17 Apr 2013 : Column 449W

17 Apr 2013 : Column 450W

Table 2: Number of Penalty Notices for Disorder issued to offenders aged 16 and over for Criminal Damage in Humberside, 2009 to 2011
Offence20042005200620072008200920102011

Criminal Damage (under £500)(1)

16

182

719

982

500

351

167

138

(1) Offence added with effect from 1 November 2004. Penalty notices may only be used for criminal damage up to a value of £300 from July 2009 onwards. Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Community Orders: Greater London

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the value is of the indemnity which his Department has underwritten for the pension liabilities created as part of the award of the London Community Payback contract to Serco. [149613]

Jeremy Wright: All three bidders in the London Community Payback competition were provided with a £2 million contract exit indemnity in relation to any pension liabilities arising during the contract period. Additionally the Ministry of Justice has agreed to indemnify any liabilities arising from historic pension liabilities at the point of contract transfer. The amount of these liabilities have been recently valued at approximately £3.7 million but this amount may vary subject to triennial revaluations.

Employment and Support Allowance: Appeals

Pamela Nash: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many claimants for employment and support allowance have had their appeals overturned at a tribunal in (a) North Lanarkshire and (b) Airdrie and Shotts constituency in each year since 2010. [150571]

Mrs Grant: The First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support (SSCS), administered by HM Courts and Tribunals Service—hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (ESA). Appeals can be made against elements of an ESA award, such as the rate of entitlement, as well as against a decision to refuse ESA.

The following tables show the number and proportion of ESA appeals found in favour of the appellant and in favour of DWP in the tribunal venues in Glasgow and Hamilton, which serve appellants living in the North Lanarkshire and Airdrie and Shotts constituencies, as well as other nearby locations, in 2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12 and April to December 2012 (the latest period for which statistics have been published).

Employment and support allowance appeals
Glasgow
  (a) Decisions in favour of DWP(b) Decisions in favour of the appellant
 ESA cases cleared at hearing(1)NumberPercentageNumberPercentage

April 2009 to March 2010

3,004

1,733

58

1,234

41

April 2010 to March 2011

6,060

3,501

58

2,395

40

April 2011 to March 2012

9,238

5,224

57

3,928

43

April 2012 to December 2012

8,898

4,833

54

4,010

45

Hamilton
  (a) Decisions in favour of DWP(b) Decisions in favour of the appellant
 ESA cases cleared at hearing(1)NumberPercentageNumberPercentage

April 2009 to March 2010

1,177

779

66

390

33

April 2010 to March2011

2,357

1,585

67

746

32

April 2011 to March 2012

2,611

1,609

62

976

37

April 2012 to December 2012

2,485

1,434

58

1,044

42

Scotland
  (a) Decisions in favour of DWP(b) Decisions in favour of the appellant
 ESA cases cleared at hearing(1)NumberPercentageNumberPercentage

April 2009 to March 2010

9,218

5,461

59

3,670

40

April 2010 to March201l

18,904

10,889

58

7,649

40

April 2011 to March 2012

22,782

12,975 ,

57

9,577

42

April 2012 to December 2012

20,967

11,234

54

9,597

46

(1) These are cases that were disposed of at a hearing. The total number of cases cleared at hearing includes some cases that were withdrawn and on which no decision was made. These figures are therefore not the sum total of decisions in favour and decisions upheld.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 451W

Employment Tribunals Service

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many employment tribunal cases have been lodged in the last three years relating to non-prison officers working in HM prisons, such as external lecturers. [150700]

Mrs Grant: Data on the number of claims made in relation to non-prison officers working in HM prisons are not collated centrally. This information could be provided only at a disproportionate cost by manually checking hard copy tribunal files or judgments. However, HM Courts and Tribunals Service maintains public registers of judgments made after the determination of employment tribunal proceedings. The public register can be searched by reference to criteria including the name of the respondent employer. For employment tribunals in England and Wales, the public register of judgments is based at the Field Support Office in Bury St Edmonds. Contact can be made via the Public Inquiry Line (08457 959775), and further information can be found on the Ministry of Justice website at the following address:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/tribunals/employment/venues/public_register_bury1.pdf

Offenders: Fines

Paul Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what his proposed time frame is for the implementation of new charges to recover the costs of collecting fines from offenders. [150079]

Jeremy Wright: There is no settled timeframe for implementation. Implementation will occur once we are satisfied that the right, fully tested and assured, systems are in place.

