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Secondment

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many staff from each of the six top energy companies were seconded to his Department to work on the development of energy policy in each year for which figures are available. [151496]

Gregory Barker: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 25 March 2013, Official Report, column 944W.

Training

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many away days his Department held in (a) 2005, (b) 2006, (c) 2007, (d) 2008 and (e) 2009; and what the cost was of each such event. [151193]

Gregory Barker: The Department of Energy and Climate Change came into being in October 2008.

The following data therefore relate to 2008-09 and 2009-10 only.

Seven events in 2008-09 at a total cost of £13,000;

43 events in 2009-10 at a total cost of £108,000.

Individual events and associated costs can be found in the following tables:

2008-09
Away-day venue or providerNumber of eventsCost (£)

Crowne Plaza London—St James

1

6,360

Middle Aston House

1

3,000

Novas Social Enterprise Ltd

1

2,000

22 Apr 2013 : Column 602W

One Queen Anne's Gate

1

267

RSA Adelphi Enterprises Ltd

1

802

THE Art Academy

1

800

Wildfowl And Wetlands Trust (Trading) Ltd

1

147

Total

7

13,375

2009-10
Away-day venue or providerNumber of eventsCost (£)

Amanda Jones t/a Pinnacle Consultancy

2

859

Barcelo Stirling Highland Hotel

1

833

Bardis Seabury

1

3,352

Barnett Hill Conference Centre Ltd

1

3,977

Browns Courtrooms

1

2,280

Capital Pleasure Boats

1

3,254

Chillisauce Ltd

2

9,202

Church House Conference Centre Ltd

1

6/503

City Inn Ltd t/a Doubletree By Hilton Westminster

1

2,758

Civil Service Club

1

307

Commonwealth club ltd

1

887

Deganwy Quay Ltd t/a Quay Hotel and Spa

1

677

Events Matter Ltd

1

475

Guoman Hotel Management (UK) Ltd t/a Thistle Hotels

1

3,493

Idenk Ltd

1

9,011

Iridium Hrd Consulting Ltd

1

1,006

Learnlab Ltd

1

2,731

London Hilton on Park Lane

1

5,075

London Portman Hotel Ltd t/a Radisson Blu Portman Hotel

1

10,350

Mairs Thistle Executive Hire Ltd

1

375

Mermaid Conference and Events Centre Ltd

1

2,830

Personnel Training Services Consortium (PTSC)

6

12,471

Photon Exchange Ltd

1

863

RSA Adelphi Enterprises Ltd

1

1,196

Science Museum

1

2,070

Southwark Cathedral Enterprises Ltd

1

548

Tate Enterprises

1

1,953

The Cumberland Guoman Ltd

1

6,648

The Royal Horseguards Hotel Ltd

1

1,462

The Waldorf Hilton

1

827

Thistle Hotel Charing Cross

1

345

W Watson (Retford) Ltd t/a Watson Management Services

1

875

Wallacespace Ltd

2

1,448

Wildfowl And Wetlands Trust (Trading) Ltd

1

1,625

Zoo Enterprises Ltd

2

5,485

Grand Total

44

108,051

United Arab Emirates

Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) what the dates, times, attendees and agendas of all meetings held during each ministerial visit to the United Arab Emirates have been since May 2010; [152431]

(2) when (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department have visited the UAE since May 2010; and who attended each such visit. [152496]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 603W

Gregory Barker: All meetings between external organisations and DECC Ministers are published on a quarterly basis on the DECC website and are available for download at this link:

http://www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/accesstoinform/registers/registers.aspx


Luciana Berger: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change if he will publish the cost of (a) travel and (b) accommodation for all ministerial visits to the UAE since May 2010; and who funded each such aspect of each visit. [152495]

Gregory Barker: Details of all overseas visits undertaken by Ministers are published on a quarterly basis on the Gov UK website. The Department's ministerial travel costs are borne by the Department.

All ministerial travel is undertaken in accordance with the Ministerial Code:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications?departments%5B%5D=department-of-energy-climate-change&publication_type=transparency-data

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Beaches

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department has taken to ensure that all UK beaches achieve blue flag status. [152613]

Richard Benyon: Blue Flag is an independent international award scheme run in England by Keep Britain Tidy. It is for beach operators, usually local authorities, to choose to apply.

In 2012, 79 Blue Flag were awarded in England out of the 244 bathing waters which met the water quality criteria. Water quality is only one of the four criteria against which applications are assessed.

From this year, beaches applying for Blue Flag will be expected to have water quality equivalent to the new ‘excellent’ classification under Directive 2006/7/EC (bathing waters). This is approximately twice as stringent as the standard, which was required last year. In the 2012 bathing season 50% of England's bathing waters achieved the 'excellent' standard. The Government's aim is for all bathing waters to achieve the directive's new minimum standard, which itself is approximately twice as stringent as the old minimum standard. This will ensure that resources are focused on ensuring the maximum number of bathers benefit from improved health protection by the 2015 deadline.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much was spent on bovine TB testing in (a) the UK and (b) Shropshire in each of the last 10 years. [151182]

Mr Heath: Financial data which allow the costs of bovine TB testing to be separately identified is not available for the last 10 years. However, figures are available for 2011-12 and 2012-13. The information is not broken down by individual county but is available regionally as shown in the following table:

22 Apr 2013 : Column 604W

£ million
 2011-122012-13

England

44.12

45.53

Of which:

  

Midlands

14.23

14.05

TB testing is defined as all skin tests and gamma interferon tests.

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how much was paid in compensation to owners of those cattle compulsorily slaughtered for bovine TB control purposes in (a) the UK and (b) Shropshire in (i) 2012, (ii) 2011, (iii) 2010, (iv) 2009, (v) 2008 and (vi) 2007. [151183]

Mr Heath: Responsibility for animal health matters, including compensation for disease affected cattle, has been fully devolved. The total compensation paid by DEFRA to owners of cattle compulsorily slaughtered for bovine TB control purposes in England between 2007 and 2012 is:

 £ million

2007

13.6

2008

28.6

2009

30.6

2010

28.6

2011

30.2

2012

34.1

I am not able to provide precise figures on compensation paid to owners of cattle compulsorily slaughtered for bovine TB control purposes in Shropshire between 2007 and 2012. However, reasonable indicative spend figures can be determined by multiplying the number of TB affected cattle slaughtered in the county by the average compensation payment(1) in each of the years. Applying this methodology provides the following compensation spend figures:

 £

2007

732,000

2008

1,520,000

2009

1,394,000

2010

2,367,000

2011

2,600,000

2012

2,316,000

(1) Average compensation payments are derived by dividing the total compensation paid in England by the total number of TB reactors in England. The figures in 2012 are subject to change as more statistical data is received.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the effects of recent adverse weather on the proposed cull of badgers; whether he plans to revise his Department's impact assessment as a result; and if he will make a statement. [151915]

Mr Heath: The pilot culls will take place during the summer months where we do not anticipate snow and cold conditions will impact on culling.

