Legislative Scrutiny: Nationality and Borders Bill (Part 5)—Modern slavery Contents

Contents

Summary

1 Introduction

The Nationality and Borders Bill

Human Rights in issue

Our Inquiry

2 Deadlines and the impact of trauma on the ability of victims to disclose exploitation

The new ‘slavery or trafficking information notice’:

The impact of trauma on the ability to disclose exploitation

Analysis

3 Defining “victim of slavery” and “victim of human trafficking”

Amendments to the MSA: Clause

Defining “victim of slavery” and “victim of human trafficking”

4 The process for determining whether a person is a victim of slavery or human trafficking

Determining whether a person is a victim of slavery or human trafficking

Potential gaps in protection for victims who have a further reasonable grounds decision

5 Victims that won’t receive protection: the public order and bad faith exceptions

Will excluding some victims impact on the UK’s ability to investigate and prosecute perpetrators of slavery and human trafficking?

Prosecuting victims of slavery or human trafficking

Public order and bad faith as exceptions

6 Support for victims of slavery and human trafficking

Leave to remain for victims of slavery or human trafficking

Assistance and support for identified potential victims of slavery or human trafficking

7 Legal aid

8 Disapplication of certain rights and obligations under the EU Trafficking Directive

9 Other Matters Arising

Other concerns relating to Modern Slavery

The Council of Europe Convention Against Trafficking in Human Beings and the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children.

New competent authority for detained victims of slavery and human trafficking

Amendments

Conclusions and recommendations

Formal minutes

Declaration of interests

Witnesses

Published written evidence

List of Reports from the Committee during the current Parliament




Published: 21 December 2021 Site information    Accessibility statement