Offenders: Rehabilitation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what vetting procedures will be in place for mentors recruited to supervise offenders leaving prison; [150377]

(2) whether mentors for supervising offenders leaving prison will be subject to Criminal Record Bureau checks; [150383]

(3) how many offenders leaving prison will each mentor be expected to manage at any one time; [150384]

(4) whether his Department plans to pay mentors supervising offenders leaving prison. [150385]

Jeremy Wright: We are committed to opening up rehabilitative services to a range of new providers, who will be paid by results to help offenders turn their lives around. As a part of this we expect to see more use of innovative approaches, such as mentoring, and for offenders to receive targeted support to tackle the root causes of offending.

The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. We will respond to the consultation and bring forward detailed plans in due course.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 452W

Prison Sentences

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders served custodial sentences of under 12 months in (a) 2010, (b) 2011 and (c) 2012. [150305]

Jeremy Wright: These figures are published quarterly in the publication ‘Offender Management Statistics Quarterly Bulletin’ (Prison discharge tables—Table 3.1) and available via this link:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/prisons-and-probation/oms-quarterly

Data for the whole of 2012 will be published on 25 April 2013.

Probation

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the total number of offenders supervised by each probation trust was at 31 December 2012. [150301]

Jeremy Wright: Information on the total number of offenders supervised by each probation trust as at 31 December 2012 is planned for publication on 25 April 2013.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the proposed budget is for each probation trust in (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15. [150306]

Jeremy Wright: The contract values for financial year 2013-14 agreed with each probation trust—as at March 2013—are in the following table. Contract prices may vary throughout the financial year. Probation trusts may also receive income from elsewhere.

Detailed contract values budgets are not available for financial year 2014-15. Budget allocations will be set as part of the Department's regular annual budget allocation process. Allocations will be made on the basis of need and according to departmental priorities.

Probation trust contract values for financial year 2013-14(1)
Probation trust£ million

Avon and Somerset

19.7

Bedfordshire

8.7

Cambridgeshire

9.5

Cheshire

14.0

Cumbria

8.0

Derbyshire

12.7

Devon and Cornwall

18.0

Dorset

8.5

Durham and Teesside

21.6

Essex

18.6

Gloucestershire

7.1

Greater Manchester

46.8

Hampshire

22.7

Hertfordshire

10.9

Humberside

15.6

Kent

19.3

Lancashire

23.7

Leicester and Rutland

13.9

Lincolnshire

8.7

London

119.7

Merseyside

28.7

Norfolk and Suffolk

18.7

Northamptonshire

8.5

Northumbria

27.7

17 Apr 2013 : Column 453W

Nottinghamshire

17.8

South Yorkshire

23.3

Staffordshire and West Midlands

67.9

Surrey and Sussex

25.0

Thames Valley

24.4

Wales

51.3

Warwickshire

6.6

West Mercia

14.4

West Yorkshire

38.1

Wiltshire

6.9

York and North Yorkshire

9.4

Total

796.3

(1) Agreed as at March 2013. Note: Figures are rounded.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what savings to the public purse he expects to arise from the implementation of his plans for transforming rehabilitation; [150368]

(2) what savings his Department estimates would be made on an annual basis if the proposals in the consultation paper Transforming Rehabilitation, published in January 2013, were implemented. [150395]

Jeremy Wright: On 22 February the Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed. Our proposed reforms will help reduce reoffending by opening up rehabilitation services to a more diverse market, using payment by results to encourage providers to focus on outcomes, and by making the whole system more efficient, so that we can extend rehabilitative provision to offenders released from short custodial sentences of less than 12 months.

We need to achieve this in a way that is affordable within the context of the Ministry of Justice's commitment to deliver annual savings of over £2 billion by 2014-15.

We have consulted on how best to structure the system so it is organised in the most efficient manner and we are looking carefully at responses to the consultation to ensure we get the details right. We will bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice if he will estimate the proportion of the total payment to contractors that will be paid by results under his plans for transforming rehabilitation. [150371]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February.

