1 Sep 2014 : Column 1MC

Ministerial Corrections

Monday 1 September 2014

Defence

Army: Recruitment

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will estimate the (a) monthly and (b) total additional cost to date for paying Capita as if it was meeting quantity and quality standards for recruitments in the Recruiting Partnering Project. [200381]

[Official Report, 23 June 2014, Vol. 583, c. 86W.]

Letter of correction from Anna Soubry:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for Moray (Angus Robertson) on 23 June 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

Anna Soubry: Between its launch in March 2012 to 31 March 2014, the Army has paid Capita £100.380 million for the Recruiting Partnering Project. The Recruiting Partnering Project remains within the overall agreed cost of £1.360 million.

The Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), set out on 14 January 2014, Official Report, column 716, the cost of Capita providing a new Information Technology platform as part of the Recruiting Partnering Project. At the time, these costs were expected to be around £47.7 million directly linked to the change of hosting provision. Since this statement, these costs have reduced to around £42.9 million.

As previously stated by the Secretary of State on 14 January, there has been an additional cost of around £1 million per month to run the Capita system. This includes costs for additional manpower.

The correct answer should have been:

Anna Soubry: Between its launch in March 2012 to 31 March 2014, the Army has paid Capita £100.380 million for the Recruiting Partnering Project. The Recruiting Partnering Project remains within the overall agreed cost of £1.360 billion.

The Secretary of State for Defence, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond), set out on 14 January 2014, Official Report, column 716, the cost of Capita providing a new Information Technology platform as part of the Recruiting Partnering Project. At the time, these costs were expected to be around £47.7 million directly linked to the change of hosting provision. Since this statement, these costs have reduced to around £42.9 million.

As previously stated by the Secretary of State on 14 January, there has been an additional cost of around £1 million per month to run the Capita system. This includes costs for additional manpower.

1 Sep 2014 : Column 2MC

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

Genetically Modified Organisms: Labelling

Huw Irranca-Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the Government's position is in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership negotiations on labelling of products containing GM in the UK food chain; and if she will make a statement. [205728]

[Official Report, 22 July 2014, Vol. 584, c. 1063W.]

Letter of correction from George Eustice:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for Ogmore (Huw Irranca-Davies) on 22 July 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

George Eustice: This issue has yet to be discussed in detail within the framework of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations. The Government will consider its negotiation position based on a range of factors including the environmental impact and public health benefit of such anti-microbial treatments that can reduce potential for foodborne illness.

The correct answer should have been:

George Eustice: The existing EU rules which require GM-derived food to be labelled are not expected to be discussed or reviewed as part of the negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.

Justice

Police Cautions

Jenny Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many cautions have been issued for offences of (a) murder, (b) rape, (c) sexual assault, (d) robbery and (e) burglary in (i) each year between 2010 and 2013 and (ii) each month since January 2013. [203136]

[Official Report, 9 July 2014, Vol. 584, c. 321-24W.]

Letter of correction from Damian Green:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for Darlington (Jenny Chapman) on 9 July 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

Damian Green: The number of offenders (including young people) cautioned, for offences of rape, sexual assault, robbery and burglary, by months in England and Wales from 2010 to 2013 (latest available) can be viewed in the table. There were no cautions administered for murder.

Simple cautions (previously police cautions) are a non-statutory disposal available to the police to dispose of any offence committed by an adult and designed for dealing with low level, mainly first time offending. The Government does not believe that cautions are appropriate for serious offences. We issued new guidelines on 14 November 2014 following a detailed review of how cautions were being used by police forces, and are strengthening the law to prevent cautions being used for serious offences.

1 Sep 2014 : Column 3MC

The Ministry of Justice issues guidance on the process to be followed by the police and the CPS when they are administering simple cautions for adult offenders. This guidance states that the use of a simple caution for indictable only offences, such as rape, should only be given following authorisation by the CPS. These will be cases where there were exceptional circumstances which would mean that it was not in the public interest to prosecute.

The overall number of simple cautions issued has halved since 2007. The cautioning rate, that is, the number of offenders cautioned as a percentage of offenders who were either cautioned or convicted, in 2013 was 20%; this has declined from a peak of 31% in 2007.

