Documents considered by the Committee on 13 November 2017 Contents

Meeting Summary

The Committee looks at the significance of EU proposals and decides whether to clear the document from scrutiny or withhold clearance and ask questions of the Government. The Committee also has the power to recommend documents for debate.

All outstanding references of EU documents to European Committees automatically lapsed on the Dissolution of Parliament. We have considered the six debate recommendations which were outstanding as follows:

(1) EU Charter of Fundamental Rights;

(2) Financial Management;

(3) European Semester 2017;

(4) Enhancing Law Enforcement Cooperation and Border Control: Strengthening the Schengen Information System (Opt-in);

(5) Proceeds of Crime: Mutual Recognition of Freezing and Confiscation Orders (Opt-in); and

(6) European Semester—Second Stage

We recommend Enhancing Law Enforcement Cooperation and Border Control: Strengthening the Schengen Information system (Opt-in) for debate on the Floor of the House.

Brexit related issues

The Committee is now looking at documents in the light of the UK decision to withdraw from the EU. Issues are explored in greater detail in report chapters and, where appropriate, in the summaries below. The Committee notes that in the current week the following issues and questions have arisen in documents or in correspondence with Minsters:

International organisations

Waste legislation

Proportionality test for professional qualifications

European services e-card

The Commission’s proposed Regulation safeguarding competition in air transport

The Commission’s action plan in relation to SOLVIT

European Electronic Communications Code

Proposed revision of the Audio Visual Media Services Directive (AVMSD)

Law enforcement cooperation—The Schengen Information System

Law enforcement cooperation—Mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders

Law enforcement cooperation—Exchanging information on criminal convictions

Law enforcement cooperation—Europol: the Government’s opt-in decision

Law enforcement cooperation—EU Canada Agreement on Passenger Name Record Data

Information-sharing—EU migration and security databases

Information sharing—Establishing a European Travel Information and Authorisation System

Information sharing—Developing interoperable EU information systems to enhance border management and security

Coordination of social security systems

Draft EU budget for 2018

Disclosure of aggressive tax avoidance schemes

Summary

Services package: European services e-card

To integrate EU business services markets the Commission proposes to introduce a fully electronic procedure which will allow businesses seeking to expand into other EU markets to deal exclusively with a coordinating authority in their home country and in their own language. Successful applicants will be issued with an e-card which will act as proof of establishment and authorise the provider to operate in the host country. As expected, the European services e-card procedure has proven the most contentious element of the services package in the Council: a General Approach has consequently not yet been agreed. Regarding Brexit, the Minister’s response clarifies that the Services Directive prohibits certain types of discrimination against service providers from the Member States, which will be permitted when the UK becomes a third country, unless preferential arrangements are negotiated.

Not cleared from scrutiny; further information requested.

Services package: Proportionality test for professional qualifications

The Commission has proposed a Directive which would introduce a proportionality test Member States would have to conduct before introducing new national regulatory measures or amending existing provisions which affect access to professions. A General Approach has been agreed by the Council regarding the Directive. The Committee seeks greater precision from the Government regarding the General Approach that has been agreed, as well as further information about the extent to which withdrawal negotiations have addressed the mutual recognition of professional qualifications to date.

Not cleared from scrutiny; further information requested.

Digital Single Market: European Electronic Communications Code

The European Electronic Communications Code (EECC) proposes to consolidate the EU Telecoms Framework into a single Directive and to make wide-ranging policy changes designed to encourage investment in next generation connectivity. On 11 October the Committee of Permanent Representatives (COREPER) granted the Estonian Presidency a mandate to open interinstitutional negotiations with the European Parliament. The mandate broadly reflects Government positions, drastically scaling back the Commission’s ambitions to assume a more prominent role in spectrum management in particular. The Committee seeks further information about the implications of Brexit for the UK telecommunications sector.

Not cleared from scrutiny; waiver granted to the BEREC Regulation subject to conditions; further information requested; drawn to the attention of the DCMS Committee.