Under our proposals we will use Payment by Results to encourage providers to focus on reducing reoffending outcomes. Using a Payment by Results model makes sense as a way of improving effectiveness and getting a good deal for the taxpayer. We are working to design success measures and a payment model that will provide strong incentives for providers to deliver results, including for more difficult and prolific offenders. We will bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether the police and other criminal justice agencies will be able to access information on offenders being

17 Apr 2013 : Column 454W

supervised by private companies and voluntary organisations that are delivering contracts as part of his plans for transforming rehabilitation. [150373]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice’s consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. Close communication and sharing of information between all those involved with an offender will be crucial to make the reformed system work effectively. We are considering carefully the responses to the consultation relating to this important issue and will bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what processes his Department plans to put in place to evaluate independently payment by results providers as part of his plans for transforming rehabilitation; [150374]

(2) whether his Department plans to take over failing contracts as part of the Transforming Rehabilitation proposals. [150375]

Jeremy Wright: The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. Under our proposals we will use Payment by Results to encourage providers to focus on reducing reoffending outcomes. Using a Payment by Results model makes sense as a way of improving effectiveness and getting a good deal for the taxpayer. We will pay for what works to reduce reoffending, but providers who fail to reduce reoffending will have to bear the cost of that failure.

We are working to design success measures and a payment model that will provide strong incentives for providers to deliver results, including for more difficult and prolific offenders. We will bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice (1) what contingency measures will be in place should contractors delivering outsourced probation services fail to meet minimum standards; [150380]

(2) what conditions will be placed on contactors delivering outsourced probation work to ensure professional standards amongst employees. [150376]

Jeremy Wright: We recognise the need to design contracts that are robust, drive the right behaviours and help generate improved value for money. The Ministry of Justice's consultation on plans for reforming the way in which offenders are rehabilitated in the community closed on 22 February. We are considering how minimum standards are set and performance is managed and will bring forward detailed plans in due course.

Prosecutions

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many times prosecutors have amended criminal charges to (a) lesser charges and (b) more serious charges after a plea has been taken in court but where the defendant has not yet been sentenced for the originally charged offence in each of the last three years. [151008]

17 Apr 2013 : Column 455W

Jeremy Wright: HMCTS does not centrally collate changes to criminal charges after a plea has been taken in either the magistrates courts or the Crown court. Cases are managed on an individual basis and this information will be held on case logs on individual files but to manually interrogate them and collate that information would involve disproportionate costs so I am unable to answer my hon. Friend’s question.

Reoffenders

Dr McCrea: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what the reoffending rate was in each of the last three years. [150262]

Jeremy Wright: These figures are published quarterly and can be found in table 1 (Summary proven re-offending for adults and juveniles) in the publication ‘Proven re-offending Statistics Quarterly Bulletin' and available via this link:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/reoffending/proven-re-offending

Robbery: Sentencing

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice pursuant to the answer of 19 March 2013, Official Report, column 788W, on sentencing: robbery, how many of those offenders convicted of robbery and not sent to prison in each year were (a) adults and (b) young offenders; and how many were subsequently convicted of another offence. [150119]

Jeremy Wright: Robbery is a serious crime carrying a maximum sentence of life imprisonment. The vast majority of offenders do go to prison for the offence—the immediate custody rate for adults in 2011 was 84.3%. The average sentence length for offenders convicted of burglary over the period 2009-11 is 1,003 days.

Reoffending rates are unacceptably high. We are tackling this by changing the way we deal with offenders released after short sentences, so there is greater supervision and rehabilitation.

Table 1 shows the number of adult and young offenders sentenced for robbery without receiving a custodial sentence in England and Wales, 2009-11.

Table 1: Number of adult and young offenders sentenced for robbery without receiving a custodial sentence England and Wales, 2009-11(1, 2)
 200920102011

Total

3,509

3,568

3,710

Of which:

   

Adults (age 18 or over)

832

907

866

Young offenders (ages 10-17)

2,677

2,661

2,844

Notes: (1) The figures given in the table on court proceedings relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: Ministry of Justice

17 Apr 2013 : Column 456W

Table 2 shows the number of adult and young offenders who, having received a non-custodial sentence for robbery between 2009 and 2011, subsequently went on to be convicted of another offence.