Therefore no assessment has been carried out of the effects of the recent adverse weather on the pilot badger culls, and the impact assessment will not be revised.

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We are confident that the recent adverse weather conditions have not had an impact on the number of badgers in the cull area. The badger population estimates are based on a wide range of evidence including new genetic data from hair trapping to create a more accurate and robust estimate of the true badger population.

Compost

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on how many occasions in each of the last five years the Environment Agency has refused to grant a licence for a windrow composting site; and what the reasons were for refusal in each case. [151888]

Richard Benyon: In the last five years, the Environment Agency has refused to issue or vary a permit for three composting sites that involved windrow composting as part of their operations.

Refusal dateReasons for refusal

2010

The Environment Agency considered that the applicant would not be able to comply with the conditions of the proposed permit. The applicant failed to provide adequate detail with regard to the proposed operation.

2011

The Environment Agency considered that the applicant would not be able to comply with the conditions of the proposed permit. There were concerns over current operations and management of the existing site.

2012

The operator could not meet the required rules of the standard rules permit as it did not have the appropriate site infrastructure to ensure protection of ground water.

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many Environment Agency licences have been withdrawn from windrow composting sites in each of the last five years; and what the criteria are for withdrawal of such licences. [151890]

Richard Benyon: The Environment Agency has not revoked any permits for windrow composting sites in the last five years.

The Environment Agency has a range of enforcement powers available where operators are not complying with their environmental permits, ranging from warnings through to formal cautions, to prosecutions and in extreme circumstances, permit revocation. The Environment Agency, where appropriate, would usually issue enforcement notices to secure specific improvements to environmental protection or vary permit conditions before considering a permit revocation. Before finally deciding to revoke a permit, any proposal would be referred to the Environment Agency's Central Assessment Panel, which would look at all the circumstances of the case in the light of the organisation's published Enforcement and Sanctions guidance, available at:

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/static/documents/Business/Enforcement_and_Sanctions_Guidance.pdf

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether his Department has a dementia strategy. [151826]

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Richard Benyon: DEFRA does not have a specific dementia strategy. Core DEFRA's attendance management strategy, policy and procedures deal with all aspects of physical and mental health and there is a guide for managers specifically covering mental ill health in the workplace. DEFRA also has special leave and flexible working policies that may be helpful to staff with caring responsibilities.

Flood Control

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 26 March 2013, Official Report, columns 1036-40W, on flood control, if he will publish a breakdown by scheme of all organisations providing external funding contributions. [151551]

Richard Benyon: Unless specific permission has been obtained from the organisations in question, the Government do not release the names of organisations that contribute to flood and coastal erosion risk management schemes. In some cases the Government would be in breach of confidentiality clauses if such information were disclosed.

One example is that Nestle will provide almost £2 million to help deliver a scheme in Derbyshire to better protect the villages of Scropton, Hatton and Egginton from the River Dove. The local community are also making contributions to help fund the £7.1 million scheme. Another example is the £9.7 million scheme at Skipton, North Yorkshire, where £2 million contributed by local authorities and businesses will reduce flooding to over 350 residential and 165 business properties in the market town.

Horse Passports

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many full-time staff work as part of the his Department's Horse Passport team; and how many such staff worked for the team in each of the last five years. [152272]

Mr Heath: Details of staffing levels within the Department's Horse Passport and Zootechnics policy team for this and the previous five years are in the following table:

 Total

2013

3.7

2012

3.65

2011

3.35

2010

3.35

2009

3.55

2008

3.55

Litter: Roads

Mr Mark Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the cost was to local authorities in England of (a) collecting and (b) disposing of road sweepings in the latest period for which figures are available. [152252]

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Brandon Lewis: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Communities and Local Government.

The net current expenditure of local authorities in England on street cleansing in 2011-12 was £731 million. This information is as reported to the Department for Communities and Local Government by all local authorities on the Revenue Outturn form. The Department does not collect more detailed information on this expenditure.

Telephone Services

Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 22 March 2013, Official Report, column 854W, on telephone services, whether a UK landline number beginning with 01, 02 or 03 is publicly available as an alternative to the 0800, 0844, 0845 and 0870 numbers in use by his Department and the agencies for which he is responsible. [151634]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA has one alternative telephone number (0207 238 6951) which is provided for callers to the DEFRA Helpline from outside the UK.

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) has one 01 number which is available as an alternative to their Non Geographic Numbers (NGNs), but this is not published as its use would bypass the RPA's Major Incident reporting and would mean that the RPA cannot analyse their calls effectively to improve future services.

Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency has a number of alternative telephone lines, which are currently available on the AHVLA website:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/about-us/contact-us/

Visits Abroad

Mr Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what his Department's budget was for overseas travel for officials and Ministers in 2012-13. [151357]

Richard Benyon: Core DEFRA does not allocate budgets at this level of detail and therefore cannot provide a figure.

Waste Disposal: EU Law

Mr Charles Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps the Environment Agency takes against organisations and sites that are found to have breached the waste framework directive in relation to odours. [151889]

Richard Benyon: One of the principal objectives of the European Waste Framework is to protect human health and the environment, including via the prevention of nuisance such as odour from waste treatment operations. This objective is largely delivered in England and Wales through the requirements of environmental permits granted by the Environment Agency to the operators of waste sites.

The Environment Agency is under a duty to carry out appropriate periodic inspections of permitted sites. Where breaches of the permit or the waste framework directive objective occur, the Environment Agency works

22 Apr 2013 : Column 608W

with the operator to bring about compliance. Where compliance cannot be achieved, the Environment Agency may exercise its powers and take appropriate enforcement action which includes the suspension and revocation of permits or prosecution. The Environment Agency acts in accordance with its published Enforcement and Sanctions guidance, available at:

http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/static/documents/Business/Enforcement_and_Sanctions_Guidance.pdf

International Development

Burma

Mr Burrowes: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department will spend in 2013-14 to assist internally displaced Kachin people in government and non-governmental controlled areas of Burma. [151685]

Mr Duncan: UK assistance to internally displaced Kachin people in government and non-government controlled areas of Burma is currently under consideration for 2013-14. DFID humanitarian aid to people affected by the conflict in Kachin totals £3.5 million. We are the largest bilateral humanitarian donor to Kachin State. This is helping to meet the needs of around 27,000 internally displaced people.

