Protecting those who protect us: Women in the Armed Forces from Recruitment to Civilian Life Contents

6Overall conclusions

226.The Armed Forces can and do provide a fulfilling career for servicewomen, with vast opportunities. But the Services are failing to help women achieve their full potential.

227.We welcome some steps by the Services in recent years—particularly, more support for (male and female) personnel with family responsibilities and the rollout of Flexible Service to Regulars and (soon) Reservists. However, there are gaps between the many policy documents and practice on the ground. Moreover, the MOD’s actions often give the impression that it is not a priority to make the necessary cultural changes, especially to the complaints system. When things go wrong, they go dramatically wrong—making it all the more worrying that this is not being focused on.

228.The legacy of serving affects female veterans for years to come, sometimes negatively. We want all our veterans to feel proud of their Service. Ex-military women need better recognition and support within transition and veterans’ services.

Senior leadership in the Armed Forces and the MOD should be bold and unequivocal in solving these challenges, both for the operational effectiveness of our Armed Forces, and because our shared British values of fairness, equality and justice demand it.

229.Senior leadership in the Armed Forces and the MOD should be bold and unequivocal in solving these challenges, both for the operational effectiveness of our Armed Forces, and because our shared British values of fairness, equality and justice demand it.




Published: 25 July 2021 Site information    Accessibility statement