Health CommitteeSupplementary written evidence from The Portman Group (GAS 54A)

Regional Data—Q156

Whilst it is encouraging that the overall national context around drinking patterns and harms is showing improvement across many indicators, some local areas have disproportionately high alcohol-related harms, with a particular concentration in the North West and North East. For example, data on the North West regional Health authority website1 shows:

Rates of alcohol specific mortality and liver disease in Blackpool are nearly 3 times the national average.

Alcohol specific hospital admissions in Liverpool are nearly 2.5 times the National average.

Binge drinking in North Tyneside, and indeed much of the North East, is 1.5 times the national average

The alcohol industry has developed a number of schemes to support local areas in promoting responsible drinking and combatting alcohol related harms, details of which can be found below.

The Portman Group will be working with local partners and the alcohol industry over the next year to ensure these, and similar schemes, are appropriately targeted where they would be of most benefit to effectively meet pressing local needs.

Best Bar None

Best Bar None is a national award scheme supported by the Home Office and aimed at promoting responsible management and operation of alcohol licensed premises. It was piloted in Manchester in 2003 and found to improve standards in the night time economy, with premises now competing to participate. It has since been adopted by 100 towns and cities across the UK and is now being taken up internationally.

The aim of BBN is to reduce alcohol related crime and disorder in a town centre by building a positive relationship between the licensed trade, police and local authorities.

It reduces the harmful effects of binge drinking as well as improves the knowledge and skills of enforcement and regulation agencies, licensees and bar staff to help them responsibly manage licensed premises.

The process of becoming recognised by BBN includes meeting minimum standards and culminates with a high profile award night with category winners and an overall winner.

Responsible operators are recognised and able to share good practice with others. A scheme can also highlight how operating more responsibly can improve the profitability of an individual business and attractiveness of a general area.

The following areas currently operate the scheme:

England & Wales

Altrincham

Leeds

Aylesbury Vale

Leicester

Barnsley

Lincoln

Bedford

Luton

Birmingham

Manchester

Bishop Auckland

Middlesbrough

Bournemouth

Nationwide—NUSSL

Bradford

Newcastle City Centre

Brent

Newcastle under Lyme

Bromley

Newport, South Wales

Calderdale

Northamptonshire

Camden

North Lincolnshire

Carlisle & Eden

Norwich

Ceredigion—covering Aberystwyth, Cardigan,

Nottingham

Lampeter, Averaeron, Llandysul, Tregaron

Oldham

Cheltenham

Peterhead

Chester-le-Street

Plymouth

City of York & Selby District

Poole

Consett

Portsmouth

Conwy and Denbighshire

Reading

Cornwall

Redbridge

Croydon

Rochdale

Darlington

Rhondda Cynon Taff

Derby City Centre

Sefton

Doncaster

Scarborough

Durham City Centre

Sheffield

Ealing

Shropshire

East Lindsey

Solihull

East Riding including Bridlington, Beverley,

Southampton

Driffield, Hornsea, Coltingham, Hessle, Goole,

Stafford

Howden & Pocklington

Stockport

Filey

Sunderland

High Wycombe

Sutton

Hull

Swindon

Ipswich

Thames Valley Area—covering Newbury

Isle of Wight

Wakfield

Islington

Walsall

Jersey

Watford

Kensington & Chelsea

Whitby

Kingston upon Thames

Wigan

Kingston upon Hull

Woking

Kirklees

Scotland

Aberdeen City Centre

 

Aberdeenshire—covering Fraserburgh, Peterhead, Inverurie

Angus—covering Forfar, Kirriemuir, Brechin, Montrose and Monifeith

Central—covering Falkirk Town centre and Stirling City Centre

East Lothian—covering Musselburgh

Mid Lothian—covering Dalkeith and Aberlady

Fife—covering Kircaldy, Dunfermline, Glenrothes, Leven, Cupar, Cowdenbeath and St Andrews

Northern—covering Inverness City Centre

Strathclyde—covering Glasgow City Centre

Tayside—covering Dundee City Centre and Perth City Centre

West Lothian—covering Livingston, Bathgate, Linlithgow, East Calder, Whitburn, Fauldhouse, Newton village, Broxburn, Seafield, Uphall and Armadale

Scottish Borders—covering Galashiels Town centre

Community Alcohol Partnerships (CAPs)

Launched in 2007, Community Alcohol Partnerships were originally developed by the Retail of Alcohol Standards Group in an effort to tackle underage drinking and is now a standalone Community Interest Company.