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether her Department has a dementia strategy. [151830]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID does not have a dementia strategy. The UK health focus in developing countries is to improve the provision of basic health services for the poor by supporting health system strengthening, health, worker capacity and access to essential medicines. Increasing coverage, equity, access and quality will strengthen health services to address all health problems including non-communicable diseases, like dementia.

EU Aid

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the objectives are of (a) the European Development Fund and (b) EuropeAid; and if she will make a statement. [152233]

Lynne Featherstone: The European Development Fund finances development assistance in African, Caribbean and Pacific countries and overseas countries and territories with the objectives of reducing and, eventually, eradicating poverty in those countries, and to promote their sustainable development and integration into the world economy.

The objectives of EuropeAid are to reduce poverty in the world, to ensure sustainable development and to promote democracy, peace and security

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the UK's annual financial commitment is to EuropeAid; and if she will make a statement. [152234]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 609W

Lynne Featherstone: The UK's contribution towards the General EU Budget for external assistance, of which about 55% is managed by EuropeAid, was £938 million for 2011-12. This is the latest year for which figures are available.

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what the UK's annual financial commitment is to the European Development Fund; and if she will make a statement. [152235]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID's contribution towards the European Development Fund, which is managed by EuropeAid, was £417 million for 2011-12. This is the latest year for which figures are available.

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much of the UK's contribution to (a) EuropeAid and (b) the European Development Fund counts towards the Government's official development assistance target. [152243]

Lynne Featherstone: The UK's contributions to (a) the General EU Budget for external assistance, of which a significant fraction is managed by EuropeAid and (b) the European Development Fund (EDF), which counted towards the Government's official development assistance target in 2011-12 were:

 Total contribution (£000)ODA amount (£000)ODA percentage

EU Budget

802,706

710,030

88.5

EDF

417,370

385,582

92.4

Food: Prices

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what recent assessment she has made of the potential effect of financial speculation on global food prices. [152058]

Justine Greening: The coalition Government recognise the damaging impact of high food prices on consumers in developing countries. Based on our continued assessment of the evidence, we believe that changes in supply and demand, rather than speculation, are the main factors behind the recent spikes in global food prices.

Nigeria

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions officials in her Department have had with the government of Nigeria on aid to that country. [152141]

Lynne Featherstone: DFID senior management has regular meetings with the National Planning Minister to review progress on the UK's Country Operational Plan, which was agreed with the Government of Nigeria in 2011. In recent months DFID officials have participated in a World Bank-led dialogue between development partners and Nigeria's Finance and Planning Ministers to agree a joint Country Assistance Framework.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 610W

The Secretary of State for International Development, the right hon. Member for Putney (Justine Greening), had a number of meetings with Finance Minister Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, in relation to our joint work on the Global Partnership For Effective Development Cooperation, and as part of the preparatory work for the High Level Panel on the post-2015 framework to succeed the Millennium Development Goals.

Overseas Aid

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps she is taking to ensure a clear audit trail for the (a) use of and (b) benefits derived from aid provided by her Department. [152139]

Mr Duncan: DFID has rigorous systems and processes to ensure that its aid reaches and delivers results for its international recipients. A formal review is required annually and at completion, which assesses and records whether funds have been used for their intended purposes and what results have been delivered. Appropriate action must be taken for any risks or issues identified, and this action is monitored.

Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much her Department has contributed to the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust to date; and if she will make a statement. [152403]

Lynne Featherstone: To date the DFID has contributed £380,000 to the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust. DFID funds were released to enable the trust to establish itself, raise money and develop a clear strategy for what it will deliver in the future.

St Helena

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps her Department is taking to promote sustainable development in Saint Helena. [151985]

Mr Duncan: The UK supports the St Helena Government (SHG) to implement its sustainable development plan and its sustainable economic development plan. We provide financial and technical support for the island's main development body, Enterprise St Helena, and for other government departments designed to stimulate growth and attract investment to the island.

Enterprise St Helena is supporting the development and expansion of small, local businesses. They also facilitate vocational training in skills that will enable local people to take advantage of the opportunities that will be offered by opening the island up to tourism when the UK funded airport opens in 2016.

Our technical assistance programme is increasing its emphasis on training and mentoring to build local capacity in the longer term.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 611W

Defence

Armed Forces

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many personnel under the age of 18 formed part of the trained strength of each service in each year since 2010-11. [152055]

Mr Francois: The number of personnel under the age of 18 who formed part of the trained strength of each service in each year since 2010-11 up to 1 March 2013 is detailed in the following table.

ServiceApril 2011April 2012March 2013

Naval Service

50

*

Army

270

250

220

Royal Air Force

10

10

10

Note: Data have been rounded to the nearest 10. Numbers ending in “5” have been rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to prevent systematic bias. “*” denotes zero or rounded to zero.

Armed Forces Day: Belfast

Mr Donaldson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what arrangements he is making with Belfast

22 Apr 2013 : Column 612W

City Council for the flying of the Armed Forces Flag on Armed Forces Day at Belfast City Hall. [152034]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]: Armed Forces Day is a day when we invite the whole nation to show support for our military community both serving and retired, at home and abroad. Each year the Chief of Defence Staff writes to each city and town council across the country requesting that they show their support to Armed Forces Day by flying the Armed Forces Day flag from the Monday preceding Armed Forces Day. This year the ‘Fly the Flag’ date will be Monday 24 June 2013. It is left to the discretion of each city or town council to decide if they wish to participate.

Armed Forces: Apprentices

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many people in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force have completed apprenticeships while serving in the last three years. [152218]

Mr Francois: The number of armed forces personnel who have completed apprenticeships while serving, in the last three academic years (AY)—1 August to 31 July is shown in the following table:

 Academic year
 2009/102010/112011/12
QualificationLevelNumberLevelNumberLevelNumber

Military Apprenticeships

2

9,874

2

9,836

2

7,453

 

3

2,065

3

2,173

3

2,676

There are two levels of apprenticeship—intermediate, which is level 2 and equivalent to GCSEs at grades A to C, or advanced, which is level 3 and equivalent to A level.

