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Child Literacy

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to encourage children to read more books in the summer holidays. [167062]

Elizabeth Truss: This Government endorse the Summer Reading Challenge run by The Reading Agency specifically to encourage children to read during the summer holidays. Children aged four to 11 read six books during the summer holiday and this year's theme is ‘Creepy House'. Children can read whatever they like from fact books and joke books to the classics of children's literature. A certificate is issued to those who complete the Challenge. The Summer Reading Challenge is open to all children and is designed for all reading abilities. Schools work with local libraries and give out information to encourage children to take part.

School Meals

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in each local authority area have no on-site facilities for producing hot school lunches; what information his Department collects on the (i) quality, (ii) availability and (iii) take-up of school lunches; whether all English schools meet the food-based and nutrient standards for lunch and non-lunch food; and if he will make a statement. [166960]

Elizabeth Truss: According to information from the School Food Trust1, in 2011-12 17.9% of primary schools had no on-site facilities for producing hot lunches, with 16.5% of these schools transporting meals from another source. 1.2% of secondary schools had no facilities, with 0.5% transporting meals from elsewhere. These figures remain virtually unchanged from 2010-11.

99% of primary and 95% of secondary schools with local authority catered school lunch provision were compliant with the food-based standards for school lunches; and 93% and 79% respectively with the nutrient-based standards. For schools with non-local authority provision, 97% of primary and 95% of secondary schools were thought to be compliant with or “working toward” the food-based standards; and 97% and 94% respectively for nutrient-based standards.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 82W

The proportion of pupils taking up school lunches has increased from 41.4% for primary and 35.8% for secondary in 2009-10, to 44.1% and 37.6% in 2010-11, again rising to 46.3% and 39.8% in 2011-12.

On 12 July 2013 the Department published the School Food Plan2 and agreed to monitor the impact of the Plan's actions. We have agreed to test and consult on a set of revised food based standards (built on a nutritional framework), with the intention of applying them to maintained schools and all new academies and free schools after September 2014.

1>http://www.childrensfoodtrust.org.uk/assets/research-reports/seventh_annual_survey2011-2012_full_report.pdf

2 www.schoolfoodplan.com

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children in English schools took school meals in each year since 2010; and if he will make a statement. [166966]

Mr Laws: The proportion of children who took school meals in English primary schools was 41.4% in 2010, 44.1% in 2011 and 46.3% in 2012. The figures for English secondary schools were 35.8% in 2010, 37.6% in 2011 and 39.8% in 2012.

Schools

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) teachers, (b) pupils, (c) teaching assistants and (d) support staff there were in English (i) primary schools and (ii) secondary schools in each year since 2010, by local authority area; and if he will make a statement. [166980]

Mr Laws: The information requested has been placed in the House Library.

Schools: Admissions

Jonathan Lord: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of children in (a) Surrey and (b) England secured places at (i) their first choice and (ii) one of their top three choices of secondary school in the most recent application period. [166775]

Mr Laws: The Department collects data from local authorities on how many parents received an offer of a place for their children at one of their preferred secondary schools. The most recent data relate to the start of the 2013/14 academic year. Figures for England and Surrey local authority are given in the following table:

Table: Applications and offers for entry to secondary schools in England and Surrey local authority in academic year 2013/14
 Percentage of children
 SurreyEngland

Offered first preference school

84.9

86.7

Offered one of top three preferences

95.4

96.5

Note: Data collected from local authorities on National Offers Day—1 March 2013

These figures were published on 26 March 2013 in the ‘Statistical First Release Secondary school applications and offers in England: March 2013’1

1https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/secondary-school-applications-and-offers-in-england-march-2013

2 Sep 2013 : Column 83W

Schools: Capital Investment

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the total capital spending on (a) primary and (b) secondary schools was in each year since 2010 in real terms; what the planned real-term figures are for each year to 2015; and if he will make a statement. [166958]

Mr Laws: The Department for Education's total schools capital allocations in real terms since 1997 are given in the following table:

Financial yearTotal capital allocations £ million (real terms)

1997-98

1,026

1998-99

1,399

1999-2000

1,482

2000-01

2,346

2001-02

2,502

2002-03

3,105

2003-04

4,160

2004-05

4,668

2005-06

5,145

2006-07

5,375

2007-08

5,817

2008-09

5,899

2009-10

6,197

2010-11

7,314

2011-12

5,241

2012-13

4,606

2013-14

3,983

2014-151

4,484

2015-161

4,405

1 Provisional. Note: Figures exclude PFI credit allocations

A significant proportion of this funding is devolved to local authorities so that they decide their own priorities for investment. The Department does not collect expenditure data centrally and they could therefore be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Schools: Defibrillators

Sir Bob Russell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make it his policy that all new schools or major extensions should have defibrillators provided; and if he will establish a programme to provide defibrillators in all existing schools. [166766]

Mr Laws: It is a matter for individual schools to decide whether to have a defibrillator and to arrange for suitable training of the school workforce in its use. However, there is a common law duty on all staff to act in loco parentis while children are at school and we know that schools take their responsibilities for the health of all children seriously.

Schools: Finance

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what increased resources are provided to schools due to higher staff costs in some parts of the country; what the basis is of that allocation policy; and if he will make a statement. [166962]

2 Sep 2013 : Column 84W

Mr Laws: The system of funding allocations we inherited is largely based on how much each authority spent in 2005-06. The 2005-06 expenditure derived from a formula that included an area cost adjustment, which incorporated a labour market measure of employment costs.