Community Alcohol Partnerships are developed within individual communities to tackle underage drinking and related antisocial behaviour. CAPs are tailored to suit local needs and, depending on the nature and extent of the problem, different methods of best practice will be adopted in order to best tackle the issue. The range of measures that could be adopted includes:

Enforcement

Joint Police & Trading Standards activity.

Visible Trading Standards and Police coordinated operations in hot spot areas.

Education

Retailers, Police and the Local Authority communicate agreed messages.

Handouts developed for school and in store use.

Local schools, sixth form colleges and youth clubs engaged.

Engagement with parents as well as young people.

Health Authority involvement.

Partnership Working

Early intelligence sharing.

Training for independent retailers.

Buddying systems.

Co-ordinated signage and leaflets.

Regular meetings.

Community Alcohol Partnerships is funded with contributions from the some of the UKs largest drinks producers as well as large and small retailers.

The following areas currently have CAPs up and running:

Bath (Midsomer Norton)

Berkshire (Caversham)

Cambridge (St Neots, South Cambs, Ely & Soham, Wisbech)

Devon (Tiverton, Crediton, Cullompton)

Durham (Stanley)

Hampshire—(Gosport, Havant & Gosport)

Islington

Kent (Edenbridge, Maidstone, Whitstable, Margate, Cliftonville, Canterbury, Thanet, Swanley)

Norfolk (Great Yarmouth)

Powys (Brecon)

Reading (Tilehurst, Caversham)

Shropshire (Ludlow, Oswestry)

South Yorkshire (Barnsley—Dearne, Peniston, Grimethorpe, Kendray&Worsbrough)

Sussex East (Hastings)

Scotland (Rosyth)

Northern Ireland (Derry/Londonderry)

Purple Flag

Purple Flag has been designed as an objective assessment that will help improve town or city centres at night. Most significantly it is designed to provide recognition that areas are managing their night time experience, and thus help overcome any negative public perceptions that may exist. Purple Flag provides the opportunity for successful centres to present themselves in their true colours and in a positive light to town centre users, including operators, residents, tourists and visitors.

Purple Flag aims to raise the standard and broaden the appeal of centres between 1700 and 0600. The scheme is managed by the ATCM working alongside the Purple Flag Advisory Committee—a partnership of key stakeholder groups, including central and local government, police, business and consumers.

Areas that reach or surpass Purple Flag standards can fly the flag! Benefits include:

A raised profile and an improved public image.

Increased visitors.

Increased expenditure.

Lower crime and anti-social behaviour.

A more successful mixed-use economy.

Purple Flag has been developed by ATCM from original research undertaken by the Civic Trust as part of the “NightVision” project. This showed that:

More people would use centres at night if they were safer, more accessible and offered more choice.

A good mix of clientele can lessen intimidation and improve perceptions.

A wider range of attractions and consumers leads to longer term economic viability.

The following places have all achieved the purple flag standards:

Aylesbury

High Wycombe

Bangor

Kingston Upon Thames

Bath

Leicester Square, Westminster

Belfast

Liverpool

Birmingham

Manchester

Bournemouth

Nottingham

Bristol

Oxford

Canterbury

Preston

Clerkenwell, Islington, London

Stockton Heath—Warrington

Covent Garden, Westminster

Torquay

Derry—Londonderry

Victoria—Westminster

Enniskillen

Winchester

Halifax

Pubwatch

Pubwatch is a scheme set up and run by licensees to reduce crime and disorder in pubs and clubs. Supported by the police, it is a national initiative, which is proved to reduce violence and other types of criminal acts such as drug dealing and vandalism.

The scheme works by creating links between licensees, allowing information—such as the identity of troublemakers—to be passed quickly between each other and police. It also provides a forum where licensees can share problems and solutions.

There are a number of advantages for licensees joining the scheme, including:

membership of Pubwatch deters troublemakers;

a reduced risk of licensees, staff and customers being assaulted or abused;

less damage caused to property and smaller repair bills; and

it is good for trade—Pubwatch helps create a pleasant environment to work and socialise in.

There are also advantages for the police, such as:

officers know more about potential troublemakers and get better quality information which they can act upon;

by receiving more precise details in calls for assistance, police can make the best response;

violence in and around licensed premises reduce; and

improving the working relationship between police and the licensed trade.

Nationally, police statistics show a significant decrease in violent offenders in those pubs where the scheme operates. The rapid growth of Pubwatch shows the scheme is valued by both the licensed trade and police.

A detailed map of Pubwatch areas can be found on the National Pubwatch website.2

June 2012

1 http://www.lape.org.uk/data.html

2 http://www.nationalpubwatch.org.uk/NPWMapping/

Prepared 19th July 2012