The breakdown by service for completed apprenticeships is only readily available for AY 2011-12 which is shown in the following table:

 Royal NavyArmyRoyal Air Force
QualificationLevelNumberLevelNumberLevelNumber

Military Apprenticeships

2

2,182

2

4,507

2

764

 

3

339

3

1,682

3

655

Armed Forces: Basic Skills

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force do not currently have (i) Level 1, (ii) Level 2 and (iii) Level 3 qualifications in (A) numeracy and (B) literacy. [151963]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]: Data are not available on the total numbers of personnel in each service holding literacy and numeracy qualifications at Levels 1, 2 and 3. However, all personnel are expected to be qualified to at least Level 1 within three years of joining and at Level 2 within eight years.

All candidates undertake Basic Skills Initial Assessments to establish their level of literacy and numeracy. These results are shown in the following tables and the three services seek to improve the English and Maths Functional Skills abilities of all their recruits by at least one national level, and to a minimum of Entry Level 3, prior to the start of Phase 2 training.

Numeracy: Initial assessment results
 RN(2012)Army (2012)RAF (Sep 2011 to date) (%)

Level 2

314

4,446

38.8

Level 1

726

1,464

59.7

Entry Level 3

73

3,489

Entry Level 2

155

Entry Level 1

12

Literacy: Initial assessment results
 RN (2012)Army (2012)RAF (Sep 2011 to date) (%)

Level 2

481

1,793

37.5

Level 1

618

4,089

62.1

22 Apr 2013 : Column 613W

Entry Level 3

10

3,347

Entry Level 2

1

286

Entry Level 1

51

Note: RAF record Basic Skills as a proportion.

Armed Forces: Disciplinary Proceedings

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will give consideration to replacing the summary hearing system with an alternative system. [151718]

Mr Francois: I have no plans to do so. The service justice system, of which the summary hearing system is one component part, is subject to regular review, and I am satisfied that it appropriately reflects the unique role and operating environments of the armed forces. The summary hearing system provides a mechanism for dealing both with minor criminal offences and minor examples of the disciplinary offences which are specific to the armed forces and calls to account those who are found, after a proper investigation, to have fallen short of the high standards of behaviour we expect from service personnel.

Personnel who are charged with an offence which is to be dealt with by a commanding officer in a summary hearing have the right to choose trial by court martial instead, with the court applying the same limited powers as a commanding officer. Furthermore, those who are found guilty of an offence in a summary hearing can appeal to the summary appeal court against both the conviction and punishment, with the appeal taking the form of a rehearing.

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many appeals against the (a) sentence and (b) punishment awarded by summary hearings have been recorded in each year since 2005; how many such appeals have resulted in a change to (i) the sentence and (ii) the punishment awarded; and if he will make a statement. [151719]

Mr Francois: The information requested is provided in the following table:

 Appeals against finding and punishmentAppeals against punishment onlyFinding changed (i.e. quashed)Punishment changed (i.e. quashed or altered)

2005

118

189

61

108

2006

98

127

48

63

2007

91

88

35

50

2008

68

53

23

31

2009

47

85

18

34

2010

20

85

9

56

2011

31

86

19

70

2012

32

65

20

46

Armed Forces: Firearms

Dr Julian Lewis: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what steps he has taken to introduce firearms amnesties for service personnel since the case of Sergeant Nightingale; what assessment he has made

22 Apr 2013 : Column 614W

of the effectiveness of such amnesties; whether Sergeant Nightingale will be permitted to benefit from such amnesties; and if he will make a statement; [149887]

(2) whether he has made an assessment of the effectiveness of the firearms amnesties introduced for serving members of the armed forces since the Sergeant Nightingale case; whether it will be open to Sergeant Nightingale to make use of such amnesties; and whether the existence of such amnesties will be a factor in the assessment of the public interest of re-trying Sergeant Nightingale. [149886]

Mr Francois [holding answer 25 March 2013]: The Secretary of State for Defence, has made it clear he thought an amnesty should be looked at. The Department is currently looking into it.

Armed Forces: Housing

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether spending on (a) single living accommodation and (b) service family accommodation (i) new build and (ii) improvements are classified as (A) current and (B) capital expenditure. [152420]

Mr Francois: Spending on new build single living and service family accommodation is classified as capital expenditure.

Improvements, refurbishment and upgrading of properties constitute both current and capital expenditure.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many (a) single living accommodation units and (b) service family accommodation units were found to be affected by damp in each of the last five years. [152421]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence has some 65,000 service family accommodation (SFA) properties and 130,000 single living accommodation (SLA) bed-spaces worldwide. Instances of damp in service accommodation are not centrally recorded and therefore an answer could be provided only at disproportionate cost. While damp is not a specific factor within the measurement of the standard for condition for SFA and the grade for condition and scale for SLA, we recognise that it can be an issue for occupants. The treatment of deep-rooted damp problems is included within the accommodation upgrade programmes, and, where necessary, during the preparation of SFA for the move in of a new family. In addition, advice is available to service families on practical steps that can be taken to reduce any condensation within their accommodation.

Mr Ainsworth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether the proceeds from the sale of Chelsea Barracks were spent on upgrading armed forces accommodation. [152422]

Mr Francois: There is no specific link between disposal receipts and individual elements of Defence expenditure. Exceptionally, however, the disposal of Chelsea barracks, by the previous Government which was sold for £959

22 Apr 2013 : Column 615W

million, was included in the plans of the Department and underpinned investment in-service accommodation of £250 million in 2007-08.

The disposal of Chelsea barracks has, therefore, helped to secure the major investment in-service accommodation through Project SLAM (Single Living Accommodation Modernisation), the service housing upgrade programme and other significant accommodation projects in the UK and overseas to improve the living conditions for our service personnel.

Armed Forces: Officers

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he is taking to promote (a) University Officer Training Corps, (b) University Air Squadrons and (c) University Royal Naval Units as a means of recruiting officers into the armed forces. [1512003]

Mr Francois: The armed forces promote University Royal Navy Unit, University Officer Training Corps and University Air Squadron opportunities and associated sponsorship schemes through their recruiting websites.

In addition, young people are offered information on the university service units during career fairs/talks or at an armed forces careers office, as required. The three services visit universities to participate in careers events and to promote closer liaison with the wider student population, and the university units are encouraged to be highly visible on campuses to support the visit programmes. The university service units also engage at a more local level with their affiliated universities through local meetings and outreach events. The university service units also have an internet presence through websites and social media.