The data presented in this table are derived from a different source from those given in table 1 and therefore are not directly comparable. In addition, it should be noted that those offenders receiving a non-custodial sentence for robbery in 2009 will have had at up to two years longer to be convicted of another offence than those receiving a non-custodial sentence in 2011, Therefore, no attempt should be made to compare the figures over the three years presented.

Table 2: Number of adults and young offenders who, having received a non-custodial sentence for robbery between 2009 and 2011, subsequently went on to be convicted of another offence, England and Wales
 200920102011

Adults (ages 18 and over)

425

403

289

Young offenders (ages 10-17)

1,901

1,684

1,414

Source: Ministry of Justice

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Unpaid Fines: North-west

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many unpaid fines there were in the north west in the latest period for which figures are available; and what the monetary value of those fines was. [147715]

Mrs Grant: As at the end of September 2012 there was a total amount of £98,894,298 outstanding in the north-west region. This amount relates to all outstanding accounts regardless of when they were imposed and includes accounts which are compliant with their payment terms or not yet due for payment.

It is not possible to identify the number of outstanding fines the amount above relates to.

HMCTS actively pursues all outstanding fines until certain that the fine cannot be collected.

Young Offenders

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice with regard to people under the age of 18 that have been arrested and cautioned since May 2005, (a) what the offence was which provoked the caution and (b) how many cautions that person had already received by (i) region and (ii) year. [144063]

Jeremy Wright: The use of cautions is at its lowest level for more than five years, as is the number of cautions issued to those who have a previous criminal record. The public and victims have a right to expect that people who commit serious crimes should be brought before a court. On 3 April 2013 we launched a review into the use of cautions which will focus on the use of cautions for serious offences and persistent offenders.

17 Apr 2013 : Column 457W

Among other things, the review will examine whether there are some offences for which the use of simple cautions is generally inappropriate, the reasons why multiple cautions are given to some criminals and the difference in the use of cautions by police force areas. The review is a significant step to ensuring that cautions are used correctly, in the interests of justice, and command the confidence of the public. The review will be completed by the end of May 2013.

Table 1 is in answer to part (a) of the question and shows the number of offenders in England and Wales under the age of 18 who have been cautioned between May 2005 and June 2012 by the offence class for which they were cautioned, by region of the police force issuing the caution and year. Table 2 is in answer to part (b) of the question and shows the number of offenders in England and Wales under the age of 18 who have been cautioned between May 2005 and June 2012 by the previous number of times they have received a caution, by region of the police force issuing the caution and year.

The data include caution occasions and the primary offence committed for each caution occasion is the one used to determine the offence type in Table 1. An

17 Apr 2013 : Column 458W

individual may appear multiple times in both tables and the previous caution count in Table 2 will include all previous caution occasions from that point. Therefore an offender may appear several times in the data with a higher previous caution count for each later caution occasion.

Please note that figures for 2005 only include cautions recorded from May to December. In addition 2012 only includes figures for cautions from January to end of June in line with published information.

These figures are derived from the data used to produce Table 7k in the offending histories tables--June 2012 of the “Criminal Justice Statistics Quarterly Update to June 2012” which was last published on 29 November 2012. The link to the report is found at:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/criminal-justice/criminal-justice-statistics

These figures have been drawn from the police's administrative IT system, the police national computer, which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.

Table 1: Number of cautions given to offenders under the age of 18 in England and Wales between May 2005 to June 2012 by police force region and offence class
Number of cautions
RegionOffence Class2005(1)2006200720082009201020112012(2)

East Midlands

Burglary

282

384

400

292

218

185

155

66

 

Criminal damage

856

1,032

631

529

278

203

208

59

 

Drug offences

331

446

485

402

475

531

513

242

 

Fraud and forgery

47

147

83

84

34

36

33

16

 

Indictable motoring offences

1

1

5

2

1

 

Other indictable offences

115

168

142

125

97

96

64

27

 

Robbery

14

23

37

23

24

28

16

2

 

Sexual offences

49

59

47

59

52

56

49

19

 

Summary motoring offences

4

13

10

8

2

2

2

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

2,275

4,306

4,363

3,274

2,434

2,219

1,827

667

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

2,125

3,446

3,215

2,451

2,061

1,613

1,246

427

 

Violence against the person

1,065

1,179

899

700

534

479

430

164

East Midlands total

 

