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Lord Jenkin of Roding: I listened carefully to what the Minister said and I am grateful for what he said about the Government recognising that there is now a need to address the regulation of these markets. He may well be right—I shall need to discuss the matter with those advising me—that GEMA is not the right body. Indeed, in my opening speech, I asked: if not GEMA, who? It might be the Financial Services Authority.

I hope that the Government will be able to think about the issue between now and the Report stage. I shall certainly consult on it. I am tempted to say that we should bring back another amendment, perhaps appointing a different regulator or imposing a different duty on the Government to provide for the regulation of these markets. As the Minister recognised, the efficient working of these derivative markets, if such they are, is an important instrument in developing the Government's overall energy policy. No one denies that. But if the market is not working properly because there is no effective regulator and because no one has the power to help to increase the liquidity of the market to attract more players so that

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the market becomes more efficient, it is to that extent operating against the Government's own energy policy. Therefore, it seems to me that the Minister's own department has a real role in the matter. I do not believe it is a DTI matter; it is primarily a Defra matter.

I am grateful to the Minister, wearing his Defra hat, for going as far as he did in recognising the need for regulation. I suspect that we may want to try again, but we will look most carefully at what he said. In the mean time, I beg leave to withdraw the amendment.

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Amendment, by leave, withdrawn.

Lord Triesman: This may be a convenient time to adjourn the Committee until 3.30 p.m. on Monday, 1 March.

The Deputy Chairman of Committees (Viscount Simon): The Committee stands adjourned until Monday, 1 March at 3.30 p.m.

        The Committee adjourned at twenty-seven minutes before eight o'clock.

Written Statements

Tuesday, 24 February 2004

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Security and Intelligence Agencies: Departmental Expenditure Limits

The Lord President of the Council (Baroness Amos): Subject to parliamentary approval of any necessary supplementary estimate, the Security and Intelligence Agencies' DEL will be increased by £27,620,000 from £1,497,446,000 to £1,525,066,000 and the administration costs limits will be increased by £4,295,000 from £566,324,000 to £570,619,000. Within the DEL change, the impact on resources and capital are as set out in the following table:

New DEL
ChangeVotedNon-votedTotal
Resource13,819,0001,119,106,00011,750,000 1,130,856,000
Capital14,402,000530,411,0005,000,000 535,411,000
Depreciation1601,000141,201,000- 141,201,000
Total27,620,0001,508,316,00016,750,000 1,525,066,000

1Depreciation, which forms part of resource DEL, is excluded from the total DEL since capital DEL includes capital spending and to include depreciation of those assets would lead to double counting.

The change in the resource element of the DEL arises from:

1. the take-up of end-of-year flexibility of £9,198,000.

2. a transfer of £7,016,000 from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to reflect funding for conflict prevention.

3. a transfer of £85,000 from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to fund planned programme activity.

4. a transfer of £1,050,000 from the Home Office.

5. a transfer of £120,000 from the Ministry of Defence for the payment of electricity.

6. a switch of £2,000,000 to capital.

7. a decrease of £735,000 resource due to an increase of £735,000 in the forecast profit on sale of an asset. This is a non-cash item.

8. a decrease of £915,000 in other non-cash items due to new forecasts.

The change in the capital element of the DEL arises from:

1. the take-up of end-of-year flexibility of £11,531,000.

2. a switch of £2,000,000 from resource.

3. a transfer of £861,000 to the Cabinet Office.

4. an increase of £1,732,000 due to the virement of £735,000 from resource (non-cash) to capital (cash) from the profit of a sale of an asset and £997,000 to correct the figures given in the winter supplementary.

24 Feb 2004 : Column WS12

Northern Ireland Office: Departmental Expenditure Limits

Baroness Amos: My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has made the following Ministerial Statement.

Subject to parliamentary approval of any necessary supplementary estimate, the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) DEL will be increased by £28,325,000 from £l,180,916,000 to £1,209,241,000. The administration cost limit has been increased by £34,000 from £163,375,000 to £163,409,000. Within the DEL change, the impact on resources and capital are as set out in the following table:

ChangeNew DELOf which: VotedNon-voted
Resource28,3251,136,389400,441735,948
Capital072,85230,11342,739
Depreciation110,95622,20927,46749,676
Total17,369408,345751,2201,159,565

1Depreciation, which forms part of resource DEL, is excluded from the total DEL since capital DEL includes capital spending and to include depreciation of those assets would lead to double counting.

The change in the resource element of the DEL arises from a change in the budgeting treatment for pension schemes (£25,000,000) and from the net effect of transfers to and from other government departments (£3,325,000). The increase in administration costs (£34,000) is also as a net effect of transfers to and from other government departments.

General Consumer Council for Northern Ireland: Annual Report and Accounts 2002–03

Baroness Amos: My honourable friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Enterprise, Trade and Investment in Northern Ireland has made the following Ministerial Statement.

The General Consumer Council for Northern Ireland 2002–03 annual report and accounts were deposited in the Library of the House today.

Planning Policy Statement 1: Draft for Consultation

The Minister of State, Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (Lord Rooker): My right honourable friend the Minister for Housing and Planning has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

I am today publishing for consultation a draft of Planning Policy Statement 1 (PPS1)—Creating Sustainable Communities—the core statement of the Government's key planning policies. I am also publishing a paper on the Government's approach to community involvement in planning.

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PPS1 is the key overarching document which sets out the Government's high level principles for planning.

Clause 39 (Clause 38, the sustainable development clause, as was) of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Bill requires regional and local plans to be drawn up with a view to contributing to the achievement of sustainable development. The clause requires that in doing so, planning authorities must have regard to guidance issued by the Secretary of State. PPS1 will be a key document underpinning this requirement.

PPS1 is based on three themes:

Planning for sustainable communities and sustainable development;

The new approach to planning we are promoting as part of planning culture change (the spatial planning approach); and

Community involvement in planning.

Sustainable development

Our legislation will make contributing to the achievement of sustainable development the key purpose of the planning system. The Office of the Deputy Prime Minister should expect planning policies to pursue proactively the four aims of sustainable development—economic development; social inclusion; environmental protection; and prudent use of natural resources—in an integrated way, in line with the Government's overall strategy for sustainable development.

Spatial Planning

The new regional and local plans provided for in the Bill are based on the philosophy of spatial planning. Spatial planning goes beyond traditional land use planning to bring together and integrate policies for the development and use of land with other policies and programmes which influence the nature of places and how they function.

PPS1 sets out the spatial planning approach that will be adopted in the new planning system. These planning tools will reflect real geographies and real community issues, and are thus a flexible approach to planning and sustainable development.

Community involvement

Effective community involvement is a vital element in delivering sustainable communities. Our aim should be to develop effective community involvement processes which enable a better understanding of the sometimes difficult choices which have to be made in considering development and more ownership of the accompanying decisions.

We need of course to strike a balance between promoting effective community involvement without allowing the system to be bogged down by endless consultation exercises. I want the reformed system to emphasise community involvement as a way of helping to resolve problems early in the process and secure ownership, so that when plans and proposals are put forward, there are fewer objections.

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The paper makes clear that community involvement should be based on a real understanding of the community's needs, should be fit for purpose, and should be front loaded—i.e. involvement early in the process.

PPS1 can only set out the key policy principles for community involvement in planning. To put these in context, the community involvement paper sets out our general philosophy on community involvement in planning, and puts this in the broader context of policy.

Copies of the two documents will be available in the Libraries of the House. They will also be available on the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister's website at (www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm–planning/documents/sectionhomepage/odpm–planning–page.hcsp)


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