1 Sep 2014 : Column 4MC

The Government is clear that serious offences should always be brought to court and to ensure that there is increased public confidence in the justice system last year announced limits on the use of simple cautions. These changes restrict the use of cautions for indictable only offences and certain serious either way offences unless there are exceptional circumstances and a senior police officer, as well as the CPS for certain cases, has agreed that a caution should be administered.

The MOJ guidance on Adult Simple Cautions was amended in November last year to reflect these changes, and we are currently legislating in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill to place statutory restrictions around their use.

Offenders cautioned1,2 for selected offences, by month, England and Wales, 2010-20133
 OffencesJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSeptOctNovDecTotal

2010

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

53

31

38

40

54

58

46

57

51

46

49

24

547

 

Rape5

3

4

3

6

4

2

5

2

5

1

35

 

Burglary6

253

245

271

278

321

332

358

297

348

290

301

190

3,484

 

Robbery7

6

4

24

19

23

27

27

13

18

14

19

13

207

 

Total (all)

315

280

337

337

401

423

435

369

422

352

374

228

4,273

               

2011

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

41

56

60

53

54

55

64

52

44

42

49

42

612

 

Rape5

1

1

4

1

2

2

2

2

1

2

1

19

 

Burglary6

237

229

290

268

339

340

303

311

286

259

212

3,359

 

Robbery7

14

28

35

31

29

21

20

17

27

21

15

11

269

 

Total (all)

293

314

389

353

370

417

426

374

382

350

325

266

4,259

               

2012

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

44

34

46

35

55

38

46

50

60

38

56

50

552

 

Rape5

1

2

2

1

1

4

1

1

3

16

 

Burglary (6)

221

187

205

197

224

218

282

259

218

195

189

136

2,531

 

Robbery7

12

20

18

13

11

17

11

18

23

16

19

10

188

 

Total (all)

278

243

271

245

291

274

339

331

301

250

265

199

3,287

               

2013

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

58

49

47

46

36

41

59

53

55

34

45

45

568

 

Rape5

1

5

3

1

2

4

3

1

20

 

Burglary6

167

153

152

145

208

196

185

175

177

153

143

119

1,973

 

Robbery7

10

10

13

13

13

8

19

5

10

4

3

11

119

 

Total (all)

236

212

217

207

257

245

264

235

246

194

191

176

2,680

1 The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence. 2 From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. 3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 4 Sexual Offences Act 2003, s2, s3, s6, s7 5 Sexual Offences Act 2003, s1, s5 6 Theft Act 1968, s.9, S.9(1)(a), S.9(1)(b), S.9 (1)(a) or (b), S.10 7 Theft Act 1968, S.8 Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

1 Sep 2014 : Column 5MC

The correct answer should have been:

Damian Green: The number of offenders (including young people) cautioned, for offences of rape, sexual assault, robbery and burglary, by months in England and Wales from 2010 to 2013 (latest available) can be viewed in the table. There were no cautions administered for murder.

The Ministry of Justice issues guidance on the process to be followed by the police and the CPS when they are administering simple cautions for adult offenders. This guidance states that the use of a simple caution for indictable only offences, such as rape, should only be given following authorisation by the CPS. These will be cases where there were exceptional circumstances which would mean that it was not in the public interest to prosecute.

The overall number of simple cautions issued has halved since 2007. The cautioning rate, that is, the

1 Sep 2014 : Column 6MC

number of offenders cautioned as a percentage of offenders who were either cautioned or convicted, in 2013 was 20%; this has declined from a peak of 31% in 2007.

The Government is clear that serious offences should always be brought to court and to ensure that there is increased public confidence in the justice system last year announced limits on the use of simple cautions. These changes restrict the use of cautions for indictable only offences and certain serious either way offences unless there are exceptional circumstances and a senior police officer, as well as the CPS for certain cases, has agreed that a caution should be administered.

The MOJ guidance on Adult Simple Cautions was amended in November last year to reflect these changes, and we are currently legislating in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill to place statutory restrictions around their use.

