Previous Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page

G8: UK Presidency

Lord Hanningfield asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office (Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean): The working estimate of the organisational cost of the G8 Gleneagles summit is £8.9 million. This figure excludes the cost of the security operation. The Treasury and Scottish Executive will assess what these additional costs will total, but it is unlikely that an accurate estimate will be available until much nearer, or soon after, the event.

With regard to the organisational cost, it is not possible to publish how this is broken down as detailed contract negotiations continue which remain commercially confidential. However, the figure covers the cost of the summit itself, including travel, entertainment, catering, venue etc. It also includes the cost of providing facilities for the media as well as technical management of the Gleneagles Hotel site.
 
7 Mar 2005 : Column WA55
 

Lord Hanningfield asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: The working estimate of the organisational cost of the G8 Gleneagles summit is £8.9 million. It is not possible to publish a breakdown of this figure as detailed contract negotiations continue which remain commercially confidential. However, the figure includes the cost of providing facilities for the media as well as technical management of the Gleneagles Hotel site. It also covers the cost of the summit itself, including venue, transport, interpretation, etc.

This figure excludes the cost of the security operation. The Treasury and Scottish Executive will assess what these additional costs will total, but it is unlikely that an accurate estimate will be available until much nearer, or soon after, the event.

Bangladesh

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: After the attack in Sylhet on 21 May 2004, which killed three and injured many including the British High Commissioner, the Bangladeshi authorities agreed to our proposal that a Metropolitan Police team deploy to Bangladesh immediately to assess the circumstances of the attack and to provide assistance and advice to the Bangladeshi authorities. The Metropolitan Police team visited Bangladesh again in July 2004 and provided further ad hoc assistance from London.

The Bangladeshi authorities have recently requested the deployment of a further Metropolitan Police team to assist with the investigation. The Metropolitan Police do not consider that this would be productive but remain ready to offer specific advice or assistance to the Bangladeshi investigators. The Bangladeshi authorities have not made requests for assistance in any of the investigations listed at (b) to (e).
 
7 Mar 2005 : Column WA56
 

Lord Avebury asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: In response to a request from the Bangladeshi Government the World Bank has agreed that the Bangladesh Development Forum (BDF) take place on a two yearly basis. The next BDF will therefore be in 2006. We are concerned about the increasing level of political and extremist violence in Bangladesh and the dangers this holds for Bangladesh. We raise these concerns and the need for effective action to ensure that those responsible are brought to justice on a regular basis with the Bangladeshi authorities and will continue to do so.

United Nations

Lord Judd asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: The Government welcome the emphasis in the high level panel report on its review of the implementation and enforcement of sanctions. The recommendations in the report reflect some of the work already in progress in the United Nations system to develop better sanctions measures. The Government have no plans to initiate a further review but will remain active in discussions on the implementation of the high level panel's recommendations.

Lord Judd asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: The Government welcome this recommendation of the high level panel. The proposals are similar to those outlined by my right honourable friend the Prime Minister in his speech in Chicago in 1999 and the report of the International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty in 2001. The UK will work with like minded countries to take forward this recommendation at the Millennium Review Summit in September 2005.
 
7 Mar 2005 : Column WA57
 

Lord Judd asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Symons of Vernham Dean: Working through its mission to the UN in New York, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) co-operates closely with the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) on the role civilian policing plays in UN peace support operations (PSOs). Already a key element of PSOs, we are working proactively to ensure civilian policing needs are considered at all stages of the establishment of a mission, including pre-mission needs assessment, definition and development of mandates, intelligence gathering, rapid deployment—on which we await further information on the DPKO's proposal to establish a standing civilian policing capability and pre-deployment training. In particular, we strongly support the DPKO's efforts to develop integrated mission planning, combining three closely interconnected pillars of the criminal justice system—police, judiciary and penal institutions. To that end, a UK secondee to the DPKO helped in the development of a handbook on integrated planning last year.

At an operational level, the UK contributes police officers to two UN missions, with 93 officers currently deployed to UNMIK (Kosovo) and six to UNAMSIL (Sierra Leone). Building on our commitment to the 2000 Brahimi Report on Peacekeeping Operations, we support the development of other member states' international civilian policing capability, and have to date delivered 11 "Train the Trainer" courses around the world. We are also in the process of developing a G8 initiative to help build African civilian policing capability. In addition, we continue to play an active role in the development and delivery of civilian police standardised training module workshops to assist in the training of military and police officers who are likely to serve in specialised functions in PSOs.

As far as the UK's own civilian policing contribution is concerned, the FCO is leading cross-Whitehall and Police Service consultation aimed at improving the UK's approach to international policing, and better prioritising and strengthening our response to calls for contributions from the UN and other international organisations. A strategic task force is expected to submit recommendations to Ministers in July 2005.


Next Section Back to Table of Contents Lords Hansard Home Page