The current distribution of funding is also affected by other factors, including separate grants which have been incorporated into the overall funding allocation, and therefore is not a direct reflection of the staffing cost measure included in the original formula.

Schools funding is in need of reform. That is why we are currently preparing to consult on the introduction in 2015-16 of a national fair funding formula for schools. We are considering whether staff cost weightings should be part of the consultation on the national funding formula.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of schools funding is distributed without reference to pupil numbers; and if he will make a statement. [166977]

Mr Laws: The Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) is made up of three blocks: schools, early years and high needs. In 2013-14, the Department for Education allocated 85% of the DSG to local authorities based on the number of pupils in schools and early years settings. 13% of DSG was allocated based on an estimate of the amount required for places for pupils with high needs as agreed with local authorities.1

Once they receive the DSG, local authorities have some flexibility in the amount of funding that they allocate to schools through each factor in their local formula.

In 2013-14, local authorities allocated 11% of the schools block to schools through a combination of non-pupil led factors. The non-pupil led factors are the lump sum, split sites, rates, private finance initiative (PFI) contracts, flexibility for local authorities within the London fringe area, sixth form and exceptional circumstance funding.

In 2014-15, we will require all local authorities to allocate a minimum of 80% of funding through pupil-led factors. The six pupil-led factors are the basic per-pupil entitlement, deprivation, looked after children, low prior attainment, English as an additional language and mobility.

1 The remaining 2% of DSG is made up of additions for the funding of early education places for two-year-olds from lower income households and transition funding following ending of the 90% funding floor protection for three year olds. Further details of these additions can be found in the OSG Technical note:

http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/a00218077/funding-settlement-2013-14

Karen Lumley: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent progress he has made on plans to move to a fairer schools funding formula before 2015. [167064]

Mr Laws: In the spending round 2013, the Government committed to consult on how best to introduce a national fair funding formula for schools in 2015-16. We are now preparing for the consultation.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 85W

Schools: Governing Bodies

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will bring forward proposals to give school governing bodies the power to remove poorly performing governors. [166820]

Mr Timpson: The Education Select Committee included this point in its recent report ‘The Role of School Governing Bodies’ (HC 365-1), published on 4 July (paragraph 117 and recommendation 20 of the report). The Government will respond to the Select Committee's report shortly and will address this point in our response.

1 http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201314/cmselect/cmeduc/365/365.pdf

Schools: Inspections

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many Ofsted school inspections took place in each year since 2010. [166964]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Library.

Schools: Sports

Mr Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what criteria or formula his Department used to determine the funding allocations for additional money for physical education and sport in primary schools. [166849]

Mr Timpson: Following the Prime Minister's announcement of cross-Government funding of £150 million per annum for academic years 2013/14 and 2014/15, all state-funded primary schools with 17 or more pupils will receive £8,000 plus a top-up of £5 per pupil. Schools with 16 or fewer pupils will receive £500 per pupil.

Each primary school will receive a sum equivalent to the cost of two days per week of a specialist PE teacher's time, with an additional weighting to reflect the size of each school's roll.

In smaller schools, where there are not sufficient pupils to make optimum use of a specialist PE teacher's time, the proportional funding of £500 per pupil enables the school to pay for cover for a teacher to attend relevant continuing professional development and/or to pay for additional equipment or facilities.

Schools: Standards

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many schools were classed as requiring significant improvement in each reporting period since 2010. [166965]

Mr Laws: This question is a matter for Ofsted. HM Chief Inspector, Sir Michael Wilshaw, has written to the hon. Member, and a copy of his response has been placed in the House Library.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 86W

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent assessment he has made of the structural changes necessary in the schools system to drive up standards; and if he will make a statement. [166981]

Elizabeth Truss: The academies programme is delivering structural reform to the schools system. As of 1 August there are 3,086 academies, 81 free schools, 16 studio schools and five university technical colleges; 1,462 of these are part of a chain. 52% of secondary schools and 8% of primary schools are academies or free schools. The number of open academies on 1 September can be found on the Department's website.1

These changes are driving up standards for pupils across England. Between 2011 and 2012, sponsored academies improved standards faster than comparable local authority maintained schools at key stage 4.

The Department has recently released the academies annual report for the academic year 2011/122; it includes information on academies, free schools, studio schools and university technical colleges.

1 http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/leadership/typesofschools /acadernies/b00208569/open-academies

This information will be updated on 5 September.

2 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/academies-annual- report-academic-year-2011-to-2012

Sixth-form Education

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what plans he has to increase the number of schools with post-16 provision; and if he will make a statement. [166979]

Mr Laws: Local authorities (LAs) are responsible for ensuring that there are enough school places to meet demand in their areas. This responsibility extends to post-16 provision, including sixth forms.

Academies can also play a key role in meeting local demand for post-16 provision by requesting a variation of their funding agreement to include such provision and expand their age range.

School sixth forms are just one type of 16-19 provider in a diverse sector that consists of sixth form colleges, FE colleges, 16-19 academies, studio schools and university technical colleges. It is the Department's aim to develop a broad range of high quality institutions to meet demand from students and their parents, with increased choice driving improvement, quality and innovation.