Offenders cautioned1,2 for selected offences, by month, England and Wales, 2010-20133
 OffencesJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSeptOctNovDecTotal

2010

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

53

31

38

40

54

58

46

57

51

46

49

24

547

 

Rape5

3

4

3

6

4

2

5

2

5

1

35

 

Burglary6

253

245

271

278

321

332

358

297

348

290

301

190

3,484

 

Robbery7

6

4

24

19

23

27

27

13

18

14

19

13

207

 

Total (all)

315

280

337

337

401

423

435

369

422

352

374

228

4,273

               

2011

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

41

56

60

53

54

55

64

52

44

42

49

42

612

 

Rape5

1

1

4

1

2

2

2

2

1

2

1

19

 

Burglary6

237

229

290

268

339

340

303

311

286

259

212

3,359

 

Robbery7

14

28

35

31

29

21

20

17

27

21

15

11

269

 

Total (all)

293

314

389

353

370

417

426

374

382

350

325

266

4,259

               

2012

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

44

34

46

35

55

38

46

50

60

38

56

50

552

 

Rape5

1

2

2

1

1

4

1

1

3

16

 

Burglary (6)

221

187

205

197

224

218

282

259

218

195

189

136

2,531

 

Robbery7

12

20

18

13

11

17

11

18

23

16

19

10

188

 

Total (all)

278

243

271

245

291

274

339

331

301

250

265

199

3,287

               

2013

Murder

 

Sexual assault4

58

49

47

46

36

41

59

53

55

34

45

45

568

 

Rape5

1

5

3

1

2

4

3

1

20

 

Burglary6

167

153

152

145

208

196

185

175

177

153

143

119

1,973

 

Robbery7

10

10

13

13

13

8

19

5

10

4

3

11

119

1 Sep 2014 : Column 7MC

1 Sep 2014 : Column 8MC

 

Total (all)

236

212

217

207

257

245

264

235

246

194

191

176

2,680

1 The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When an offender has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence. 2 From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and warnings. These figures have been included in the totals. 3 Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. 4 Sexual Offences Act 2003, s2, s3, s6, s7 5 Sexual Offences Act 2003, s1, s5 6 Theft Act 1968, s.9, S.9(1)(a), S.9(1)(b), S.9 (1)(a) or (b), S.10 7 Theft Act 1968, S.8 Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services—Ministry of Justice

Home Department

Passports

Ian Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications for (a) new passports and (b) passport renewals there have been in the last year; and what the annual change in such figures has been. [200217]

[Official Report, 8 July 2014, Vol. 584, c. 200W.]

Letter of correction from James Brokenshire:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for Dudley North (Ian Austin) on 8 July 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

James Brokenshire: During the period between 1 June 2013 and 31 May 2014, Her Majesty's Passport Office received 1,446,983 first time passport applications and 4,528,751 passport renewal applications.

This compares with 1,346,246 first time applications and 4,036,267 passport renewal applications during the period between 1 June 2012 and 31 May 2013.

The correct answer should have been:

James Brokenshire: During the period between 1 June 2013 and 31 May 2014, Her Majesty's Passport Office received 1,425,885 first time passport applications and 4,461,343 passport renewal applications.

This compares with 1,346,246 first time applications and 4,036,267 passport renewal applications during the period between 1 June 2012 and 31 May 2013.

DNA: Databases

Mr Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many requests for information held on the National DNA Database were received by her Department from other countries in each of the last five years. [200768]

[Official Report, 15 July 2014, Vol. 584, c. 636-37W.]

Letter of correction from Karen Bradley:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for Bury St Edmunds (Mr Ruffley) on 15 July 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

Karen Bradley: The first category relates to searches carried out against the National DNA Database (NDNAD) of DNA profiles from outstanding serious crimes or for the identification of an unknown deceased person believed to be a UK national. The following figures are for requested searches undertaken on the basis of a direct request from the National Crime Agency (NCA) formerly Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA), with the report as to the outcome of each profile search being issued directly to the United Kingdom National Central Bureau for Interpol (UK NCB).

