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NHS Blood Products: Inquiries

Lord Morris of Manchester asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord Warner): In December last year, the noble Lord, Lord Jenkin of Roding contacted Ministers about access to papers on the treatment of haemophilia patients and blood safety dating back to the period when he was Secretary of State for the Department of Health and Social Security. Lord Jenkin has also been in touch with the chief executive and officials in the Department of Health.

Lord Jenkin has received several letters from the department and met with the chief executive on 13 April 2005. In addition, he visited the department on two occasions to inspect files dating back to his period in office. A number of papers were released at his request. However, we acknowledged early on in Lord Jenkin's enquiries that a number of papers from the 1970s and 1980s have been destroyed in error.
 
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NHS Litigation Authority

Baroness Barker asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord Warner): The indicative revenue resource limit (budget) for the NHS Litigation Authority in 2005–06 is £14,453,000. The total budget for 2005–06 can only be confirmed at year end due to the demand-led nature of NHSLA work. It is not possible to estimate the total budget of the NHSLA following the establishment of the NHS Redress Scheme proposed in the NHS Redress Bill as the functions of the NHSLA in relation to NHS Redress have not yet been approved by Parliament.

Baroness Barker asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: The NHS Litigation Authority has an agreed whole-time equivalent maxima of 176. As at 14 December 2005, the NHSLA employed a whole-time equivalent of 155 staff. It is not possible to estimate the whole-time equivalent number of staff the NHSLA will employ following the establishment of a NHS Redress Scheme as the functions of the NHSLA in relation to NHS Redress have not yet been approved by Parliament.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: The NHS Litigation Authority was established on 20 November 1995 by the Secretary of State for Health to perform such functions in connection with the establishment of a scheme under Section 21 of the National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 (scheme for meeting liabilities of health bodies), and such other functions as the Secretary of State may direct the authority to perform on his behalf. Five schemes were established (the existing liabilities scheme, the ex-regional health authority scheme, the clinical negligence scheme for trusts, the liabilities for third parties scheme and the property expenses scheme) and the NHSLA was required to administer these schemes.

The Government have not placed any duty upon the NHSLA to reduce the level of claims sought against the NHS for clinical negligence and performance of the authority is not assessed in this area. However, the NHSLA promotes good practice in the NHS by risk assessing all scheme members once every two years
 
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against a set of risk management targets. Trusts are incentivised in two ways: first, the level of risk management is assessed against three levels of attainment, achieving a discount of contributions into the clinical negligence scheme for trusts as attainment increases. Secondly, the risk management systems assist NHS scheme members to drive down the levels of incidents, which in turn reduces the levels of compensation claims.

NHS: Local Improvement Finance Trust

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Department of Health (Lord Warner): It is currently possible for some secondary care schemes to be taken forward by a local improvement finance trust (LIFT) company. However, it is for local health economies to determine their best procurement option for delivering new healthcare facilities. Their options could include LIFT, the private finance initiative or public capital with consideration given to achieving an optimum level of risk transfer and appropriate payment and performance mechanisms to deliver a value for money project.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: The local improvement finance trust (LIFT) is one of a number of procurement options open to primary care trusts to develop primary care facilities. In deciding which option to take they will need to ensure that it provides relevant risk transfer and that appropriate payment and performance mechanisms are in place to deliver a value for money project. This is documented through their business cases. There has been no national assessment of the application of LIFT model to primary care building projects in excess of £25 million.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Lord Warner: Forty-two local improvement finance trusts (LIFT) have reached financial close in three
 
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waves. The total capital value of financially closed schemes undertaken by these trusts is over £740 million. The following table gives the total capital value of these schemes for each trust.
 
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Total investment figures for each scheme are not collected centrally. However, as a general rule, private investment is 96 per cent, and the public sector investment is 4 per cent, of the total value.
 
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LIFTStatusCapital value of financially-closed schemes £ms*
Wave 1
BarnsleyFinancial Close13.12
Camden and IslingtonFinancial Close3.50
East LondonFinancial Close29.19
Manchester, Salford and TraffordFinancial Close39.06
Newcastle and N TyneFinancial Close13.40
SandwellFinancial Close9.80
Wave 2
Barking and HaveringFinancial Close25.00
Birmingham and SolihullFinancial Close9.10
BradfordFinancial Close14.00
Cornwall and Isles of ScillyFinancial Close3.46
CoventryFinancial Close7.00
East LancashireFinancial Close53.80
HullFinancial Close6.55
LeicesterFinancial Close15.40
Liverpool and SeftonFinancial Close10.64
MedwayFinancial Close18.20
North StaffordshireFinancial Close7.50
Redbridge and Waltham ForestFinancial Close15.06
Wave 3
Ashfield (N Notts)Financial Close33.74
Ashton, Leigh and WiganFinancial Close30.00
Barnet, Enfield and HaringeyFinancial Close13.60
Brent and HarrowFinancial Close17.50
BristolFinancial Close15.90
Bromley, Bexley and GreenwichFinancial Close28.70
Colchester and TendringFinancial Close35.80
DerbyFinancial Close16.80
DoncasterFinancial Close8.89
DudleyFinancial Close13.20
Ealing, Hammersmith and HounslowFinancial Close28.60
E Hants, Fareham and GosportFinancial Close7.80
Gedling (Gt Notts)Financial Close33.50
Lambeth, Southwark and LewishamFinancial Close30.70
LeedsFinancial Close18.10
NorfolkFinancial Close3.98
OldhamFinancial Close2.52
OxfordFinancial Close16.00
PlymouthFinancial Close14.60
S E SheffieldFinancial Close5.00
S W LondonFinancial Close18.48
St Helens, Knowsley and WarringtonFinancial Close28.70
Tees ValleyFinancial Close17.17
WolverhamptonFinancial Close8.00
Wave 4
Bolton, Rochdale, Heywood and MiddletonOJEUNot Applicable
Bury, Tameside and GlossopOJEUNot Applicable
South East MidlandsOJEUNot Applicable
South EssexITNNot Applicable
South MidlandsOJEUNot Applicable
South West HantsOJEUNot Applicable
Sustainable Communities KentOJEUNot Applicable
WiltshireOJEUNot Applicable
Total741.06




* Capital value of financially closed schemes is the capital value of the LIFT facilities that have reached financial close under each LIFT trust.

 
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