Diabetes: Children

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many accident and emergency (a) attendances and (b) admissions for diabetes treatment for children aged 0 to 18 years there were for each trust in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [152241]

Anna Soubry: Information on emergency admissions for children with a primary diagnosis of diabetes has been placed in the Library.

Information on accident and emergency attendances for diabetes is not separately available.

Diseases

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his best estimate is of the number of people in England with (a) multiple sclerosis, (b) Huntington's disease and (c) 22q deletion syndrome. [152508]

Norman Lamb [holding answer 22 April 2013]: The Department does not hold the information centrally.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre have advised that Hospital Episodes Statistics (HES) only supply information on the number of in-patient hospital episodes where the diagnosis was present. However, since it is not known what proportion of people with

23 Apr 2013 : Column 890W

each condition would be treated in hospital, nor how many times they would be treated in a year, the number of patients with each of these conditions cannot be estimated.

Family Nurse Partnership Programme

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Family Nurse Partnership Programme in addressing the relevant priorities of the Public Health Outcomes Framework. [152173]

Dr Poulter: The Family Nurse Partnership programme is based on more than 30 years of United States of America research that has shown significant benefits for disadvantaged young families. Early evaluation in England is promising, suggesting that the programme can be delivered well here, clients like it and the potential for impact is good in relation to the Public Health Outcomes Framework indicators relating to smoking in pregnancy, breastfeeding and birth weight. Additionally, mothers are very positive about their parenting capacity and have improved self-esteem.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to encourage take-up of the Family Nurse Partnership Programme in deprived areas. [152174]

Dr Poulter: The Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) programme offers an evidence-based approach to supporting young, at risk, first time mothers, their babies and their partners. The Government has committed to increasing the number of places on the programme to 16,000 by 2015. FNP is present in the majority of the most disadvantaged local authority areas in England, and the majority of women who are offered a place on the programme take this place up.

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 March 2013, Official Report, column 712W, on the Family Nurse Partnership Programme, what the take-up of the scheme has been in each local authority. [152176]

Dr Poulter: The following table sets out the number of families enrolled on the Family Nurse Partnership (FNP) programme by site between April 2007 (when the programme began in England) and 31 March 2013. The relevant local authority area is also included.

FNP sites are not always coterminous with local authority areas, as some sites offer services to part of or more than one local authority area. FNP sites are made up of one family nurse supervisor and up to eight family nurses delivering a maximum of 200 FNP places at any one time.

The numbers of families enrolled by site vary according to the number of places they have available and when the programme started in that area. New FNP sites build up their caseloads over a 12-month period, and some sites will be at the very early stages of recruitment. The FNP programme lasts for approximately two and half years, from early pregnancy until the child is two years old. At this point a new client can be recruited to the place.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 891W

FNP site nameNumber of women ever enrolled 31 March 2013Local authority area covered

Barking and Dagenham

98

Barking and Dagenham

Barnet

85

Barnet

Barnsley

329

Barnsley

Bath and North East Somerset

17

Bath and North East Somerset

Berkshire East

345

Slough Windsor and Maidenhead, Bracknell Forest

Berkshire West

30

Reading, West Berkshire, Wokingham

Birmingham 1

124

Birmingham, Solihull

Birmingham 2

163

Birmingham

Birmingham 3

40

Birmingham, Solihull

Blackpool

178

Blackpool

Bolton

108

Bolton

Bradford

196

Bradford

Brighton and Hove

28

Brighton and Hove

Buckinghamshire

39

Buckinghamshire

Calderdale

165

Calderdale

Cambridgeshire

131

Cambridgeshire

Cheshire East

57

Cheshire East

Cornwall

261

Cornwall

Coventry

185

Coventry

Croydon

112

Croydon

Cumbria

142

Cumbria

Derby 1

355

Derby

Derbyshire

149

Derbyshire

Doncaster

157

Doncaster

Dudley

8

Dudley

Durham and Darlington 1

398

County Durham, Darlington

Durham and Darlington 2

130

County Durham, Darlington

Ealing

167

Ealing

East Sussex—East

246

East Sussex

East Sussex— West

137

East Sussex

Gateshead and South Tyneside

181

Gateshead, South Tyneside

Great Yarmouth and Waveney

162

Norfolk (part), Suffolk (part)

