23 Apr 2013 : Column 779W

Written Answers to Questions

Tuesday 23 April 2013

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

South Africa: Sexual Violence

17. Gavin Shuker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress he is making on tackling sexual violence in South Africa. [152362]

Mr William Hague: Levels of gender-based violence in South Africa are among the highest in the world. The UK Government have committed £4 million to working with the South African Government, UN agencies, and civil society to tackle the root causes.

Yemen

18. Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the recent national dialogue conference in Yemen. [152364]

Alistair Burt: The National Dialogue Conference will address Yemen's complex legacy of challenges, reshape its political landscape, and prepare for a new constitution. I welcome the involvement of previously marginalised groups, including women and Yemeni youth. Success depends on broad participation and we urge everyone, especially Southern leaders, to embrace this process.

Sexual Violence in Conflict

19. Damian Hinds: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps his Department is taking to implement the G8 declaration on preventing sexual violence in conflict; and if he will make a statement. [152365]

Mr Hague: Following the adoption of the historic G8 declaration we will take the campaign to the UN and begin implementation immediately. GB peacekeeping experts meet next week to discuss the commitments on military training and work begins next month in The Hague, London and Geneva on the development of the protocol.

Al-Qaeda

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what reports he has received on a link between Jabhat-al-Nasra and al-Qaeda. [152896]

Alistair Burt: We are aware of the reports linking the al-Nusrah Front with al-Qaeda. We are concerned about any terrorist groups gaining a foothold in Syria, which is one of the reasons why we are working with Syria's opposition National Coalition to ensure a strong and representative moderate voice capable of meeting the legitimate aspirations of the Syrian people.

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Bahrain

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of the Bahrain Government's implementation of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry's recommendations in the last 12 months for which information is available. [153024]

Alistair Burt: Our ambassador and his team regularly discuss implementation of the recommendations of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry (BICI) and the UN Human Rights Council Periodic Review with the Government of Bahrain, including the Minister for Justice, who heads the BICI Follow-Up Unit. The Unit published two reports last year, detailing progress made since the BICI presented their recommendations to HM the King in November 2011. While progress has been made in certain areas, there is still more to be done and we continue to raise this with the Bahraini authorities. We support the reforms already under way, and will continue to provide targeted and practical assistance to help bring long-term stability to the Kingdom.

I welcome the ongoing National Consensus Dialogue and encourage all sides to play an inclusive and constructive role in the process.

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received following the inclusion of Bahrain as a case study in his Department's 2011 Human Rights report, published in April 2012. [153027]

Alistair Burt: I regularly meet a variety of organisations to discuss human rights in Bahrain, as do officials at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and the ambassador and his team in country. These meetings include human rights organisations such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International; the Bahraini Government; the Bahraini opposition; other political societies; members of the Bahraini Parliament; and Bahraini civil society.

I believe the Government of Bahrain remain committed to improving their human rights record, including full implementation of the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry and the UN Human Rights Council Universal Periodic Review. However, as I continue to voice both in private and in public, more needs to be done. Our decision to include Bahrain as a case study in 2011 FCO Human Rights Report, and to do so for the 2012 Report, reflects our view of the current trend of events and concerns.

Cyprus

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what support he is giving to British nationals stationed in Akrotiri and Dhekelia in the light of the current economic situation in Cyprus. [151982]

Mr Robathan: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Armed forces personnel serving in Cyprus, and their families accompanying them, will be protected from any losses on their personal deposits in Cyprus-based banks as a result of recent events there.

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India

John Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the protection of Christians and other religious minorities in India; and if he will make a statement. [152363]

Mr Swire: There continue to be incidents of discrimination against religious minorities, including Christians, in India. In response, the Indian Government have a range of policies and programmes to support religious minorities.

I discussed issues of discrimination against minority communities with Indian human rights organisations during my visit to India in March. The British high commissioner in New Delhi also met the Indian Minister for Minorities on 7 March to reinforce our concerns.

Mali

Mr Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the security situation in Mali; and if he will make a statement. [152356]

Mark Simmonds: The situation in Mali is stabilising but fragile. French-led military operations are drawing down and African troops are playing an increasing role in maintaining security. Negotiations for deployment of a UN Peacekeeping Operation are currently under way, and UK trainers have deployed to the EU Training Mission for the Malian armed forces.

