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Foot and Mouth

Lord Willoughby de Broke asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Whitty: Slaughter is complete on all holdings where foot and mouth disease has been confirmed, up to the week ending 15 July.

(a) and (b) Weekly breakdown of the number of infected premises from 19 February to 15 July 2001.

Week endingTotal
25 Feb 200113
4 Mar 200166
11 Mar 2001126
18 Mar 2001151
25 Mar 2001298
1 Apr 2001290
8 Apr 2001225
15 Apr 2001175
22 Apr 2001104
29 Apr 200167
6 May 200146
13 May 200133
20 May 200124
27 May 200133
3 Jun 200144
10 Jun 200128
17 Jun 200134
24 Jun 200122
1 Jul 200121
8 Jul 200123
15 Jul 200125
Total1,1848


24 Jul 2001 : Column WA226

(c) Weekly breakdown of premises on which animals have been slaughtered as "dangerous contacts" since 19 February

Week endingTotal
25 Feb 200125
04 Mar 2001318
11 Mar 2001325
18 Mar 2001337
25 Mar 2001337
01 Apr 2001933
08 Apr 2001938
15 Apr 2001935
22 Apr 2001397
29 Apr 2001207
06 May 2001108
13 May 2001107
20 May 200174
27 May 200182
03 Jun 2001122
10 Jun 200196
17 Jun 2001108
24 Jun 200169
01 Jul 200162
08 Jul 200179
15 Jul 200160
Total6,053

339 dangerous contact cases have been converted to infected premises. These premises are also included in the table answering parts (a) and (b) of the question.


(d) Weekly breakdown of the number of premises on which animals have been "slaughtered on suspicion"

Week endingTotal
04 Mar 20012
11 Mar 20013
25 Mar 200112
01 Apr 200143
08 Apr 200136
15 Apr 200141
22 Apr 200143
29 Apr 200125
06 May 200123
13 May 200119
20 May 20016
27 May 20019
03 Jun 20012
10 Jun 20017
17 Jun 20015
24 Jun 20016
01 Jul 20015
08 Jul 20015
15 Jul 20013
Total295

Seventy-six slaughter on suspicion cases have been converted to infected premises. These premises are also included in the table answering parts (a) and (b) of the question.


Lord Willoughby de Broke asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will provide a week-by-week breakdown since 20 February of the number of cases of "slaughter on suspicion" and the number of those subsequently confirmed as infected with foot and mouth disease.[HL248]

24 Jul 2001 : Column WA227

Lord Whitty: The table below shows the weekly breakdown of slaughter on suspicion cases and the number of those that were subsequently converted to IPs on the receipt of positive test results.

Week EndingTotal number of SOS casesNumber converted to IPs
04/03/20012--
11/03/20013--
25/03/200114--
01/04/20014311
08/04/2001377
15/04/2001417
22/04/20014516
29/04/2001266
06/05/2001233
13/05/2001233
20/05/200162
27/05/200193
03/06/200121
10/06/200175
17/06/200152
24/06/200173
01/07/200151
08/07/200153
15/07/200153
Total30876

Lord Willoughby de Broke asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will provide a week-by-week breakdown since 20 February of the number of farms slaughtered out under the "contiguous cull" regime and the number of those subsequently confirmed as infected with foot and mouth disease.[HL249]

Lord Whitty: The following table shows contiguous premises identified by week, and of these the number that have converted to infected premises. Conversion was in the main due to diagnosis on clinical grounds.

Week endNew contiguous premisesContiguous premises converted to infected premises
25/02/200170
04/03/2001291
11/03/2001282
18/03/2001776
25/03/20012224
01/04/200145121
08/04/200141012
15/04/200145728
22/04/20011619
29/04/2001924
06/05/2001591
13/05/2001913
20/05/2001693
27/05/2001785
03/06/20011228
10/06/20019310
17/06/200110511
24/06/2001637
01/07/2001637
08/07/2001645
15/07/2001578
Grand Total2798155

There may have been livestock on some contiguous premises that were infected, but clinical symptoms were not present at slaughter. As it has not been possible to take blood samples from livestock slaughtered on all contiguous premises, it is impossible to estimate the overall proportion of CPs that were infected.