Haringey

113

Haringey

Hertfordshire

112

Hertfordshire

Hounslow

75

Hounslow

Hull

222

Hull

Islington

209

Islington

Kent

90

Kent

Kirklees

240

Kirklees

Knowsley

149

Knowsley

Lambeth

155

Lambeth

Leeds

246

Leeds

Leicester

97

Leicester

Lewisham

161

Lewisham

Liverpool

264

Liverpool

Manchester 1

361

Manchester

Manchester 2

169

Manchester

Medway

223

Medway

Milton Keynes

184

Milton Keynes

Norfolk

201

Norfolk

North and North-East Lincolnshire

85

North Lincolnshire, North East Lincolnshire

23 Apr 2013 : Column 892W

North Tees

64

Stockton on Tees, Hartlepool

Northamptonshire

212

Northamptonshire

Nottingham 1

294

Nottingham

Nottingham 2

56

Nottingham

Nottinghamshire

34

Nottinghamshire

Oxfordshire

241

Oxfordshire

Peterborough

85

Peterborough

Plymouth

168

Plymouth

Portsmouth

83

Portsmouth

Rotherham

77

Rotherham

Sandwell

186

Sandwell

Sheffield

241

Sheffield

Somerset

110

Somerset, stopped delivering FNP 2010

South East Essex

270

Southend on Sea, Essex (part)

South Tees

51

Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland

Southampton

193

Southampton

Southwark

290

Southwark

Staffordshire—Cannock and Tamworth

5

Staffordshire (part)

Stockport

111

Stockport, stopped delivering FNP 2011

Stoke on Trent

201

Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (part)

Sunderland

169

Sunderland

Swindon

189

Swindon

Telford and Wrekin

143

Telford and Wrekin

Tower Hamlets

359

Tower Hamlets

Wakefield

89

Wakefield

Walsall

338

Walsall

Waltham Forest

137

Waltham Forest

Warwickshire

135

Warwickshire

West Central London

127

Hammersmith and Fulham, Westminster, Kensington and Chelsea

West Cheshire

94

West Cheshire

West Sussex

96

West Sussex

Wigan

89

Wigan

Wirral

199

Wirral

Total

13,415

 

Health Centres: Christchurch

Mr Chope: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 15 January 2013, Official Report, column 698W, on health centres: Christchurch, whether his Department has disposed of its interest in Christchurch Health Centre. [152891]

Dr Poulter: The Department has not yet disposed of its interest in the property. The surrender of the lease is dependent upon the landlord finalising agreements with the proposed hotel operator, the freeholder and other interested parties which are outside the Department's control. It is understood that this is likely to take place shortly.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 893W

Heart Diseases: Children

Stuart Andrew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how much NHS Specialised Services has spent on external communications consultants for the Safe and Sustainable Review of children's heart surgery services in England and Wales and JCPCT decision-making process to date; [152903]

(2) how much has been spent by the NHS on legal costs for the judicial review case brought by Save Our Surgery Ltd; [152904]

(3) how much NHS Specialised Services has spent in total on the Safe and Sustainable Review of children's heart surgery services in England and Wales and the JCPCT decision-making process to date. [152905]

Anna Soubry: The figures requested are tabled as follows:

Costs incurred by NHS Specialised Services on the Safe and Sustainable review of children's heart services in England and Wales and the Joint Committee of Primary Care Trusts decision-making process, to March 2013
 £

Legal costs for the judicial review case brought by Save Our Surgery Ltd

301,000

External communications consultants

1,740,000

Other costs incurred (from 2009-10 to 2012-13 inclusive)

6,036,000

Horses: Slaughterhouses

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 11 February 2013, Official Report, column 521W, on horses: slaughterhouses, how many horses have been slaughtered in (a) total and (b) each abattoir in the UK in each of the last five months for which figures are available. [152817]

Anna Soubry: The Food Standards Agency records the number of solipeds (a mammal having a single hoof on each foot, including horses, hinnies, mules and asses) slaughtered in the United Kingdom.

The following table provides details on the total number of solipeds slaughtered in the last five months, for which figures are available. The majority of animals will be horses:

MonthNumber of solipeds slaughtered in the United Kingdom

November 2012

890

December 2012

655

January 2013

488

February 2013

382

March 2013

600

Details of the number of horses slaughtered in each of the abattoirs in each of the last five months, have not been provided as to release such information would be likely to prejudice the commercial interests of the abattoirs concerned.

Hospitals: Admissions

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many accident and emergency (a) attendences and (b) admissions for (i) epilepsy and (ii) asthma

23 Apr 2013 : Column 894W

treatment there were for children aged 0 to 18 in each hospital trust in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [152168]

Anna Soubry: Information on emergency admissions for children with a primary diagnosis of epilepsy and asthma has been placed in the Library.

Information on accident and emergency attendances for epilepsy and asthma is not separately available.

In Vitro Fertilisation

Alison Seabeck: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps his Department is planning to take to allow mitochondrial transfer IVF technique to move forward following the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority consultation findings. [152396]

Anna Soubry: I refer the hon. Member to the written answer I gave to her on 16 April 2013, Official Report, column 339W.

