Implementation of the Armed Forces Covenant in Northern Ireland - Northern Ireland Affairs Committee Contents


4  The current situation in Northern Ireland

33. Because of the nature of devolution and the different issues that arise throughout the UK, we were told that the Covenant has been implemented differently in the separate jurisdictions.[47] As noted previously, the Minister of State for Northern Ireland told us that the vast majority of the Armed Forces Covenant is being delivered in Northern Ireland,[48] but that HM Government was not complacent about addressing areas where more needed to be done. The Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans, Rt Hon Mark Francois MP, echoed this view, saying that "overall our assessment is that provision in Northern Ireland is generally good."[49] This was confirmed by Brigadier Rob Thomson, Commander of 38 (Irish) Brigade, who said "I have a genuinely strong sense that the outputs and the ends of the Covenant are being delivered, largely."[50]

34. With an estimated 150,000 Armed Forces veterans resident in Northern Ireland, access by the Armed Forces Community to public services such as health and housing is a significant issue. Around 63,000 of the veterans resident in Northern Ireland served in the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Home Service Battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment during Operation Banner, and so have particular needs in relation to their security and, sometimes, mental health care. We have heard about some bespoke support mechanisms being available in Northern Ireland, such as the Aftercare Service, but also of areas where benefits available to the Armed Forces Community elsewhere in the UK are not available in Northern Ireland, such as increased priority for social housing and access to certain health services. We explore these, and others matters, below.

Assessment of disadvantage to the Armed Forces in NI

35. The Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans told us that, following a debate in the House on the Armed Forces Covenant in November 2012, the Prime Minister had taken a particular interest in the question of the Armed Forces Covenant in Northern Ireland, and had called a meeting in January 2013 where the Minister of State for Northern Ireland, Mike Penning MP, was present. This resulted in two policies:

·  that HM Government should try to establish a clear understanding of where there might be any shortfall in Covenant provision for service personnel in Northern Ireland, and

·  that options should then be developed to fill any gaps in provision that were identified.[51]

As a result of this meeting, Mr Penning convened a meeting in February 2013 of representatives from a range of Armed Forces charities operating in Northern Ireland to form the Northern Ireland Veterans Forum. He told us that the Forum allowed for ministerial guidance to be given to Armed Forces organisations operating in Northern Ireland, and that the Forum would be meeting regularly.[52]

36. The work being taken forward to identify any shortfall in Covenant provision in Northern Ireland is similar to a suggestion from the Committee on the Administration of Justice, an independent human rights organisation based in Northern Ireland, which took the view that a full assessment of the health and housing needs of the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland might be a helpful way of understanding the situation and taking things forward,[53] an idea supported by SSAFA Forces Help.[54] Mr Francois told us that, in effect, "that is what the Veterans Forum is attempting to do."[55] Following such an assessment, Mr Francois told us "if we do find any genuine gaps, we need to come up with a mechanism to address them."[56] The Minister of State for Northern Ireland also confirmed that any gaps which were identified would be filled, saying:

    My attitude is that I will get that problem sorted out. It may not be me and my Department, but we will sort it out.[57]

37. We heard from two ministers in the Northern Ireland Executive, Edwin Poots MLA, Minister for Health, Social Services and Public Safety, and Nelson McCausland MLA, Minister for Social Development, that there had been engagement between their departments and HM Government in relation to the current assessment of the provision of services to the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland. Mr McCausland told us that he was fairly clear as to the issues that needed to be addressed, and confirmed that he would be happy to look at anything new that arose.[58]

38. We welcome the work undertaken by the Northern Ireland Office and the Ministry of Defence, at the Prime Minister's direction, to assess any shortfall in Covenant provision in Northern Ireland. It is vital that any such shortfalls are addressed, whether this is by the Northern Ireland Executive or HM Government. We recommend that the MoD respond to any identified needs of the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland, and report on how these will be met.