Armed Forces: Pay

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many members of the armed forces were paid on average at below the hourly rate of national minimum wage in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13. [151942]

Mr Francois: In order to safeguard operational effectiveness, the armed forces are exempt from the provisions of the 1998 National Minimum Wage (NMW) Act. Nevertheless, we aim to ensure that the armed forces are in line with NMW provisions. As part of their work, the independent Armed Forces Pay Review Body (AFPRB) makes a broad assessment each year of whether there may be personnel earning below NMW rates. In their most recent report, a copy of which is in the Library of the House, the AFPRB noted that service personnel on average worked 44.5 hours per week which, when applied to the basic pay of junior ranks on the lowest level of pay, equated to an hourly rate of £7.55, higher than the then NMW hourly rate of £6.08.

Given the hours that personnel have to work on operations, a similar calculation could produce an hourly rate which is below the NMW for some deployed junior personnel. However, additional allowances, including operational allowance, are payable during these periods and additional paid post-tour leave is also granted on return.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 616W

Armed Forces: Qualifications

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) pursuant to the answer to the right hon. Member for Birkenhead of 12 March 2013, Official Report, column 159W, on armed forces: recruitment, if he will publish the data collected by his Department over the last 10 years on educational qualifications of recruits joining the armed forces; [151849]

(2) what proportion of new recruits to the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy, excluding Royal Marines, (c) Royal Marines and (d) Royal Air Force had gained GCSE grades A* to C or Scottish Standard grades 1 to 3 in (i) English or English language and (ii) mathematics in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [151850]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]: The information is not held in the format requested and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the minimum educational qualifications are for joining each (a) branch and (b) trade of the armed forces. [151857]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]: The following information shows the minimum educational qualifications for joining each branch and trade of the armed forces. Where reference to GCSEs is stated, equivalent qualifications are acceptable.

Generally, Royal Navy officers require five GCSEs and 180 UCAS points; additionally engineer officers require appropriate BEng, MEng, IET, CEng or IENG qualifications. Additional qualifications are required for the officers detailed in the following table.

OfficersMinimum qualification

Warfare officer (Hydrographer and Met)

A level in Maths, Physics or Chemistry.

Dental officer

Qualified dentist (Cadetships available for last three years).

Medical officer

Qualified from medical school (Cadetships available for last three years).

Nursing officer

RGN qualified with two years experience.

Environmental health officer

EHO qualified and registered.

Chaplain

Ordained chaplain.

Generally, for Royal Navy Ratings there is no minimum educational qualifications requirement but they require a pass at the Recruiting Test to the required level for their branch of choice. Exceptions are detailed in the following table.

RatingsMinimum qualification

Aircraft controller

Two GCSEs

Dental nurse/medical assistant

Two GCSEs

Dental hygienist

Diploma/Certificate in oral hygiene—GDC registered

Medical technician (radiographer)

Five GCSEs + BSC in diagnostic radiography—HPC member

Communications technician

Two GCSEs

Naval nurse (qualified)

Relevant degree and NMC qualification number

Naval nurse (student)

280 UCAS points

Musician

Musical competency in mainstream instrument

22 Apr 2013 : Column 617W

Generally, Army officers must achieve GCSE/SCE in English Language, Maths, a science or foreign language. They must achieve at least 35 ALIS points at GCSE from their best seven subjects, and have scored a minimum of 240 UCAS points at A-level or equivalent from at least two passes.

Additional qualifications are required for the officers detailed in the following table.

 Qualification

Engineer officers

Degree level qualifications in CEng, Mech Eng or Electrical Eng or Chartered Engineering status

Signals

Degree in Telecoms, Electronic software, Computer Sciences, IT, IS, Maths, Physics, Comms and IS

Legal officer

2:1 Law degree or equivalent, fully qualified barrister, solicitor or Scottish advocate, completed pupillage, solicitors to have completed training contract

Nursing officer

Diploma or BSc in either adult or mental health, registered and with two years post registration experience

Chaplain

Ordained with two or three years experience (TA or Regular)

Dental officer

Degree in dentistry, qualified dentist, GDC registered

Medical officer

Qualified and specialised—GMC registered

Environmental health officer

EHO qualified and registered

Pharmacy officer

Degree or graduate diploma in pharmacy and registered

Physiotherapist

Qualified and registered

Radiologist

Diploma or degree in diagnostic radiography and registered

Veterinary officer

Degree and registration

Generally, Army other ranks require no educational qualification but recruits must pass the Recruiting Test (BARB) to a level commensurate with their branch of choice. Exceptions are as follows:

 Qualification

Combat HR specialists

GCSE or Level 1 Basic Skills in English and Maths or Maths and a Science

Royal military police

GCSEs in English and Maths at Grade C or above

Musician

Musical competency in one mainstream instrument

Operator military intelligence

Five GCSE from Maths, English or mainstream subjects

Linguist

GCSE in English Language plus four others

Nurse (qualified)

Diploma or BSc and registered

Nurse (student)

Five GCSE including English, Maths and a science. 280 UCAS points

Healthcare assistant

Gained or working towards NVQ2 in Care

Operating department practitioner (Regular)

200 UCAS points for university entry

Operating department practitioner (TA)

NVQ level 3 or Dip HE and registration with HPC

Radiographer

Diploma or BSc in diagnostic radiography and registered

Biomedical scientist (Regular)

260 UCAS points and human sciences background

Biomedical scientist (TA)

Diploma or BSc in biomedical services and registered

Pharmacy technician (Regular)

Four GCSEs including English, Maths and two sciences

Pharmacy technician (TA)

BTech or National Certificate and NVQ level 3 in pharmacy

Veterinary technician

Diploma or BSc in veterinary nursing and RVN registered

Dental nurse

NEBDN Cert or NVQ level 3 as oral health care worker

Environmental health technician

Four GCSEs including English, Maths and two sciences

22 Apr 2013 : Column 618W

Physiotherapist

Qualified and registered

Paramedic (TA)

Qualified, practising and registered

All RAF officers require five GCSEs and two A- levels. Additional qualifications are required for the officers as follows:

 Qualification

Aero systems/communications electrical engineer

BEng in appropriate subject

Medical/dentist/nursing

Professionally qualified

Medical support officer

Registered as a physiotherapist

Chaplain

Ordained

Legal

Member of the English/Scottish/NI Bar or an admitted solicitor

All airmen/airwomen require a suitable pass in the Recruit Test applicable to their

choice of trade. Additionally, the following apply:

 Qualification

All trades (excluding RAF Gunner)

Two GCSEs

Air cartographer

Three GCSEs (third in ICT or equivalent)

Aircraft/weapon/ICT/general technicians

Three GCSEs (third in a science/technology based subject)

Int analyst/pharmacy technician

Four GCSEs

Musician

Two GCSEs and Grade 8 ABRSM

Qualified chef

Two GCSEs and CGLI/OND/TEC/BTEC/PCD/NVQ 2

Nurse

RGN/NMC

Student nurse/environmental health technician/radiographer

Five GCSEs plus 280 UCAS points

Biomedical scientist

Five GCSEs plus two A levels.

