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Ministerial Corrections

Wednesday 21 January 2015

Justice

Probation Service

The following is an extract from the Westminster Hall debate on the Probation Service on 13 January 2015:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice (Andrew Selous): All the existing expertise of our fantastic public sector probation staff is still there in the system. Most people are working at the same desk, doing the same job as before. That is highly valuable. I should point out that the report of Her Majesty’s inspectorate of probation goes up to September last year, and there have been significant improvements since then on a lot of the issues that Members have quite properly raised. To give just one example, the rate for completion of the risk of serious recidivism report within two days is now at 80%, which is a significant increase. We have every confidence that that figure will carry on increasing, and I hope that that reassures Members.

[Official Report, 13 January 2015, Vol. 590, c. 242WH.]

Letter of correction from Andrew Selous:

An error has been identified in the response I gave to a point raised in the debate by the hon. Member for Stretford and Urmston (Kate Green).

The correct response should have been:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Justice (Andrew Selous): All the existing expertise of our fantastic public sector probation staff is still there in the system. Most people are working at the same desk, doing the same job as before. That is highly valuable. I should point out that the report of Her Majesty’s inspectorate of probation goes up to September last year, and there have been significant improvements since then on a lot of the issues that Members have quite properly raised. To give just one example, the most recent figures show that 82% of cases are allocated within two working days after sentence and the risk of serious recidivism assessment is recorded as completed in 80% of cases, which is a noteworthy increase. We have every confidence that that figure will carry on increasing, and I hope that that reassures Members.

Deputy Prime Minister

Electoral Roll

The following is an extract from Questions to the Deputy Prime Minister on 6 January 2015:

Graeme Morrice: Can the Minister tell the House how many fewer voters there were on the electoral register for England and Wales in December 2014, compared with the previous year, and whether he is alarmed at the reduction?

Mr Gyimah: The full December register has not been published yet so it is impossible to tell the state of the register as at December. As the hon. Gentleman knows, individual electoral registration is a two-year project.

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We are mid-way through it and it is proving very successful. Nine out of 10 electors were transferred to the electoral register, and online registration is proving very successful.

[Official Report, 6 January 2015, Vol. 590, c. 142.]

Letter of correction from Mr Gyimah:

An error has been identified in the response I gave to the hon. Member for Livingston (Graeme Morrice) during Questions to the Deputy Prime Minister.

The correct response should have been:

Mr Gyimah: The Electoral Commission’s evaluation of the December registers has not been published yet, so it is impossible to tell the state of the register as at December. As the hon. Gentleman knows, individual electoral registration is a two-year project. We are mid-way through it and it is proving very successful. Nine out of 10 electors were transferred to the electoral register, and online registration is proving very successful.

Women and Equalities

Homophobic Bullying

The following is an extract from Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities on 15 January 2015:

Mrs Sharon Hodgson (Washington and Sunderland West) (Lab): According to Stonewall’s latest figures, more than half of secondary school teachers fail to challenge homophobic bullying, while 17% feel they are inadequately trained to tackle such bullying. Therefore, does the Minister acknowledge that the Government’s failure to make sexual relationships education compulsory in the curriculum in mainstream teacher training has failed lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender young people, as teachers feel ill equipped to deal with homophobia in the classroom, or to advise children who approach them in confidence?

Jo Swinson: Sexual relationships education is compulsory, but the hon. Lady raises an important point about training, and about ensuring that teachers feel comfortable in discussing these issues and know the best way to do so. We recognise that more can be done; that is why we have announced the project to develop that evidence base, so that teachers can see what best practice is, and how they can develop the confidence to tackle these issues effectively in the classroom.

[Official Report, 15 January 2015, Vol. 590, c. 1006.]

Letter of correction from Jo Swinson:

An error has been identified in the response I gave to the hon. Member for Washington and Sunderland West (Mrs Hodgson) during Questions to the Minister for Women and Equalities.

The correct response should have been:

Jo Swinson: Sexual relationships education in maintained schools is compulsory, but the hon. Lady raises an important point about training, and about ensuring that teachers feel comfortable in discussing these issues and know the best way to do so. We recognise that more can be done; that is why we have announced the project to develop that evidence base, so that teachers can see what best practice is, and how they can develop the confidence to tackle these issues effectively in the classroom.