Armed Forces organisations in Northern Ireland

39. Throughout the course of our inquiry we heard that there was "a good deal of care for veterans within Northern Ireland" from various charities and organisations,[59] and that the services provided by the voluntary sector in Northern Ireland were often superior to those provided elsewhere in the UK.[60] Following a visit to Northern Ireland, the Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans also stated that the Armed Forces charities and third sector organisations in Northern Ireland "deliver[ed] a good service in the spirit of the Armed Forces Covenant."[61] We have heard that the various Armed Forces charities in Northern Ireland provide valuable support to the Armed Forces Community, including:

·  independent inquest advice for bereaved families;

·  financial support, in terms of short term crisis type grants;

·  practical assistance and advice;

·  signposting the appropriate organisations;[62]

·  financial casework for individuals,[63] and

·  treatment and support for mental health problems.

We were also told that the work of the Armed Forces charities in Northern Ireland, and the problems their clients brought to them, were broadly similar to what their colleagues dealt with in other parts of the UK.[64]

40. Colonel Richard Gordon of SSAFA Forces Help told us that he did not see huge disadvantages to the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland by not having the Covenant formally implemented. This view was echoed by Brian Maguire of the Royal British Legion:

    I cannot point to a single case, in all the cases we have dealt with in our time, where I can say for sure that the individual would have been better treated had they been living elsewhere in the United Kingdom.[65]

Similar views were expressed by Colonel Paul Cummings of ABF, the Soldiers Charity, who said that in almost every respect the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland was treated the same as that community in GB.[66]

41. The Royal British Legion and SSAFA Forces Help told us that there was a very close working relationship between a number of charities and other stakeholders operating in Northern Ireland,[67] but other witnesses believed that there was a lack of "overarching co-ordination, co-operation and governance."[68] The Northern Ireland Veterans Advisory and Pensions Committee said that, although at a working level there was good co-operation between the various Armed Forces organisations in Northern Ireland,[69] it seemed every organisation was "doing their own thing", and that engagement was needed from Northern Ireland politicians to give their work impetus.[70] The establishment of the Northern Ireland Veterans Forum, outlined above, is intended to allow for ministerial guidance of the various Armed Forces organisations operating in Northern Ireland.

42. We were told that most of the Armed Forces charities in Northern Ireland neither receive, nor seek, financial support from the MoD, and are independently supported.[71] As an exception, Combat Stress receives remuneration from the MoD in respect of those in receipt of a war pension and those who the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency (SPVA) agrees need treatment.[72] We also heard that ABF, the Soldiers' Charity, had historically received £25,000 from the Northern Ireland Office, but that they had not received a grant this year.[73]

43. The Armed Forces charities operating in Northern Ireland are essential to the effective support of the Armed Forces Community, and we applaud the efforts of all those working in the Armed Forces voluntary sector. We welcome the establishment of the Northern Ireland Veterans Forum, which has brought together many of the key stakeholders. We would urge this forum to address concerns that we heard regarding a lack of over-arching co-ordination and co-operation between the many Armed Forces organisations operating in Northern Ireland.

Measures put in place by Northern Ireland Departments

44. Although the Northern Ireland Executive has not formally endorsed the Armed Forces Covenant, individual Northern Ireland departments have taken measures to ensure that members of the Armed Forces Community do not face any disadvantage in accessing public services.

45. The Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (DHSSPS) published a protocol in 2009 for ensuring equitable access to health and social care services for members of the Armed Forces. This set out a framework to ensure that serving members of the Armed Forces, their families and veterans suffered no disadvantage in accessing health and social care services. The protocol was supported by the Armed Forces Liaison Forum, which includes representatives from the Armed Forces, SSAFA, ABF, Royal British Legion, MoD, and Combat Stress.[74]

46. However, the Northern Ireland Veterans Advisory and Pensions Committee raised concerns that the Liaison Forum was not meeting frequently enough, as it was difficult to get everyone required together. They said the Forum was meant to meet two or three times a year, but had actually been meeting only once a year.[75] Since being established in 2010, the Forum had met on only three occasions. It is due to meet again in October 2013.[76]

47. The Northern Ireland Minister for Social Development assured us that his department engaged with representative bodies of the Armed Forces Community, and also that he was keen to discuss replicating DHSSPS's model with his officials, telling us "it does seem to be a very good model."[77] The Commander of 38 (Irish) Brigade also told us that they would like to see the arrangements made at the DHSSPS replicated in the housing sector.[78]

48. We welcome the protocol for ensuring equitable access to health and social care services for the Armed Forces published by the Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety in 2009, and also the Armed Forces Liaison Forum which was established to support this protocol. This has established an important mechanism enabling the Armed Forces Community to engage with a department of the Northern Ireland Executive on issues and policies affecting them. We believe that other departments might usefully consider establishing similar forums on areas of policy particularly relevant to the Armed Forces Community.

