. [148969]

Mr Hurd [holding answer 19 March 2013]: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

25 Mar 2013 : Column 965W

Letter from Glen Watson:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked how many and what proportion of jobs created in the private sector since May 2010 are (a) located in each area of the UK and (b) in each industrial sector; and how many are in (i) in excess of 35 hours per week, (ii) between 20 and 35 hours per week, (iii) between 10 and 20 hours per week, (iv) up to 10 hours a week and (v) have no contracted hours (148969).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) compiles labour market statistics for local areas from the Annual Population Survey (APS), following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions. Estimates of the number of zero hour contracts are not available from this source.

Individuals in the APS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses to the survey. In the APS the distinction between public and private sector is based on respondents' views about the organisation for which they work. The private sector estimates provided do not correspond to official estimates of the split between public and private sector employment which are based on a National Accounts' definition and are not available for areas smaller than regions.

Estimates of the number of jobs created in the private sector are not available from the APS. As an alternative we have provided the net change in the number of people employed in the private sector, according to responses to the APS, between the 12 month period ending June 2010, the period closest to May 2010, and the 12 month period ending September 2012, the latest available period. Along with the number of people employed in the two periods.

Since the estimates are net changes in the number of people employed in the private sector, which are a mixture of increases and decreases, a measurement of a proportion of the total net change is not appropriate.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at:

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

A copy of the table will be placed in the Library of the House.

Mr Russell Brown: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many and what proportion of jobs created in the private sector since May 2010 are (a) agency jobs and (b) paid at the minimum wage. [148970]

Mr Hurd [holding answer 19 March 2013]: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated March 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking how many and what proportion of jobs created in the private sector since May 2010 are (a) agency jobs and (b) paid at the minimum wage. (148970)

Information regarding jobs created is not available. As an alternative, estimates of the number of people in employment in the private sector are available from the Labour Force Survey (LFS). This includes an estimate of the number of temporary employees who report that they work for an employment agency.

Sufficiently reliable estimates of the number of people in the private sector who are paid at the level of the minimum wage are not available from the LFS or any other source of official labour market statistics.

The table provided contains the available private sector employment statistics for the three-month period January to March 2010 onwards. In the LFS the distinction between public and private sector is based on respondents' views about the organisation for which they work. The estimates do not correspond directly to the

25 Mar 2013 : Column 966W

official statistics for private sector employment published in the monthly Labour Market Statistical Bulletin. Those statistics, which are derived partly from employers and are based on National Accounts definitions, do not provide for an estimate of agency workers.

In the table, the change over the last two years is shown along with the change between April to June 2010 and April to June 2012. The estimates are not seasonally adjusted so changes between individual quarters needs to be interpreted carefully.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the LFS are subject to a margin of uncertainty. These are indicated in the table.

Private sector employment, quarterly, 2010 to 2012, United Kingdom
(thousands) not seasonally adjusted
 Private Sector Employment(1)
 TotalTemporary employees(2) working for an employment agency

2010

  

January to March

21,341

168

April to June

21,440

200

July to September

21,828

208

October to December

21,781

214

   

2011

  

January to March

21,688

205

April to June

21,870

200

July to September

22,068

204

October to December

22,132

213

   

2012

  

January to March

22,077

189

April to June

22,394

206

July to September

22,608

210

October to December

22,623

233

   

Change April to June 2010 to April to June 2012

954

7

Change October to December 2010 to October to December 2012

842

19

1 Individuals in the LFS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses regarding the organisation for which they work. 2 All those who report that their job was not permanent in some way. Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of an estimate, the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population total to be within the range 180-220. Key Coefficient of Variation (CV) (%) * 0 ≤ CV< 5 ** 5 ≤ CV < 10 *** 10 ≤ CV < 20 **** CV ≥ 20 Source: Labour Force Survey