North Korea

Chris Skidmore: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps the Government are taking in response to the recent actions of North Korea. [152355]

Mr Hague: Our assessment remains that there is no immediate risk to British nationals living or travelling in the Korean peninsula. But North Korea's rhetoric and behaviour pose a serious risk to the stability of the region, which includes several of the world's largest economies.

The impact of miscalculation by the North Korean regime could extend well beyond its region. That is why the international response must remain clear, calm and united.

Sexual Offences

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what criteria will be used to determine to which countries experts should be deployed as part of the preventing sexual violence initiative. [153025]

Mark Simmonds: When considering a deployment, we take a number of factors into account, including the extent and impact of sexual violence, the national and international response to date and the particular role the UK can play in reinforcing or complementing existing efforts. We also consult closely with the UN and other organisations working on the ground to determine how, and where, the team will be of most assistance.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 782W

Kerry McCarthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when the UK team of experts on preventing sexual violence will be deployed to (a) South Sudan, (b) Bosnia, (c) Mali, (d) Syrian borders and (e) Democratic Republic of Congo; and what their priorities will be in each country. [153026]

Mark Simmonds: In December last year members of the UK Team of Experts deployed to the Syrian Borders to deliver training for local health care professionals on sexual violence and effective evidence gathering. In March this year members of the Team worked alongside the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) to deliver capacity building training to members of the local judiciary in Bosnia. Work is Ongoing to prepare for deployments this year to Mali, DRC, South Sudan and a further deployment to the Syrian Borders. The focus, prioritisation and timing for each of these deployments will be the result of consultation with international, national and local partners as well as our network of Posts.

Sri Lanka

Karl Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with the Sri Lankan Government since the UN Human Rights Council resolution on political reconciliation in that country. [152346]

Alistair Burt: I met the Sri Lankan Foreign Minister on 22 April. I made clear that the UK expected Sri Lanka to improve its human rights record. The UK supported the March 2013 UN Human Rights Council resolution on human rights in Sri Lanka because it reflects our concern over insufficient progress in post war reconciliation and lack of accountability for alleged violations of international law during the war. I also raised recent attacks and restrictions on the press and urged swift action to investigate incidents and ensure freedom of reporting.

Syria

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his counterparts in (a) the US, (b) the EU and (c) France; and what comparative assessment he has made of the policy towards Syria of the UK and those foreign policy factors. [152897]

Alistair Burt: Syria is an international problem, and demands an international solution. My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary discusses the issue frequently with counterparts in the US, France, EU institutions, and indeed many other countries from around the world. He spoke about Syria in detail with all the states outlined above within the last few days, many of them at a meeting of the Core Group of the Friends of Syria. We share a common aim: an end to the killing and a more stable and democratic Syria. And we share a common understanding of how to achieve it through increasing our support to the moderate opposition—who made a

23 Apr 2013 : Column 783W

clear statement at Istanbul last weekend about their commitments, including distancing themselves from extremism—and putting pressure on the Assad regime.

Northern Ireland

Bombings: Omagh

Vernon Coaker: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what recent discussions she has had with (a) the Omagh families and (b) the Irish Government about the 1998 Omagh bombing; and if she will make a statement. [153020]

Mrs Villiers: I met representatives of the Omagh Support and Self Help Group on 25 February to discuss the report which they commissioned and their request for an inquiry. I have also met the Irish Government on this matter and hope to do so again soon.

Leader of the House

Travel

Priti Patel: To ask the Leader of the House (1) how many officials in his Office stayed in hotels in (a) the UK and (b) every other country during the last five years; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest such hotel expenses in each such year; [152562]

(2) how many officials in his Office travelled on (a) domestic and (b) international flights in each of the last five years; in which class categories; at what total cost; and what the monetary value was of the 20 highest airfare charges in each such year. [152538]

Mr Lansley: The Office of the Leader of the House of Commons is part of the Cabinet Office. Our answer will be included in the response by the Minister for the Cabinet Office, shortly.