We have, therefore, provided an additional £80 million in 2013-15 through the Demographic Growth Capital Fund, which is available specifically for increasing the number of post-16 places, including sixth form expansions in both maintained schools and academies, in LAs that have identified insufficient capacity. In addition to this the Government are providing £5.2 billion to local authorities over the spending review period to help meet the demand for school places. This funding is delivered via basic need allocations and the targeted basic need programmes, both of which are available for increasing sixth form provision.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 87W

Special Educational Needs

Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the new funding system for higher needs students on (a) a local authority's ability to commission independent specialist colleges to provide courses, (b) the teaching time a student can expect and (c) the quality of the course. [166839]

Mr Laws: We have conducted extensive preparatory work to introduce the new funding system for high needs students. The funding reforms enable education, health and social care budgets to be brought together, and pave the way for all students or their parents to hold personalised budgets and to have a new legal right to express a preference for provision.

The Education Funding Agency has worked closely with local authorities to ensure they fully understand the new funding system and to support them during implementation of the changes. Local authorities have been commissioning individual student placements from independent specialist colleges for a number of years.

The Department offers a level of protection for provision in independent specialist colleges over the next two academic years. Transitional protection will be paid in instances where the numbers of places commissioned by local authorities in the 2013 to 2014 academic year are fewer than in the 2012 to 2013 academic year.

The Department has not set any criteria for local authorities on the number of hours needed by students with learning difficulties and/or disabilities. We expect a local authority and a provider to work together to agree a suitable study programme and support package for those students with high needs.

Arrangements for inspecting the quality of provision have not been changed by the introduction of the new high needs funding system.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the average time taken was to carry out an assessment for a statement of special educational needs in each year since 2010, broken down by local education authority; and if he will make a statement. [166948]

Mr Timpson: The Department does not collect data on the average time taken to complete assessments for statements of special educational needs.

However, we do publish data on the percentage of statements in each local authority that are completed within the statutory 26-weeks. Data for the 2011-12

2 Sep 2013 : Column 88W

financial year are published as additional tables in the Statistical First Release, Special Educational Needs in England, January 2012

1

, a copy of which has been placed in the House of Commons Library. In 2011-12, 86% of all statements of special educational needs were completed within the statutory 26-weeks. Data since 2008-09 were published in separate statistical releases, Special Educational Needs Statements Issued within 26-weeks

2

, which have also been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Draft regulations drawn up under the Children and Families Bill, which will be published for consultation in the autumn, will propose a reduction in the statutory time limit for assessing children's special educational needs and drawing up Education, Health and Care plans. These will replace statements of special educational needs subject to Royal Assent for the Bill.

1 This can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2012

2 The 2010-11 publication can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-sen-statements-issued-within-26-weeks-financial-year-2010-to-2011

and the 2008-09 and 2009-10 publication can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-statements-issued-within-26-weeks-academic-year-2009-to-2010

Teachers: Training

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many people are training to become (a) primary and (b) secondary school teachers by subject area; and how many were in such training in each of the last five years. [166961]

Mr Laws: The data requested has been set out in the following table.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership publish data about initial teacher training in England in their annual publication “the initial teacher training performance profiles”. The latest published data are for the academic year 2010/11. The 2011/12 data will be published in September 2013.

The data shown in the table are the number of first year trainees (rounded to the nearest ten) on an initial teacher training programme in England in the academic year shown.

Vocational subjects include: applied art and design, applied biology, applied business studies, applied chemistry, applied physics, applied ICT, engineering, health and social care, leisure and tourism, and psychology.

 2006/072007/082008/092009/102010/11

Primary

17,920

17,300

17,350

17,920

17,960

Secondary by subject:

     

Art and Design

780

700

700

660

580

Business Studies

730

630

590

590

580

Citizenship

270

280

250

280

270

Classics

40

40

40

40

50

Design and Technology

1,220

1,190

1,190

1,350

1,260

Drama/Dance

540

630

150

490

480

English

2,570

2,490

2,300

2,250

2,340

2 Sep 2013 : Column 89W

2 Sep 2013 : Column 90W

Geography

840

700

650

730

720

History

890

820

800

750

650

Information and Communications Technology

1,110

920

850

950

940

Mathematics

2,280

2,210

2,340

2,680

2,650

Modern Languages

1,630

1,460

1,410

1,610

1,450

Music

780

770

750

770

660

Physical Education

1,900

1,820

1,700

1,590

1,510

Religious Education

850

900

870

830

830

Science

3,340

3,290

3,280

3,440

3,240

Social science/studies

130

120

150

130

120

Vocational subjects

310

360

450

460

450

Diploma subjects

1

1

1

150

1

Economics

2

10

1

10

10

Other (not identified)

90

2

10

2

2

1 Not applicable. 2 Fewer than five.

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to attract more of the best graduates into teaching; and if he will make a statement. [166982]

Mr Laws: We are committed to raising the status and quality of the teaching profession, by attracting more of the best graduates into teaching.

In academic year 2012/13 we introduced a bursary system which awards higher bursaries to trainees with good degrees, and this system is continuing in the academic year 2013/14. For priority subjects, including maths and physics, we offer a bursary of £20,000 for trainees with a first class degree, £15,000 for those with upper second class degrees and £12,000 for those with lower second class degrees. For other subjects we offer a bursary of £9,000 for trainees with first class degrees and £4,000 for trainees with upper second class degrees. Under this bursary system, initial teacher training (ITT) candidates holding third class or ordinary degrees are no longer eligible for a training bursary. This approach will help raise the status of teaching as a career choice and incentivise the best graduates to become teachers.

The ITT scholarship scheme has been expanded and scholarships worth £20,000 each are now available in maths, physics, chemistry and computer science. Announcements on bursary and scholarship levels for AY 2014/15 will be made in due course.