49. One possible area for improvement was the lack of any mechanism within the Northern Ireland Executive which would enable departments to liaise and share details of best practice in relation to work affecting the Armed Forces Community. The Northern Ireland Health Minister, Edwin Poots MLA, suggested that the establishment of a ministerial sub­group would be an option to improve dialogue between departments, something which the Northern Ireland Minister for Social Development, Nelson McCausland MLA, supported.[79] Mr Poots went on to say that, because various other departments were involved with services relevant to the Armed Forces Community, a ministerial sub-group would "assist us in having a better co­ordinated response to the issues that come before us."[80]

50. The MoD said that although liaison with the Northern Ireland Executive worked well at a "grassroots" level, they would welcome the Executive engaging with them at a more corporate level on the Armed Forces Covenant.[81] This could potentially be achieved through the establishment of a sub-ministerial group, which could then liaise with HM Government departments.

51. We welcome the suggestion by Mr Poots and Mr McCausland that a ministerial sub-group be established within the Northern Ireland Executive to improve co-ordination between Northern Ireland departments on policy affecting the Armed Forces. Clearly, this is a matter that is the responsibility of the Northern Ireland Executive but, nonetheless, we hope that such a group will be established without delay to further the work being done by Northern Ireland Departments.

Healthcare, housing and education issues

HOUSING AND HOMELESSNESS

52. There are differences across the UK in how social housing is provided. In Great Britain, many social housing providers have decided to award members of the Armed Forces Community increased priority in accessing social housing. However, in Northern Ireland the Housing Executive operates the Common Selection Scheme, which does not allow for that flexibility.

53. In practice, however, this does not appear to be a problem. Brigadier Rob Thomson told us that 38 (Irish) Brigade had connections with the Housing Executive in Northern Ireland so that particular issues could be addressed and people signposted to the most appropriate place.[82] Rear Admiral Williams, Defence Services Secretary with the MoD, told us:

    The normal places I would look for evidence of a real problem—the service families federations and service charities—do not seem to indicate the size of the problem you might expect.[83]

54. When we questioned Armed Forces charities about difficulties members of the Armed Forces Community might face in accessing housing in Northern Ireland, we were told that there was not a huge disadvantage, and that the charities were set up to provide support to those needing, for instance, help with a deposit and rent in advance for private rented accommodation.[84] The representative from ABF, the Soldiers Charity, told us that the Housing Executive in Northern Ireland was extremely responsive at enabling people, whether from the Armed Forces Community or not, to move into social housing, while in other areas of the UK veterans might be at the top of the waiting list but there was no housing available.[85] We also heard from 38 (Irish) Brigade that lack of capacity in social housing was the main issue, but that contacts with the Housing Executive enabled individuals to be signposted appropriately.

55. One area we questioned witnesses about was evidence of problems arising from homelessness and mental health in the Armed Forces Community. Most witnesses told us that they were not aware of homelessness being a particular problem for veterans in Northern Ireland,[86] but that no comprehensive assessment had been made. Brian Maguire of the Royal British Legion told us that although homelessness and alcoholism were issues for veterans, they were not a significant problem in Northern Ireland.[87] The Northern Ireland minister responsible for housing told us that in the absence of accurate data, there was no evidence that homelessness was greater amongst veterans.[88] Work had been commissioned on this issue and it had been specifically tasked to look as "the position of former soldiers."[89]

56. Although the Northern Ireland Executive did not prioritise service leavers wishing to access social housing, the Northern Ireland Minister of Social Development, Nelson McCausland MLA, told us that his intention was that

    where service personnel and their families have to vacate military-provided housing, they are not placed at a disadvantage compared with other applicants.[90]

Mr McCausland took the view that personnel returning to Northern Ireland after service should be treated on the same basis as any other local person. His written submission to the Committee also raised a number of interesting points, including:

·  Homelessness - the Department for Social Development, NI, take the view ex-service applicants who are at risk of homelessness or rough sleeping because of their institutional background are vulnerable persons and should be given priority status.