Operating department practitioner

Three GCSEs and two A levels


Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many individuals gained GCSEs during their phase 1 initial training in each year since 2005. [151965]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]:Phase 1 training is the broad militarisation training completed by all recruits on joining the armed forces. Training is generally short (10 weeks for the RN, 14 weeks for Army Standard Entry and nine weeks for the RAF) and the focus is on inculcating the essential military skills, so there is no time to complete a GCSE course.

The Army Foundation College (Harrogate) offers longer Phase 1 training courses of 23 and 49 weeks and the infantry and RAF regiment each undertake a combined Phase 1/2 training course (26 weeks and 24 weeks respectively). These courses include Intermediate level apprenticeships but not GCSEs, although individuals may elect to study for GCSEs and other academic qualifications in their own time.

Armed Forces: Recruitment

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer of 12 March 2013, Official Report, columns 159-60W, on armed forces: recruitment, if he will place in the Library the data on fitness levels. [151418]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 619W

Mr Francois: The following table reflects the number of fitness tests undertaken by potential candidates over the past seven financial years (FY). The number of

22 Apr 2013 : Column 620W

fitness tests conducted does not correlate to the number of candidates recruited into the armed forces and includes all tests regardless of whether the result was pass or fail.

 Number of fitness tests conducted
 Financial year
Service2006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Royal Navy

5,518

5,460

6,609

9,656

7,936

7,711

7,444

Army

20,270

19,394

23,806

21,916

15,771

17,836

13,660

Royal Air Force

1,697

3,480

4,691

3,721

2,125

2,625

2,059

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of infantry recruits in each year since 2011 were aged (a) 21 or below and (b) under 18. [152053]

Mr Francois: The information is shown in the following table as percentages of total infantry recruits and relates to training years, which run from April to March.

Percentage
Training year21/Under 21Under 18

2011-12

59.2

22.6

2012-13

57

18.4

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what proportion of recruits enlisting in the (a) armed forces and (b) Army under 18 years old attended the (i) Army Foundation College, Harrogate and (ii) Army Technical Foundation College, Winchester in each year since 2011. [152068]

Mr Francois: Only Army personnel attended the colleges. The Army Technical Foundation College, Winchester closed for Junior Entry intakes in June 2012, when all Junior Entry Phase One training transferred to the Army Foundation College, Harrogate. The table shows the percentages of the total Army inflow for each period, and relates to training years which run from April to March.

Percentage
Training yearArmy Foundation College HarrogateArmy Technical Foundation College Winchester

2011-12

13.8

8.2

2012-13

14.5

2.1

Armed Forces: Rented Housing

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information his Department holds on the proportion of members of the armed forces who rent domestic properties. [151943]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence does not hold information on the proportion of service personnel who privately rent their accommodation. However, the most recent Armed Forces Continuous Attitude Survey (2012) indicated that some 4% of respondents occupied privately rented accommodation during the working week. The full survey is available at the following link:

http://www.dasa.mod.uk/index.php?pub=AFCAS-MAIN

Armed Forces: Training

Mr Jim Murphy: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how long phase 1 initial training is for those who join the (a) Army, (b) Royal Navy and (c) Royal Air Force at 16 years old. [152219]

Mr Francois: Phase 1 training is the broad militarisation training completed by all recruits on joining the armed forces. This training focuses on inculcating the essential military skills. For young people joining the Army, including those aged 16 years old, Phase 1 training is completed at the Army Foundation College, where courses last either 23 or 49 weeks.

Phase 1 training for entrants to the Royal Navy and Royal Air Force is not dependent on age and lasts 10 weeks for the Royal Navy and nine weeks for the Royal Air Force, although the RAF Regiment undertakes a longer combined Phase 1/2 training course.

Army: Discharges

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many army personnel were given a temporary discharge in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12; [152302]

(2) how many army personnel given a temporary discharge subsequently had their discharge changed to permanent discharge as a result of ill health. [152305]

Mr Francois: There is no such term as a temporary discharge and therefore no information is held to answer these questions.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many army personnel were discharged for medical reasons in (a) 2010-11 and (b) 2011-12. [152303]

Mr Francois: There were a total of 834 UK Regular Army personnel medically discharged from the service during the financial year 2010-11 and a total of 963 UK Regular Army personnel medically discharged from the service during the financial year 2011-12.

Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many army personnel discharged from the army have claimed their preserved pension under AFPS 75 early in each of the last 10 years due to being permanently incapacitated. [152304]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 621W

Mr Francois: The numbers of Army personnel who have been awarded their preserved pension under AFPS 75 early due to being assessed as permanently unable to undertake any form of full-time employment are as follows:

Pension awarded
Calendar yearNumber

2007

131

2008

157

2009

116

2010

153

2011

157

2012

156

2013 (so far)

18

Note: Data prior to 2007 are not held.

Army: Qualifications

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many and what proportion of infantry soldiers gained GCSE grades A*-C or Scottish Standard grades 1-3 in (a) English and English Language and (b) mathematics in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [151848]

Mr Francois [holding answer 18 April 2013]: The Ministry of Defence does not routinely collect nor centrally record the information requested.

Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what apprenticeship qualifications are available to those enlisting in the Army as minors. [151956]

Mr Francois: The following is a list of qualifications for all those enlisting in the Army including minors:

ICT Users (Levels 2 and 3)

Driving Goods Vehicles (Levels 2 and 3)

Logistics Operations (Levels 2 and 3)

Warehousing and Storage

Mail Operations

Aviation Operations on the Ground (Levels 2 and 3)

IT and Telecoms Professional (Levels 2 and 3)

Policing (Level 3)

Animal Care (Levels 2 and 3)

Horse Care (Levels 2 and 3)

Customer Service (Level 3)

Engineering Maintenance (Levels 2 and 3)

Engineering Maintenance and Installation (Level 2)

Performing Engineering Operations (Levels 2 and 3)

Plant Operations (Construction) (Level 2)

Professional Cookery (Levels 2 and 3)

Communications Technologies Practitioners (Levels 2 and 3)

Fabrication and Welding (Level 2)

Public Services (Level 2)

Providing a Security Service (Level 2).

