Victims: Surcharges

Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how much income the Victims Surcharge (a) generated and (b) was originally projected to generate in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13. [165774]

17 July 2013 : Column 735W

Mrs Grant: We want criminals to properly pay for their crimes and so in October 2012 we increased and extended the Victim Surcharge to ensure criminals pay for victims’ services, and that they pay more than they used to. These changes will help generate up to £50 million extra a year from offenders for victims’ services on top of the £66 million already spent by Government.

Having previously only been ordered with fines at a flat rate of £15, until the reforms were introduced last October, receipts from the Victim Surcharge were dependent on the number of fines issued by the courts.

In 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13 the Victim Surcharge raised £10.5 million, £10.3 million and £10.5 million respectively.

Work Capability Assessment: Appeals

Mr Byrne: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice what proportion of claimants have appealed successfully against the original Atos determination of their capacity to work in each year since 2009. [162054]

Mrs Grant: The First-tier Tribunal—Social Security and Child Support (SSCS), administered by HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) hears appeals against Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) decisions on entitlement to employment and support allowance (ESA), decisions in which the work capability assessment (WCA) undertaken by Atos is a key factor, rather than appeals against WCA decisions themselves or Atos themselves. HMCTS does not, therefore, hold the information requested.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

Egypt

Jeremy Corbyn: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on what date the UK gave recognition to the current administration of Egypt. [165773]

Alistair Burt: We recognise states not Governments, and we will work with the authorities in Egypt. We have stressed the need for a swift return to democratic processes and dialogue with all sides.

Equality

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much has been spent by his Department (a) in total and (b) on staff costs on promoting equality and diversity in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and how many people are employed by his Department for this purpose. [165454]

Alistair Burt: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is committed to promoting diversity and inclusion for all its employees. The following table shows the amounts spent by the FCO's central diversity and equality team and the staffing costs for that team over the last three years.

17 July 2013 : Column 736W

 Cost of activities (£)Staff costs (£)Staff (full-time equivalent)

2010-11

115,031

98,671

2

2011-12

174,118

98,202

2

2012-13

27,374

111,465

3

Diversity and equality considerations are factored into a wide range of aspects of the FCO's work as an employer, as a provider of services to British people around the world and in the development and delivery of aspects of foreign policy. The figures in this table do not include spending and staff costs for all these activities, for which data is not held centrally, nor for the costs of individual reasonable adjustments for officers with a disability under the Equality Act 2010. The FCO publishes an annual Equality Report which provides information about the diversity and makeup of our staff, as required by the Equality Act 2010.

EU Budget

Sir Richard Shepherd: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs in which of the last 20 years the auditors of the EU have refused to approve the EU accounts; and what the reasons for such refusals were in each case. [165012]

Greg Clark: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Treasury.

For the last 18 consecutive years the European Court of Auditors (ECA) has not been able to give a positive statement of assurance on the spending of EU funds, due to material error being found in EU budget payments. The ECA requires an error rate of less than 2% before declaring the EU budget to be free from material error.

Grant Thornton

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how much his Department has spent on contracts with Grant Thornton in each year since 2008. [165692]

Mr Lidington: The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) did not have any contracts or spend with Grant Thornton in the financial years from 2007-08 to 2012-13.

Hamas

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what the Government's position is on negotiating with Hamas. [165394]

Alistair Burt: Our policy on Hamas is clear: we do not have any direct contact with Hamas. Hamas must renounce violence, recognise Israel, and accept previously signed agreements. Hamas must make credible movement towards these conditions, which remain the benchmark against which its intentions should be judged.

Hezbollah

Bob Blackman: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the implications of Hezbollah activities for British interests in the Middle East. [165716]

17 July 2013 : Column 737W

Alistair Burt: We have condemned Hezbollah’s acknowledged military involvement in Syria. It is prolonging the Assad regime's brutal repression of the Syrian people and, by undermining Lebanon's agreed policy of disassociation from the Syria conflict, risks destabilising Lebanon. We also remain very concerned by continued reports of transfers of conventional weapons from Syria and Iran to Hezbollah in Lebanon, including Hezbollah’s own claims that it possesses significant military capabilities. Any such transfers would be in violation of Security Council resolution 1701 and would pose a threat to Lebanese and regional stability.

Bob Blackman: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on adding Hezbollah to the EU's list of recognised terrorist organisations. [165727]

Alistair Burt: We firmly believe that the evidence indicating Hezbollah’s Military Wing as a terrorist organisation, and an organisation that has committed terrorism on EU soil, to be compelling. This is why we believe that their formal listing by the EU as a terrorist organisation is fully justified. We continue to work closely with EU countries on this issue and want to reach a robust, collective EU position. Ministerial colleagues, senior officials and I continue to have the necessary discussions with our EU counterparts to achieve this aim.

Iran

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of links between the Iranian Government and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard. [165357]

Alistair Burt: The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) is a military force created to defend the principles of the Islamic Revolution. It sits alongside Iran's regular military under a combined command structure of which the Supreme Leader is Commander-in-Chief. It has significant political, defence, and economic links and influence. Many politicians and officials are serving or former IRGC members. The most senior IRGC commanders have particularly close contact with the Supreme Leader.

Israel

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made of trade between the UK and Israel in the first quarter of 2013; and if he will make a statement. [165367]

Alistair Burt: Our bilateral trade has consistently been in excess of £2 billion over the last 10 years and should reach £4 billion this year. Between January and April 2013, the UK exported £482 million of goods, a decrease of 10% on the same period in 2012. Between January and April 2013, the UK imported £1,103 million of goods, an increase of 47% on the same period in 2012.

17 July 2013 : Column 738W

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his policy is on public campaigns for boycotting Israeli produce, universities and speakers. [165398]

Alistair Burt: We do not agree with many of Israel's actions with respect to the Occupied Palestinian Territories and do not hesitate to express strong views whenever we feel it necessary. At the same time, we enjoy a close and productive relationship with Israel which enables us to express our views at senior levels very frankly. It is our assessment that boycotts of Israel would lessen this influence, not increase it, and would not promote the urgent progress towards a two-state solution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict which we want to see. We view with concern campaigns Israeli speakers at higher education institutions.

Mali

Stephen Phillips: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent assessment he has made of the efficacy of European Union Training Mission Mali. [165076]

Mr Robathan: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) receives weekly reports from the Mission Commander and UK personnel within the European Union Training Mission (EUTM) Mali. Through these means, the MOD is able to monitor the efficacy of the mission against the agreed political objectives set out in the mission's Crisis Management Concept.

To date, the EUTM Mali has trained the first of four battalions specified in the mission mandate. This first battalion consisted of approximately 650 personnel and completed its training in early June.

Currently, around 700 soldiers of the second battalion to be trained are in the process of reporting to the training camp.

Our current assessment is that the mission is delivering against its objectives. However, it is too early to assess the effectiveness of the trained troops on operations as they have only recently deployed forward.

Occupied Territories

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his policy is on a boycott of settlement goods from the West Bank. [165314]

Alistair Burt: We understand the concerns of people who do not wish to purchase goods exported from Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. It was in order to enable consumers to make a more fully informed decision concerning the products they buy that, in December 2009, the UK introduced voluntary guidelines to enable produce from Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories to be specifically labelled as such. We welcome Baroness Ashton's commitment to work with fellow Commissioners to prepare EU-wide guidelines on the labelling of settlement produce. These are an important step to ensure correct and coherent implementation of EU consumer protection and labelling

17 July 2013 : Column 739W

legislation, which is in fulfilment of our previous commitments and is fully consistent with long-standing policy in relation to settlements. But there are currently no plans for EU or domestic legislation to ban the import of settlement products. We have received no representations from Palestinian workers in the West Bank either calling for, or opposing; a boycott of settlement produce.