The National College for Teaching and Leadership also provides bespoke support to top graduates through its Premier Plus service. This includes help in securing school experience prior to making an ITT application, and personalised one-to-one support throughout the application process.

We are also quadrupling the Teach First programme which is successfully getting top graduates into teaching.

Teachers: Yorkshire and the Humber

Andrew Percy: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) teachers and (b) classroom assistants were employed in maintained schools in (i) Brigg and Goole constituency and (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber in each of the last five academic years. [166649]

Mr Laws: The following table provides the full-time equivalent number of teachers and teaching assistants who were in service in publicly funded schools in each of the last five academic years in Yorkshire and the Humber and Brigg and Goole constituency.

November 2011 data for Brigg and Goole constituency are incomplete and therefore not available.

Full time equivalent teachers and teaching assistants in service in publicly funded schools, January 2008 to 20091, November 2010 to 20122, Yorkshire and the Humber region and Brigg and Goole constituency
 20082009201020112012

Teachers

     

Yorkshire and the Humber

44,970

44,640

43,600

42,580

44,160

Brigg and Goole3

670

670

670

n/a

660

      

Teaching assistants

19,420

20,090

20,570

24,320

25,920

Yorkshire and the Humber

290

300

260

n/a

320

Brigg and Goole3

     
1 Sources: Form 618g for Yorkshire and the Humber region (teachers) and School Census for Yorkshire and the Humber and Brigg and Goole (teachers and teaching assistants). 2 Source: School Workforce Census. 3 2010 teaching assistant figures for Brigg and Goole are estimated.

Truancy

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what the total spend by his Department was on anti-truancy programmes in each year since 2010; and what assessment of value for money has been made of such spending. [166947]

Mr Timpson: In 2009/10 and 2010/11, the Government spent £6 million a year on a behaviour and attendance programme through the then National Strategies, before the contract ended in March 2011. Ofsted's review of the National Strategies raised considerable doubts about the effectiveness of its programmes. Our assessment was that this programme did not provide good value for money. Instead the Government have taken what Ministers believe to be more effective action to reduce truancy: increasing fines for truancy; reducing the amount of time parents have to pay truancy fines; and reducing the threshold for persistent absence so that schools tackle the problem sooner.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 91W

Unemployment: Young People

Kevin Brennan: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what his latest estimate is of the (a) number and (b) proportion of (i) 16, (ii) 17 and (iii) 18 year olds who are not in education or training; and if he will make a statement. [166944]

Matthew Hancock: I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 11 July 2013, Official Report, column 412W.

Vocational Education

Jonathan Reynolds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education when he expects to announce what subjects will be included in the technical baccalaureate. [166854]

Matthew Hancock: The technical baccalaureate is a performance measure that will be included in the performance tables from 2016.

We will identify the qualifications that count towards the technical baccalaureate in the autumn.

Written Questions

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many questions answered by his Department included fewer than four pages of statistics in the Official Report for the last month; [166701]


(2) if he will make it his policy to ensure that all answers provided by his Department containing tables of statistical data which would not require more than four pages in the Official Report are published in full rather than by reference to a hyperlink. [166726]

Elizabeth Truss: Between 18 June and 18 July inclusive, the Department answered 314 written questions from Members of the House of Commons. Checking the answers as published showed that 54 of the responses (17%) provided statistics or other information set out in a table, which was published in the Official Report. A

2 Sep 2013 : Column 92W

further 21 responses (6%) referred hon. Members to statistics or other documents which had been placed in the House Library, and 16 responses (5%) referred hon. Members to information, which was already publicly available on the internet.

We publish information on the internet proactively so that it is easily available to hon. Members and the public. The Department will continue to follow guidance from the Leader's office about how to provide statistics when answering parliamentary questions.

Cabinet Office

Average Earnings

Dan Jarvis: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the average weekly gross earnings of full-time employed (a) men and (b) women in (i) Barnsley Central constituency, (ii) South Yorkshire and (iii) England were in each year since 2006-07 in (A) cash terms and (B) constant prices. [166604]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the average weekly gross earnings of full-time employed (a) men and (b) women in (i) Barnsley Central constituency, (ii) South Yorkshire and (iii) England were in each year since 2006-07 in (A) cash terms and (B) constant prices. (166604)

The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. Weekly levels of earnings are estimated from ASHE, and are provided for employees on adult rates of pay, whose earnings for the survey pay period were not affected by absence.

The tables show estimates of median gross weekly earnings in Barnsley Central constituency, South Yorkshire local authority and England from 2006 to 2012, the latest period for which results are available. Figures are provided for full-time male employees and full-time female employees and are given separately in cash terms and in 2012 prices.

Median gross weekly earnings (£, cash prices) for employeesa in Barnsley Central constituency, South Yorkshire local authority and England between April 2006 and April 2012
 Full-time malesFull-time females
 Barnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEnglandBarnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEngland

2006b

*429.2

450.2

494.5

332.6

337.1

388.5

2006c

*427.8

449.2

492.1

332.6

332.6

386.1

2007

*427.4

460.0

505.5

374.2

344.6

400.0

2008

*500.5

477.9

528.8

385.0

363.1

417.3

2009

*446.5

477.2

538.2

396.1

396.8

430.8

2010

*512.5

498.0

545.8

426.9

409.1

442.5

2011d

*500.9

498.3

547.8

433.2

399.7

448.5

2011e

*498.7

497.8

547.4

429.7

393.5

442.3

2 Sep 2013 : Column 93W

2 Sep 2013 : Column 94W

2012

*497.5

505.1

553.0

427.1

413.7

452.3

Notes: a Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. b 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2005. c 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2007. d 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000. e 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2010. Guide to Quality: The coefficient of variation (CV) indicates the quality of a figure; the smaller the CV value, the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population average to be within the range 180 to 220. Key: CV <= 5% * CV > 5% and <= 10% ** CV > 10% and <=20% Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics
Median gross weekly earnings (£, 2012 prices) for employeesa in Barnsley Central constituency, South Yorkshire local authority and England between April 2006 and April 2012
 Full-time malesFull-time females
 Barnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEnglandBarnsley Central constituencySouth YorkshireEngland

