Home AffairsLetter from Rob Whiteman, Chief Executive, UK Border Agency, to the Chair of the Committee, 6 December 2012

Foreign National Offenders (FNO) (Questions 1–14)

1. The table below provides a breakdown of the status of the 2006 cohort of 1,013 FNOs released without consideration for deportation, as at the end of quarter three 2012:

Cases
concluded

Of which
removed
/deported

Of which
not
removed

Going
through
deportation
process

Serving
custodial
sentence

Not
located

Total

At end Q3 2012

857

405

452

97

12

47

1,013

2. A further four cases from this cohort were concluded in quarter 3 of 2012, all of which were removed. An additional three were located and are now going through the deportation process.

3. The UK Border Agency (UKBA) and the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) have reviewed the mechanism for referring foreign nationals sentenced to serve a prison sentence upon arrival in prison. The process is generally effective at ensuring UKBA are notified, however the timeliness of the referral falls outside the agreed five day service level. A review of cases showed that 37% of cases were referred within five days of sentencing, although almost 80% of referrals are completed with 30 days, and there is a separate process for referring cases where release is imminent. However in order to minimise the risk of failing to refer foreign nationals, UKBA are now conducting weekly checks for immigration record matches against all newly sentenced NOMS prisoners. I will continue to provide updates on the development of this process and other mechanisms for identifying criminality amongst foreign nationals.

4. With regard to the cohort of 28 FNOs released without consideration for deportation in 2010–11, three remained untraced. We are continuing to attempt to trace these individuals and their details have been circulated on the Police National Computer stating that the UK Border Agency should be contacted if they are encountered. We have also sought information on their whereabouts using internal and external databases. All were convicted of offences in the “other” category—the least serious category of offence.

5. The table below shows the number of FNOs released from prison, transferred into immigration detention and released without consideration for deportation in quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Released from prison

819

Transferred in to immigration detention

1,160

Released without consideration for deportation

1

6. Since my letter of 7 September it has come to light that a further two individuals were released from prison without consideration for deportation in quarter two of 2012. Both individuals, and the individual released in quarter three, were convicted of “other” offences and are currently not detained.

7. The table below shows the status of the FNOs eligible for deportation released from prison in quarter three of 2012:

Q3 2012

Deported

3

Concluded1

10

Outstanding

327

Total

340

8. The table below shows a breakdown of the status of the outstanding cases:

Q3 2012

Being caseworked2

211

Legal issues3

86

Removal issues4

24

Further criminal proceedings

3

Other5

3

Total

327

9. Note these figures refer to FNO cases outstanding at the end of the same quarter in which they were released. Some will have been released late in that quarter and so while they remain outstanding they may have only been so for a short period of time.

10. The table below shows the number of FNOs facing removal or deportation who at that time could not be removed, the number of FNOs who had been waiting 12 months or more for a travel document to enforce their removal, and the number of FNOs subject to deportation action living in the community, at the end of quarter three 2012:

End of Q3 2012

FNOs facing removal or deportation who at that time could not be removed

512

FNOs waiting 12 months or more for a travel document to enforce removal

103

FNOs subject to deportation action living in the community6

3,980

11. The table below shows details of failed removals of FNOs, and the average time taken to remove an FNO, in quarter three of 2012:

Q3 2012

Number of failed removal attempts

165

Percentage of total removal attempts

13%

Average time (in days) taken to deport7

118

12. Note this relates to removal attempts, not individuals. One individual may account for multiple failed removals, and in most instances individuals involved in failed removals are successfully removed at a later date.