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what his policy is on campaigns for boycotting settlement produce in the west bank; and what representations he has received from Palestinian workers in the west bank on their opposition to boycotts of settlement produce. [165397]

Alistair Burt: We understand the concerns of people who do not wish to purchase goods exported from Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. It was in order to enable consumers to make a more fully informed decision concerning the products they buy that, in December 2009, the UK introduced voluntary guidelines to enable produce from Israeli settlements in the Occupied Territories to be specifically labelled as such. We welcome Baroness Ashton's commitment to work with fellow Commissioners to prepare EU-wide guidelines on the labelling of settlement produce. These are an important step to ensure correct and coherent implementation of EU consumer protection and labelling legislation, which is in fulfilment of our previous commitments and is fully consistent with long-standing policy in relation to settlements. But there are currently no plans for EU or domestic legislation to ban the import of settlement products. We have received no representations from Palestinian workers in the west bank either calling for, or opposing, a boycott of settlement produce.

Official Cars

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which officials of his Department are entitled to use a car from the Government car pool. [165351]

Mr Lidington: Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials do not use the Government Car Service.

The FCO provides internal guidance to staff on use of public transport and taxis. The London Car Service, a small pool of cars operated by FCO Services, is also used by certain senior officials including the Permanent Under-Secretary.

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many officials of his Department used Government cars in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012. [165352]

Mr Lidington: Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials do not use the Government Car Service.

The FCO provides internal guidance to staff on use of public transport and taxis. The London Car Service, a small pool of cars operated by FCO Services, is also used by certain senior officials including the Permanent Under-Secretary.

17 July 2013 : Column 740W

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many officials in his Department were entitled to use the Government car pool in each year since 2009. [165358]

Mr Lidington: Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) officials do not use the Government Car Service.

The FCO provides internal guidance to staff on use of public transport and taxis. The London Car Service, a small pool of cars operated by FCO Services, is also used by certain senior officials including the permanent under-secretary.

Travel

Gavin Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) how many officials in his Department travelled business class by train in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; and what the cost was in each such year; [165338]

(2) how many officials in his Department travelled by economy class train in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; and what the cost to the public purse was in each such year; [165341]

(3) how many officials in his Department travelled by first class train in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; and what the cost to the public purse was in each such year; [165344]

(4) how many officials of his Department travelled economy class by aeroplane in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012; and what the total cost was of such travel in each such year; [165372]

(5) how many officials of his Department travelled first class by aeroplane in (a) 2011-12, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2009-10 and (d) 2008-09; and what the total cost was of such travel in each such year; [165375]

(6) how many officials of his Department travelled business class by aeroplane in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12; and what the total cost was in each year. [165437]

Alistair Burt: I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 25 April 2013, Official Report, column 1055W.

Treasury

Air Passenger Duty

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he plans to commission further analysis of the economic impact of air passenger duty on the tourist industry in the UK. [165828]

Sajid Javid: The Chancellor keeps all taxes under review and considers them in the round. The Government have limited the rise in air passenger duty (APD) to inflation over the period 2010-11 to 2012-13. Budget 2013 set out rates from April 2014, which will also only rise in line with inflation, ensuring that level of APD will again remain constant in real terms.

Bank Services

Mr Bain: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will estimate the number of people without access to basic banking facilities in each parliamentary constituency in the UK; and what plans his Department has to reduce this number. [165636]

17 July 2013 : Column 741W

Sajid Javid: The Government do not collect this data.

The UK's basic bank account policy has been successful in driving down the number of individuals without access to such accounts within the UK. The Government are continuing to work with UK industry on access to bank accounts ahead of the introduction of universal credit and have recognised the recommendations of the Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards regarding UK basic bank accounts.

The Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards recommended that the major banks come to a voluntary agreement on minimum standards for basic bank accounts, including the free use of the ATM network.

Civil Servants: Pay

Mr Tom Clarke: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the annual pay settlements in the Civil Service were between 1983 and 1997. [165824]

17 July 2013 : Column 742W

Danny Alexander: This information is not readily available. Accessing it would impose disproportionate cost to the Department.

Day Care

Paul Burstow: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much the Government has allocated in each of the last five years to programmes to support families to meet (a) the cost of childcare and (b) the cost of care of adult children or other family members. [165857]

Sajid Javid: The Government hold the following information on budget allocations or where these are not produced, actual expenditure over the last five financial years.

£ million
Programme2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Childcare element of working tax credits

1,567

1,618

1,548

1,217

n/a

Employer-Supported Childcare(1)

400

460

530

670

640

Spending by local authorities on free early education for three-four year olds(2)

1,796

1,883

Spending by local authorities on free early education for two year olds

17

58

67

64

296

Spending by local authorities on Adult Social Care (cash terms)(3, 4, 5)

13,850

14,460

14,610

14,750

n/a

(1) These figures include childcare vouchers and directly contracted childcare but not workplace nurseries. (2) A new method for LAs to fund providers of free early education was introduced in 2011, because of the way data was collected before this change it is not possible to obtain complete data on free early education spend prior to 2011-12. (3) It is for local authorities to determine the allocation of expenditure across services provided at a local level; figures for adult social care are therefore actual expenditure rather than an allocation.. (4) Figures for adult social care are collected and published by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSGC). They do not take into account funding transferred from the NHS to local authorities to support adult social care services. Expenditure data for 2012-13 is not yet available. (5) Expenditure on disability and carers' benefits is in addition to this.

Equality

Philip Davies: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much has been spent by his Department (a) in total and (b) on staff costs on promoting equality and diversity in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and how many people are employed by his Department for this purpose. [165460]

Sajid Javid: In common with other Government Departments HM Treasury seeks to promote equality of opportunity for all its employees.

Table 1 gives the total spend by HM Treasury in each of the last three financial years on promoting equality and diversity.

Table 1
 £

2010-11

139,465

2011-12

96,663

2012-13

(1)56,018

(1) In 2010-11 and 2011-12 the salary cost for a support worker for a employee with a disability was met form the diversity budget. In 2012-13 this cost (HM Treasury range C, salary range £21,837-£27,970) was met from the employee's team budget.

The spend, detailed in Table 1, is from the diversity budget and includes funding for reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities as required by the disability section of the Equality Act.

In addition to the spend detailed in Table 1, staff costs on promoting equality and diversity are (i) one full-time equivalent employee at HM Treasury range D/D2 (in pay range £31,000 to £45,000) and (ii) from April 2013, 20% of an HR business partner leading on diversity at HM Treasury range E (in pay range £45,283-£64,498).

Government Departments: Assets

Nicholas Soames: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how Government Departments are incentivised to offer up assets for disposal and complete sales rapidly to contribute to debt reduction; and if he will make a statement. [165644]

Danny Alexander: The Government are committed to ensuring the effective and efficient management of publicly owned assets, including assessing options for disposal. Departments are permitted to retain up to 120% of the asset sales proceeds that they have negotiated with HM Treasury as part of the spending round.

17 July 2013 : Column 743W

In ‘Investing in Britain's Future’, published on 27 June, the Government announced an ambitious target for central Government to deliver at least £15 billion of asset sales between 2015 and 2020. To support the delivery of this target, the Government also announced the intention to implement a series of policy changes, including improved incentives for central Government Departments to ensure efficient use of assets. Further details on these policies will be provided at autumn statement 2013.

Infrastructure

Ann McKechin: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many applications there have been to the UK Guarantees scheme; and how many such applications were accepted. [165741]

Danny Alexander [holding answer 16 July 2013]: Over 125 inquiries have been received to date. More

17 July 2013 : Column 744W

than 25 projects, worth £13.5 billion, are prequalified in addition to Hinkley Point C for a Guarantee. A further nine projects that prequalified for the scheme have found, or are close to finding, financing without the need for a Guarantee.