·  Connection with Northern Ireland - the Housing Selection Scheme could be interpreted so as to render applicants for social housing ineligible if they are ex-service personnel from elsewhere in the UK who have been based in Northern Ireland. The Minister has instructed the Housing Executive not to interpret the Scheme in a way which is disadvantageous to any "ex-service applicant", and it will be amended at the next opportunity.

·  Priority status - the Department is exploring the possibility of giving some recognition to ex-service applicants in priority for social housing, but the different legal framework makes it unlikely that it would be able to fully reflect the position in Great Britain.[91]

HEALTHCARE

57. A number of healthcare disadvantages to veterans in Northern Ireland were identified, including:

·  IVF treatment - in England and Scotland, certain injured service personnel would get three cycles of IVF, in Wales two but in Northern Ireland they were only entitled to one, in line with the general population in Northern Ireland.[92]

·  Priority NHS treatment - in England, Scotland and Wales there was priority NHS treatment for veterans with Service-related injuries subject to the clinical needs of others, but in Northern Ireland there was no such priority.[93]

The MoD told us that they were working with the relevant Northern Ireland department to see if this disparity in IVF treatment could be addressed.[94] We were also told by a representative from SSAFA Forces Help that they would "pay for IVF treatment for injured service personnel as well, on a country­wide basis", [95] and the Commander of 38 (Irish) Brigade said that he was confident a bespoke solution could be provided if someone needed IVF treatment.[96] Additionally, Mr Poots made it clear that, in relation to IVF treatments, ex-service personnel in Northern Ireland were not losing out in comparison to other residents of Northern Ireland, but simply did not have the same benefits as were provided to veterans in GB.[97] In relation to priority treatment under the NHS, the Northern Ireland minister responsible for health told us that the differences between NI and the rest of the UK were unlikely to make a considerable difference in practice.[98]

58. The Minister of State for Northern Ireland specifically noted Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as one area where more needed to be done to ensure that treatment could be effectively delivered to veterans in Northern Ireland.[99] The MoD told us that there had been some problems with how service leavers were briefed on mental health issues in the past, but that work had been done to improve this and to offer more support.[100] Mr Poots told us that PTSD was a particular issue for veterans who had served in NI during "the Troubles" and those who had served in Iraq, with an anticipation that many returning from service in Afghanistan would also be affected.[101] The Regimental Association of the Royal Irish Regiment told us that they relied very heavily on the Aftercare Service for members suffering from PTSD, although there were still some people who fell through the net.[102]

59. We heard from Combat Stress that they had a centre in Belfast for providing advice and out-patient treatment, but those veterans who required in-patient treatment had to travel to a facility in Scotland.[103] When questioned on whether the DHSSPS could take a role in providing treatment for veterans suffering from mental health problems, Mr Poots said it was something the Armed Forces Liaison Forum could look at to assess the "desirability and affordability" of such measures.[104] He also told us that the "amount of money that we spend on mental health as a proportion of the population that requires mental health treatment is not where I would like it to be", but that he was not in a position to increase this at present.[105]

60. We received evidence from the Northern Ireland Health Minister and others that some veterans may benefit from access to a psychiatrist. We strongly recommend that HM Government gives serious consideration to a more robust mental health support team for veterans in Northern Ireland, including the appointment of a dedicated psychiatrist.

61. The provision of advanced prosthetics to Armed Forces veterans was an area where HM Government had made £6.5 million available for service personnel wounded in Iraq or in Afghanistan. Mr Francois told us that he understood that, so as not to be seen to give the Armed Forces in Northern Ireland preferential treatment, the NI department for health wanted to try and make the advanced prosthetics available to all.[106] This was confirmed by Mr Poots, who told us "we have taken the position that those who require prosthetics should all receive it at the top-end standard", and that his officials had been liaising closely with the MoD about this matter.[107] On the question of funding for advanced prosthetics, supplementary evidence we received from Mr Poots explained that his department was working with the MoD and NHS towards recognising the Regional Disablement Service, Musgrave Park Hospital, Belfast, as Northern Ireland's Disability Services Centre of Excellence, so that funding from the MoD's advanced prosthetics provision would be available to Northern Ireland. [108]

EDUCATION

62. A specific benefit available to members of the Armed Forces Community in England, Scotland and Wales, but not Northern Ireland, is the Further and Higher Education Commitments Scheme, where eligible service leavers are provided with access to a first full Level 3 course.[109] The Ministry of Defence told us that they were moving closer to an agreement with the relevant Department in the Northern Ireland Executive to review that position in the hope of operating the same scheme in Northern Ireland,[110] and this work was "looking promising".[111]

63. There are a number of cases where the Armed Forces Community in NI does not receive the same level of benefits in relation to health, housing and education as that community in GB. However, we are encouraged that HM Government is working with the relevant Northern Ireland departments to resolve these disparities, where possible, and that in general there is no serious material disadvantage to the Armed Forces Community in Northern Ireland under current arrangements.

The Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish (Home Service) Regiment Aftercare Service

64. One unique support mechanism that exists exclusively in Northern Ireland is the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish (Home Service) Regiment Aftercare Service. Of the estimated 150,000 veterans in Northern Ireland, the Aftercare Service is open to the 63,000 who served in the Royal Irish Regiment Home Service Battalions or in the UDR. The MoD's evidence stated:

    The largest veteran community is that of the Royal Irish Regiment and the Ulster Defence Regiment. Recognising the enduring security situation, a bespoke Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish (Home Service) Regiment Aftercare Service is in place, funded by the Ministry of Defence. It supports veterans in the delivery of psychiatry, physiotherapy and welfare casework and signposts them to other organisations, according to their needs.

Rear Admiral Williams, from the MoD, explained that there was a benevolent element to it and there was some physiotherapy and psychotherapy associated with the service, and that the level of service it provided "could be considered better than that which would be provided elsewhere".[112] The MoD told us that the Aftercare Service was a "bespoke" service that catered for the specific needs of veterans from the RIR and UDR., and that other veterans were supported in different ways by the MoD and SPVA.[113] Colonel Gordon of SSAFA Forces Help also argued against extending the Aftercare Service to the broader veterans community, saying that it was a bespoke service and extending it would involve "public funds being extended into other areas where there is existing provision."[114]

65. Colonel Cummings, Director of Welfare for ABF, the Soldiers' Charity, took the view that the wider veterans community in Northern Ireland would very much like to see the Aftercare Service extended to them, saying:

    It is hugely valued. It is hugely valued by the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Royal Irish (Home Service) Regiment, and also it is hugely valued by the veterans community in Ireland, which believes that this reflects a real commitment by Government to support individuals who have made a significant sacrifice over time. The veteran community, I have no doubt, would very much like to see the support that is given to the Ulster Defence Regiment and the Home Service, through the Aftercare Service, extended to them.[115]

He said that the impediment to extending the service was the cost, as currently the service was being provided by the voluntary sector, as it is in GB.[116] He did not accept the argument that the service was too tailored to be applicable to the wider veterans community, saying "with some minor adaptation it could meet the needs of the veteran population as a whole," as the needs of the RIR Home Service and UDR were shared in many cases by other veterans in Northern Ireland.[117]

66. The Regimental Association of the Royal Irish Regiment supported the extension of the Aftercare service to all HM Forces Veterans living in Northern Ireland, alongside an expansion of the service to provide increased support.[118] Brigadier Rob Thomson, Commander of 38 (Irish) Brigade told us that he did not see the case for extending the Aftercare Service, as those veterans not from the UDR or RIR (Home Service) were having their needs met under other existing arrangements.[119]

67. The Royal Irish Regiment raised concerns about future funding for the Aftercare Service in the future. They told us they understood the service to be funded until 2014, but had concerns about what would happen after that.[120] When we questioned the Minister of State for Northern Ireland on this point, he told us that funding for the Aftercare Service was in place until 2016, and that negotiations would start in 2014 or 2015 about funding going forward.

68. A number of witnesses have made the case that veterans in Northern Ireland could benefit from the expansion of the Ulster Defence Regiment and Royal Irish (Home Service) Regiment Aftercare Service. We appreciate the argument that this is a bespoke service tailored to the specific needs of units that were based and served in Northern Ireland, but feel there could be value in extending the services it offered more widely where, for example, there is best practice which would benefit other veterans. We recommend that the MoD assesses the benefits of extending the Aftercare Service to all veterans based in Northern Ireland, and report back to us.