Digital Single Market: Audio Visual Media Services Directive

As part of its Digital Single Market Strategy, the European Commission proposes to revise the regulatory framework which governs the operation of the Single Market for broadcasting to ensure that it reflects recent technological developments. The Council has agreed a General Approach to the file, which extends the proposed levy on on-demand services - the so-called “Netflix tax” - to linear broadcasting, and increases the quotas for video-on-demand services from 20% of European Works to 30%. The Government voted against the General Approach. The implications of Brexit are potentially serious for international broadcasters, given the exclusion of their services from EU Free Trade Agreements and the deficiencies of the Council of Europe’s Convention on Transfrontier Television. The Committee requested further information from the Government on this point.

Not cleared from scrutiny; further information requested; drawn to the attention of the DCMS Committee.

Coordination of social security systems

Regulation 883/2004 coordinates social security systems across the EU for citizens who move between EU countries. As a rule, it allows them to access benefits in the country where they were last employed, even if they no longer live there. For example, it allows the 190,000 UK pensioners living in France and Spain to have their local healthcare costs reimbursed by the UK Government. Social security contributions made in multiple Member States can also be aggregated. Proposals are currently under consideration to change the way this system works for unemployment benefit, economically inactive people and long-term care benefits. Moreover, the UK and EU both agree that the Regulation, and the proposed amendments, should continue to apply to EU nationals already resident in the UK and vice versa on “Brexit Day”.

The Committee has asked the Government for further information on its position on the substance of the new proposals, as well as on social security coordination in the Withdrawal Agreement and its contingency planning in case UK residents lose the right to access, aggregate and export their social security entitlements after Brexit on the same terms as they do currently.

Not cleared from scrutiny; Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Work & Pensions Committee and the Exiting the EU Committee.

Draft EU budget for 2018

Each November, the European Parliament and the Member States in the Council agree on the EU’s budget for the year ahead. For 2018, agreement is close on an annual budget of €160 billion, a slight increase compared to this year. It is also the first annual budget to be agreed since the UK triggered Article 50 and started the process of leaving the EU. As part of the withdrawal, the EU is seeking a financial settlement which includes the UK paying for a share of the EU’s unpaid spending commitments which are outstanding when it leaves. As such, the 2018 budget could have an impact on the overall size of the “Brexit bill”.

In addition to routine questions about the substance of the 2018 budget, the Committee has asked the Government to clarify its position on paying for a share of these outstanding spending commitments as part of the Brexit process, as well as on the process of agreeing the financial settlement more broadly.

Not cleared from scrutiny; Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Exiting the EU Committee, the Public Accounts Committee and the Treasury Committee.

Insolvency: Restructuring and Second Chances for Businesses and Entrepreneurs

The proposed Insolvency Directive is a very significant proposal to harmonise substantive aspects of Member States’ insolvency laws, the scope and nature of which our predecessors have already explored. Although it is unlikely that the UK would have to implement this proposal before Brexit, that does not take account of any transitional/implementation period. The ECB Opinion also deposited for scrutiny calls for wider harmonisation which would be a problem for any UK implementation. The Government commits to keeping the Committee up-to-date on any further developments.

Not cleared from scrutiny; further information requested about the impact of any possible transitional/implementation period and any post-Brexit alignment of UK insolvency law with the Directive once adopted ; drawn to the attention of the Business, Energy and Industrial Energy Committee.

Consumer Protection Law: Cooperation on enforcement

This proposal will replace the existing Consumer Protection Cooperation (CPC) Regulation. The previous Government confirmed that it is likely to come into force before Brexit. The aim of the proposal is to improve enforcement by national authorities of EU consumer law. In particular, it will tackle abuses which could undermine consumer confidence in online trade, such as scam websites, geo-blocking and unlawful after-sales conditions. It therefore supports the Digital Single Market. The previous Government has been generally supportive of the proposal subject to some concerns about impacts on resources at the main UK authority (the Competition and Markets Authority), the threshold for Commission involvement in coordinated and common action on EU-wide infringements and the scope of its implementing powers. The Government wants to secure an effective but proportionate cross-border enforcement system which will work well for both consumers and businesses.

Since the agreement of a General Approach for which the previous Committee waived scrutiny, the Government now request scrutiny clearance for the final adoption of the text at a Council meeting expected in November. As the Government appears to have met its negotiation objectives of a proportionate approach to cooperation, the Committee clears the document but asks the Government in due course to confirm that the provisions in the final text on third country cooperation are adequate for UK’s purposes post Brexit.

