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Wind Power

Lord Dixon-Smith asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: Under the current energy market, there are strong incentives on generators to deliver the power they are contracted to deliver. Wind generators are no different from any other generators in that they have to enter into contracts in the knowledge that their capacity may or may not be available at any given time. Since, by its nature, wind power is intermittent, wind generators have to deal with intermittency, but similarly other generators will seek to enter into contracts that cover them in the event that their plant is unavailable, for example because a technical problem suddenly occurs.

Lord Dixon-Smith asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: There will be no climate change levy due consequent on a short-term failure of supply from a wind power generating company. The wind power generator will, however, be required to ensure that, over time, the amount of levy-free electricity claimed by its customers is equal to the amount of wind power-derived electricity delivered to the grid.
 
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Nuclear Safeguards Act 2000

Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Sainsbury of Turville: The Nuclear Safeguards Act 2000 is the domestic legislation that implements the additional protocol to the UK/Euratom/IAEA safeguards agreement. The member states of the European Union agreed that all of the additional protocols applicable to them should enter into force at the same time. This required all of the then 15 member states and the European Commission to notify the IAEA that their statutory and/or constitutional requirements for implementation were in place. The final notification required was given to the IAEA on 30 April 2004, and the commencement order for the Act was made the same day.

NHS Trusts: Finances

Baroness Noakes asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department of Health (Lord Warner): There is unlikely to be any borrowing by National Health Service foundation trusts from non-government sources during 2004–05 for capital investment purposes although there may be some for working capital. However, this is a matter for the Office of the Independent Regulator of NHS Foundation Trusts.

Skin Conditions

Lord Clement-Jones asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: Individual higher education institutions determine their own undergraduate medical curriculum in the light of recommendations from the General Medical Council's (GMC's) education committee, which has the statutory
 
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responsibility to determine the extent of knowledge and skill required for the granting of primary medical qualifications in the United Kingdom.

The content and standard of postgraduate medical training is the responsibility of the UK competent authorities, the Specialist Training Authority for specialist medicine and, for general practice, the Joint Committee on Postgraduate Training for General Practice. Their role is that of custodians of quality standards in postgraduate medical education and practice. They are independent of the Department of Health. In addition, the GMC's education committee has the general function of promoting high standards of medical education and co-ordinating all stages of medical education to ensure that students and newly qualified doctors are equipped with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for professional practice.

Lord Clement-Jones asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: The Government do not specify the content of the general practitioner training curriculum. This is the job of the Joint Committee on Postgraduate Training for General Practice, which is the competent authority for general practice training in the United Kingdom. The JCPTGP is an independent professional body, and it is required by Section 9(3) of the Vocational Training Regulations 1997 to determine and publish the curriculum to be followed by a GP registrar (that is a trainee GP).

The regulations do specify seven competencies which must be tested, and which the curriculum must therefore teach:

GPs are therefore expected to learn in training the skills needed to deal with all their patients.



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