NHS: Pay

Mr Tom Clarke: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what the annual pay settlements in the NHS were between 1983 and 1997; [165781]

(2) what the annual pay settlements for doctors and consultants were between 1983 and 1997. [165823]

Danny Alexander: The information requested is provided in the following table.

 Hospital Medical StaffStaff covered by NHS Pay Review Body, or predecessors (non-medical)
 PercentageDescriptionPercentageDescription

1983-84

6

In full(1)

(2)

(2)

1984-85

6.9

Staged(3)

7.8

In full

1985-86

6.3

From 1 June

12.1

Staged(4)

1986-87

7.6

From 1 June

8.2

from 1 July

1987-88

7.7

In full

9.1

In full

1988-89

7.9

In full

8.8

In full

1989-90

8.2

In full

7.7

In full

1990-91

9.5 to 11

Staged(5)

10.1

Staged(6)

1991-92

9.5 to 11

Staged(7)

9.8

Staged(8)

1992-93

5.5 to 8.5

In full

6.3

In full

1993-94

1.5

In full

1.5

In full

1994-95

3.0

In full

3.0

In full

1995-96

2.5 to 2.8

In full

1.5 to 3.0

In full

1996-97

3.8 to 6.8

Staged(9)

2.0

In full

1997-98

3.4

Staged(10)

3.3

Staged(11)

(1) In addition, 3% abated from 1982 recommendations restored from January 1984. (2) Formerly-named bodies of National Health Service Pay Review Body first established for 1984-85 pay round. (3) 3% from 1 April; balance from 1 November. (4) 5% from 1 April; balance from 1 February. (5) 7.5% from 1 April; balance from 1 December. (6) 7% from 1 April; balance from 1 January. (7) 7.5% from 1 April; balance from 1 December. (8) 7.5% from 1 April; balance from 1st December. (9) 1% held back to 1 December. (10) 2% from 1 April; balance from 1 December. (11) 2.8% from 1 April; balance from 1 December. Source: Department of Health

Public Expenditure: Scotland

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much funding in (a) capital DEL, (b) resource DEL and (c) financial transactions has been allocated to the Scottish Government in (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16. [165765]

Danny Alexander: I refer the hon. Member to my answers of 17 and 24 June 2013, Official Report, columns 455W and 84W.

Information relating to 2015-16 is shown in the following table:

2015-16
 £ million

Capital DEL

2,964

Of which:

 

Financial transactions

311

Resource DEL

26,686

Smuggling: Tobacco

Stephen Williams: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much HM Revenue and Customs spent on the Tackling Tobacco Smuggling strategy in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; how many of his Department's staff worked on implementing the strategy in each such year; and how many such staff were engaged in (i)

17 July 2013 : Column 745W

detection, (ii) intelligence-gathering and analysis, (iii) investigations and (iv) the provision of legal advice. [165649]

Sajid Javid: HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) total expenditure on tobacco work was £68.918 million in 2011-12 and £67.641 million in 2012-13. This includes administration and policy, as well as enforcement.

It is not possible to provide the information in the format requested as HMRC does not record the number of staff spent working on the tackling tobacco strategy separately. To the extent that the Government are able to breakdown the number of staff engaged on tobacco related activity this is detailed in the following table:

Full-time equivalent
HMRC activity2011-122012-13

Investigation (includes detection, criminal investigation, and specialist civil investigation)

541

556

Risk and Intelligence

176

184

Other

60

37

Total

777

777

Note: Estimated figure

These figures represent HMRC's best estimate of the way resources were used in the years specified, bearing in mind that staff employed on anti-fraud activity often cover a number of different taxes and commodities. HMRC is unable to disaggregate time spent on the provision of legal advice on tobacco from time spent on other advisory work.

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what guidance his Department follows in determining whether statistics in answers to parliamentary questions are (a) provided in full, (b) provided via a link to a website and (c) placed in the Library. [165497]

Sajid Javid: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Leader of the House of Commons, my right hon. Friend the Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), to the hon. Member for West Bromwich East (Mr Watson) on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 649W.

Energy and Climate Change

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how much (a) he and (b) officials in his Department spent on external assistance to prepare for (i) appearances before select committees and (ii) contact with the media in (A) 2011-12 and (B) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [164665]

Gregory Barker: The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, my right hon. Friend the Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), has received media training. It took place on 31 July 2012 at a cost of £2,160.00 inclusive of VAT.

DECC has not paid for any external assistance to prepare for appearances before select committees.

17 July 2013 : Column 746W

Electricity Generation

Mark Reckless: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he has made of how much capacity will be required to fill the gap until the Capacity Market begins operating; and for how long mothballed capacity will be needed. [165567]

Michael Fallon [holding answer 16 July 2013]: We consider that there will be adequate electricity capacity before the Capacity Market begins operating.

Ofgem's recent report shows that in some scenarios capacity could fall to uncomfortable levels if no further action were taken.

This is why Ofgem is consulting on whether to enable National Grid to develop new services to balance the electricity system in middle of the decade. If needed, these services would provide consumers with additional safeguards against any increased risk to mid-decade security of supply.

The balancing services could be initiated from the winter of 2014-15 and operate in the period before the Capacity Market begins to deliver capacity (from 1 October 2018). Decisions on whether to allow National Grid to procure such services will be taken by Ofgem based on an assessment of need.

DECC fully supports Ofgem's consultation, and has liaised with Ofgem and National Grid on the development of the proposals.

Energy

Oliver Colvile: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change when Ofgem will be provided with powers over the Third Party Intermediate Market. [165169]

Michael Fallon: Through the Energy Bill we are clarifying that Ofgem's power to apply to the Secretary of State to make specified activities licensable, provided they are connected with the supply of electricity/gas, covers the activities of Third Party Intermediaries. It is a decision for Ofgem as to if and when they make such an application.

Ofgem have launched a piece of work to review the regulatory framework for Third Party Intermediaries which will inform such a decision. Their consultation exploring market issues and options for the sector can be found at:

http://www.ofgem.gov.uk/Markets/RetMkts/rmr/Documents1/TPI%20con%20doc.pdf

Energy Company Obligation: Scotland

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change how many households in (a) Scotland and (b) Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency have been identified as eligible for the Energy Company Obligation. [165856]

Gregory Barker: There are three elements to the Energy Company Obligation, with different eligibility criteria:

The Carbon Saving Obligation—under which any solid waif property or one with hard to treat cavities, anywhere in GB, is potentially eligible for treatment;

17 July 2013 : Column 747W

The Home Heating Cost Reduction Obligation (HHCRO)—under which vulnerable customers on a range of benefits are eligible for treatment. We estimate there are around 160,000 households in Scotland eligible under the HHCRO;

The Carbon Saving Communities Obligation—under which properties located in the 15% lowest income areas (data zones in Scotland) are potentially eligible for treatment. There are around 970 eligible areas in Scotland of which 18 are located in the Kilmarnock and Irvine Valley constituency. In meeting this obligation companies are also required to provide a certain level of assistance to vulnerable customers living in rural areas.

Energy: Greater London

Mr Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what estimate he or his officials have (a) made and (b) seen of the average annual energy bill for a typical family living in London in (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11, (iii) 2011-12 and (iv) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [165934]

Michael Fallon: Average annual household spend on fuel and power in London is shown in the following table. This represents the average actual spend by households, and includes spend on all fuel types:

YearAverage annual spend on energy (£)

2009-11

1,082

These data are taken from the Living Costs and Food survey (LCFS), run by the Office for National Statistics (ONS). The data are published in the form of three year averages, due to the small sample sizes involved in this survey. The 2009-11 period is the latest for which data is available. The spend data shown are an average for all households, and do not specifically focus on families, as data at this level of detail is not available.