2006b

518.7

544.0

597.6

401.9

407.4

469.5

2006c

517.0

542.8

594.7

401.9

401.9

466.6

2007

502.7

541.0

594.5

440.1

405.3

470.4

2008

571.7

545.9

604.0

439.7

414.7

476.6

2009

498.4

532.7

600.8

442.1

442.9

480.9

2010

551.5

535.9

587.4

459.4

440.3

476.2

2011d

516.0

513.3

564.3

446.3

411.8

462.0

2011e

513.7

512.8

563.9

442.7

405.4

455.6

2012

497.5

505.1

553.0

427.1

413.7

452.3

Notes: a Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. b 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2005. c 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2007. d 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000. e 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2010. Guide to Quality: The coefficient of variation (CV) indicates the quality of a figure; the smaller the CV value, the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an estimate of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population average to be within the range 180 to 220. Key: CV <= 5% * CV > 5% and <= 10% ** CV > 10% and <=20% Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what the average gross weekly earnings of full-time employed (a) men and (b) women in the UK in each year since 1997 were in cash terms. [167089]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the average gross weekly earnings of full-time employed (a) men and (b) women in the UK in each year since 1997 were in cash terms. (167089)

The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. Weekly levels of earnings are estimated from ASHE, and are provided for employees on adult rates of pay, whose earnings for the survey pay period were not affected by absence.

The following table shows estimates of median gross weekly earnings for full-time male employees and full-time female employees in the UK from 1997 to 2012, the latest period for which results are available.

Median gross weekly earnings (£) for employees1 in the UK between April 1997 and April 2012
Year (April)Full-time malesFull-time females

1997

356.9

265.2

1998

372.7

276.5

1999

383.9

288.5

2000

397.7

298.1

2001

415.7

314.3

2002

430.1

330.7

2003

444.6

343.0

20042

463.0

360.8

20043

460.0

356.7

2005

471.0

371.4

20064

487.1

385.8

20065

484.3

383.3

2007

498.3

394.8

2008

522.0

412.4

2009

531.0

425.8

2010

537.6

439.0

20116

538.5

445.1

20117

538.2

440.0

2 Sep 2013 : Column 95W

2012

545.8

448.6

1 Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. 2 2004 results excluding supplementary survey for comparison with 2003. 3 2004 results including supplementary survey designed to improve coverage of the survey, for more information see ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk 4 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2005. 5 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2007. 6 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000, 7 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2010. Note: The numbers are in current prices/cash rather than constant prices. Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics

Average Earnings: Wales

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 15 July 2013, Official Report, columns 556-8W, on average earnings: Clywd, what the average weekly gross earnings of a full-time employed (a) man and (b) woman in Wales was in cash terms in each year since 1997. [166869]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the average weekly gross earnings of a full-time employed (a) man and (b) woman in Wales was in cash terms in each year since 1997. (166869)

The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. Weekly levels of earnings are estimated from ASHE, and are provided for employees on adult rates of pay, whose earnings for the survey pay period were not affected by absence.

The following table shows estimates of median gross weekly earnings for full-time male employees and full-time female employees in Wales from 1997 to 2012, the latest period for which results are available.

Median gross weekly earnings (£, cash prices) for employees1 in Wales between April 1997 and April 2012
Year (April)Full-time malesFull-time females

1997

335.9

244.5

1998

343.6

251.2

1999

350.2

263.4

2000

362.9

276.2

2001

373.7

282.1

2002

383.9

'290.5

2 Sep 2013 : Column 96W

2003

397.6

303.8

20042

423.1

325.2

20043

417.7

320.5

2005

425.5

334.8

20064

440.8

349.2

20065

438.7

346.7

2007

441.0

355.6

2008

463.8

369.2

2009

478.8

383.3

2010

482.8

401.2

20116

485.9

402.6

20117

482.4

398.2

2012

482.4

403.9

1 Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. 2 2004 results excluding supplementary survey for comparison with 2003. 3 2004 results including supplementary survey designed to improve coverage of the survey. For more information see ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk 4 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2005. 5 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2007. 6 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2000. 7 2011 results based on Standard Occupational Classification 2010. Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics

Chris Ruane: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 15 July 2013, Official Report, columns 556-8W, on average earnings: Clwyd, what the average weekly gross earnings of a full-time employed (a) man and (b) woman was in each local authority area in north Wales in cash terms in each year since 1997. [166972]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office of National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking what the average weekly gross earnings of a full-time employed (a) man and (b) woman were in each local authority area in north Wales in cash terms in each year since 1997. (166972)

The Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), carried out in April each year, is the most comprehensive source of earnings information in the United Kingdom. Weekly levels of earnings are estimated from ASHE, and are provided for employees on adult rates of pay, whose earnings for the survey pay period were not affected by absence.

The tables show estimates of median gross weekly earnings for full-time male employees and full-time female employees in each local authority area in north Wales from 1997 to 2012, the latest period for which results are available.