Cleared from scrutiny; further information requested on third country cooperation in view of Brexit; drawn to the attention of the Business Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee.

EU Charter of Fundamental Rights: Annual Reports on application in the EU and MS

The Committee considered the Commission’s latest annual report on the application of the Charter within the EU in 2016. The Committees has decided not to revive the long outstanding debate recommendations on the previous three Annual Reports for the years 2013, 2014, 2015 because issues concerning the Charter can now be debated by Members during the passage of the EU (Withdrawal) Bill (EUWB). This is currently drafted to exclude the Charter from EU law to be retained in UK law after Brexit, though underlying rights and principles will be retained and can be referred to by the UK courts in their application of pre-Brexit CJEU and domestic case law.

Despite Brexit, the Charter may, to a greater or lesser extent, remain relevant to the UK because it will continue to apply until Brexit and possibly into a transitional/implementation period; it may remain relevant to the UK courts’ identification of retained fundamental rights and principles which will mostly, however, apply with weaker effect under the EUWB and it may be indirectly relevant to data-sharing post Brexit and EU citizen rights. The withdrawal and future partnership agreements will also need to comply with the Charter.

The current annual report is retained under scrutiny, but the three previous annual reports are cleared and the corresponding debate recommendation not revived; further information requested on continuing relevance of the Charter to the UK despite its exclusion from UK law under the EU Withdrawal Bill.

Multiannual Framework for the Fundamental Rights Agency 2018–22 and publication of the Official Journal

The Committee considered two proposals, both based on Article 352 TFEU, the so-called “flexibility” provision and so falling within the scope of the European Union Act 2011 (EU Act). In both cases, the Committee agrees with the Government that an EU Act exemption applies, meaning that primary legislation is not required to approve in order for the Government to support the proposals.

The EU’s Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA) provides specialist advice to the EU institutions and the Member States on fundamental rights, including the EU Charter. This proposed Council Decision is to approve the FRA’s financial framework for 2018–22 (MAF). The Government now confirms that Member States representatives agreed the proposal in COREPER with only formal adoption in the Council outstanding. As adoption in the Council is therefore now no more than a formality, the Committee clears the document but highlights this apparent breach of the spirit of the Committee’s scrutiny reserve. The text to be adopted does at least clarify the exclusion of funding for JHA-related activities from the MFA, a point which the previous Committee had questioned.

The second document, a proposed Regulation, is more technical simply involving a change in the way that the electronic publication of the Official Journal of the EU is authenticated.

Both documents cleared from scrutiny; copy of Written Ministerial Statements on EU Act Exemptions requested.

Enhancing law enforcement cooperation and border control: strengthening the Schengen Information System

The Schengen Information System (SIS II) is an important EU border management and law enforcement tool containing more than 70 million “alerts” on individuals or objects likely to be of interest to border control, customs and police officers. It is used to circulate European Arrest Warrants. At the end of 2016, the Commission proposed three Regulations to strengthen SIS II. The aim is to close information gaps and make it easier for Member States to share information on terrorism, other serious cross-border crime and irregular migration. The Government has decided to participate in one of the three proposed Regulations dealing with law enforcement cooperation, even though it is only likely to take effect after the UK leaves the EU. The Committee says that the Government’s decision to participate only makes sense if it intends the UK to remain part of (or seek special access to) SIS II post-Brexit. The Committee asks the Government to confirm that this is the case, highlights the possible constraints (not least that participation in SIS II is only open to Schengen countries and the Government has made clear it will not join the Schengen free movement area when it leaves the EU) and seeks further information on the Brexit implications of the Government’s decision.

Opt-in/opt-out decisions recommended for debate on the Floor of the House; further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

Managing EU migration and security databases

A new EU Agency—“eu-LISA”—was established in 2012 to manage three EU information systems dealing with asylum, border management and law enforcement. The Commission has proposed a Regulation to give eu-LISA responsibility for managing new EU information systems. UK participation in eu-LISA is legally complex, bringing into play the UK’s justice and home affairs opt-in and Schengen opt-out Protocols. The Government considers eu-LISA to be an effective Agency and supports most of the proposed changes. If it wishes to participate, it will need to notify an opt-in decision (covering three of the EU information systems), an opt-out decision (covering one) and request an additional Council Decision authorising the UK to take part in those parts of the proposed Regulation concerning EU information systems from which the UK is excluded because it is outside the Schengen border-free zone. Whilst accepting that many of the changes proposed by the Commission are essentially technical, the Committee notes that the potential impact of EU information systems managed by eu-LISA on UK citizens is likely to be greater once the UK leaves the EU since many of them will mainly contain data on third country (non-EU) nationals. It seeks further information on the opt-in and opt-out decisions and the Government’s position on UK participation in (or access to) EU information systems managed by eu-LISA and in eu-LISA itself post-Brexit.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