13. The table below shows a breakdown of the length of time since release of the FNOs living in the community at the end of quarter three 2012:

Q 3 2012

Less than six months

380

Less than 12 months

329

Less than 24 months

629

More than 24 months

1,598

More than 60 months

993

Data quality issues8

51

Total

3,980

14. The table below shows the percentage of FNO removals that were made during their Early Release Scheme (ERS) period and under the Facilitated Returns Scheme (FRS) in quarter three 2012:9

Q3 2012

ERS

45%

FRS

38%

Asylum and Immigration Caseload (18–21)

15. As I informed the Committee in my letter of 21 November, the Agency has completed its tracing programme and all of the cases remaining in the controlled archives have either been transferred to the live cohorts for caseworking or, where no trace was found, closed. Deloitte conducted an independent assurance exercise of this process to ensure that all the necessary checks were undertaken and the National Audit Office has been kept informed. Should any individual associated with a closed case subsequently come to light their case will be reactivated and, where appropriate, action taken to remove them from the UK.

16. Due to the way we record our data, I am unable to provide figures exactly in the format requested. The table below shows the number of cases in the asylum and migration live cohorts and the asylum and migration controlled archives at the end of the month specified (figures are to the nearest 500):

April
2011

September
2011

December
2011

March
2012

June
2012

September
2012

Live asylum cohort

23,000

21,500

17,000

21,000

25,500

28,500

Asylum controlled archive

75,500

98,000

93,000

80,000

74,000

70,000

Migration live cohort

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

3,500

4,000

Migration controlled archive

26,000

26,000

22,000

21,500

21,000

19,000

17. The table below shows a breakdown of the outcomes of the total concluded asylum legacy cases as at the end of quarter three 2012 (rounded to the nearest 100):

Conclusion total at end of Q3 2012

Grant

8,400

Removal

3,600

Duplicate

3,100

Deceased

*

Total

15,100

* Negligible (50 or less)

18. The table below shows a breakdown of the outcomes of the total concluded migration legacy cases as at the end of quarter three of 2012 (rounded to the nearest 100):

Conclusions total at the end of Q3 2012

Grant

1,000

Removal

600

Duplicate

500

Deceased

*

Total

2,100

* Negligible (50 or less)

19. I am unable to split granted figures by permanent and temporary grants of leave as we do not hold this information historically.

20. The controlled archive is managed within the CAAU and is not a stand alone unit. Therefore the controlled archive Full Time Equivalent (FTE) is included in the total CAAU FTE at the end of quarter three 2012 as follows:

End of Q3 2012

FTE employed in CAAU (including agency staff)

19910

Migration Refusal Pool

21. Each month the Agency decides cases, of which a proportion will be refusals. The Committee is aware that we keep a record of these refusals in order to satisfy ourselves that these individuals have subsequently left the UK. As reported in the Independent Chief Inspector’s report in to the Hampshire and Isle of Wight Local Immigration Team, we have previously targeted enforcement work on these cases at a regional level. We are now looking at the Migration Refusal Pool in a more systematic way through our national command, which will include bulk checking against a range of Home Office and other government databases and credit reference agency checks. As we clear casework backlogs the number of refusals will increase and these new refusals will be the subject of bulk checking at a future date.

22. The table below shows details of the number of records in the Migration Refusal Pool (MRP) over quarter three 2012:

Net number of
records at the
beginning of
Q3 2012

Number of
records that left
the pool during
Q3 2012

Number of
records that
entered the pool
during Q3 2012

Net number of
records at the
end of Q3 2012

MRP

174,057

24,772

32,256

181,541

23. A number of records in the MRP were assessed by the Agency during quarter three 2012 as part of our business as usual activities (casework and conclusion of applications; enforcement operations and removals etc). It is not possible to state how many of these records were assessed as a result of proactive work to tackle the MRP without conducting a manual check of each record which would incur a disproportionate cost. However, as I stated before the Committee in September, the responsibility for initially assessing records in the MRP has been contracted to Capita. This contract was signed on 29 October.