Median gross weekly earnings for employees1 in each local authority area in North Wales between April 1997 and April 2012
 Isle of AngleseyGwyneddConwy
AprilFull-time malesFull-time femalesFull-time malesFull-time femalesFull-time malesFull-time females

1997

**359.2

X

**276.2

**254.6

**278.2

**216.6

1998

**382.1

**260.7

*312.6

**281.9

**307.0

*222.8

1999

**342.1

**283.5

*320.5

**242.8

*316.6

**234.6

2000

**366.1

**262.4

*315.8

**240.0

*328.3

**243.2

2001

**325.4

**291.8

*329.9

**238.5

*343.1

**276.7

2002

**319.9

**284.9

*360.9

**269.0

**328.7

**261.0

2003

**416.5

**284.2

*331.2

*278.9

*384.2

**289.4

2 Sep 2013 : Column 97W

2 Sep 2013 : Column 98W

20042

**431.6

**284.9

*363.8

*326.4

*428.7

**321.5

20043

*439.5

**285.2

*367.4

*323.7

**414.7

**321.3

2005

**434.1

**328.9

*385.2

**322.3

*411.6

**360.1

20064

**426.2

**299.3

*403.2

**375.9

**393.0

*354.1

20065

**426.5

**302.8

*404.1

**375.9

**388.0

*354.7

2007

*443.4

X

*394.4

**371.3

**396.7

**340.5

2008

*482.6

**362.1

*431.6

*336.2

**427.4

**378.0

2009

*497.2

**350.9

*430.6

*345.5

*407.4

*320.0

2010

**472.7

*329.7

*409.6

**417.8

**442.3

**356.8

20116

*486.8

*342.7

*433.9

**391.0

**450.9

**370.8

20117

*484.5

*343.9

*430.7

**389.6

**452.1

**350.6

2012

*498.3

**342.1

*406.9

**361.3

**503.9

**397.6

 DenbighshireFlintshireWrexham
AprilFull-time malesFull-time femalesFull-time malesFull-time femalesFull-time malesFull-time females

1997

*302.9

**245.0

*360.1

**258.2

*338.3

**233.6

1998

*341.2

**282.6

*374.9

**259.7

*365.2

**232.5

1999

*317.1

**281.9

*381.5

**276.5

*384.0

*236.0

2000

*345.7

**313.2

*397.1

**287.9

*387.1

**252.4

2001

*356.9

**273.4

*428.4

**314.8

*400.7

*264.7

2002

*402.0

**262.4

417.2

**320.1

*412.0

*268.4

2003

*383.9

**256.7

431.9

**297.6

*404.4

*288.5

20042

*382.5

**271.5

466.2

*320.3

*457.4

*297.8

20043

*374.3

**271.5

450.5

*320.3

*445.6

*288.6

2005

*394.7

**305.0

482.0

*318.4

*430.1

*306.6

20064

*367.3

*335.1

476.2

*381.4

*458.1

*327.9

20065

*367.9

*333.5

476.2

*375.4

*458.1

*325.6

2007

*382.4

**351.9

*445.6

*363.2

*470.1

*332.4

2008

**437.3

*391.6

500.0

*379.5

*475.0

*337.8

2009

**482.7

**446.3

*526.6

*389.9

*493.4

*383.9

2010

**439.7

**408.0

521.6

*389.9

*488.4

*387.1

20116

*463.6

*475.7

547.9

*366.6

*443.2

*354.6

20117

*460.9

*454.3

*547.9

*366.6

*438.7

*353.7

2012

*454.4

*468.0

563.7

*372.7

*477.6

*376.4

1 Employees on adult rates whose pay for the survey pay-period was not affected by absence. 2 2004 results excluding supplementary survey for comparison with 2003. 3 2004 results including supplementary survey designed to improve coverage of the survey (for more information see ONS website: www.ons.gov.uk). 4 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2005. 5 2006 results with methodology consistent with 2007. 6 2011 results based on standard occupational classification 2000. 7 2011 results based on standard occupational classification 2010. The numbers are in current prices/cash rather than constant prices Guide to Quality: The Coefficient of Variation (CV) indicates the quality of a figure the smaller the CV value the higher the quality. The true value is likely to lie within +/- twice the CV—for example, for an average of 200 with a CV of 5% we would expect the population average to be within the range 180-220. Key CV <= 5% * CV > 5% and <= 10 ** CV > 10% and <= 20% X unreliable Source: Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings (ASHE), Office for National Statistics

Big Society Capital

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) with reference to the answer of 25 February 2013, Official Report, column 198W, on Big Society Capital, to which Government Minister or other public body Big Society Capital is accountable; [166211]

(2) what assessment he has made of the rate of interest at which Big Society Capital is offering to lend money; [166230]

(3) what recent representations he has received regarding Big Society Capital. [166301]

Mr Hurd: Big Society Capital (BSC) is accountable to its shareholders—Big Society Trust and the Merlin Banks (four high street banks that contributed start-up capital to it. These are independent from Government. The Big Society Trust (a company limited by guarantee) has a controlling interest in BSC, which ensures that BSC remains true to its mission to grow the social investment market in the UK. BSC must report regularly to the BST on its financial and organisational performance. This information is publically available in its annual report and accounts.

As BSC is an independent social investment institution, the Cabinet Office has not made a formal assessment of the rate of interest at which BSC is offering to lend money.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 99W

I meet regularly with representatives from across the social investment sector to discuss market development.