Food

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what proportion of all food procured for his Department was sourced from (a) British producers, (b) small and medium-sized enterprises and (c) producers which met British buying standards in the latest period for which figures are available. [164764]

Gregory Barker: DECC's catering service is delivered through a contract procured by the Department for Environment. Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA).

(a) The proportion of food procured from British producers was 65%

(b) The proportion of food procured from small and medium-sized enterprises was 44%

(c) All food procured meets British buying standards.

Green Deal Scheme

Cathy Jamieson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) how many people he expects to sign up to Green Deal packages in the financial years (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15; [165854]

(2) how many installations he expects to take place under the Green Deal scheme in the financial years (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15. [165855]

17 July 2013 : Column 748W

Gregory Barker: The Green Deal/ECO final Impact Assessment published in June 2012 expected 535,000 households to install packages of energy efficiency measures following a Green Deal assessment between 2013 and March 2015 (it did not split out different years' uptake into financial years).

Some of these packages will be partially or fully funded by Green Deal finance; some will be funded through other sources of finance, such as householders' savings.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/42984/5533-final-stage-impact-assessment-for-the-green-deal-a.pdf

Moira Wallace

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change (1) who was responsible for negotiations regarding the severance payment for Moira Wallace; and what role he played in these negotiations; [164249]

(2) whether the severance payment for Moira Wallace is consistent with other payments of this kind in (a) his Department and (b) other Government departments; and by what method such payments are calculated; [164250]

(3) whether (a) he or (b) anybody in his Department consulted the Cabinet Office before agreeing a severance deal with Moira Wallace; [164251]

(4) what the reasons are for Moira Wallace's (a) £262,185 compensation for severance and (b) £209,783 discretionary payment; and whether these payments met the guidelines from the Cabinet Office designed to reduce civil servants' severance payments. [164252]

Gregory Barker: The exit package for the former Permanent Secretary at the Department of Energy and Climate Change was within the provisions of the reformed civil service compensation scheme as provided for in legislation. The Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, the right hon. Member for Kingston and Surbiton (Mr Davey), was advised of the payment which was agreed by the Cabinet Office and HM Treasury as permissible within the rules of the scheme. The calculations used for Moira Wallace's severance payment are consistent with other payments of this kind both in DECC and other Government Departments.

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change against what criteria the performance of Miss Moira Wallace as Permanent Secretary to his Department was assessed. [164266]

Gregory Barker: Permanent Secretaries are subject to the same performance management regime as the rest of the senior civil service and their performance is assessed, including against their objectives, by the independent Permanent Secretary Remuneration Committee. The objectives for all permanent secretaries for 2011-12 covered the following areas: setting direction, delivering results, developing people and living our values. As part of the Government's commitment to greater transparency, all Permanent Secretary individual objectives were published for the first time in December 2012.

17 July 2013 : Column 749W

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change for what reason Moira Wallace resigned from her position as Permanent Secretary to his Department. [164305]

Gregory Barker: Moira Wallace left DECC on 31 October 2012 after four years working in the department. Four years is generally considered the norm for a permanent secretary posting. As there were no suitable alternative roles available at that level for Ms Wallace to move to she left the civil service in accordance with the terms of voluntary exits under the Civil Service Compensation scheme.

Power Stations

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what the installed capacity was of each power station (a) commissioned and (b) which began generating in each year since 1989 for which data is available. [165260]

Michael Fallon: The installed capacity of each operational power station (owned or operated by major power producers) that began generating, since 1989, and until May 2012, can be found in table DUKES 5.11, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/electricity-chapter-5-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes

No distinction is made between the year in which commissioning began and the year in which normal generation began. Data to May 2013 will be published on 25 July 2013.

Note:

The installed capacity given is as at the end of May 2012; the installed capacity of some sites may have changed since commissioning, while others (e.g. large wind farms) may not yet be at final capacity.

Redundancy Pay

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change what assessment he has made of the effect on the overall departmental budget of severance payments to officials in his Department. [164265]

Gregory Barker: The overall departmental budget has been set through the spending review process. Any severance payments to officials have been met from within existing administration budgets.

Northern Ireland

Apprentices

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many apprenticeships her Department offered to people aged (a) 16 to 18, (b) 19 to 21 and (c) 22 to 26 years old in each year since 2010. [165879]

Mrs Villiers: My Department has not offered any apprenticeships since 2010.

Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what strategies she has to create apprenticeships in her Department; and what plans she has to promote such strategies. [165897]

17 July 2013 : Column 750W

Mrs Villiers: As a small policy Department, with a full-time staff in the region of 165, there are limited opportunities to offer apprenticeships in the NIO. Staffing levels are kept under constant review and posts are filled, normally by way of secondments or on-loan arrangements, when there is a sound business case for doing so. Should any apprenticeship opportunities arise within my Department, they would be advertised in the usual way via the Civil Service Jobs website.

Grant Thornton

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how much her Department has spent on contracts with Grant Thornton in each year since 2008. [165697]

Mrs Villiers: Because of the devolution of policing and justice functions on 12 April 2010, my Department does not hold figures for the periods prior to 2010; attempting to obtain this information would incur disproportionate cost.

My Department has not incurred any expenditure on contracts with Grant Thornton since 2010.

Public Bodies

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when she has met the (a) Northern Ireland Equality Commission and (b) Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission since her appointment; and if she will make a statement. [165295]

Mike Penning: The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, met Professor Michael O'Flaherty, Chief Commissioner of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, on 19 November 2012. We continue to liaise regularly with the Commission at both ministerial and official level on areas of mutual interest. Sponsorship and oversight of the Equality Commissioner for Northern Ireland is in the main a matter for the devolved Administration. While neither the Secretary of State nor I have yet had the opportunity to meet the Commissioner we look forward to doing so.

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) how many answers to parliamentary questions involving tables of statistics fewer than four pages in length were (a) printed in full and (b) provided via a weblink to a website in the last year; [165474]

(2) what guidance her Department follows in determining whether, when answers to parliamentary questions which include statistics, those statistics are (a) provided in full, (b) provided via a weblink to a website and (c) placed in the Library. [165493]

Mrs Villiers: My Department's answers to parliamentary questions are a matter of public record and can be found in the Official Report.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Leader of the House of Commons, my right hon. Friend the Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), to the hon. Member for West Bromwich East (Mr Watson) on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 649W.

17 July 2013 : Column 751W

Wales

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) how many answers to parliamentary questions involving tables of statistics fewer than four pages in length were (a) printed in full and (b) provided via a weblink to a website in the last year; [165478]

(2) what guidance his Department follows in determining whether, when answers to parliamentary questions which include statistics, those statistics are (a) provided in full, (b) provided via a weblink to a website and (c) placed in the Library. [165498]

Stephen Crabb: My Department's answers to parliamentary questions are a matter of public record and can be found in the Official Report.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Leader of the House of Commons, my right hon. Friend the Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), to the hon. Member for West Bromwich East (Mr Watson) on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 649W.

Scotland

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) how many answers to parliamentary questions involving tables of statistics fewer than four pages in length were (a) printed in full and (b) provided via a weblink to a website in the last year; [165476]

(2) what guidance his Department follows in determining whether, when answers to parliamentary questions which include statistics, those statistics are (a) provided in full, (b) provided via a weblink to a website and (c) placed in the Library. [165495]

David Mundell: My Department's answers to parliamentary questions are a matter of public record and can be found in the Official Report.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Leader of the House of Commons, my right hon. Friend the Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), to the hon. Member for West Bromwich East (Mr Watson) on 12 February 2013, Official Report, column 649W.