7,164

11,204

10,317

7,947

6,209

5,448

4,545

1,691

          

Eastern

Burglary

317

542

412

320

274

171

153

39

 

Criminal damage

436

671

569

474

376

266

153

43

 

Drug offences

398

566

693

939

831

769

775

288

 

Fraud and forgery

56

124

121

104

74

56

52

16

 

Indictable motoring offences

5

1

 

Other indictable offences

75

127

184

141

148

126

91

28

 

Robbery

18

20

16

9

15

9

22

6

 

Sexual offences

38

69

63

67

58

47

52

31

 

Summary motoring offences

7

15

17

14

7

1

3

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

3,208

5,270

5,697

4,911

3,913

2,831

2,163

790

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

2,758

4,642

5,050

4,072

3,693

2,243

1,553

463

 

Violence against the person

695

1,000

891

694

668

479

383

148

Eastern total

 

8,006

13,051

13,713

11,745

10,057

6,999

5,400

1,853

          

17 Apr 2013 : Column 459W

17 Apr 2013 : Column 460W

London

Burglary

218

352

360

278

205

118

78

38

 

Criminal damage

416

761

529

181

120

60

38

15

 

Drug offences

963

1,350

1,571

1,834

1,550

1,213

896

421

 

Fraud and forgery

105

155

233

260

186

142

55

32

 

Indictable motoring offences

3

3

1

1

 

Other indictable offences

159

312

327

262

215

173

110

22

 

Robbery

105

238

250

188

116

110

130

30

 

Sexual offences

32

48

62

72

63

36

36

15

 

Summary motoring offences

3

14

25

28

15

12

4

4

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

1,869

3,598

3,906

3,809

2,633

1,740

1,184

386

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

2,384

3,926

3,898

3,206

2,978

1,901

1,069

385

 

Violence against the person

771

1,335

1,134

814

536

414

325

129

London total

 

7,028

12,089

12,298

10,933

8,617

5,920

3,925

1,477

          

North East

Burglary

174

311

285

186

153

111

89

53

 

Criminal damage

341

498

307

296

237

163

168

68

 

Drug offences

328

389

316

333

266

177

198

72

 

Fraud and forgery

42

63

72

72

50

36

26

11

 

Indictable motoring offences

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

 

Other indictable offences

70

157

137

134

72

82

52

12

 

Robbery

5

14

6

8

3

4

1

1

 

Sexual offences

32

37

36

35

26

29

33

11

 

Summary motoring offences

3

8

13

10

7

2

2

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

2,555

4,424

4,723

3,562

2,484

1,510

1,287

546

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

1,601

2,668

2,848

2,203

1,919

964

810

335

 

Violence against the person

561

899

749

540

411

322

242

101

North East total

 

5,713

9,470

9,493

7,380

5,629

3,401

2,908

1,212

          

North West

Burglary

566

859

714

525

476

348

252

97

 

Criminal damage

286

428

380

301

200

170

103

25

 

Drug offences

869

1,029

1,527

1,701

1,612

1,169

910

327

 

Fraud and forgery

83

116

151

109

112

75

55

21

 

Indictable motoring offences

2

2

3

2

2

1

 

Other indictable offences

158

217

232

211

175

137

113

52

 

Robbery

28

34

47

24

24

20

27

10

 

Sexual offences

47

71

98

59

52

63

42

21

 

Summary motoring offences

13

19

17

19

8

6

2

2

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

4,882

7,786

7,576

5,911

4,295

3,150

2,351

822

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

3,117

4,578

4,370

3,582

2,655

1,974

1,314

415

 

Violence against the person

1,540

1,979

1,630

1,098

860

684

489

200

North West total

 

11,591

17,118

16,745

13,542

10,471

7,797

5,658

1,992

          

South East

Burglary

462

687

702

484

393

312

256

77

 

Criminal damage

548

1,023

746

487

389

278

229

89

 

Drug offences

940

1,109

1,363

1,511

1,069

873

689

307

 

Fraud and forgery

122

200

320

189

109

69

67

22

 

Indictable motoring offences

1

7

1

1

2

1

 

Other indictable offences

167

268

316

203

208

135

114

28

 

Robbery

27

43

26

22

17

14

16

3

17 Apr 2013 : Column 461W

17 Apr 2013 : Column 462W

 