Sponsors and Licensing (22–30)

24. The table below shows the number of sponsors registered at the beginning of quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Tiers 2 and 511

25,104

Tier 4

2,036

25. The table below shows the number of sponsor applications made in each Tier in quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Tier 2

722

Tier 412

35

Tier 5

77

26. The table below shows the number of new sponsor applicants that received a pre-registration visit in quarter three 2012:

Pre-registration visits

Tier 2

181

Tier 4

10

Tier 5

7

Tiers 2 and 513

8

27. The table below shows the number of follow up visits made to sponsors in each Tier in quarter three 2012, and the number of these that were unannounced:

Follow up visits

Unannounced follow up visits

Tier 2

1,467

451

Tier 4

411

125

Tier 5

153

17

28. At the end of quarter three 2012 77% of Tier 4 sponsors had Highly Trusted Sponsor status.

29. The table below shows the average and maximum time taken to process a sponsor application in quarter three 2012:14

Q3 2012

Average

41 days

Maximum

283 days15

Number of applications that took longer than the average length of time to process

478

30. The time taken to process an application may be extended for a number of reasons, including awaiting the outcome of investigations by other government departments and agencies. Where an institution that applies for a sponsor licence is already, or becomes, under investigation by, for example, the police, we will co-operate fully with their investigation which may mean delaying issuing our decision. Additionally our decision may rest upon the outcome of these external investigations which we have no power to accelerate.

Visa Applications (31–34)

31. The table below shows the percentage of visa applications processed within the Agency’s service standards in quarter three 2012:

15 days (target: 90%)

30 days (target: 98%)

60 days (target: 100%)

Tier 1

85%

96%

99%

Tier 2

94%

99%

100%

Tier 4

95%

100%

100%

Tier 5

94%

100%

100%

32. The table below shows the number of visa applications in progress as at the end of quarter three 2012 for both temporary and permanent migration broken down by case type. It is not possible to run a report to show the equivalent figures retrospectively.

Category

Work in Progress

EEA Family Permits

456

Family Visit

4,881

Other Non-Settlement

1,252

Other Visitor

20,382

PBS Tier 1

388

PBS Tier 2

1,074

PBS Tier 4

4,295

PBS Tier 5

370

Student

15

Transit

238

Work permit

20

Non-Settlement Total

33,371

Settlement

11,909

33. The table below shows the average, maximum and minimum length of time between receipt of an application for refugee/humanitarian family reunion and the applicant being notified of the decision in quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Average

49 days

Maximum

216 days

Minimum

1 day

34. The table below shows the number and percentage of applications for refugee/humanitarian family reunion still pending at the end of quarter three 2012 that had been pending for more than six months:

Pending six to 12 months

Pending over 12 months

Number

7

399

Percentage

1%

29%

Enforcement (35–38)

35. In quarter one 2012 we issued 346 civil penalties to employers caught employing migrant workers illegally. At time of writing 43 of these penalties had been cancelled following an objection or appeal and 15 are still in the appeal process. Of the remaining 288 we have collected payments of over £480,000. We expect this figure to increase as many pay in instalments.

36. Note that the number of civil penalties has reduced by one since my last letter to the Committee. This is because of a duplicate record. The previous figure of 47 penalties cancelled included cases where an objection had been received, the penalty cancelled and then reissued. The figure of 43 does not include reissued penalties in accordance with our definition of cancelled penalties.

37. 310 Carriers Liability Charges were raised during quarter two of 2012, of which 223 (72%) have been collected. To identify what proportion of these was collected by the due date would require a manual check of each record which would incur a disproportionate cost. We are pursuing all outstanding debt.

38. The table below shows the number of sponsor notifications regarding non-compliance received in quarter three 2012:

Notifications in a potential non-compliance category16

Tiers 2 and 517

5,967

Tier 4

22,780

39. These figures have increased considerably since quarter two 2012, demonstrating an increase in sponsor compliance in light of the revocation of London Metropolitan University’s sponsor licence.