Education

Children’s Centres: West Midlands

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many new children’s centres have opened in (a) the West Midlands, (b) Birmingham and (c) Selly Oak constituency since 2010; and what funding his Department has provided to such centres in each year since 2010. [165539]

Elizabeth Truss: According to information supplied by local authorities, no new Sure Start children's centres have opened in the West Midlands, Birmingham or Selly Oak since 2010.

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Funding for Sure Start children's centres is included in the Early Intervention Grant. Since funding decisions are devolved to local authorities it is not possible for us to provide a breakdown of funding by constituency or for individual centres.

Equality

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much has been spent by his Department (a) in total and (b) on staff costs on promoting equality and diversity in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and how many people are employed by his Department for this purpose. [165451]

Elizabeth Truss: During the last three years the Department has spent the following amount fulfilling its legal duties as an employer on equality and diversity:

Financial yearExpenditure (£)

2010-11

152,605

2011-12

164,981

2012-13

184,953

Most of this expenditure relates to providing reasonable adjustments for staff considered disabled under the Equality Act, for example: providing assistive software and related training for staff with a visual impairment, and adjustment of office equipment or furniture for staff with limited mobility.

Equality and diversity activity, including promotion, is incorporated in work across the Department, but this information is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Free Schools

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many free schools did not have registration recommended in their pre-opening Ofsted inspection in (a) 2011, (b) 2012 and (c) 2013. [165843]

Mr Timpson: Ofsted inspected all new free schools opening in 2011 and 2012; all received a recommendation for independent school registration. The Ofsted pre-registration inspections of free schools opening in 2013 are still taking place.

ICT: Curriculum

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Secretary of State for Education with reference to the contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education, 24 April 2013, Official Report, column 986, which employers and leading companies have contributed to the new computer science curriculum; which are engaged in helping schools to implement that curriculum; and how companies who have not been consulted can get involved. [165946]

Elizabeth Truss: The new computing curriculum, which includes content relating to computer science and programming at each key stage, has been developed in association with experts from a wide range of organisations led by the British Computer Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering. This includes commercial

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companies such as Microsoft and Metaswitch; and bodies representing IT sector employers—e-Skills UK and Intellect.

The curriculum development process also involved representatives from non-commercial organisations including universities, subject associations, learned societies and schools. A list of all of those consulted in the process of developing the draft published in February has been placed in the House Library, and is also available on the Department for Education website at:

https://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/l/lists%20of%20commentators%20-%20final.pdf

Some of the organisations involved in developing the new computing curriculum are already working independently of the Government to help schools teach computer science and programming. For example, Microsoft is promoting its free visual programming language Kodu to schools, which enables primary school children to learn some of the basics of programming. E-Skills UK has worked with several major employers—including BT, IBM and John Lewis—to develop the ‘Behind the Screen’ initiative, which teaches key stage 4 pupils how to apply their knowledge and skills in computer science and information technology to address problems in real-world settings.

We are keen to see a wide range of organisations involved in supporting schools to teach the new curriculum. By reducing unnecessary Government intervention in this area, we are providing space and opportunity to any companies and employers that want to help schools deliver the new programmes of study successfully.

Ofsted

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many Ofsted inspectors were employed in each year between 2010 and 2013; and if he will make a statement. [165299]

Mr Laws: This is a matter for Ofsted. I have asked Sir Michael Wilshaw, Her Majesty's chief inspector, to write to the hon. Member. The response will also be placed in the House Library.

Pupils: Disadvantaged

Gloria De Piero: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many children in Ashfield constituency are entitled to the pupil premium; and what assessment he has made of whether receipt of that premium has had a corresponding effect on levels of attainment. [165723]

Mr Laws: According to data held by the Department for Education 4,005 pupils in Ashfield schools were eligible for the pupil premium in 2012.

The Department for Education publishes annual attainment data for disadvantaged pupils who are eligible for the pupil premium. Results for 2012, the first year to reflect the impact of a full year of pupil premium, showed a larger than expected narrowing of attainment gaps nationally for both key stage 2 and key stage 4.

A copy of the key stage 2 and key stage 4 performance tables data on disadvantaged pupils for each school in Ashfield has been placed in the House Library.

17 July 2013 : Column 754W

Teachers

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many qualified teachers have left state-funded schools since 2010. [165839]

Mr Laws: The most recent information available on the number of qualified teachers leaving the state funded sector is for 2010-11. This was published on 17 July 2013 in Table C1 of the Additional Tables: SFR 15/2013 within the ‘School Workforce in England, November 2012’ Statistical First Release(1).

The relevant table has been placed in the House Library.

(1) https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-workforce-in-england-november-2012

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many qualified teachers below retirement age were teaching in schools other than in the state sector in each year since 2010. [165841]

Mr Laws: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what schools have been (a) successful and (b) unsuccessful in their application to be a national teaching school. [165842]

Mr Laws: The lists of the schools which have been previously successfully designated and the ones that have been unsuccessful in their application for national teaching school status have been placed in the House Library. Over 65% of schools have been successful in their application for teaching schools designation.

Those schools on the successful list may not all remain designated as a national teaching school due to subsequent changes in their circumstances. To ensure that the teaching school designation retains its credibility and the programme delivers impact, we carefully review designations where a teaching school no longer meets the criteria, or appears to be failing to carry out the role as intended. This is done with sensitivity to each individual case and with great care. 4% of successfully designated schools have since either withdrawn or been de-designated. These schools are no longer published on the list of designated teaching schools which is available on the Department for Education website(1).

Schools on the unsuccessful list and those that have been de-designated may re-apply for teaching schools designation. Over 30% of unsuccessful applicants have since re-applied and been successful for teaching school designation.

(1) http://education.gov.uk/nationalcollege/index/support-for-schools/teachingschools.html

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Agriculture: Finance

Mary Creagh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 3 June 2013, Official Report, columns 782-4W,

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on agriculture: finance, what the reasons are for the decrease in the level of funding for Central finance ongoing activity - CAP between 2009-10 and 2011-12. [161473]

Mr Heath [holding answer 24 June 2013]: The ‘Central finance ongoing activity—CAP’ figures relate to ‘Disallowance’ payments. These arise as a result of financial corrections applied by the European Commission where it takes the view that EU regulations for payments funded through European schemes, including the common agricultural policy (CAP), have not been applied correctly.

Following the introduction of the new common agricultural policy, EU compliance audits across all member states had stalled for a number of years. This resulted in decisions, for example covering the single payment scheme (SPS) 2005 through to 2009, not being made until 2009-10 and 2010-11. This led to Disallowance penalties for four schemes years being accounted for in two years 2009-11. However in 2011-12, the opposite happened where further delays were experienced with the EU audit and decision making process for SPS schemes, resulting in a fall in expenditure recorded against CAP Disallowance.

Bees

Nia Griffith: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to the speech of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Lord de Mauley of 28 June 2013, when his Department expects to (a) finish collecting the results of the urgent and comprehensive review of current policy on pollinators, (b) finalise the new National Pollinator Strategy and (c) begin implementing the National Pollinator Strategy. [163707]

Mr Heath: As announced by my noble Friend, Lord de Mauley, at the Bee Summit hosted by Friends of the Earth on the 28 June: (a) we are hosting a series of workshops to collate information on the latest scientific thinking and policy initiatives on pollinators. We aim to finish collecting the results of this review in November in time for; (b) the publication of the Pollinator Health Strategy before the end of 2013. A public consultation will be held on the strategy; and (c) we will implement priority actions of the finalised strategy from spring 2014 onwards.