Proceeds of crime: mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders

The Government confirms that it has decided to opt into a proposed Regulation which would provide for court orders issued in one Member State for the freezing and confiscation of the proceeds of crime to be recognised and enforced in another. It says that the proposal is “highly unlikely to take effect” before the UK leaves the EU but that opting in would “signal our commitment to cooperation in this important area”. The Committee requests further information on the Government’s expectations for future cooperation with the EU on this and other EU law enforcement and criminal justice measures, the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union, and possible transitional arrangements.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee, the Justice Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

Combating payment fraud

The Commission has proposed a Directive establishing minimum rules on the definition of non-cash payment fraud (for example, fraudulently making credit or debit card payments or obtaining payment information) and on criminal penalties. It is intended to make it easier to investigate and prosecute cross-border fraud and close regulatory gaps. The proposal is subject to the UK’s justice and home affairs opt-in. The Government “strongly supports international cooperation to tackle fraud” and considers that UK law “largely meets the requirements” of the proposed Directive. Previous Governments have been reluctant to accept similar EU criminal law measures. The Committee asks the Government whether this remains the case and how it envisages maintaining cooperation in this area post-Brexit.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee; not cleared from scrutiny.

Exchanging information on criminal convictions

The European Criminal Records Information System—ECRIS—was established in 2012 to enable Member States to exchange information on the offending history of EU citizens. The UK participates fully in ECRIS. The Commission has proposed changes to make ECRIS a more efficient tool for sharing information on the previous convictions of third country (non-EU) offenders within the EU. These changes are subject to the UK’s justice and home affairs opt-in, meaning that they will only apply to the UK if the Government decides to opt in. The Committee requests further information on the Government’s opt-in decision, its assessment of the impact of the proposal (given that British citizens will be third country nationals once the UK leaves the EU), the timescale envisaged for agreeing and implementing the proposed changes to ECRIS, and the wider Brexit implications.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee, the Justice Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

Establishing a European Travel Information and Authorisation System

The proposed European Travel Information and Authorisation System—ETIAS—is intended to strengthen security, reduce the risk of irregular migration and protect public health by requiring nationals of around 60 countries who do not need a visa to visit the Schengen area to complete an online application form and obtain authorisation before they travel. It is expected to be operational around 2020, after the UK’s departure from the EU. The UK is not entitled to participate in ETIAS as it builds on part of the Schengen rulebook which does not apply to the UK. The ETIAS proposal envisages that Europol would establish a “watchlist” of criminal suspects. The UK does participate in Europol. The Commission has proposed changes to the Europol Regulation to give Europol the powers to host and operate the watchlist. These changes are subject to the UK’s justice and home affairs opt-in and will only apply to the UK if the Government decides to opt in. The Government has decided not to opt in “at this time”, leaving open the possibility of opting in once the proposed Regulation has been adopted. The Committee requests further information on the implications of not opting in for the UK’s continued participation in Europol (before and after Brexit) and on future data-sharing arrangements between the EU and UK post-Brexit.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

Developing interoperable EU information systems to enhance border management and security

The Commission describes how it intends to make EU asylum, border management and security information systems interoperable by 2020 and eliminate “blind spots” in the information available to border guards, customs and police officers. The Government supports the move towards interoperable EU information systems but provides no analysis of how the UK’s departure from the EU would affect its ability to participate in these systems or to cooperate with the EU and its Member States in tackling cross-border crime and security threats. The Committee requests further information on the wider Brexit implications and on the safeguards needed to ensure that individual rights are protected.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

The European Police College: the Government’s post-adoption opt-in decision

The European Police College—CEPOL—is an EU Agency providing training for police officers on the European dimension of policing. The UK did not opt into a Regulation proposing changes to CEPOL’s mandate and governance in 2014. The Government now confirms that it does not intend to opt into the Regulation following its adoption in November 2015 and accepts that the UK is at risk of being ejected from CEPOL. The Committee asks whether UK policing supports the decision not to opt in and seeks further information on the risk of ejection, the possible financial consequences and spillover effects for UK participation in other EU Agencies (notably Europol), and the implications for the UK’s longer-term relationship with CEPOL.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; cleared from scrutiny.