Maternity Services

Andy Sawford: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 March 2013, Official Report, column 715W, on maternity services: Northamptonshire, and with reference to the announcement by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health, the hon. Member for Central Suffolk and North Ipswich (Dr Poulter) on 24 January 2013 that more than 100 hospitals will share a £25 million fund to improve their maternity units, what his Department's role is in the co-ordination, planning and announcement of (a) improvements and (b) other changes to maternity services. [152136]

Dr Poulter: From 1 April 2013, the Department's role is to create national policies and provide the long-term vision and ambition to meet current and future challenges in maternity services. The Department secures resources, sets national priorities and holds the health and social care system to account on behalf of the Secretary of State for Health.

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for commissioning maternity services locally that improve choice of place of birth, continuity of care and women's experience of care. It is for CCGs, working with local authorities through health and wellbeing boards, and in conjunction with provider partners, to identify where and how maternity services can be improved. NHS England has developed a maternity commissioning resource pack for CCGs. NHS England will also enable these local discussions and processes to happen and will respond proactively to CCGs when they require support to reshape services.

Reconfiguration of front line maternity services should be locally-led and clinically-driven. The underlying rationale for any reconfiguration should be that changes deliver a real improvement in quality and outcomes for patients. The guiding principles for national health service reconfigurations are that schemes should have support from clinical commissioners, clarity on the clinical evidence base, robust patient and public engagement and support for patient choice.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 895W

Members: Correspondence

Mrs Moon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when he plans to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Bridgend of 18 March 2013, reference MM/JH/18/03/2013. [152170]

Dr Poulter: My noble Friend, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Earl Howe), replied to the hon. Member's letter of 18 March 2013 on 18 April 2013.

Midwives

Jim Shannon: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to provide incentives for hospitals and trusts to use newly-trained bank midwives for the purposes of allowing new midwives finding placements to gain experience whilst waiting for full-time positions to become available. [152196]

Dr Poulter: In delivering a high quality service, it is the responsibility of the local national health service organisations to plan and deliver a workforce appropriate to the needs of their local population, based on clinical need and sound evidence. The decision on how local providers source their requirement is a matter for local determination.

Dan Rogerson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to (a) update Directive 2005/36/EC on the recognition of professional qualifications and (b) introduce a minimum (i) number of hours of training for midwives and (ii) proportion of training for midwives that must be clinical practice. [152799]

Dr Poulter: The Directive on the Recognition of Professional Qualifications is under review by the European Commission and includes amendments relating to the training of midwives. The Department is working closely with the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office during negotiations, which are set to conclude from mid-2013. The United Kingdom has been an active member of the European Council Working Groups to develop the proposals, and the Department has worked closely with the key national groups affected by the issue.

NHS: Legal Costs

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much the NHS has spent on compensation, litigation and legal fees since May 2010. [152469]

Dr Poulter: The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) provided the following data in respect of payments that it has made in relation to litigation between May 2010 and March 2012. Audited data are not yet available for April 2012 to March 2013.

 £000

Damages paid

1,556,716

Claimant costs

464,697

Defence costs

143,341

Source: NHS Litigation Authority, April 2013

23 Apr 2013 : Column 896W

Firstly, it should be noted that some of the payments relate to incidents that occurred prior to May 2010 rather than wholly incidents that occurred during the period. Additionally, the damages, claimant legal costs and defence legal costs will cover a different cohort of claims.

The data only cover claims made against members of the NHS indemnity schemes, which primarily cover clinical negligence, employers' and public liabilities. The non-clinical scheme also operates ‘excess’ levels, with claims below excess funded by individual members. Data therefore only represent expenditure by the NHS LA under these schemes.

NHS: Temporary Employment

Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will take steps to ensure that NHS trusts granted funding to employ contract staff under Agenda for Change honour the contracts they enter into with (a) contracted staff and (b) the companies who recruit them; and if he will make a statement. [152195]

Dr Poulter: Employers have the freedom to determine the terms and conditions including pay for the staff they employ. It is right that employers locally, not government, make their own decisions about the employment contracts that enable them to recruit and retain the caring staff the national health service needs. Employers cannot change employment contracts unilaterally; they must consult their staff and or staff representatives and seek agreement.

All employers are expected to meet their obligations under employment law, including those under the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations.

Nurses

Mr Lammy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the current availability of (a) school nurses, (b) health visitors and (c) community children's nurses is in each local authority area. [152175]

Dr Poulter: The Non-Medical Workforce Census, published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre, shows that as of 30 September 2012 there were 21,443 full time equivalent qualified school nurses, health visitors, and children's nursing staff employed by the national health service in England.

The full breakdown of the numbers by strategic health authority area and by organisation have been placed in the Library. The overall number of children's nurses is 11,883, health visitors 8,386 and school nurses 1,174.