Bovine Tuberculosis

Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to his Department's Consultation on a “Draft Strategy for Achieving Officially Bovine Tuberculosis-Free Status for England” published on 4 July 2013, for what reasons the UK is not following the approach used in the rest of the EU of only culling infected cattle when faced with a herd breakdown. [164522]

Mr Heath: In accordance with EU law, and in line with what happens in other member states, all cattle in England that react positively to a TB diagnostic test are compulsorily slaughtered. In cases where the TB problem in a herd is particularly severe or extensive, other cattle considered to be at high risk of being infected (or becoming infected) will also be removed and slaughtered.

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Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs with reference to his Department's Consultation on a Draft Strategy for Achieving Officially Bovine Tuberculosis-Free Status for England published on 4 July 2013, for what reasons biosecurity measures will be voluntary; and what evidence was taken into account in the decision between a voluntary and mandatory approach. [164523]

Mr Heath: With regard to specific TB controls, including bio-security measures, I hope that DEFRA's consultation on a draft TB strategy will generate innovative ideas on how Government and industry can work in partnership to eradicate this devastating disease. No options are off the table. However, the business costs associated with a TB breakdown provide many farmers with the incentive to maintain good biosecurity measures voluntarily so as to reduce the risk of their herds contracting the disease.

Mandatory biosecurity controls against TB are also in place—for example, cattle herds are regularly tested for the disease and if a herd owner fails to have a test completed on time cattle movement restrictions are applied immediately; tight movement restrictions are also applied on TB infected herds to minimise the risk of disease spread; and cattle moving from annually tested herds must be pre-movement tested.

We are also working with industry to implement the recommendations of the Risk-Based Trading Group. This will involve putting in place measures that will better enable farmers to share TB history information at the point of sale to enable farmers to make informed risk-based decisions when purchasing cattle.

When making a decision on whether to implement a mandatory approach the Government considers a range of evidence including the benefits and the costs.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether an evaluation of the incidence of TB in cattle in the badger cull pilot areas will be conducted during the pilot period. [165085]

Mr Heath: The main purpose of the pilots is not to determine the impact of badger culling on TB incidence in cattle. However, information on cattle TB incidence will continue to be collected from the pilot areas as part of DEFRA's ongoing TB surveillance programme. We are putting in place research that will examine this information as it becomes available, to evaluate the impact of the badger control policy. However, it will be a number of years before culling has an impact on cattle TB incidence.

Mrs Main: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how humaneness will be defined in his Department's terms of reference for the badger cull pilots. [165086]

Mr Heath: Independent monitoring will be undertaken to assess the humaneness, along with the effectiveness and safety, of controlled shooting during the pilots. The design of this monitoring has been overseen by an independent panel of experts, who have advised on the appropriate methods for monitoring, which will include field observations and post mortems. Further details

17 July 2013 : Column 757W

of the monitoring protocols are available online at the following link and I have also placed copies in the library of the House:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animal-diseases/a-z/bovine-tb/badgers/badger-culling-pilots/

Dangerous Dogs

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs pursuant to the answer of 1 July 2013, Official Report, column 447W, on dangerous dogs, if he will estimate the likely effect on the number of people being injured by dogs each year as a result of the proposed changes to the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991; and if he will make a statement. [165416]

Mr Heath: We have not estimated the likely effect on the number of people injured by dogs every year once our proposals come into force.

Floods: Insurance

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the effect of flooding on insurance premiums of farmers whose (a) land, (b) livestock and (c) crops are in high risk flood areas. [164559]

Richard Benyon: DEFRA has made no assessment of the effect of flooding on the insurance premiums of farmers whose land, livestock and crops are in high risk flood areas. Farmers have a wide range of successful risk and crisis management strategies at their disposal. These include weather insurance, diversification and ‘self-insurance’ through saving and borrowing.

Horses: Exports

George Freeman: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what progress has been made on negotiations on changes to the Tripartite Agreement on the movement of horses between France, Ireland and the UK. [165282]

Mr Heath: Officials and industry representatives from the signatory countries met in Dublin on 11 July and made encouraging progress toward changing the scope of the Tripartite Agreement (TPA). All three countries hope that it will be possible to ratify a new agreement in the autumn.

At the meeting there was agreement in principle that the TPA should be limited to horses with a demonstrably high health status. A new agreement would be based on assurances provided by industry bodies through the verifiable observance of codes of practice or other established good practice.

Changes to the TPA will be limited to the movement of horses between the UK and France and Ireland and France. All horse movements that fall outside the scope of a new TPA would need to be accompanied by an EU health certificate. The UK equine sector has been closely involved in these negotiations and we will write to interested organisations shortly with further details.

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Pigs: Diseases

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps he is taking to prevent new strains of porcine epidemic diarrhoea from China and the US entering the UK. [164981]

Mr Heath: Porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED) is not a notifiable disease in the EU, nor is it an OIE (the animal equivalent of the WHO) listed disease and as such there are no legislative measures in place to control it.

China is not an approved country for the import of pigs into the EU and as such does not pose the UK a risk.

EU legislation Regulation 102/2013 enabling import of live pigs into the EU from the USA, amending 2004/68/EC came into place on 4 February 2013. As such, this trade is not well developed, only two consignments, less than 100 animals in total, have been imported. All pigs imported from USA for breeding or production must have been isolated for 30 days prior to export and certified by a vet that within 24 hours prior to loading for export, they have been examined and show no clinical signs of any disease. In addition, on arrival into the EU they must remain on the destination premises for a minimum of 30 days before they can move to another holding, unless for slaughter. These import conditions help mitigate against PED entering the UK. Industry is aware of this new disease risk and is advised to consider where they source pigs from and any disease risks they may pose. Routine best practice biosecurity measures undertaken in the UK pig industry to prevent disease spread by fomites or mechanical means additionally reduce the risk of PED introduction.

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the UK pig sector of porcine epidemic diarrhoea from China and the US entering the UK. [164991]

Mr Heath: DEFRA undertakes routine scanning surveillance for the detection of new or re-emerging animal diseases that may pose a threat to animal health or public health. The Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency led Pig Species Expert Group (SEG) are aware of porcine epidemic diarrhoea (PED) and the emergence of a new virulent strain in the USA and China. The SEG routinely looks for changes in trends of disease diagnosed in Great Britain and also consider samples where it is has not been possible to reach a diagnosis through routine testing. Threats identified are then escalated to the Veterinary Risk Group for consideration and to the UK's four Chief Veterinary Officers. In this way, we can identify new diseases like PED that are not notifiable and do not require specific legislative control measures.

As PED is not a notifiable disease, nor is it listed by the OIE (the animal equivalent of the WHO), DEFRA is not required to carry out an assessment of its impact. Working with the pig industry, the SEG can raise awareness of this disease to enable industry to ensure best practice biosecurity measures are in place. Indeed, the National

17 July 2013 : Column 759W

Pig Association is at present raising awareness with its members of the need for strict biosecurity measures to support their disease prevention and control.

Rural Areas: Affordable Housing

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department has taken in order to increase the provision of affordable housing in rural areas. [165729]

Richard Benyon: The Government believe that meeting the housing needs of rural communities is important. Local authorities are best placed to decide what development is suitable in rural communities and they should plan positively to meet local requirements for both affordable and market housing. The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has lead responsibility for policy on housing provision. DEFRA officials work closely with DCLG officials to ensure that there is a proper understanding of the need for affordable housing in rural areas when developing policy initiatives.