40. The table below shows the number of sponsors that had their licences suspended or revoked in the quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Suspended

Revoked

Tier 2

271

96

Tier 4

62

47

Tier 5

15

4

Appeal Tribunals (39–45)

41. The table below shows the number of First Tier Tribunal cases promulgated, allowed, dismissed and withdrawn in quarter two 2012:

First Tier Tribunal

Promulgated

Allowed

Dismissed

Withdrawn

Asylum

3,113

919

1,995

199

Managed Migration

6,458

2,745

2,950

763

Entry Clearance

5,232

1,872

2,011

1,349

Family Visit Visa

7,500

2,250

3,888

1,362

Deportation

164

49

100

15

42. The table below shows the number of Upper Tribunal cases promulgated, allowed, dismissed, withdrawn and remitted in quarter two 2012:

Upper Tribunal

Promulgated

Allowed

Dismissed

Withdrawn

Remitted

Asylum

624

169

388

47

20

Managed Migration

1,045

421

545

64

15

Entry Clearance

501

228

253

13

7

Family Visit Visa

184

73

109

1

1

Deportation

52

12

39

1

0

43. The table below shows the number of deportation appeals (First Tier and Upper Tribunal) promulgated, allowed, dismissed and withdrawn in quarter two 2012:

Promulgated

Allowed

Dismissed

Withdrawn

Deportation appeals

216

61

139

16

44. The table below shows the percentage of appeals at which the UK Border Agency was represented in quarter three 2012:

Representation rate

First Tier Tribunal

85%

Upper Tribunal

100%

Deportation

100%18

All appeal hearings

87%

45. The table below shows the number of cases where leave to remain was granted in quarter two 2012 following an appeal being withdrawn:

Admin
removals

Asylum

Entry
Clearance

Human
Rights

Permanent
migration

Temporary
migration

Total

First Tier

7

15

36

1

39

68

166

Upper Tier

0

0

1

0

2

8

11

Total

7

15

37

1

41

76

177

46. There were no deportation appeals in this category in quarter two 2012.

47. Please see below an update on our performance against targets in the Appeals Improvement Plan:

Bundle performance

48. We aim to get appeal bundles to courts by target timescales which are in advance of the appeal hearing. Ministry of Justice (MoJ) management information indicates performance against these timescales continues to improve, from 63% in 2011–12 to 66% between April and June 2012.19

Representation

49. We continue to achieve a 100% representation rate in the Upper Tribunal and at Deportation appeals. Management information suggests there has been significant increase in overall representation at First Tier hearings during quarter three, from 78% in July to 92% and 95% in August and September respectively. This is compared to 76% between April and June 2012. This improvement is due to recruitment into the presenting role and sharing staff resource between regional offices to meet hearing volumes.

Appeal Outcomes

50. MoJ published statistics show that over the three month period April to June20 UKBA won 49% of all appeals at the First Tier and 64% of asylum appeals. The win rate in 2011–12 was 44% (65% for asylum appeals).

Reducing appeal volumes

51. Appeal volumes are continuing to fall. MoJ published statistics show that in 2010–11 there were 136,800 appeals compared to 112,500 in 2011–12. April to June21 there were 25,500 appeals, compared to 26,700 in the same period last year.

52. The table below shows the average, shortest and longest time between the date when an appeal determination was received at the overseas post to the issuing of a visa/entry clearance for quarter two 2012:

Average time taken

22 days

Shortest time taken

1 day

Longest time taken

180 days

MPs’ Correspondence (46–47)

53. The table below shows the percentage of further action referrals that were completed within service standard and the percentage of MPs’ emails that were answered within service standard in quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Further action referrals

78%

MPs’ emails

83%

Detention (48–64)

54. 48 children entered immigration detention in quarter three 2012. As at 30 September 2012 there were no children in immigration detention.

55. It is not possible to provide definitive information on the number of people held in immigration detention found to have suffered a breach of Article 3 of the European Convention of Human Rights due to multiple grounds of challenge and the fact that cases are managed separately by different business areas.