 Number of searched profile responses provided to NCA/SOCA1,2,3

2009-104

5377

2010-11

548

2011-12

469

2012-13

443

2013-14

4,094

1 The data have been extracted from logs produced by NDNAD (validated as the only source of this information) by the application of the specified criteria (requests directly received from NCA/SOCA). The data were extracted by the manual filtering of Excel Spreadsheets. 2 The UK NCB is not currently able to provide data on the number of requests received from other countries so these data relate solely to information supplied by the National DNA Database Delivery Unit (NDU). 3 The data were extracted on 17 June. 4 Data are not available for the period October 2009 to January 2010. 5 These figures have been verified on a 1:1 comparison basis.

The second category includes requests for the DNA profile held for a subject on the NDNAD, where fingerprints have been provided to the country that the individual currently resides in. Again this is information provided to NCA/ SOCA.

 Number of requests for subject profiles release to NCA/SOCA1,2,3

2009-10

1,384

2010-11

85

2011-12

19

2012-13

14

1 Sep 2014 : Column 9MC

2013-14

3

1 The data have been extracted from logs produced by NDNAD (validated as the only source of this information) by the application of the specified criteria (requests directly received from NCA/SOCA). The data were extracted by the manual filtering of Excel Spreadsheets. 2 The UK NCB is not currently able to provide data on the number of requests received from other countries so these data relate solely to information supplied by the National DNA Database Delivery Unit (NDU). 3 The data were extracted on 17 June.

The third category relates to database management information. This provides the number of subject and crime scene DNA profile records held on the database and the number of match reports generated. Countries which do not have a DNA database use this information to demonstrate the success of the UK Database to support their case for legislation in their own country for a DNA database.

Requestors are directed to the most recent published statistics on the Home Office NDNAD website, at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-dna-database-statistics

thus no figures are kept for the numbers of such requests.

The correct answer should have been:

Karen Bradley: The first category relates to searches carried out against the National DNA Database (NDNAD) of DNA profiles from outstanding serious crimes or for the identification of an unknown deceased person believed to be a UK national. The following figures are for requested searches undertaken on the basis of a direct request from the National Crime Agency (NCA) formerly Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA), with the report as to the outcome of each profile search being issued directly to the United Kingdom National Central Bureau for Interpol (UK NCB).

 Number of searched profile responses provided to NCA/SOCA1,2,3

2009-104

5377

2010-11

548

2011-12

469

2012-13

443

2013-14

409

1 The data have been extracted from logs produced by NDNAD (validated as the only source of this information) by the application of the specified criteria (requests directly received from NCA/SOCA). The data were extracted by the manual filtering of Excel Spreadsheets. 2 The UK NCB is not currently able to provide data on the number of requests received from other countries so these data relate solely to information supplied by the National DNA Database Delivery Unit (NDU). 3 The data were extracted on 17 June. 4 Data are not available for the period October 2009 to January 2010. 5 These figures have been verified on a 1:1 comparison basis.

The second category includes requests for the DNA profile held for a subject on the NDNAD, where fingerprints have been provided to the country that the individual currently resides in. Again this is information provided to NCA/ SOCA.

 Number of requests for subject profiles release to NCA/SOCA1,2,3

2009-10

4138

2010-11

85

1 Sep 2014 : Column 10MC

2011-12

19

2012-13

14

2013-14

3

1 The data have been extracted from logs produced by NDNAD (validated as the only source of this information) by the application of the specified criteria (requests directly received from NCA/SOCA). The data were extracted by the manual filtering of Excel Spreadsheets. 2 The UK NCB is not currently able to provide data on the number of requests received from other countries so these data relate solely to information supplied by the National DNA Database Delivery Unit (NDU). 3 The data were extracted on 17 June. 4 These figures have been verified on a 1:1 comparison basis.

The third category relates to database management information. This provides the number of subject and crime scene DNA profile records held on the database and the number of match reports generated. Countries which do not have a DNA database use this information to demonstrate the success of the UK Database to support their case for legislation in their own country for a DNA database.

Requestors are directed to the most recent published statistics on the Home Office NDNAD website, at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-dna-database-statistics

thus no figures are kept for the numbers of such requests.

Passports

Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many passport (a) applications and (b) renewal applications were received by the Passport Office in each (i) month and (ii) year of the last five years. [199406]

[Official Report, 30 June 2014, Vol. 583, c. 378W.]