UK Trade and Investment

Daniel Kawczynski: To ask the Leader of the House if he will bring forward proposals to set up a parliamentary Select Committee to scrutinise the workings of UK Trade and Investment. [153064]

Mr Lansley: There are no plans to set up a new Committee, which would be contrary to the recommendations of the House of Commons Reform Committee to seek to reduce the overall numbers of parliamentary Select Committees (House of Commons Reform Committee, First Report of Session 2008-09, “Rebuilding the House”, HC 117).

The Business, Innovation and Skills Committee periodically review the workings of UK Trade and Investment and some of its operations in overseas markets. More recently, the House of Lords ad hoc Committee on SME exports published its report which explores the workings of UK Trade and Investment (“Road to Success: SME Exports”, 8 March 2013, HL Paper 131).

23 Apr 2013 : Column 784W

Home Department

Andrey Pavlov

Mr Raab: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what data is held by border control authorities on the movements of Andrey Pavlov, a Russian citizen, in and out of the UK since 1 October 2012. [152073]

Mr Harper [holding answer 22 April 2013]:It is long-standing policy not to disclose details of records which may be held in relation to arrivals in the United Kingdom.

Antisocial Behaviour

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many responses from members of the public to her Department's 2011 consultation on antisocial behaviour proposed the abolition of the antisocial behaviour order. [152322]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The 2011 consultation sought views on the proposed new powers to deal with antisocial behaviour, not specifically on the repeal of the antisocial behaviour order, and 425 members of the public responded to the consultation. Of these, 40% thought the proposed new powers would be more effective and only 9% thought they would be less effective than the current measures.

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many responses from front-line professionals to her Department's 2011 consultation on antisocial behaviour proposed the abolition of the antisocial behaviour order. [152323]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The 2011 consultation sought views on the proposed replacements for a number of powers available to deal with antisocial behaviour, not specifically on the repeal of the antisocial behaviour order. A total of 547 front-line professionals and organisations representing their interests responded to the consultation. Of these, 57% thought the proposed new powers would be more effective and only 9% thought they would be less effective than the current measures.

Asylum: Iraq

Sir Menzies Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many representations the UN has made to the UK on granting asylum to residents of Camp Liberty in Iraq. [152184]

Mr Harper: A total of 17 individuals in Camp Liberty have so far been referred by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to the Home Office for consideration of their re-admission to the UK as refugees. We are seeking further information about the progress of other cases which are being examined by the UNHCR.

Cannabis: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police raids on properties in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber resulted in the discovery of cannabis farms in the last 12 months. [152274]

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Damian Green [holding answer 22 April 2013]:The requested information is not collected by the Home Office.

Dementia

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether her Department has a dementia strategy. [151829]

James Brokenshire: The Home Office does not have a dementia strategy. The Home Office does have a diversity strategy which covers disability.

Deportation: Appeals

Mike Crockart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the UK Border Agency is reconsidering the case of Mr Edrick Phanuel Mazarodze; and when the Agency plans to respond to his request for a reconsideration of the decision for removal. [151314]

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Mr Harper: The Home Office will be writing to the hon. Member separately on this individual case once the application has been reconsidered.

Deportation: Offenders

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) of those foreign nationals deported under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, what (a) crimes they were found guilty of and (b) length of custodial sentence they served in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150386]

(2) of those foreign nationals deported under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, (a) what offences they were found guilty of and (b) what length of custodial sentence they received in each year since the Act came into force. [150394]

Mr Harper: The following table shows the number of foreign national offenders (FNOs) deported under Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 since it came into force.

FNOs under Section 32 of UK Borders Act 2007, to 31 December 2012
 Removal year 
 20082009201020112012Grand total
 Length of custodial sentence
Offence Type<1 year>=1 year and <3 years>=3 years and <10 years>= 10 years and <15 years15 years +Grand total

FNO Deported under Section 32

109

1,703

2,324

1,921

1,884

7,941

Of which:

      

Alteration/Possession of a False Document

6

203

4

213

Armed Robbery

1

2

2

5

Arson

6

6

1

13

Arson with intent to endanger life

1

1

1

3

Assisting an offence

11

7

18

Attempted Murder

12

7

7

26

Attempted Rape (Adult or Minor)

4

22

2

2

30

Attempting/ perverting the course of justice (incl. threatening jurors/witnesses/tamping with evidence)

11

3

14

Avoiding Enforcement Action by Deception

2

2

Behaviour (Including bomb hoaxes/threats to kill etc)