24 Jul 2001 : Column WA228

Lord Willoughby de Broke asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they will provide a week-by-week breakdown, since 20 February, of the number of farms where notifications of suspected foot and mouth disease were received from private vets; and how many of these were subsequently served with "infected place" notices and slaughtered out. [HL250]

Lord Whitty: The table below shows the number of infected premises (IPs) which were initially reported by private veterinary surgeons, on a weekly basis from 19 February 2001.

Week endingNumber of IPs
25 February2
4 March5
11 March6
18 March2
25 March8
1 April5
8 April2
15 April2
22 April1
29 April2
6 May2
13 May0
20 May0
27 May2
3 June3
10 June1
17 June0
24 June2
1 July1
8 July1
15 July0

It is not possible to provide figures for the total number of farms where notifications of suspected foot and mouth disease were received from private veterinary surgeons. DEFRA does not hold centrally collated records of cases reported by private vets which are concluded not to have foot and mouth disease.


Baroness Masham of Ilton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is the number of sheep affected by foot and mouth disease broken down into lambs, ewes and rams; and what for each group are the numbers of (a) animals culled, (b) dangerous contacts and (c) infected premises.[HL531]

Lord Whitty: The number of sheep recorded as slaughtered as a result of foot and mouth disease is not broken down into lambs, ewes and rams. The total

24 Jul 2001 : Column WA229

number of sheep slaughtered in Great Britain for each of the categories requested as at 17:00, 19 July 2001 is as follows:


    (a) total number of sheep slaughtered as a result of foot and mouth disease: 2,883,338;


    (b) number of sheep slaughtered on dangerous contact premises: 1,940,544;


    (c) number of sheep slaughtered on infected premises: 844,564.

Baroness Masham of Ilton asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether any of the viruses which cause foot and mouth disease can survive in people's noses; if so, for how long; and whether foot and mouth disease can be transmitted by sneezing.[HL292]

Lord Whitty: The sampling of human subjects who have been in contact with animals infected with the foot and mouth disease virus, showed that the virus could be recovered from the nose, throat, saliva and from air expelled during coughing, sneezing, talking and breathing. In the majority of subjects, the virus could not be recovered from the nose after 3.5 hours but in one case, virus was found in one person's nose after 28 hours.

Deer Act 1991

Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer asked Her Majesty's Government:

    Whether they intend to review the Deer Act 1991 and implement the recommendations of the Savage report.[HL304]

Lord Whitty: The Government have no plans to review the Deer Act 1991. The Government understand that the Savage report was commissioned by the National Trust. It is therefore for the National Trust to decide what action it wishes to take on the report's recommendations. The Government have given support to the deer initiative and believe that local deer management groups have an important role in deer management.

Water Framework Directive

Baroness Byford asked Her Majesty's Government:

    What is their estimate of the cost per hectare to United Kingdom farmers of the Water Framework Directive.[HL315]

Lord Whitty: Estimates were prepared in 1998 to illustrate possible costs for notional average farms of reducing diffuse pollution. These assumed an average compliance cost of approximately £175 per hectare per annum for arable land and £117 per hectare per annum for grassland. These costs would be incurred annually from 2012 at the latest, when all measures required by the directive have to be operational.

24 Jul 2001 : Column WA230

These figures did not relate to actual costs to farmers necessary to meet the directive's objectives in relation to specific measures to control agricultural pollution. This is because the need for, and use of such additional measures, has yet to be decided. The figures were based on data from a range of area-based schemes to compensate farmers for income lost as a result of changes to agricultural practice. The amount of compensation awarded provided an indication of the costs to farmers of implementing best agricultural management schemes in order to reduce pollution.

The estimated average compliance costs do not apply to all farms and should not be assumed to apply to the whole area of any farm where a reduction in diffuse pollution was judged to be necessary. This is because action should not be required on all farms to meet the directive's objectives, nor the whole area of every farm where some action is needed.

The above costings therefore remain fairly speculative in nature and the Government recognise the need to update them where possible. A more accurate assessment of costs to different farm types will be possible once the Government have assessed what are the full range of additional measures necessary to address diffuse pollution from agriculture, and to what extent they would need to be used to meet the directive's objectives by 2015. The Government plan to consult on the need for additional measures in England to control diffuse agricultural pollution and other implementation issues later this year or early in 2002. Revised costings can then be provided alongside the publication of the draft implementing regulations for the directive in 2002 or early 2003. In the meantime, the Government are considering what more can be done to update and improve the 1998 estimates.


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