Army: Recruitment

Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the average expenditure per Army recruit was of recruiting and training to identical roles recruits who were aged (a) under 18 years and (b) 18 years or above in each year since 2010-11. [152244]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 622W

Mr Francois: Recruits under the age of 18 undertake either the Junior Entry or Senior Entry training route. Although the majority of recruits over 17 will enter the Senior Entry route, some recruits between 17 and 17.5 undertake the longer Junior Entry course as, during selection, it was assessed that the Junior Entry route would be more appropriate for the needs of the individual.

For those on Senior Entry, the cost of recruiting and training those under 18 is the same as for those over 18.

In recruiting year 2010-11, the average cost of Phase 1 training for each of those under 18 (including both Junior and Senior Entry) was £52,267 and the average cost for those over 18 (Senior Entry route only) was £19,916. Recruitment costs are the same across the board and an additional £10,823 should be added to each.

In recruiting year 2011-12, the average cost of Phase 1 training for each of those under 18 (including both Junior and Senior Entry) was £44,526 and the average cost for those over 18 (Senior Entry route only) was £18,178. An additional £11,094 should be added to each for recruitment costs.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he is taking to encourage enlistment into the Army's technical corps. [1512002]

Mr Francois: The Army's technical corps include The Royal Engineers, The Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers, The Royal Corps of Signals and the Royal Logistic Corps. While we are actively recruiting soldiers across the Regular Army and the Reserve, the technical corps remain well subscribed. Further education bursaries continue to offer financial incentives for potential technical corps soldiers to stay on at school or college before joining their chosen trade.

For officers, A-level courses are offered at the Defence Sixth Form College at Welbeck, and the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme offers degrees to students in predominantly science and engineering-based areas. Bursaries and mentorships are available for those studying under the scheme. More information is available at the Army website:

http://www.army.mod.uk

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he is taking to encourage people leaving school or university to choose a career as an Army officer as their first choice. [1512005]

Mr Francois: A review of officer recruiting is currently under way, which is likely to lead to a marketing and recruiting campaign later in the year. The forthcoming 'Boots' Army recruiting campaign will also have an officer element. University Officer Training Corps units offer undergraduate members valuable insights into life with the armed forces. The Defence Sixth Form College at Welbeck offers places for applicants who wish to join the Army as officers, predominantly within the technical corps, and who progress to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst via the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme.

For others, a limited number of scholarships are available to Sixth Form students, and bursaries are available to undergraduates. More information on Army Officer careers is available at the Army website:

http://www.army.mod.uk

22 Apr 2013 : Column 623W

Army: Scholarships

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many individuals awarded Army scholarships have failed to progress to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst upon completion of their degree in each of the last five years. [1512004]

Mr Francois: This information is no longer held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. Data were collated until 2007, and the information for the most recent full three years held is shown in the following table. The proportion of those in receipt of Army scholarships failing to progress to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst since 2007 is believed to remain at similar levels. The target figure for the awarding of Army scholarships is 100 per year.

Training yearScholar withdrawalsRMAS total course intake

2003-04

12

746

2004-05

15

713

2005-06

15

731

Army: Training

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the average age is of an Officer Cadet at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. [1512006]

Mr Francois: The average age of an Officer Cadet on entry to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst is 23.

Assets

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the value was of (a) thefts, (b) items lost and (c) items lost in transit from his Department's establishments in (i) October 2012, (ii) November 2012, (iii) December 2012, (iv) January 2013, (v) February 2013 and (vi) March 2013; and if he will make a statement. [151681][Official Report, 5 September 2013, Vol. 567, c. 5-6MC.]

Mr Francois: The information on thefts is shown in the following table:

 £000

October 2012

48

November 2012

29

December 2012

5

January 2013

263

February 2013

46

March 2013

76

The reason for the high figure in January 2013 was as follows:

Theft of a Tornado Jig Assembly—£193,243

Theft of NVG—£11,573

Theft of Military equipment—£36,310

Further information on losses is not available at this stage because accounts information for financial year 2012-13 has not been finalised and is still subject to audit. Losses information recorded in the accounts only distinguishes between culpable losses and other losses

22 Apr 2013 : Column 624W

of accountable stores. Figures across the Ministry of Defence for losses in transit could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Losses of any type are not necessarily recorded in the same month that they occurred. However, it is important that losses are recorded in the correct financial year for accounting purposes.

Defence: Procurement

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which projects being delivered for his Department by (a) Babcock, (b) Boeing, (c) Cobham, (d) the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company, (e) Finmeccanica, (f) General Dynamics, (g) Kelloggs-Brown-Root, (h) Lockheed Martin (i) Marshall Aerospace, (j) Northrup Grumman, (k) Rolls-Royce, (l) Thales and (m) Ultra Electronics are running over budget; and by how much in each case. [128063]

Mr Dunne [holding answer 13 November 2012]: The information will take time to collate and the commercial sensitivity of the data could prevent full disclosure. I will write to the hon. Member as soon as I am in a position to provide further information.

Substantive answer from Mr Dunne to Angus Robertson:

I am writing in full response to the answer I gave on 26 November 2012, Official Report, column 22W, regarding the question you asked about Ministry of Defence (MOD) projects being delivered by a list of named companies that are running over budget.

The following table details the three projects being delivered by those named contractors that are currently assessed as running over budget.

ContractorProject nameCost variation as at March 2013 (£ million)

Airbus Ltd (EADS)

A400M

+770

Northrop Grumman

Sentry Mode S Identification Friend or Foe

+6

Thales UK Ltd

Watchkeeper

+57

For the purpose of answering this question, my officials have examined all Category A-D equipment acquisition projects, but limited to those showing a variance of more than £1 million against their approval costs, 50% confidence figure. It is also limited to those projects where the named company is listed as the prime contractor or where projects are being delivered by subsidiaries of the named companies. It does not include support projects. This was necessary to avoid significantly exceeding the disproportionate cost threshold limit for answering parliamentary questions.

This approach means that there are some differences between the above table and the list provided to you in my answer of 6 November 2012, Official Report, column 519W, for example the inclusion of the A400M supplied by Airbus Ltd. as a subsidiary of EADS. The differences are due to the filters placed upon the data as explained above, as well as the passage of time.