Sexual offences

88

127

104

82

76

66

53

29

 

Summary motoring offences

9

21

23

25

19

12

12

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

5,572

8,178

8,311

6,327

4,989

3,580

2,626

1,000

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

4,441

6,302

6,589

5,396

5,137

3,160

1,734

599

 

Violence against the person

1,171

1,687

1,504

1,069

923

647

522

190

South East total

 

13,548

19,652

20,005

15,796

13,331

9,147

6,318

2,345

          

South West

Burglary

320

403

414

328

237

195

139

64

 

Criminal damage

308

532

421

303

239

194

175

62

 

Drug offences

475

623

633

677

569

645

682

305

 

Fraud and forgery

59

98

97

78

38

37

30

16

 

Indictable motoring offences

1

2

1

 

Other indictable offences

104

138

146

98

96

94

61

22

 

Robbery

10

18

11

8

6

6

2

3

 

Sexual offences

37

52

53

60

52

52

43

23

 

Summary motoring offences

12

27

19

15

9

11

4

4

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

3,156

5,191

5,303

4,265

2,956

2,381

1,988

806

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

2,279

3,599

3,446

2,573

1,935

1,383

1,045

381

 

Violence against the person

605

828

650

545

422

363

269

110

South West total

 

7,365

11,510

11,195

8,950

6,559

5,362

4,438

1,796

          

Wales

Burglary

249

377

317

310

239

162

105

38

 

Criminal damage

521

881

722

700

572

391

230

105

 

Drug offences

399

469

390

485

399

373

348

157

 

Fraud and forgery

36

51

42

38

28

25

13

4

 

Indictable motoring offences

7

1

1

1

1

 

Other indictable offences

174

293

152

75

66

50

32

12

 

Robbery

13

9

7

7

3

2

2

 

Sexual offences

25

36

31

29

31

20

33

8

 

Summary motoring offences

6

10

12

8

3

3

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

1,424

2,643

2,943

2,805

2,329

1,573

1,110

457

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

1,400

1,940

2,064

1,991

1,799

1,080

635

260

 

Violence against the person

478

743

551

436

320

186

170

53

Wales total

 

4,725

7,459

7,231

6,885

5,790

3,861

2,682

1,097

          

West Midlands

Burglary

355

563

461

331

213

201

170

73

 

Criminal damage

230

526

431

235

137

99

83

37

 

Drug offences

588

882

759

694

564

486

463

182

 

Fraud and forgery

64

122

108

81

75

49

28

7

 

Indictable motoring offences

2

6

5

1

1

1

 

Other indictable offences

163

314

281

270

162

118

83

20

 

Robbery

17

52

50

48

33

34

21

10

 

Sexual offences

77

91

83

65

51

51

36

22

 

Summary motoring offences

6

11

14

13

7

1

3

1

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

4,297

6,517

6,624

4,615

2,849

1,863

1,470

543

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

2,691

4,346

4,253

2,846

1,977

1,167

835

276

 

Violence against the person

1,061

1,631

1,344

1,131

788

519

424

177

17 Apr 2013 : Column 463W

17 Apr 2013 : Column 464W

West Midlands total

 

9,551

15,061

14,408

10,334

6,857

4,589

3,617

1,348

          

Yorkshire and Humberside

Burglary

404

681

642

464

381

265

243

88

 

Criminal damage

449

708

723

558

401

201

194

78

 

Drug offences

423

584

547

531

463

382

380

159

 

Fraud and forgery

55

119

83

106

56

44

37

13

 

Indictable motoring offences

3

7

4

3

1

1

1

 

Other indictable offences

173

312

255

198

154

109

90

32

 

Robbery

41

46

53

35

20

16

10

9

 

Sexual offences

54

81

68

42

39

54

45

25

 

Summary motoring offences

10

31

18

17

11

14

13

6

 

Summary offences excluding motoring

4,508

7,078

6,437

4,690

3,256

2,145

1,655

634

 

Theft and handling stolen goods

3,106

4,596

4,757

3,772

3,295

1,642

1,186

418

 

Violence against the person

1,275

2,060

1,727

1,169

816

587

472

135

Yorkshire and Humberside total

 