56. The table below shows the number and proportion of people who entered immigration detention in the first three quarters of 2012 that were subsequently granted leave to enter or leave to remain in the UK, broken down by length of detention:

Quarter

Length of detention

Granted leave to enter

Proportion granted leave

2012 Q1

Total

34

0.5%

2012 Q1

Three days or less

17

0.8%

2012 Q1

Four to seven days

5

0.4%

2012 Q1

Eight to 14 days

7

0.6%

2012 Q1

15 to 28 days

3

0.2%

2012 Q1

29 days to three months

2

0.1%

2012 Q2

Total

23

0.3%

2012 Q2

Three days or less

15

0.8%

2012 Q2

Four to seven days

2

0.2%

2012 Q2

Eight to 14 days

2

0.2%

2012 Q2

15 to 28 days

3

0.3%

2012 Q2

29 days to three months

1

0.1%

2012 Q3

Total

31

0.4%

2012 Q3

Three days or less

15

0.7%

2012 Q3

Four to seven days

6

0.5%

2012 Q3

Eight to 14 days

4

0.4%

2012 Q3

15 to 28 days

3

0.2%

2012 Q3

29 days to three months

3

0.2%

57. The table below shows the number and proportion of people who left immigration detention in the first three quarters of 2012 that were subsequently granted leave to enter or leave to remain in the UK:

Quarter

Length of detention

Total number granted leave

Proportion granted leave

2012 Q1

Total

43

0.6%

2012 Q1

Three days or less

16

0.9%

2012 Q1

Four to seven days

4

0.4%

2012 Q1

Eight to 14 days

10

1.1%

2012 Q1

15 to 28 days

4

0.4%

2012 Q1

29 days to two months

2

0.2%

2012 Q1

Two to three months

3

0.7%

2012 Q1

Three to four months

0

0%

2012 Q1

Four to six months

1

0.5%

2012 Q1

Six to 12 months

1

0.7%

2012 Q1

12 to 18 months

2

5.7%

2012 Q1

18 months or more

0

0%

2012 Q2

Total

29

0.4%

2012 Q2

Three days or less

16

1%

2012 Q2

Four to seven days

2

0.2%

2012 Q2

Eight to 14 days

3

0.3%

2012 Q2

15 to 28 days

3

0.3%

2012 Q2

29 days to two months

2

0.2%

2012 Q2

Two to three months

2

0.4%

2012 Q2

Three to four months

0

0%

2012 Q2

Four to six months

0

0%

2012 Q2

Six to 12 months

1

0.7%

2012 Q2

12 to 18 months

0

0%

2012 Q2

18 months or more

0

0%

2012 Q3

Total

43

0.6%

2012 Q3

Three days or less

16

0.9%

2012 Q3

Four to seven days

7

0.7%

2012 Q3

Eight to 14 days

5

0.6%

2012 Q3

15 to 28 days

5

0.5%

2012 Q3

29 days to two months

5

0.4%

2012 Q3

Two to three months

0

0%

2012 Q3

Three to four months

3

1.3%

2012 Q3

Four to six months

1

0.4%

2012 Q3

Six to 12 months

1

0.7%

2012 Q3

12 to 18 months

0

0%

2012 Q3

18 months or more

0

0%

58. All people held are detained in the United Kingdom solely under Immigration Act powers and exclude those in police cells, Prison Service establishments, short term holding rooms at ports and airports (for less than 24 hours), and those recorded as detained under both criminal and immigration powers and their dependants. Data relates to most recent period of sole detention. The period of detention starts when a person first enters the UK Border Agency estate. If the person is then moved from a removal centre to a police cell or Prison Service establishment, this period of stay will be included if the detention is solely under Immigration Act powers.

59. Information on the reasons why people who entered or left immigration detention and were subsequently granted leave to enter the UK were originally detained could only be obtained by manually checking individual records which would incur a disproportionate cost.

60. The table below shows the overall cost of detaining people who entered immigration detention and were subsequently granted leave to enter or leave to remain in the UK in quarters one, two and three of 2012.

Quarter

Cost22

2012 Q1

£26,214.00

2012 Q2

£16,626.00

2012 Q3

£28,968.00

61. The table below shows the overall cost of detaining people who left immigration detention and were subsequently granted leave to enter or leave to remain in the UK in quarters one, two and three of 2012.

Quarter

Cost23

2012 Q1

£175,440.00

2012 Q2

£61,914.00

2012 Q3

£114,852.00

62. The cost of detaining an individual in immigration detention is £102 per day. This value is based on the total cost of running the detention estate on a per bed, per day basis.