Sky Lanterns

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps his Department has taken to record injuries to livestock caused by the residue of Chinese lanterns; and how many reports of such injuries have been recorded in each local authority area in Cheshire in each of the last three years. [164688]

Mr Heath: The Department does not routinely record specific injuries to livestock nor do we receive regular

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reports on such injuries from local authorities. Recognising the serious concerns that people have about the possible impacts of sky lanterns, we have encouraged the farming industry to gather evidence. In order to further improve the evidence-base DEFRA and the Welsh Government commissioned an independent report on sky lanterns. Published in May 2013, this report brings together and evaluates the available evidence, including evidence presented by the farming sector and through stakeholder surveys. While farmers have lost livestock due to ingested wire from sky lanterns, the evidence from this independent report suggests that any widespread risk of injury and death to livestock is low.

The independent report is available from the following link:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Menu=Menu& Module=More&Location=None&ProjectID=18402&From Search=Y&Publisher=1&SearchText=lanterns&SortString=Project Code&SortOrder=Asc&Paging=10#Description

Women and Equalities

Accountancy

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how much the Government Equalities Office spent on contracts with (a) Deloitte, (b) Pricewater- houseCoopers, (c) KPMG and (d) Ernst and Young in each year since 2008. [164952]

Mrs Grant: The amount spent with each of these firms is set out in the following table:

£
 2008-092009-102010-112011-122012-13

Deloitte

160,514

108,789

112,800

PricewaterhouseCoopers

58,581

153,459

41,984

35,990

15,570

KPMG

2,872,170

2,513,180

Ernst and Young

1,302,000

773,320

The ongoing expenditure with KPMG is for support to Broadband Delivery UK. Ernst and Young was predominantly paid for advisory work on the sale of the Tote, and the costs were recovered from the sale proceeds. Deloitte worked with the Finance Team in 2012-13 to deliver the first group financial statements.

Consultants

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how much (a) she and (b) officials in the Government Equalities Office spent on external assistance to prepare for (i) appearances before select committees and (ii) contact with the media in (A) 2011-12 and (B) 2012-13; and if she will make a statement. [164668]

Mrs Grant: Neither myself nor my officials spent anything on external assistance when appearing before select committees or on contact with the media on behalf of DCMS, which includes the GEO.

Equality

Philip Davies: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how much has been spent by the Government Equalities Office (a) in total and (b) on staff costs on promoting equality and diversity in each of the last three years for which figures are available; and how many people are employed by her Department for this purpose. [165455]

Mrs Grant: DCMS is mindful of the need to promote equality and draw the best from a diverse work force. While there are individuals who have responsibility for promoting equality and diversity—this is in addition to their other duties. The Department is unable to break down the figures to show how much was spent on the equality and diversity aspect of their role. The Government Equalities Office works to take action on the Government's commitment to remove barriers to equality and help to build a fairer society, leading on issues relating to women, sexual orientation and transgender equalities. In this

17 July 2013 : Column 761W

broader sense the whole of the staff of GEO and its programme spend is devoted to promoting equality and diversity.

Equality and Human Rights Commission

Seema Malhotra: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what the Equalities and Human Rights Commission staffing levels were (a) in May 2010, (b) in May 2011, (c) in May 2012, (d) in May 2013 and (e) at the end of the current spending review round. [164224]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 9 July 2013]: Along with all Government Departments and Government-funded bodies, funding was reduced at the time of the 2010 comprehensive spending review in order to deal with the enormous economic deficit left by the last Government. In May 2012, the Government set out a package of legislative and non-legislative reforms to make the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) a valued and respected national institution. The Commission's past poor financial and control record indicated that these measures were necessary and our reforms are producing results. We are clear that these improvements are consistent with the EHRC maintaining its ‘A’ status with the International Coordinating Committee of National Human Rights Institutions, and this status has recently been confirmed. EHRC’s staffing levels for the dates in the question are as follows:

EHRC staffing
 FTEHeadcount

May 2010

510.24

536

May 2011

440.53

465

May 2012

319.94

338

May 2013

211.35

223

Estimated 2014-15

186

n/a

Married People

Gordon Henderson: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities if she will put forward amendments to the Same Sex Marriage Bill in the House of Lords to ensure that the word wife will continue to be used in statute and other official contexts to refer only to the female spouse of a heterosexual marriage and will not be redefined subsequent to the Same Sex Marriage Act to include any partner in a same sex marriage. [164799]

Mrs Grant: The Government do not intend to amend the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill in this way. The word "wife" will continue to refer to a married woman, regardless of the sex of her spouse. The Bill completed its Third Reading in the House of Lords on 15 July.

Newspaper Press

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities if she will support the No More Page 3 campaign. [159350]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 12 June 2013]:Regulatory changes to ban page 3 would amount to content regulation of the press, and Government do not believe this is the right response. However, I understand the strength of feeling about how women are represented in the media.

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That is why Government has implemented its Body Confidence campaign—and we are working with industry on these issues. This year my ministerial colleagues and I have met with a number of organisations that aim to challenge how women are portrayed in the media, and we will continue to discuss how we can best support healthy and respectful representations

Mr Jim Cunningham: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities if the Government Equalities Office will investigate the effect of topless modelling in newspapers on the negative representation of women in the media. [159351]

Mrs Grant [holding answer 12 June 2013]: There are no plans to investigate the effect of topless modelling in newspapers on the representation of women in the media. However, I understand the strength of feeling about how women are represented in the media. That is why Government has implemented its Body Confidence campaign—and we are working with industry on these issues. This year my ministerial colleagues and I have met with a number of organisations that aim to challenge how women are portrayed in the media, and we will continue to discuss how we can best support healthy and respectful representations.

Northcote House

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how many (a) Ministers and (b) officials in the Government Equalities Office used the facilities at Northcote House, Sunningdale Park, Berkshire in (i) 2010-11, (ii) 2011-12 and (iii) 2012-13; and if she will make a statement. [164822]

Mrs Grant: DCMS, which includes the GEO, uses a variety of locations for training and conference purposes. However the Department does not hold data in such a way as to identify the specific information requested.

Public Appointments

Seema Malhotra: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities what steps she is taking to increase the representation of (a) women, (b) people with disabilities and (c) ethnic minorities on the boards of public bodies falling within the Government Equalities Office's area of responsibility. [164607]

Hugh Robertson [holding answer 11 July 2013]: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

This Government is committed to increasing the diversity on public Boards and we are taking this forward in a number of different ways.

Earlier this year the Centre for Public Appointments, based in the Cabinet Office, published its own strategy to increase the diversity of public appointments. And last month the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), and the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), hosted a high-level networking event to help to increase the diversity of our Boards.

17 July 2013 : Column 763W

DCMS aims to attract people from a range of different backgrounds, including from under-represented groups. It also continues to promote vacancies though new routes to encourage applications from the broadest range of candidates. The DCMS approach is working; for the year to March 2013 it increased the proportion of women appointed to DCMS boards from 31% to 38% and it is committed to achieving 50%.

Senior Civil Servants

Stephen Barclay: To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities how many senior civil servants left the Government Equalities Office and public bodies under voluntary exit and received a severance payment in each of the last three years; and what the value of such payments was. [164402]

Mrs Grant: As a result of the machinery of government change in September 2012, the Government Equalities office transferred from the Home Office to DCMS.

Table 1 shows the number of senior civil servants who left the Department under a voluntary exit scheme in each of the last three financial years and Table 2 the value of such payments by cost band.

Table 1
Financial year2010-112011 -122012-13

Number of leavers in senior civil service grades

8

3

3

Table 2
Cost band of such payments2010-112011-122012-13

<£10,000

£10,000 to £25,000

£25,000 to £50,000

2

£50,000 to £100,000

1

£100,000 to £150,000

4

1

£150,000 to £200,000

1

2

2

£200,000 to £250,000

1

As part of a money saving exercise, in line with the rest of Government, DCMS has been offering, in cyclical phases, the opportunity for civil servants to take voluntary redundancy. DCMS does not hold central records for our bodies. Figures for the Government Equalities Office, which joined my DCMS in September 2012 are held by the Home office, its previous parent Department.