COBRA

Keith Vaz: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many times the COBRA Committee has convened since January 2013. [166783]

Mr Maude: The Cabinet Office Briefing Rooms (COBR) have been used on a number of occasions since January 2013, In line with the practice of previous Administrations, further details of Cabinet Committee and other ministerial meetings are not routinely disclosed.

Data Protection

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what guidance his Department provides to officials on anonymising public data. [166036]

Mrs Grant: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Justice.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) is the independent regulatory body responsible for enforcing the Data Protection Act 1998 in the UK.

The ICO has produced the “Anonymisation: managing data protection risk code of practice” which describes the steps an organisation can take to ensure that anonymisation is conducted effectively, while retaining useful data. The code of practice is available on the ICO website at the following link:

http://www.ico.org.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/anonymisation

Dove Trust

Ms Gisela Stuart: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what reports he has received from the Charity Commission on the advice it has given to charities whose funds were frozen when the Charity Giving website and accounts were closed. [166781]

Mr Hurd: The Charity Commission has appointed an Interim Manager to the Dove Trust, which runs the Charity Giving website. The Interim Manager has provided advice to donors, fundraisers and charities on the Charity Giving website. This advice has been, and will continue to be, reviewed and updated as the situation develops. Answers to frequently asked questions are also available on the Charity Commission website.

Emigration

Lindsay Roy: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many people migrated from the UK to (a) other EU states, (b) other Commonwealth countries and (c) the rest of the world in the last five years. [166556]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people

2 Sep 2013 : Column 100W

migrated from the UK to (a) other EU states, (b) other Commonwealth countries and (c) the rest of the world in the last five years. [166556]

ONS produces estimates of Long-Term International Migration (LTIM), primarily based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS). The IPS is a continuous voluntary sample survey conducted by ONS and is the prime source of long-term international migration data for the UK providing estimates of both inflows and outflows. LTIM is the only data series to provide single year estimates of emigration from the UK and to separate EU states, other Commonwealth countries and the rest of the world.

Table 1 shows estimates of emigration from the UK for the year ending December 2007 to the year ending December 2011. Data for the year ending December 2012 will be published on 28th November 2013.

Table 1: LTIM emigration estimates from the UK, by country of next residence, for EU countries, commonwealth countries, and the rest of the world
Year ending December:Other EU states1Other Commonwealth countriesRest of the worldTotal

2007

131,000

127,000

83,000

341,000

2008

202,000

119,000

105,000

427,000

2009

144,000

127,000

97,000

368,000

2010

136,000

102,000

102,000

339,000

2011

124,000

124,000

103,000

351,000

1 Other EU states estimates are for the EU27 states excluding the UK. Source: ONS http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/long-term-international-migration/2011/2-02-ltim-country-of-last-or-next-residence--1991-2011.xls

LTIM provisional estimates of emigration by citizenship for the year ending September 2012 can be found within our published tables at the following link:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/migration1/migration-statistics-quarterly-report/may-2013/provisional-long-term-international-migration--ltim--estimates-sep-2012.xls

Revised net migration, immigration and emigration figures have been published as components of change in revised mid-year population estimates from the year to mid-2002 to the year to mid-2010 for England and Wales. These take into account the results from the 2011 Census, and included a revision to the net migration component, focussed primarily on immigration during the middle part of the decade before improvements were made to the International Passenger Survey in 2009. This is explained in a report published in December 2012. Table 7 of that report shows the differences between LTIM and the revised net migration component. Pages 7 and 15 specifically refer to revisions made to the emigration flows.

http://ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/specific/population-and-migration/population-statistics-research-unit--psru-/methods-used-to-revise-the-national-population-estimates-for-mid-2002-to-mid-2010.pdf

ONS plans to publish a further analytical report in Autumn 2013 that will further explain the differences between LTIM and the net migration component of the revised population estimates series.

Government Departments: Information

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office (1) what recent discussions he has had with ministerial colleagues on the format of data published by Government; [166038]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues on the accessibility of data published by Government. [166039]

Mr Hurd: In line with practice of previous Administrations details of internal discussions are not normally disclosed.

2 Sep 2013 : Column 101W

Government Departments: Procurement

Keith Vaz: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when the audit of procurement contracts held by G4S and Serco will (a) start and (b) finish. [166753]

Miss Chloe Smith: The Government-wide review of contracts held by G4S and Serco commenced on 22 July 2013 and is expected to report in the autumn. Details are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/review-of-government-g4s-and-serco-contracts

Further information on the costs of the review will be published in due course.

Migration: Statistics

Mr Frank Field: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office if he will request that the Office for National Statistics revises its long-term international migration estimates. [166350]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will request that the Office for National Statistics revises its long-term international migration estimates. [166350]

ONS produces estimates of Long-Term International Migration (LTIM), primarily based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS). The IPS is a continuous voluntary sample survey conducted by ONS and is the prime source of long-term international migration data for the UK providing estimates of both inflows and outflows.