5

1

6

Breach of Conditions

4

15

4

23

Breaches Of the Peace (Affray, rioting)

20

1

21

Burglary (aggravated/breaking and entering)

2

133

26

2

163

Conspiracy (defraud/murder/kidnap)

34

41

75

Conspiracy to Defraud

1

1

Copying a False instrument

1

11

12

Court Offences ( Bail offences, Perjury, Contempt)

1

1

2

Crimes against a minor (all other not listed)

5

6

11

Criminal Damage

1

6

3

10

Death by Dangerous Driving

 

5

8

13

Deception (Pecuniary advantage/Property/Services)

2

89

16

107

Drugs

4

1

10

1

3

19

Drugs—Production

5

1928

228

2

1

2164

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23 Apr 2013 : Column 788W

Drugs—Being knowingly involved in the supply/production of drugs

2

251

174

19

9

455

Drugs—Importation of Controlled Drugs

65

551

80

19

715

Drugs—with intent to supply

1

225

281

19

7

533

Entry in Breach of a DO

1

1

Facilitating Asylum Entry for Gain

1

1

Facilitating gaining Leave by Deception

7

1

8

Facilitating Illegal Entry

34

13

1

48

False imprisonment

15

15

1

31

False Reps to obtain support

3

1

4

False Statement to get Marriage Licence

4

4

False Statement to Register marriage

3

3

Firearms (other then Poss/Use Offensive weapon)

1

2

1

4

Forgery

14

2

16

Fraud/Embezzlement

6

224

62

1

293

Handling Stolen Goods

13

4

17

Illegal Entry

14

1

15

Indecent Assault

11

10

1

1

23

Indecent Assault on a Minor

9

8

17

Kidnapping and attempted

 

8

17

4

5

34

Making false Statements/Representations

1

13

1

15

Manslaughter

20

6

2

28

Money Laundering (drugs criminal and immigration)

5

4

9

Motoring Offences other

3

14

2

19

Motoring Offences serious

5

2

7

Murder

1

2

2

23

28

Obstruction of an Immigration Officer

1

1

Obtaining British Passport by Deception

1

1

Offences Against the Person (assault)

2

36

12

50

Offences under Sex Offenders Act

 

13

5

18

Offences under the Marriage Acts

3

3

Overstaying

1

1

Possession and or use of False Instrument

12

1176

33

1221

Possession and or use of Offensive Weapon (Firearm Offences)

7

41

5

2

55

Possession and or use of weapon (Non Firearms)

6

5

11

Possession/Use of Offensive Weapon

2

14

17

33

Racially Motivated Crime (except attempted/ murder violence)

1

1

Rape

9

202

28

22

261

Rape on a Minor

5

26

5

1

37

Revenue and Customs case (other than drugs)

4

4

Robbery (including street)

107

123

10

8

248

S2 Failure to Produce a Document at Interview

1

2

3

Seeking/Obtaining Leave by Deception

1

12

1

14

Sex Offences against Children not listed Elsewhere

1

52

34

3

4

94

Sex Offences not Listed Elsewhere

3

94

40

3

5

145

Terrorist Offences

2

3

1

6

Theft

8

94

23

125

Trafficking (people/drugs)

2

2

4

Violent Crime (inc ABH/GBH)

2

160

135

13

11

321

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23 Apr 2013 : Column 790W

Extradition—Offences Not Known

5

5

Grand total

78

5,230

2,281

219

133

7,941

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. The UK Borders Act 2007 came into force on 1 August 2008. Consequently, data for calendar year 2008 covers the period from 1 August to 31 December 2008 only.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department of those foreign nationals who successfully appealed against their deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, (1) what (a) crimes they were found guilty of and (b) length of custodial sentence they had served in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150387]

(2) what (a) offences they were found guilty of and (b) what length of custodial sentence they received in each year since the implementation of the Act. [150393]

Mr Harper: The following table shows the number of foreign national offenders (FNOs) who were successful in their appeal lodged against section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007.