It is important to note that it is currently impossible to isolate the true numbers of community children's nurses (CCNs) from the overall number of children's nurses in the workforce census data. Current guidance suggests that the numbers of CCNs be included with the numbers of children's nurses who work primarily within acute settings.

Pigs

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of pigs slaughtered for human consumption in the UK are bred and reared in a totally indoor environment. [153037]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 897W

Anna Soubry: Based on information held by the Food Standards Agency (England, Scotland and Wales) and Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (Northern Ireland), details of the numbers of pigs slaughtered for human consumption in the United Kingdom between 1 January and 31 December 2012 are provided in the following table by production system.

It should be noted that a high percentage of sows in the UK are kept outdoors and give birth outdoors and

23 Apr 2013 : Column 898W

the table also includes these figures. Most of the born outdoors pigs are put into indoor accommodation for the growing/finishing period. Only a small percentage of growing pigs will spend their entire lives outdoors in free-range conditions. This is how the differential between born outdoors and fully outdoor pigs is made.

Production system
 Born outdoorsIndoorsNot providedOther systemsOutdoorsTotal

Number of pigs

497,999

5,258,670

3,240,316

113,089

217,740

9,327,814

Percentage of total throughput

5.33

56.37

34.73

1.21

2.33

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of pigs slaughtered for human consumption in the UK are recorded as having abscesses in the lymph nodes in their heads; and what inspection procedures are carried out by Food Standards Agency inspectors to ensure that such abscesses do not enter the human food chain. [153038]

Anna Soubry: Between 1 January and 31 December 2012, 37,609 (0.40%) incidences of abscesses were recorded in pig heads at post mortem inspection by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in Great Britain and by the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) in Northern Ireland.

All carcases and accompanying offal are inspected without delay after slaughter. These include visual inspection of the head and throat of domestic swine with incision and examination of the submaxillary lymph nodes; and visual inspection of the mouth, fauces and tongue. The competent authority may decide, on the basis of epidemiological or other data from the holding, that certain fattening pigs housed under controlled housing conditions in integrated production systems since weaning, need only undergo visual inspection.

Abscesses in pigs heads identified by FSA or DARD during the inspection procedure are removed by food business operator staff, along with affected lymph nodes, under supervision, and rejected for human consumption. Heads are then disposed off as a category 2 by-product by the food business operator, with verification of disposal carried out by FSA or DARD inspectors.

Polypropylene

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his policy is on the use of (a) TVT, TVT-O and TOT medical devices and (b) other medical devices using surgical polypropylene synthetic mesh. [152757]

Norman Lamb: The Mandate to NHS England requires it to deliver continued improvements in relation to helping people recover from episodes of ill health or following injury.

There are wide varieties of surgical treatments that have been developed using polypropylene synthetic mesh as a medical device.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has produced a clinical guideline on the use of vaginal tapes for stress urinary incontinence. Further guidance on the use of vaginal meshes for pelvic organ prolapse is set out in a series of interventional procedure guidance notes.

The NHS England National Medical Director, Sir Bruce Keogh, wrote to all national health service surgeons and medical directors in November 2012 to raise their awareness of the NICE guidance on the use of these devices and gain their support in making surgery using vaginal tapes and meshes as safe and effective as possible.

Andrea Leadsom: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints there have been to date to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency about the use of (a) TVT, TVT-O and TOT medical devices and (b) other medical devices using surgical polypropylene synthetic mesh. [152758]

Norman Lamb: Departmental and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency records indicate that to date there have been 24 items of correspondence complaining about the use of TVT, TVT-O and TOT medical devices and three relating to other medical devices using surgical polypropylene synthetic mesh.

Radiotherapy

Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether his Department collects information on the average distance cancer patients must travel from their homes to receive radiotherapy. [152591]

Anna Soubry: This information is not collected centrally.

The National Radiotherapy Advisory Group (NRAG) report, ‘Radiotherapy: developing a world class service for England’, published in 2007, stated that 45 minutes travel time should be seen as best practice, although it recognised that this is not achievable in all areas. The report also found the vast majority of the population already live within 45 minutes of a radiotherapy centre. A copy of this report has already been placed in the Library.

Since the publication of the NRAG report, the National Cancer Action Team, now part of NHS Improving Quality, has continued to provide advice to commissioners and providers to help them assess travel times for their patients and plan the location of new services.

23 Apr 2013 : Column 899W

Sir Robert Edwards

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans his Department has to mark the death of Sir Robert Edwards. [152181]

23 Apr 2013 : Column 900W

Anna Soubry: The Secretary of State for Health, my right hon. Friend the Member for South West Surrey (Mr Hunt), paid tribute to Professor Sir Robert Edwards in the House on 16 April 2013, Official Report, column 162W.