63. The fact that an individual detained by UKBA is subsequently granted leave does not necessarily mean that the decision to detain was incorrect. In many cases new information is provided at a later stage that alters the individual’s status, whilst in others an individual may enter detention for their own safety while a final decision is made on their case.

64. The table below shows the number of reports under Rule 35 that were made to UKBA about individuals in immigration detention, and the number of these that resulted in the individual being released, in the first three quarters of 2012:

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Rule 35 reports

314

280

231

Rule 35 reports resulting in release

27

14

13

65. The table below shows a breakdown of the number of reports made under Rule 35 in the first three quarters of 2012 by institution:

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Brook House IRC

17

15

20

Campsfield House IRC

17

28

12

Cedars PDA

0

1

0

Colnbrook IRC

43

43

16

Dover IRC

22

38

38

Dungavel IRC

31

31

18

Harmondsworth IRC

31

35

16

Haslar IRC

6

3

3

Larne House

1

3

5

Morton Hall IRC

60

39

35

Pennine House

31

24

26

Tinsley House

23

9

17

Yarlswood IRC

81

64

74

66. The totals for each quarter in the above tables do not match as some detainees move between institutions. In such cases one individual’s Rule 35 report will be counted against more than one immigration removal centre.

Intelligence (65–70)

67. The National Allegations Database went live on 30 September as scheduled with the roll out of the Allegation Management System. The key benefits being introduced at this stage include the ability to count what we receive nationally (previously done manually) and an ability to track an individual allegation through to outcome. The next phase of the system, which will change the public facing elements of this system and provide members of the public with an e-form to submit, is scheduled currently for delivery in 2013.

68. The table below contains details of the allegations received, and action taken, during quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Total allegations received24

28,243

Percentage given an initial assessment within 48 hours of receipt

99%

Subsequently investigated by UKBA25

15,269

Allegations-based enforcement action taken26

797

Allegations-based arrests27

561

69. Removals information is currently recorded on a separate system therefore data matching has to be carried out between the National Operations Database and the Case Information Database to identify those individuals arrested subsequently removed. Following the National Allegations Database becoming operational a unique reference number will be applied across both systems to allow the UK Border Agency to track the outcome of allegations based activity.

Asylum (71–92)

70. The table below shows the number of individuals removed from the UK and subsequently granted refugee status or humanitarian protection in quarter three 2012:

Q3 2012

Individuals removed from the UK and subsequently granted refugee status or humanitarian protection

4

71. These figures are made up of nationals of Iran, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. For data protection reasons I am unable to provide a more specific breakdown.

72. The table below shows the number of Azure cards28 in use during the first three quarters of 2012:

Period

Number of unique Azure cards in use (averages)

Q1 2012

2,846

Q2 2012

2,764

Q3 2012

2,823

73. Neither UKBA nor Sodexo maintain specific data for problems with Azure cards (ie those which do not function due to technical problems with the card and/or its interface with the Azure payment network). Issues that require corrective action are logged as generic support enquiries. I am therefore unable to provide the data requested.

74. When a period of leave for applicants granted asylum or humanitarian protection expires, the applicant will then be subject to a review of their leave to remain in the UK in order to obtain a residence permit. To progress this a settlement case must be raised and considered before any residence permits are issued. Therefore the data provided in relation to questions 75–92 relates to settlement applications which support the issue of residence permits.

75. Our systems do not allow us to differentiate whether these applications are from individuals that have previously been granted asylum or humanitarian protection, therefore I am only able to provide a total for each quarter.