FNOs who were successful in their appeal lodged against section 32 of UK Borders Act 2007, between 1 August 2008 and 31 December 2012
 Length of custodial sentence
Offence type<1 year>=1 year and <3 years>=10 years and <15 years>=3 years and <10 years15 years+Total

Alteration/possession of a false document

1

28

1

9

39

Armed robbery

1

1

Arson

6

5

11

Arson with intent to endanger life

1

1

Assisting an offence

1

6

1

8

Attempted murder

1

 

1

Attempted rape (adult or minor)

1

1

Attempting/perverting the course of justice (including threatening jurors/witnesses/tampering with evidence)

9

1

10

Behaviour (including bomb hoaxes/threats to kill etc.)

1

1

2

Breach of conditions

1

3

1

5

Breaches of the peace (affray, rioting)

14

2

16

Burglary (aggravated/breaking and entering)

28

11

1

40

Conspiracy (defraud/murder/kidnap)

8

9

17

Copying a false instrument

1

1

Crimes against a minor (all other not listed)

2

1

3

Criminal damage

2

2

Death by dangerous driving

1

3

4

Deception (pecuniary advantage/property/services)

2

19

4

3

28

Drugs

1

1

2

Drugs—Production

24

13

37

Drugs—Being knowingly involved in the supply/production of drugs

1

46

41

88

Drugs—Importation of controlled drugs

11

1

12

1

25

Drugs—With intent to supply

1

71

82

154

Facilitating gaining leave by deception

2

2

Facilitating illegal entry

3

1

2

1

7

False imprisonment

1

7

3

11

False reps to obtain support

1

1

False statement to get marriage licence

1

1

False statement to register marriage

1

1

Firearms (other then poss/use offensive weapon)

2

2

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Forgery

1

1

Fraud/embezzlement

2

49

15

1

67

Handling stolen goods

8

4

12

Illegal entry

2

2

Indecent assault

1

2

2

5

Indecent assault on a minor

4

1

5

Kidnapping and attempted

1

2

1

1

5

Making false statements/representations

3

3

Manslaughter

1

1

Money laundering (drugs criminal and immigration)

3

3

Motoring offences other

2

3

5

Motoring offences serious

2

1

3

Murder

1

2

3

Obstruction of an immigration officer

1

1

Offences against the person (assault)

1

13

2

16

Offences under Sex Offenders Act

1

1

Possession and or use of false instrument

3

200

2

24

229

Possession and or use of offensive weapon (firearm offences)

6

1

9

16

Possession and or use of weapon (non firearms)

2

2

Possession/use of offensive weapon

11

3

1

15

Racially motivated crime (except attempted/murder violence)

1

1

Rape

2

10

1

13

Rape on a minor

3

3

Revenue and customs case (other than drugs)

1

1

Robbery (including street)

1

55

1

54

1

112

Seeking/obtaining leave by deception

2

1

3

Sex offences against children not listed elsewhere

5

6

11

Sex offences not listed elsewhere

2

12

7

21

Terrorist offences

1

1

Theft

1

26

1

3

2

33

Violent crime (including ABH/GBH)

4

77

1

29

4

115

Total

24

786

11

354

55

1,230

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. The UK Borders Act 2007 came into force on 1 August 2008. Consequently, figures relate to the period 1 August 2008 to 31 December 2012.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department of those foreign nationals deported under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, (1) how many unsuccessful appeals there were using (a) the European Convention on Human Rights and (b) the Refugee Convention in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150388]

(2) of those foreign nationals deported under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 who unsuccessfully appealed against their deportation using the European Convention on Human Rights, which articles of the Convention were used as part of the appeal in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150389]

(3) of those foreign nationals who successfully appealed against their deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, which articles of the European Convention on Human Rights were used as part of the appeal in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150390]

(4) how many foreign nationals deported under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 sought to use Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights to appeal their deportation in each year since the implementation of the Act; [150391]

(5) how many foreign nationals who successfully appealed against their deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 used Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights as part of their appeal in each year since the implementation of the Act. [150392]

Mr Harper: In relation to PQ 150388, PQ 150389, and PQ 150391, data on unsuccessful appeals against deportation are held only at the level of co-ordinated paper case files or within the notes section of the Case Information Database (CID). Such data are not aggregated in national reporting systems, which would mean these questions could be answered only through a disproportionately expensive manual case search to collate the data.