Europol: the Government’s opt-in decision

The new Europol Regulation took effect in May. The Government decided to opt in last December on the grounds that “opting in would enable the UK to maintain its current access to the Agency until the UK leaves the EU”. The Committee now clears the new Europol Regulation from scrutiny, but asks the Government to explain what sort of “bespoke” relationship it is seeking with Europol once the UK leaves the EU.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; cleared from scrutiny.

EU-Canada Agreement on Passenger Name Record Data

In July, the Court of Justice ruled that parts of a draft Agreement between the EU and Canada on the transfer and processing of Passenger Name Record (PNR) data were incompatible with fundamental rights and contrary to EU law. A new Council Decision is needed to authorise the Commission to re-open negotiations with Canada to the extent needed to make the Agreement compatible with EU law. The proposed Council Decision is subject to the UK’s justice and home affairs opt-in meaning that it will only apply to the UK if the Government decides to opt in. The Government indicates that it has some concerns with the Court’s ruling (on data retention and onward transfers to other third countries). The Committee seeks further information on the Government’s concerns, the implications of the Court’s ruling for existing EU PNR Agreements with Australia and the US, and how the UK’s exit from the EU will affect its ability to share PNR data with third countries.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the Home Affairs Committee and the Committee on Exiting the European Union; not cleared from scrutiny.

EU legislation on waste

The European Commission has proposed to strengthen waste recycling targets. While the UK is aligned with Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary and Poland in supporting less ambitious targets, a number of other Member States have taken a divergent view, along with Wales and Scotland, both of which have already adopted ambitious waste reduction policies unilaterally. The Committee asks for clarity about the reasons behind the different levels of ambition. On Brexit, the Minister indicated that there was an expectation that the UK would adopt this legislation, or broadly equivalent measures, post-Brexit. The Committee asks the Minister to explain the source of that expectation and asks what assessment the Government has undertaken of the implications of deciding not to adopt these new, or broadly equivalent, measures. The Committee also asks about the status of this legislation during any post-Brexit implementation period.

Further information requested: drawn to the attention of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, the Environmental Audit Committee, the Communities and Local Government Committee, the Welsh Affairs Committee, the Scottish Affairs Committee and the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee; cleared from scrutiny.

Opening of EU trade negotiations with Australia and New Zealand

The European Commission has published, for the first time, proposed negotiating mandates for trade talks. These set out in detail the EU’s priority areas in the negotiations, along with an impact assessment that looks at the possible impact of an ambitious deal on sensitive sectors such as agriculture. The Committee asked the Government to confirm that it will take a similarly transparent approach to the UK’s future trade negotiations by empowering Parliament to scrutinise proposed negotiating mandates.

Further information requested; drawn to the attention of the International Trade Committee; cleared from scrutiny.

Documents drawn to the attention of select committees:

(‘NC’ indicates document is ‘not cleared’ from scrutiny; ‘C’ indicates document is ‘cleared’)

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee: Coordination of insolvency proceedings in the EU [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Insolvency, Restructuring and Second Chances for Business and Entrepreneurs [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) ECB Opinion (NC)]; Cooperation on enforcement of consumer protection law [Proposed Regulation (C)]; Compliance package: single digital gateway [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; European standardisation work programme 2018 [Commission Communication (NC)]; Compliance package: Action plan on the reinforcement of SLOVIT [Commission Communication (NC)]

Communities and Local Government Committee: EU legislation on waste [(a), (b), (c) and (d) Proposed Directives (C)]

Defence Committee: European Defence Fund [(a) Commission Communication (C), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC), (c) Reflection Paper (C)]

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Digital Single Market: European Electronic Communications Code [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC)];

Environmental Audit Committee: EU legislation on waste [(a), (b), (c) and (d) Proposed Directives (C)]