Engagement by HM Government

69. Although no representative of the devolved administration in Northern Ireland sits on the Covenant Reference Group, we did hear that the Minister of State for Northern Ireland, Mike Penning MP, sits on the Covenant Committee, a cross-Government Committee, tasked with implementing the Armed Forces Covenant across various HM Government departments.[121] We were also told about the close working relationship between the Northern Ireland Office and the Ministry of Defence on issues relating to the Armed Forces Covenant, and the work of 38 (Irish) Brigade.[122] The Minister for Defence Personnel, Welfare and Veterans particularly praised the role of 38 (Irish) Brigade in engaging with the devolved administration. When we took evidence from Brigadier Rob Thomson, its Commander, he told us:

    I am responsible for delivering firm base, which is a phrase we use in the military to talk about support to families of soldiers and support to service personnel. I am responsible for the security of all the garrison: the serving, regular and reserve within Northern Ireland. I include civil servants within my responsibility, who are currently serving our Department. Finally, my job is to represent the Army in Northern Ireland as a region of the United Kingdom.[123]

Comparisons with Scotland and Wales

70. A number of support mechanisms that the Scottish and Welsh Governments have put in place for the Armed Forces Community in Scotland and Wales were highlighted throughout our inquiry. These included:

·  Access and support for veterans through the All Wales Health and Wellbeing Service;

·  £485,000 provided annually by the Welsh Government to the NHS directly aimed at mental health for veterans;

·  £400,000 from the Scottish Government to facilitate 60 projects for the benefit of veterans, and

·  £1.7 million from the Scottish Government to Combat Stress, which provided treatment for 721 veterans in Scotland.[124]

In comparison, the NIVPAC told us that in Northern Ireland "no direct or ring-fenced funding had been provided to the best of our knowledge."[125]

71. Mr Francois told us that "provision is not precisely the same in all three nations, partly because they are devolved", and his staff said that in the case of Scotland, as a comparison,

    the Scottish Executive has taken a much more proactive political role in trying to keep pace with developments in England and Wales. It is that kind of leadership that has made a significant difference for us there.[126]

In relation to MoD spending in the devolved administrations, Mr Francois told us "I do not think there is any disadvantage in terms of what we spend" in Northern Ireland.[127]


47   Q68 Back

48   Q423 Back

49   Q68 Back

50   Q344 Back

51   Q94 Back

52   Q424 Back

53   AFC 05 Back

54   Q134 Back

55   Q103 Back

56   Q94 Back

57   Q434 Back

58   Q284 Back

59   Q24 Back

60   Q221 Back

61   Ev 126 Back

62   Q136 Back

63   Q136 Back

64   Q161 Back

65   Q129 Back

66   Q187 Back

67   Q130, Ev 111 Back

68   Q24 Back

69   Q39 Back

70   Q24 Back

71   Q138 Back

72   Q199 Back

73   Q203 Back

74   Q244 Back

75   Q18 Back

76   Ev 136 Back

77   Q249 Back

78   Q348 Back

79   Q240 Back

80   Q285 Back

81   Q93 Back

82   Qq 70, 347 Back

83   Q70 Back

84   Qq 130, 178 Back

85   Q187 Back

86   Q37 Back

87   Q139 Back

88   Q245 Back

89   Q246 Back

90   Q232 Back

91   Ev 102 Back

92   Ev 114 Back

93   Ev 114 Back

94   Q69 Back

95   Q164 Back

96   Q350 Back

97   Q269 Back

98   Q270 Back

99   Q423 Back

100   Q89 Back

101   Q252 Back

102   Q307 Back

103   Q222 Back

104   Q253 Back

105   Q272 Back

106   Q105 Back

107   Q276 Back

108   Ev 136 Back

109   This is is a GCE A-level or vocational equivalent, or a first higher education qualification, or first foundation degree, or first undergraduate degree or equivalent, free of tuition fees. Back

110   Q69 Back

111   Q91 Back

112   Qq 81-82 Back

113   Qq 86-88 Back

114   Q144 Back

115   Q214 Back

116   Q215 Back

117   Q216 Back

118   Q310 Back

119   Q355 Back

120   Q312 Back

121   Q77 Back

122   Q69 Back

123   Q342 Back

124   Q31 Back

125   Q32 Back

126   Q101 Back

127   Q122 Back


 
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© Parliamentary copyright 2013
Prepared 17 July 2013