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With regard to PQ 150390 and PQ 150392, figures on the number of foreign national offenders (FNOs) who successfully appealed against deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007, are shown in the following table:

FNOs who were successful in their appeal lodged against section 32 of UK Borders Act 2007, between 1 August 2008 and 31 December 2012
Number
Grounds of appeal20082009201020112012Total

Human rights—Article 2 and 3

12

17

19

4

52

Human rights—Article 3

1

7

8

11

1

28

Human rights—Article 3 and 8 (with or without other articles)

25

102

128

100

355

Human rights—Article 8

4

144

225

185

151

709

Appeals allowed—Other

3

30

27

9

5

74

EEA Regs

2

6

3

1

12

Total

8

220

385

355

262

1,230

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. The UK Borders Act 2007 came into force on 1 August 2008. Consequently, data for calendar year 2008 cover the period from 1 August to 31 December 2008 only.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign nationals (a) were deported and (b) successfully appealed against their deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 in each year since the implementation of the Act. [150397]

Mr Harper: The following table shows how many foreign national offenders (FNOs)—were deported and successfully appealed against their deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 in each year since 2007.

 20082009201020112012Grand total

FNOs Deported Under Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007

109

1,704

2,324

1,921

1,884

7,942

FNOs successful in their appeal lodged against Section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007

8

220

385

355

262

1,230

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. The UK Borders Act 2007 came into force on 1 August 2008. Consequently, data for calendar year 2008 covers the period from 1 August to 31 December 2008 only.

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many appeals against deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 were outstanding on 1 January in each of the last six years. [150398]

Mr Harper: The following table shows how many appeals against deportation under section 32 of the UK Borders Act 2007 were lodged between 1 August 2008 and 31 December 2012.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 794W

The table also shows the number of appeals still outstanding on 31 December in each calendar year from 2008. The status of cases on 31 December has been provided as the Home Office reports on the requested data at month end in its standard reports.

FNOs appeals lodged against section 32 of UK Borders Act 2007 between 1 August 2008 and 31 December 2012
Year appeal lodged:20082009201020112012Total

No. of appeals lodged:

31

709

856

766

902

3,264

Number of outstanding appeals remaining for each year as of:

      

31 December 2008

29

29

31 December 2009

5

368

373

31 December 2010

2

52

450

504

31 December 2011

1

20

56

370

447

31 December 2012

5

15

57

522

599

Notes: 1. All figures quoted have been derived from management information and are therefore provisional and subject to change. This information has not been quality assured under National Statistics protocols. 2. The UK Borders Act 2007 came into force on 1 August 2008. Consequently, data for calendar year 2008 cover the period from 1 August to 31 December 2008 only.

Driving Offences: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many fixed penalty notices were issued to motorists in (a) Brigg and Goole constituency and (b) Yorkshire and the Humber in 2011. [152270]

Damian Green: Data on FPNs for motoring offences issued by the police are published in the National Statistics series ‘Police Powers and Procedures’. The latest internet-only release published on 18 April 2013 is available in the Library of the House and from the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/police-powers-and-procedures-in-england-and-wales-201112

Police issued 151,308 FPNs for motoring offences in the Yorkshire and the Humber Region in 2011.

The Home Office does not centrally collect data on fixed penalty notices (FPNs) issued at constituency level.

Driving under Influence

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have had breathalyser tests administered to them by police officers in each of the last five years; and how many such people failed the test in each such year. [152014]

Damian Green: Available data relate to the number of roadside breath tests carried out by police and the number positive or refused between 2007 and 2011, and

23 Apr 2013 : Column 795W

are published in table BT.01 within the National Statistics series ‘Police Powers and Procedures’.

The latest internet-only release published on 18 April 2013 is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/police-powers-and-procedures-in-england-and-wales-201112

Drugs: Wales

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what grants were offered to each organisation in the South Wales Police Force area which received funds from the Drug Testing Grant during (a) 2012-13 and (b) 2011-12. [152823]

Mr Jeremy Browne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 18 March 2013, Official Report, columns 412-16W. The Drug Testing Grant was paid solely to South Wales police. The grant funding was (a) £353,691 in 2012-13 and (b) £372,306 in 2011-12.