In light of the 2011 Census, revised net migration, immigration and emigration figures have been published as components of change in revised mid-year population estimates from the year to mid-2002 to the year to mid-2010 for England and Wales. These include a revision to the net migration component, focussed primarily on the middle part of the decade before improvements were made to the International Passenger Survey in 2009. This provides a revised series of net migration for the inter-censal period, which is shown in Table 1:

Table 1: Population Estimates for England and Wales: Components of Change for Net International Migration for the year to mid-2002 to the year to mid-2010
Thousand
 ImmigrationEmigrationAsylum seekers net migrationNet Migration

2001-02

375

271

67

171

2002-03

402

288

59

173

2003-04

457

292

25

190

2004-05

569

283

15

302

2005-06

541

332

8

217

2006-07

587

345

10

252

2007-08

548

318

14

244

2008-09

515

353

18

181

2009-10

510

300

11

220

Note: Net migration includes visitor and migrant switchers, plus asylum seeker net migration. Source: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/about-ons/what-we-do/publication-scheme/published-ad-hoc-data/population/may-2013/mid-2002-to-2010-revised-components-of-change-for-england-and-wales

2 Sep 2013 : Column 102W

These revisions are explained in a report published in December 2012. Table 7 of that report shows the differences between LTIM and the revised net migration component:

http://ons.gov.uk/ons/guide-method/method-quality/specific/population-and-migration/population-statistics-research-unit--psru-/methods-used-to-revise-the-national-population-estimates-for-mid-2002-to-mid-2010.pdf

ONS plans to publish a further analytical report in Autumn 2013 that will further explain the differences between LTIM and the net migration component of the revised population estimates series. Any decision regarding the revision of LTIM will be made in the light of this analysis.

National Security Council

Keith Vaz: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what proportion of National Security Council meetings have focused on (a) terrorism and (b) organised crime since May 2010. [166785]

Mr Maude: In line with the practice of previous Governments, information relating to the proceedings of Cabinet Committees is generally not disclosed.

New Businesses: Woking

Jonathan Lord: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many business start-ups there have been in Woking constituency in each of the last three years. [166777]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office how many business start-ups there have been in the Woking constituency in each of the last three years. [166777]

Data on the number of business start-ups (enterprise births) are available in the ONS release on Business Demography at:

http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/bus-register/business-demography/index.html

The latest data available are for 2011. Data for 2012 will be available in November 2013.

The following table contains the count of enterprise births in the Woking constituency in the last three years.

Count of enterprise births in the Woking constituency 2009-2011
 Count

2009

530

2010

520

2011

645

Notes: 1. The above table has been produced using an extract from the Inter Departmental Business Register. 2. Figures have been rounded to protect confidentiality. 3. These numbers do not include very small businesses, typically those below the threshold for VAT and PAYE.

Office for Civil Society: Leyton

John Cryer: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office how much each project in Leyton and Wanstead constituency has received funding from the Office for Civil Society to date. [166143]

2 Sep 2013 : Column 103W

Mr Hurd: A record is kept of all organisations that receive direct funding from the Cabinet Office. However, my Department does not keep a record of expenditure by constituency.

Public Sector Employment

Jessica Morden: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what recent estimate he has made of the proportion of public sector workers in Wales who work part-time; and what proportion of such workers are women. [166507]

Mr Hurd: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Glen Watson, dated July 2013:

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), I have been asked to reply to your Parliamentary Question asking the Minister for the Cabinet Office for the proportion of public sector workers in Wales who work part time and what proportion of such workers are women. (166507)

The ONS compiles Labour Market Statistics for areas below the UK following International Labour Organisation (ILO) definitions using the Annual Population Survey (APS).

Individuals in the APS are classified to the public or private sector according to their responses to the survey. The public sector estimates provided do not correspond to those derived as part of the calculation of the official Public Sector Employment estimates. These are based on a National Accounts' definition, are generally lower and are not available by gender within regions.

According to APS interviews held during the period April 2012 and March 2013, the latest available period, 28% of public sectors workers in Wales were employed on a part-time basis and of these 85% were women.

As with any sample survey, estimates from the APS are subject to a margin of uncertainty.

National and local area estimates for many labour market statistics, including employment, unemployment and claimant count are available on the NOMIS website at

http://www.nomisweb.co.uk

Public Sector: Information

Chris Heaton-Harris: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office when he plans to publish a national data strategy, as recommended by the Shakespeare Review, published in May 2013. [166590]

Mr Maude: The Shakespeare Review recommended that Government should produce a recognisable and actionable National Data Strategy. The Government response to the Shakespeare Review agreed that the National Data Strategy would be taken forward through the Information Economy Strategy which was published on 14 June, and through the UK OGP National Action Plan The UK National Action Plan will be presented at the annual Open Government Partnership Summit in London on 31 October.

Social Enterprises

Chi Onwurah: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what support he plans to introduce for social enterprises based outside London. [166056]

2 Sep 2013 : Column 104W

Mr Hurd [holding answer 18 July 2013]:The Cabinet Office offers support to social enterprises across the UK, including through the Investment Readiness Programme. This programme includes both the Investment and Contract Readiness Fund

www.beinvestmentready.org.uk

open to more established social enterprises across the UK; and the Social Incubator Fund

www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/global-content/programmes/england/social-incubator-fund

which specifically targets social incubators. The Social Incubator Fund is particularly looking to support social enterprises in the north of the country, see

http://socialincubatornorth.org.uk/

but it is open to all regions. The Cabinet Office also works closely with other key organisations such as Social Enterprise UK, Social Finance and the Big Lottery Fund to support social enterprises across the UK.

Spice Innovations

Mr Thomas: To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office what funding his Department has provided to the charity Spice in (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12 and (c) 2012-13; and if he will make a statement. [165936]

Mr Hurd [holding answer 17 July 2013]: In 2010-11, Spice received £250,000 administered by NESTA to design and develop a showcase programme of Time Credit systems in Lewisham, West Norfolk and Wiltshire. In 2011-12 Spice also received £548,000 under the Social Action Fund programme managed by Social Investment Business, to scale their model in England—building partnerships, engaging new volunteers and developing materials and resources.