Counter-terrorism - Home Affairs Committee Contents


Annex A: Case chronology of Mohammed Ahmed Mohamed


The Home Office have provided us with a chronology of their involvement with Mr Mohamed.

·  On 14 January 2011 Mr Mohamed was arrested and interviewed in Burao, Somaliland with two other individuals. All three were accused of conspiracy to commit offences against national security. But Somaliland authorities did not prosecute any of the three because of insufficient admissible evidence. One individual was released locally; Mr Mohamed and the third individual, a British national, were subsequently deported to the UK.

·  On 13 March 2011 Mr Mohamed was deported back to the UK.

·  On 14 March 2011 Mr Mohamed arrived in the UK. He was detained and examined under Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000. Following that he was served with a Control Order and relocated to a town in the east of England.

·  On 12 October 2011 Mr Mohamed was arrested, and subsequently charged and remanded in custody in relation to 14 breaches of his control order:

·  18 August-failed to call monitoring company as required.

·  27 August-failed to report to police station as required.

·  7 September-failed to call monitoring company as required.

·  11 September-failed to report to police station as required.

·  15 September-failed to call monitoring company as required.

·  23 September-returned late for curfew.

·  28 September-met a person without prior permission.

·  28 September-possession of unauthorised mobile phone.

·  29 September-met a person without prior permission.

·  29 September-went outside his geographical boundary.

·  29 September-entered an internet cafe without permission.

·  30 September-failed to report to police station as required.

·  9 October-failed to call monitoring company as required.

·  11 October 2011-unauthorised possession of an MP3 player.

·  On 21 February 2012 Mr Mohamed was released on bail by the court after successfully arguing-amongst other reasons-that his trial for breaches should be delayed behind the High Court review of his control order. The CPS opposed bail but the Judge decided that, given the length of time Mr Mohamed had spent on remand, bail should be granted. A TPIM notice was served on Mr Mohamed the same day and he was moved to Home Office provided accommodation in London.

·  In July 2012 the High Court heard the review of the lawfulness of the Control Order and TPIM.

·  On 19 October 2012 Lord Justice Lloyd Jones handed down a judgment, upholding both the Control Order and TPIM.

·  On 29 December 2012 Mr Mohamed was arrested, and subsequently charged and remanded in custody in relation to six breaches of his TPIM between 22 and 28 December 2013 (failing to report to the police station or reporting late).

·  On 19 April 2013 Mr Mohamed was released on bail by the court (again, the CPS opposed bail). The High Court had upheld the control order and TPIM in a judgment handed down on 19 October 2012, but Mr Mohamed argued that his trial for breach should be delayed behind his appeal against the High Court's judgment.

·  On 25 July 2013 Mr Mohamed was arrested, and subsequently charged and remanded in custody in relation to one breach of his TPIM-a 'tag tamper' which occurred on 16 May 2013.

·  On 6 August 2013-Mr Mohamed was released on bail by the court (again, the CPS opposed bail). He continued to argue that his trial for breaches should be delayed behind his appeal against the High Court's judgment upholding the control order and TPIM.

·  On 1 November 2013 the CPS discontinued the prosecution for the alleged 'tag tamper' of 16 May 2013 because challenges to the reliability of the forensic evidence meant that, in their view, there was no realistic prospect of a conviction. Later that day Mr Mohamed absconded. His tag sent a tamper alert to the monitoring company, which was relayed by an automatic email to the Home Office and police. This was followed up by telephone between the monitoring company, Home Office and police.

·  The police immediately launched an intensive operation to locate Mohamed. Ports and borders were notified with his photograph and details circulated nationally and internationally.

·  On 2 November 2013 the Court, on the application of the Home Secretary, lifted the anonymity order in place in relation to Mohamed.

·  On 3 November 2013 the police appealed for public's help in locating Mohamed.


 
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Prepared 9 May 2014