Emergencies

Mr Ellwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what funding her Department provides for the running of local resilience forums; [152689]

(2) what recent assessment she has made of the Local Resilience Board; and if she will make a statement; [152690]

(3) what arrangements are in place to assess police involvement with local resilience forums. [152691]

Damian Green: The Home Office does not provide funding for the running of local resilience forums. The Department has made no assessment of local resilience forums.

Human Trafficking

Michael Connarty: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 26 March 2013, Official Report, column 1147W, on human trafficking, if she will list the Government Departments and agencies involved in work to combat human trafficking; and how much each department and agency spent on such work in each of the last three years for which information is available. [152586]

Mr Harper: The inter-departmental ministerial group report on human trafficking includes details of the departments and agencies working to combat human trafficking. Expenditure by each Department and agency on work to combat human trafficking is not recorded separately or centrally.

Immigration: EU Nationals

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what checks are in place to ensure that pensioners in the UK who are EU nationals have (a) comprehensive health cover and (b) sufficient income to live without needing income support before being allowed to enter or remain resident in the UK. [150710]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 796W

Mr Harper: All EU nationals, including pensioners, have a right of admission and residence in the UK for an initial period of three months.

An EU national who remains in the UK beyond the initial period of three months as a self-sufficient person (which would apply to pensioners) is required to hold comprehensive sickness insurance and sufficient resources to prevent themselves and any family members from becoming an unreasonable burden on the social assistance system of the UK.

In such cases, strict checks are made to ensure that the requirements set out in the regulations are met. It is not desirable to state the exact nature of these checks as such disclosure may enable immigration offenders to circumvent our chocking processes and prejudice the operation and integrity of our immigration controls, but these include checks on whether the EU national is exercising free movement rights in the UK.

Members: Correspondence

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when she intends to reply to the letter to the Minister for Immigration dated 5 March 2013 from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Mr S. Ullah. [152850]

Mr Harper: I wrote to the right hon. Member on 16 April 2013.

Overseas Students: Fees and Charges

Rushanara Ali: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress her Department has made towards establishing a fees structure for higher education institutions accessing the Account Management Service. [151603]

Mr Harper: The fee for higher education institutions to access the premium service for Tier 4 sponsors from 1 July 2013 is £8,000.

This fee was set out in the Fees Regulations for 2013 which were approved by Parliament and published on 6 April.

Pay

Chris Bryant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what salary the director general of the (a) visas and immigration and (b) immigration law enforcement commands will receive. [151285]

Mr Harper [holding answer 17 April 2013]: The salary paid to the Director UK Visas and Immigration and the Director General of Immigration Enforcement will be set within the Senior Civil Service Pay Band 3 range.

Police: Corruption

Robert Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what obligations there are on police authorities and their legal representatives to respond to serious allegations of corruption against certain individuals within that police force. [152986]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 797W

Damian Green: Police authorities were replaced on 22 November 2012 by elected police and crime commissioners (PCCs).

For each police force, the PCC is the appropriate authority for handling serious allegations of corruption against the chief constable. The chief constable is the appropriate authority in relation to serious allegations of corruption against all other members of the force, but the PCC is required to remain informed of such allegations and has the power to direct the chief constable to comply with his or her legal obligations in dealing with them.

The duties of the appropriate authority are set out in Part 2 of the Police Reform Act 2002 and the Police (Complaints and Misconduct) Regulations 2012, which include provision for the recording, reference to the Independent Police Complaints Commission, and investigation of allegations, as well as for reference of the case to the Director of Public Prosecutions where appropriate. The Police (Conduct) Regulations 2012 make provision for the taking of disciplinary action, in addition to any criminal proceedings that may result.

Police: Foreign Nationals

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign police officers are operating in the UK, by country of origin; and who holds that information. [151267]

Damian Green: The requested information is not collected by the Home Office.

Police: ICT

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many online crime reports have been submitted at www.actionfraud.police.uk. [152488]

James Brokenshire [holding answer 22 April 2013]:Action Fraud is the UK's national reporting centre for fraud and internet crime. It takes fraud and information about fraud reports on behalf of the police, and passes these to the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau based at City of London police.

Over the last three months (January to March 2013) there have been 27,665 reports of on-line crime made to Action Fraud.