10,501

16,303

15,314

11,585

8,893

5,460

4,325

1,598

          

Grand total

 

85,192

132,917

130,719

105,097

82,413

57,984

43,816

16,409

(1) 2005 includes data from May to December only. (2) 2012 includes data from January to June only. Source: Ministry of Justice
Table 2: Number of cautions given to offenders under the age of 18 in England and Wales between May 2005 to June 2012 by police force region and by previous cautions.
Number of cautions
RegionNumber of previous cautions received2005(1)2006200720082009201020112012(2)

East Midlands

0

5,509

8,416

7,324

5,646

4,506

3,936

3,287

1,250

 

1-2

1,640

2,747

2,945

2,263

1,690

1,495

1,247

437

 

3-6

15

41

48

38

13

17

11

4

East Midlands total

 

7,164

11,204

10,317

7,947

6,209

5,448

4,545

1,691

          

Eastern

0

6,441

10,080

10,500

8,766

7,534

5,165

3,865

1,322

 

1-2

1,558

2,965

3,200

2,964

2,510

1,822

1,526

529

 

3-6

7

6

13

15

13

12

9

2

Eastern total

 

8,006

13,051

13,713

11,745

10,057

6,999

5,400

1,853

          

London

0

5,728

9,800

9,838

8,554

6,745

4,558

3,008

1,153

 

1-2

1,295

2,282

2,456

2,367

1,865

1,361

913

319

 

3-6

5

7

4

12

7

1

4

5

London total

 

7,028

12,089

12,298

10,933

8,617

5,920

3,925

1,477

          

North East

0

4,263

6,925

6,952

5,248

3,814

2,084

1,870

832

 

1-2

1,444

2,532

2,532

2,124

1,809

1,311

1,035

379

 

3-6

6

13

9

8

6

6

3

1

North East total

 

5,713

9,470

9,493

7,380

5,629

3,401

2,908

1,212

          

North West

0

8,999

12,879

12,320

9,913

7,446

5,533

4,023

1,461

 

1-2

2,579

4,197

4,386

3,600

3,003

2,248

1,621

525

17 Apr 2013 : Column 465W

17 Apr 2013 : Column 466W

 

3-6

13

42

39

29

22

16

14

6

North West total

 

11,591

17,118

16,745

13,542

10,471

7,797

5,658

1,992

          

South East

0

10,113

14,438

14,612

11,346

9,627

6,518

4,377

1,693

 

1-2

3,374

5,152

5,337

4,408

3,674

2,611

1,922

642

 

3-6

61

62

56

42

30

18

19

10

South East total

 

13,548

19,652

20,005

15,796

13,331

9,147

6,318

2,345

          

South West

0

5,831

8,820

8,359

6,616

4,728

3,835

3,236

1,309

 

1-2

1,527

2,683

2,824

2,328

1,825

1,520

1,197

487

 

3-6

7

7

12

6

6

7

5

South West total

 

7,365

11,510

11,195

8,950

6,559

5,362

4,438

1,796

          

Wales

0

3,510

5,419

5,249

4,944

4,119

2,655

1,788

722

 

1-2

1,196

2,003

1,951

1,908

1,646

1,199

886

365

 

3-6

19

37

31

33

25

7

8

10

Wales total

 

4,725

7,459

7,231

6,885

5,790

3,861

2,682

1,097

          

West Midlands

0

7,205

11,275

10,504

7,210

4,901

3,237

2,593

1,001

 

1-2

2,321

3,736

3,876

3,097

1,934

1,339

1,014

346

 

3-6

23

50

28

27

22

13

10

1

 

7-10

2

West Midlands total

 

9,551

15,061

14,408

10,334

6,857

4,589

3,617

1,348

          

Yorkshire and Humberside

0

7,902

11,833

10,975

8,114

6,349

3,757

3,013

1,171

 

1-2

2,589

4,438

4,315

3,447

2,530

1,688

1,307

424

 

3-6

10

32

24

24

14

15

5

3

Yorkshire and Humberside total

 

10,501

16,303

15,314

11,585

8,893

5,460

4,325

1,598

          

Grand total

 

85,192

132,917

130,719

105,097

82,413

57,984

43,816

16,409

(1) 2005 includes data from May to December only. (2) 2012 includes data from January to June only. Source: Ministry of Justice