Deputy Prime Minister

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Deputy Prime Minister how many answers by his Office to parliamentary questions involving tables of statistics fewer than four pages in length were (a) printed in full and (b) provided via a link to a website in the last year. [165465]

The Deputy Prime Minister: My Department's answers to parliamentary questions are a matter of public record and can be found in the Official Report.

I also refer the hon. Member to the answer given by the Leader of the House of Commons, the right hon.

17 July 2013 : Column 764W

Member for South Cambridgeshire (Mr Lansley), to the hon. Member for West Bromwich East (Mr Watson) on 12 February 2013,

Official Report

, column 649W.

Culture, Media and Sport

Arts Council England

Nadhim Zahawi: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will estimate the full cost to the Exchequer of restoring funding to the Arts Council to the level it would have been without the Spending Rounds of both 2010 and 2013 in the fiscal year 2015-16. [165103]

Mr Vaizey: ACE's funding before SR10 was £450.8 million and that a 2015-16 budget of £372.8 million was set in the recent SR13 announcements, so the cost to the Exchequer of restoring funding to the same level as in SR10 would be £78 million.

Broadband

Alun Cairns: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the broadband coverage targets are for each (a) local authority, (b) nation of the UK and (c) contract held by BD:UK [164244]

Mr Vaizey [holding answer 11 July 2013]: The Government made funding allocations to local authorities and the devolved Administrations based on the estimated minimum amount of Government and locally matched funding that was required to provide 90% of premises in the UK with superfast broadband availability and to provide universal standard broadband availability. Local authorities and the devolved Administrations have undertaken project procurements using this funding, and have required suppliers, to provide bids to achieve the maximum possible coverage. The only contract that BDUK has with broadband suppliers is the BDUK Broadband Framework Agreement. This does not specify a specific superfast broadband coverage target.

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the answer of 24 June 2012, Official Report, column 113W, on broadband, what her Department recommends as the optimum broadband speed to enable businesses and education institutions in this country to match competitor companies in other countries. [165704]

Mr Vaizey: The Department has not made a recommendation on a specific optimum broadband speed for businesses and education institutions as speeds will vary depending on operational needs. The Department for Education has however issued guidance on buying broadband services to schools and academies which includes the recommendation that they should carefully consider the type of connectivity they may require depending on their particular needs.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will publish the data showing where the last 10 per cent of the country not being included in the BDUK roll out will be. [165831]

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Mr Vaizey: The data on the coverage of the rural broadband projects which have funding from Broadband Delivery UK is held by the local authorities and Devolved Administrations who are responsible for the contracts, and who may make information available on the extent of coverage by agreement with their supplier.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what funds have been spent to date on the super connected cities programme. [165860]

Mr Vaizey: To date, no funding has been drawn down by the cities from the Super Connected Cities programme. Work is under way to establish confirmed grant agreements with the cities by the autumn, at which point funding will be made available.

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the cost to the public purse was of people seconded to local authorities to help with the roll-out of broadband in (a) 2011-12 and (b) 2012-13; and what the cost of such secondments is expected to be in (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16. [165944]

Mr Vaizey: BDUK has not seconded any people to local authorities.

Broadband Delivery UK

Helen Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport with reference to the answer of 8 November 2012, Official Report, columns 816-7W, on Broadband Delivery UK, what the total cost of external consultants employed by Broadband Delivery UK between 30 September 2012 and 30 June 2013 was; and what she anticipates this cost to be from (a) 1 July 2013 to 31 March 2014, (b) 2014-15, (c) 2015-16 and (d) 2016-17. [165858]

Mr Vaizey: The total cost of external consultants (including interims) employed by Broadband Delivery UK between 30 September and 30 June was approximately £5.95 million. Further spend on consultants from July 2013 onwards will depend on the outcome of the review announced in the spending review which aims to give BDUK greater operational freedom and an enhanced delivery focus, and to equip it with the commercial skills that it needs.

Grant Thornton

Mr Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much her Department has spent on contracts with Grant Thornton in each year since 2008. [165687]

Hugh Robertson: The total amount the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, spent on contracts with Grant Thornton, in each year since 2008, is set out in the following table:

 Total spent (£)

2008

2009

17 July 2013 : Column 766W

2010

170,375.00

2011

639,404.93

2012

480334.09

2013

327350.66

Total

1,617,964.68

Pornography: Internet

Mr Leech: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether she has received reports on the discussions that the UK video on demand regulator ATVOD is having with UK financial institutions to consider whether it is possible to block payments from the UK to the operators of non-UK websites which appear to be breaking the Obscene Publications Acts by allowing children to access explicit hardcore pornography; what the Government's policy is on this matter; and if she will make a statement. [164732]

Mr Vaizey: I welcome the work that the Authority for Television on Demand (ATVOD) has undertaken in this area to explore with UK financial institutions and card companies the possibility of declining to process payments to websites operating from outside the EU which allow under 18s in the UK to view explicit pornographic content. The protection of children online is of the utmost importance and we will watch this work with interest. ATVOD provided a report on this area to the UKCCIS executive board on July 8th 2013 and we look forward to receiving further reports on their progress in due course.

Public Appointments

Seema Malhotra: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what steps she is taking to increase the representation of (a) women, (b) people with disabilities and (c) ethnic minorities on the boards of public bodies falling within her Department's area of responsibility. [164605]

Hugh Robertson [holding answer 11 July 2013]: This Government is committed to increasing the diversity on public boards and we are taking this forward in a number of different ways.

Earlier this year the Centre for Public Appointments, based in the Cabinet Office, published its own strategy to increase the diversity of public appointments. And last month the Minister for the Cabinet Office and Paymaster General, my right hon. Friend the Member for Horsham (Mr Maude), and the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Basingstoke (Maria Miller), hosted a high-level networking event to help to increase the diversity of our boards.

DCMS aims to attract people from a range of different backgrounds, including from under-represented groups. It also continues to promote vacancies, though new routes, to encourage applications from the broadest range of candidates. The DCMS approach is working; for the year to March 2013 it increased the proportion of women appointed to DCMS boards from 31% to 38% and it is committed to achieving 50%.

17 July 2013 : Column 767W

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many answers by her Department to Parliamentary Questions involving tables of statistics fewer than four pages in length were (a) printed in full and (b) provided via a link to a website in the last year. [165463]

Hugh Robertson: DCMS' IT system does not record answers to parliamentary questions in that format and this information could be extracted only at a disproportionate cost.

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what guidance her Department follows in determining whether statistics in answers to Parliamentary Questions are (a) provided in full, (b) provided via a link to a website and (c) deposited in the Library. [165483]

Hugh Robertson: DCMS follows the guidance provided by the Office of the Leader of the House on the practice of answering parliamentary questions by reference to Government websites. The guidance advises that the answer should give the Member the factual information requested (including supplying paper copies of the website pages), with an additional line in the answer indicating that the information is already made readily available.

The full Guide is available on the Cabinet Office website at:

http://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guide-to-parliamentary-work

A copy of the guidance relating to referring to websites has already been placed in the Library.

Cabinet Office

Civil Servants: Ethnic Groups

Keith Vaz: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what steps he is taking to ensure that there is a diverse pool of Black, Asian and minority ethnic staff for Ministers to choose from for their private offices. [165326]

Mr Maude: Civil service appointments are made on merit in accordance with the requirements of the Civil Service Commission's Recruitment Principles and the Civil Service Management Code. Within the requirement of merit, the civil service is committed to ensuring a diverse pool of staff for roles within departments, including for staff in its private offices.