Public Appointments

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the directoral salaries of the (a) Immigration and Visa Service and (b) Law Enforcement Agency are planned to be; and when such appointments will be made. [151212]

Mr Harper [holding answer 18 April 2013]: The salary paid to the Director General of UK Visas and Immigration and the Director General of Immigration Enforcement will be set within the Senior Civil Service Pay Band 3 range. We have made interim appointments to both roles and will make permanent appointments in the summer.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 798W

Sexual Offences: Victim Support Schemes

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department with reference to the announcement by the Director of Public Prosecutions that the Crown Prosecution Service will be re-opening historic sexual abuse cases, what plans she has to increase funding for independent sexual violence advisers. [152151]

Mr Jeremy Browne: The Home Office currently provides £1.72 million per year to part-fund 87 independent sexual violence adviser posts across England and Wales. This level of funding will continue to 2015.

The Government are committed to ensuring that victims of these heinous crimes have access to the support they need. In February, the Ministry of Justice announced it will continue to fund rape support centres until 2015, giving existing centres a stable financial future and allowing new centres to be established.

Cabinet Office

Baroness Thatcher

Emily Thornberry: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office for what reason his Department rather than the Department for Culture, Media and Sport organised the funeral of Baroness Thatcher. [152892]

Mr Maude: The preparations for the funeral of Baroness Thatcher began under a previous Government. The Cabinet Office performed its usual central/co-ordinating role.

Crime

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many offences of (a) domestic violence, (b) rape, (c) other serious sexual violence and (d) hate crime were committed in England (i) in total and (ii) by region in (A) 2011-12 and (B) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [153069]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated April 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Secretary of State of the Home Department for the number of offences of (a) domestic violence, (b) rape, (c) other serious sexual violence and (d) hate crime committed in England (i) in total and (ii) by region in (A) 2011-12 and (B) 2012-13. (153069)

The information provided in the table is sourced from incidents reported to and recorded by the police and thus will not include all crimes committed under the categories asked. ‘Domestic violence’ is not in itself a separate legal offence and thus does not form part of the notifiable offence list that is reported within the National Statistics on crime.

Cases of ‘domestic violence’ will be incorporated within the relevant category of offence in accordance with the intent of the offence and any injuries sustained, such as ‘inflicting grievous bodily harm (GBH)’ or ‘less serious wounding’ for example. It is not possible to separately identify within all possible categories which cases would fall under the heading ‘domestic violence’.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 799W

However, there are published statistics sourced from a separate collection which provides counts of recorded incidents of domestic abuse, but not all of these will necessarily be subsequently recorded by the police as notifiable offences.

Similarly, ‘hate crimes’ are generally not in themselves recorded as separate notifiable offences except where they are defined by statute, for example racially or religiously aggravated harassment. It is possible though to separately identify any notifiable offence committed against a person or property that is motivated by hostility towards someone based on their disability, race, religion, gender-identity or sexual orientation, whether perceived to be so by the victim or any other person. However, it should be noted that more than one form of hate crime can be assigned to an offence.

The table provides the number of domestic abuse incidents, rape and other serious sexual offences, and hate crimes recorded by the police in 2011/12 in England, by region. Data for 2012/13 are due to be published for the first time in July 2013, so these are not currently available.

  Serious sexual offences
RegionDomestic abuse incidents(1)RapeOther serious sexualHate crimes(2)

North East

55,619

632

1,158

1,272

North West

120,080

1,929

3,414

6,574

Yorkshire and the Humber

85,154

1,390

2,315

3,225

East Midlands

58,161

1,234

2,137

3,177

West Midlands

70,922

1,576

2,981

4,589

East of England

76,368

1,526

2,597

3,458

London

118,169

3,335

5,078

10,085

South East

107,917

2,024

4,072

4,861

South West

52,715

1,598

2,702

3,146

     

England(3)

745,105

15,244

26,454

40,387

(1) Domestic abuse incidents are defined as any incidence of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults, aged 18 and over, w ho are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality. (2) Hate crimes are taken to mean any crime where the perpetrator's hostility or prejudice against an identifiable group of people is a factor in determining who is victimised. Note that the figures relate to the five monitored strands of hate crime classifications used by the criminal justice system (race, religion, sexual orientation, disability and transgender) and are not a count of crime as more than one form of hate crime can be assigned to an offence. (3) Excludes British Transport Police. Sources: Police incident data, Home Office /Police recorded crime, Home Office