Letter of correction from James Brokenshire:

An error has been identified in the written answer given to the hon. Member for North Ayrshire and Arran (Katy Clark) on 30 June 2014.

The full answer given was as follows:

James Brokenshire: The following table provides the requested information.

Applications for passports and renewals 2010 to May 2014
 Number of passport renewalsTotal number of applications

January 2010

332,546

429,010

February 2010

409,434

538,099

March 2010

491,887

662,570

April 2010

424,877

579,053

May 2010

437,406

590,496

June 2010

497,764

665,118

July 2010

403,901

560,475

August 2010

295,810

422,438

September 2010

245,652

350,492

October 2010

203,107

289,121

November 2010

206,803

288,285

December 2010

124,975

180,609

January 2011

373,010

483,502

February 2011

403,128

536,090

March 2011

477,062

648,103

1 Sep 2014 : Column 11MC

April 2011

363,562

502,243

May 2011

460,205

623,727

June 2011

492,401

656,060

July 2011

376,455

524,602

August 2011

292,986

423,661

September 2011

235,191

336,945

October 2011

192,653

274,813

November 2011

197,884

279,982

December 2011

130,674

191,188

January 2012

368,969

483,275

February 2012

430,084

573,659

March 2012

433,458

594,051

April 2012

404,293

554,373

May 2012

466,807

636,952

June 2012

401,849

546,067

July 2012

400,366

557,708

August 2012

266,719

390,507

September 2012

235,049

333,657

October 2012

228,216

322,989

November 2012

194,846

276,642

December 2012

132,867

193,010

January 2013

365,980

482,356

February 2013

433,754

580,431

March 2013

413,887

570,393

April 2013

474,055

653,767

May 2013

488,679

669,404

June 2013

449,916

615,691

July 2013

408,667

576,261

August 2013

275,759

399,665

September 2013

245,211

347,045

October 2013

241,364

338,840

November 2013

210,083

296,202

December 2013

227,003

320,174

January 2014

427,652

552,192

February 2014

472,436

622,727

March 2014

525,820

705,850

April 2014

504,769

681,509

May 2014

540,071

727,087

The correct answer should have been:

James Brokenshire: The following table provides the requested information.

Applications for passports and renewals 2010 to May 2014
 Number of passport renewalsTotal number of applications

January 2010

332,546

429,010

February 2010

409,434

538,099

March 2010

491,887

662,570

1 Sep 2014 : Column 12MC

April 2010

424,877

579,053

May 2010

418,582

570,299

June 2010

460,425

623,198

July 2010

403,901

560,475

August 2010

273,655

396,703

September 2010

245,652

350,492

October 2010

203,107

289,121

November 2010

206,803

288,285

December 2010

124,975

180,609

January 2011

373,010

483,502

February 2011

403,128

536,090

March 2011

477,062

648,103

April 2011

363,562

502,243

May 2011

460,205

623,727

June 2011

452,997

615,168

July 2011

376,455

524,602

August 2011

276,088

402,132

September 2011

235,191

336,945

October 2011

192,653

274,813

November 2011

197,884

279,982

December 2011

130,674

191,188

January 2012

368,969

483,275

February 2012

391,094

524,517

March 2012

433,458

594,051

April 2012

404,293

554,373

May 2012

466,807

636,952

June 2012

401,849

546,067

July 2012

400,366

557,708

August 2012

266,719

390,507

September 2012

235,049

333,657

October 2012

228,216

322,989

November 2012

194,846

276,642

December 2012

132,867

193,010

January 2013

365,980

482,356

February 2013

433,754

580,431

March 2013

413,887

570,393

April 2013

474,055

653,767

May 2013

488,679

669,404

June 2013

449,916

615,691

July 2013

408,667

576,261

August 2013

275,759

399,665

September 2013

245,211

347,045

October 2013

241,364

338,840

November 2013

210,083

296,202

December 2013

159,595

228,195

January 2014

427,652

552,192

February 2014

472,436

622,727

March 2014

525,820

705,850

April 2014

504,769

681,509

May 2014

540,071

727,087