It should be noted that the cost variation quoted is assessed against MOD project approval figures, which represent the total MOD costs for any particular project. They therefore do not necessarily reflect contractual obligations. Project performance can be affected by a number of reasons, not all of which are in the contractor's control.

I apologise for the time it has taken to get this information to you but its compilation has involved a significant amount of work and there was also a need to consult the companies concerned.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 625W

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether his Department has a dementia strategy. [151822]

Mr Francois: The Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not have a dementia strategy. Our population, in the main, is not likely to suffer dementia while of working age. In the unlikely event of any incidence of dementia, it would be covered by the MOD's employee health and well-being policies.

HMS Victory

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) further to his Answer of 13 March 2013, Official Report, column 644W, on HMS Victory, whether he has taken expert advice in order to ascertain whether the skull from HMS Victory 1744 recently shown on television was exposed by human excavation of the seabed; [151549]

(2) whether his Department gave permission for excavation of HMS Victory 1744; and what assessment he has made of whether there has been any breach of the Deed of Gift of the wreck. [151550]

Mr Francois: The Deed of Gift signed on 12 January 2012 forms the current agreement between the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and the Maritime Heritage Foundation (MHF) for management of the site of the wreck of HMS Victory 1744.

Odyssey Marine Exploration (OME) has conducted regular site surveys since it discovered the wreck in 2008. No specific permission was sought from the MOD before OME revisited the site in summer 2012.

On 13 March 2013 the expert panel discussed the television images of the skull in advance of OME's report of last summer's activity, which the Government expect to receive shortly as part of MHFs revised management plan and response to the key management principles.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 626W

No determination has been made on whether there has been any breach of the Deed of Gift. The expert panel will review the MHF submission and provide its advice to the Government through the advisory group.

Military Alliances

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence with which non-EU nations other than the US the UK has undertaken collaborative defence projects in each of the last five years; and which such projects have been undertaken. [152022]

Mr Dunne: Over the last five years, the UK has undertaken collaborative defence equipment and support projects with Brazil and Australia.

For Brazil, the collaboration has been on maritime systems, which commenced in 2012.

For Australia, the collaboration has been on the advanced short range air to air missile (ASRAAM) which commenced in 2012. The other collaboration involves submarines, which also commenced in 2012.

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the cost to his Department was of military aviation collaboration projects with the US in each of the five years prior to 2011; [152023]

(2) what the cost to his Department was of military aviation collaboration projects with non-EU countries other than the US in each of the five years prior to 2011; [152024]

(3) what the cost to his Department was of military aviation collaboration projects in the EU in each of the five years prior to 2011. [152025]

Mr Dunne: Ministry of Defence expenditure on military aviation collaboration projects for each of the five years prior to 2011 is shown in the following table, rounded to the nearest million pounds. The expenditure includes airframes, engines and other systems intrinsic to the aircraft. It does not include airborne weapons fitted to aircraft.

Expenditure per financial year
£ million
Aviation collaboration projects2005-062006-072007-082008-092009-102010-112011-12

EU

1,194

1,319

1,499

1,836

2,260

2,302

2,466

Non-EU (excluding US)

2

10

16

16

12

18

19

US

330

388

379

282

348

365

375

The information for financial years 2005-06 and 2006-07 is incomplete owing to the impracticality of retrieving and disaggregating financial data from legacy systems which could be completed only at disproportionate cost.

The information provided for financial year 2011-12 has changed compared to that previously provided, owing to accounting treatment decisions and variations in exchange rates.

The UK is not engaged in any military aviation collaborative projects with only non-EU countries and excluding the USA. One project includes a collaboration of EU, non-EU countries and the US. This explains the cost in the 'non-EU’ category above.

RAF Fylingdales

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when RAF Fylingdales was last refurbished. [152190]

Mr Francois: Work to refurbish or replace the infrastructure at all RAF bases is assessed and programmed on a regular and continuous basis and carried out as required.

The recent programme of work at RAF Fylingdales has included the provision of a new combined mess facility and demolition of a number of redundant buildings.

22 Apr 2013 : Column 627W

RAF Staxton

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when the refurbishment of the radar at RAF Staxton will be complete; and if he will make a statement. [152191]

Mr Dunne: The delivery of the TPS-77 radar at Remote Radar Head (RRH) Staxton Wold is scheduled for August 2013, with Full Operating Capability planned for September 2013.

Royal Military Academy

Bob Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recent assessment he has made of the necessity for the Royal Military Academy to charge the Sandhurst Foundation, which hosts events to bring former officer cadets and instructors back to the academy, for room hire. [152433]

Mr Francois: The Sandhurst Foundation is a non-publicly funded, registered charity, located at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst. When departmental assets such as rooms and facilities are hired out to third parties, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) is obliged under Treasury repayment rules to recover an appropriate and consistent level of cost, so that the taxpayer is not left out of pocket. This will include insurance cover. Where services such as catering are provided by a single contractor, they might also charge for service provision that is over and above that provided under contract to the MOD. Any further charging that the Sandhurst Foundation might wish to apply is a matter for the foundation.

Staff

Priti Patel: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many days of work were carried out by officials in (a) his Department and (b) each of its agencies and non-departmental public bodies on average in each of the last five years; and what the total salary cost was of officials in each year. [151103]

Mr Francois: A broad estimate of the number of days work carried out in the last five years by civilian defence officials is set out in the following table. Each full-time member of staff is expected to work 214 days per year after the deduction of weekends, public and privilege holidays and annual leave. From this must be deducted the average level of sick leave taken.

 Civilian strength(1)as at 1 AprilAverage number of days workedSalary costs (£000)

2007-08

89,500

207

2,201,070

2008-09

86,600

208

2,249,684

2009-10

85,800

209

2,272,723

2010-11

83,100

208

2,292,129

2011-12

71,000

207

2,191,353

(1) This figure includes those in the Department, and its Trading Funds and locally engaged civilians.

Territorial Army: Dudley

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what plans he has for the military facilities at Vicar Street in Dudley; [151619]

22 Apr 2013 : Column 628W

(2) what his policy is on the future of the Territorial Army's base at Vicar Street in Dudley. [151620]

Mr Francois: The Reserves White Paper and associated basing announcements are expected later this year. Until it is announced it is too early to make a decision on the future of the Territorial Army Centre in Vicar Street Dudley.

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many residents of Dudley currently serve in the Territorial Army. [152059]

Mr Francois: This information is not held in the format requested.