76. The table below shows the number of applications for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection in the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Applications

1,776

1,952

1,754

77. The table below shows the number of applications for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection that were outstanding at the end of the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Applications

93

657

1,601

78. The table below shows the average length of time that it took to process an application for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection in the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Times (days)

103

140

109

79. The table below shows the number of applications that took longer than the average time to process an application for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection in the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Applications

639

642

92

80. The table below shows the maximum length of time that it took to process an application for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection in the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Time

301

221

129

81. The table below shows the number of acknowledgement letters that were issued to applicants that submitted an application for settlement received from people granted asylum and humanitarian protection in the first three quarters of 2012:

Quarter

Q1 2012

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Acknowledgement letters issued

1,776

1,952

1,754

Staff Numbers and Remuneration (63—65)

82. The table below shows the number of full time equivalent (FTE) staff employed by the Agency, by group, at the end of quarter three 2012. Note this reflects the new Agency structure as outlined in the organisational chart that I provided with my letter of 7 September:

Q3 2012

International Operations and Visas

1,982

Resource and Organisational Directorate

1,315

Strategy and Intelligence Directorate

541

Enforcement and Crime Group

4,102

Immigration and Settlement Group

4,243

Director of Operations

982

Total

13,165

83. The Agency spent £27,000 on external consultants in quarter three 2012.

December 2012

1 Includes those subsequently found to have a form of nationality / status that precluded deportation and those against whom we did not pursue deportation due to the loss (or the likely loss) at appeal.

2 Includes cases currently being caseworked, application to revoke deportation order, children issues, further representations, medical reasons, awaiting travel documents, deportation order not yet served, awaiting removal, decision served.

3 Appeal against deportation, asylum claim, judicial review.

4 Emergency Travel Document (ETD) compliant but country situation prohibits removal; ETD required, non compliant and unwilling to go voluntarily.

5 Nationality not confirmed; unable to revoke asylum.

6 Includes absconders and those who for legal reasons we are unable to detain.

7 The length of time between date time served and removal date.

8 These are cases where the custodial end date or early release date were not recorded at the time. Manual checks conducted since my letter of 7 September have reduced the number of cases in this category from 162 at the end of quarter 2 2012. The remainder are old cases that we will continue to work through to determine the release date.

9 Note that individuals may be removed under FRS as well as during their ERS period, therefore some records will be included in both categories.

10 The 50 additional FTE since my last letter are temporary agency staff.

11 Tier 2 and Tier 5 sponsors appear on the same sponsor register.

12 Not all of these applications are for new licences. For example, the figures also include reinstatements.

13 These are sponsors that have applied for both a Tier 2 and Tier 5 sponsor licence simultaneously.

14 Our service standard is to process 80% of sponsor applications within four weeks.

15 This was due to an administrative oversight in formally closing the case on our database. In fact the decision was made and dispatched to the applicant within 25 days of receipt.

16 Note that sponsors self-select from a number of categories and a proportion are miscategorised.

17 The Sponsor Management System (SMS) does not distinguish between Tier 2 and Tier 5 employers for the purposes of sponsor notifications.

18 UKBA was represented at 703 out of 704 deportation hearings. We were not represented at one hearing due to a listing error whereby we were not sent notification of the hearing.

19 These are statistics published by the Ministry of Justice and data covering July to September 2012 has not yet been published.

20 As above.

21 As above.

22 The cost has been calculated based on the daily per bed per day cost of detention provided in response to question 61.

23 As above.

24 A breakdown of the type of allegations received is not currently recorded.

25 Following initial assessment, details of allegations are logged and sent to the appropriate teams for research and development. No further action may be taken either because they were not linked to Agency priorities, they do not contain enough information to identify a crime, or they contain information which had been provided previously or which was known to be incorrect or vexatious.

26 This details the number of enforcement visits as a result of the receipt of an allegation by the UK Border Agency Intelligence Unit, not necessarily linked to allegations received in the same quarter. For historical data we are unable to link specific allegations to a specific enforcement activity. This has been addressed with implementation of the National Allegations Database.

27 Arrest information relates to the number of instances an arrest has been made and is not a count of the number of individuals arrested. Not all the individuals arrested are subject to immigration control and therefore are not removable. For example a British citizen may be arrested for facilitation and would not be removed.

28 The Azure is a pre-payment card designed to enable failed asylum claimants to buy essential food and toiletries while they make arrangements to leave the UK.

Prepared 25th March 2013