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee: International Vine and Wine Organisation [Proposed Decision (NC)]; EU legislation on waste [(a), (b), (c) and (d) Proposed Directives (C)]; Fisheries: catch quotas and effort limitation for 2017 [Proposed Regulation (C)]

Exiting the European Union Committee: EU finances: draft budget for 2018 and future of the EU budget [(a) Draft EU Budget (NC), (b) Proposed Decision (C), (c) Reflection Paper (C)]; Coordination of social security systems [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Enhancing law enforcement cooperation and border control strengthening the Schengen Information System [(a) Proposed Regulation (NC), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC), (c) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Managing EU migration and security databases [(a) Commission Report (C), Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Proceeds of crime: mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Exchanging information on criminal convictions [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) Commission Report (C), (c) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Establishing a European Travel Information and Authorisation System [(a) Proposed Regulation (NC), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Developing interoperable EU information systems to enhance border management and security [Commission Communication (NC)]; The European Police College: the Government’s post-adoption opt-in decision [(a) Commission Communication (C), (b) Proposed Regulation (C)]; Europol: the Government’s opt-in decision [Regulation (C)]; EU-Canada Agreement on Passenger Name Record Data [Recommendation for a Council Decision (NC)]

Foreign Affairs Committee: European Defence Fund [(a) Commission Communication (C), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC), (c) Reflection Paper (C)]

Health Committee: Carcinogens and Mutagens Directive (Phase I and Phase II) [(a) Proposed Directive (C), (b) Proposed Directive (NC)]

Home Affairs Committee: Enhancing law enforcement cooperation and border control strengthening the Schengen Information System [(a) Proposed Regulation (NC), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC), (c) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Managing EU migration and security databases [(a) Commission Report (C), Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Proceeds of crime: mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Combating payment fraud [Proposed Directive (NC)]; Exchanging information on criminal convictions [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) Commission Report (C), (c) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Establishing a European Travel Information and Authorisation System [(a) Proposed Regulation (NC), (b) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Developing interoperable EU information systems to enhance border management and security [Commission Communication (NC)]; The European Police College: the Government’s post-adoption opt-in decision [(a) Commission Communication (C), (b) Proposed Regulation (C)]; Europol: the Government’s opt-in decision [Regulation (C)]; EU-Canada Agreement on Passenger Name Record Data [Recommendation for a Council Decision (NC)]

International Development Committee: European Fund for Sustainable Development [Proposed Regulation (C)]

International Trade Committee: Opening of negotiations for free trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand [(a) Recommendation for a Council Decision (C), (b) Recommendation for a Council Decision (C)]

Joint Committee on Human Rights: EU Charter of Fundamental Rights [Annual Reports (a) 2016 (NC), (b) 2015 (C), (c) 2014 (C), (d) 2013 (C)]

Justice Committee: Proceeds of crime: mutual recognition of freezing and confiscation orders [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Exchanging information on criminal convictions [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) Commission Report (C), (c) Proposed Regulation (NC)]; EU Charter of Fundamental Rights [Annual Reports (a) 2016 (NC), (b) 2015 (C), (c) 2014 (C), (d) 2013 (C)]

Public Accounts Committee: EU finances: draft budget for 2018 and future of the EU budget [(a) Draft EU Budget (NC), (b) Proposed Decision (C), (c) Reflection Paper (C)]; Tax avoidance and evasion: disclosure by intermediaries [Proposed Council Directive (NC)]

Treasury Committee: EU finances: draft budget for 2018 and future of the EU budget [(a) Draft EU Budget (NC), (b) Proposed Decision (C), (c) Reflection Paper (C)]; Tax avoidance and evasion: disclosure by intermediaries [Proposed Council Directive (NC)]; Financial service regulatory framework: resolution and recovery and capital requirements [(a) Proposed Directive (NC), (b) Proposed Directive (C), Proposed Directive (NC), Proposed Regulation (NC)]

Women and Equalities Committee: EU Charter of Fundamental Rights [Annual Reports (a) 2016 (NC), (b) 2015 (C), (c) 2014 (C), (d) 2013 (C)]

Work and Pensions Committee: Coordination of social security systems [Proposed Regulation (NC)]; Carcinogens and Mutagens Directive (Phase I and Phase II) [(a) Proposed Directive (C), (b) Proposed Directive (NC)]





20 November 2017