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Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: The Legal Services Commission (LSC) has undertaken internal reviews of the MMR/MR litigation and monitored its progress as it does with all publicly funded multi-party actions. As litigation is still in progress, it would not be appropriate to comment further on this case. The funding for the MMR litigation commenced in the early 1990s. Since then, the LSC had made significant changes to the funding of multi-party actions generally. Key changes include the introduction of affordability criteria, tendering based on quality and price, and "risk rates" to share the risk between the LSC and the service providers, so that service providers would be unlikely to profit from a case which was unsuccessful.

Northern Ireland: Alleged Spy Ring

Lord Laird asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Attorney-General (Lord Goldsmith): I have outlined the reasons in this case in a number of letters, including one to the noble Lord, and most recently in response to a request from the Northern Ireland Affairs Select Committee. Its report, which includes my response, has been published and has been placed in the Library of the House. I have also replied to an earlier question form the noble Lord (Official Report, 14/12/05, WA 168–69).

People Trafficking

Lord Hylton asked Her Majesty's Government:

2 Feb 2006 : Column WA74
 

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): The Kingston pilot is a three-month trial, which attempts to identify vulnerable children who are travelling to the UK on direct flights from Jamaica, taking place at Heathrow, Gatwick and Manchester airports. Airline staff participating in the Kingston pilot received child protection awareness training delivered by UKIS and the Metropolitan Police. A hotline manned by border control staff has been provided to airline check-in staff so that they can report concerns about children travelling to the UK during the trial. The pilot, which began on 31 October 2005, ran for three months. The results are currently being analysed to see whether the process can be rolled out to other areas of the world of even greater concern, in particular West Africa.

The Kingston pilot is one of several initiatives aimed at identifying and dealing appropriately with children at risk prior to their arrival in the United Kingdom. Other areas include:

The use of a network of airline immigration liaison officers who are posted in most of the countries that give us greatest cause for concern with regard to minors, particularly unaccompanied asylum seeking minors. Some 892 inadequately documented children were denied boarding on flights to the UK between January and November 2005 after airline check-in staff referred to airline liaison officers.

Work undertaken internationally on drafting best practice guidance on the carriage of minors.

The introduction of a new child visitor category in the Immigration Rules, which requires parents or guardians of children who are visa nationals to demonstrate that suitable arrangements have been made for the travel, reception and care of children intending to visit the UK.

Pharmaceutical Product Litigation

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Department for Constitutional Affairs (Baroness Ashton of Upholland): The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

2 Feb 2006 : Column WA75
 

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Earl Howe asked Her Majesty's Government:

Baroness Ashton of Upholland: The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Police: Geographical and Population Areas

Lord Roberts of Llandudno asked Her Majesty's Government:

The Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Scotland of Asthal): The geographical area and population size of each of the present police authority areas is in the attached table. No decisions have been made as yet on potential merged police authority areas so information on their area and population size cannot be given at this stage.
 
2 Feb 2006 : Column WA76
 

Police Force geographic area and population—based on 2004 population estimates


Police Force/AuthorityGeographic Area (sq. miles)Population
Avon and Somerset1,8431,519,119
Bedfordshire475576,218
Cambridgeshire1,307737,890
Cheshire902992,642
City of London18,605
Cleveland230553,311
Cumbria2,626494,782
Derbyshire1,012979,226
Devon and Cornwall3,9491,619,062
Dorset1,022700,419
Durham935595,388
Dyfed Powys4,227503,663
Essex1,4151,635,605
Gloucestershire1,021572,791
GMP4912,539,043
Gwent598556,641
Hampshire1,5981,801,442
Hertfordshire6321,041,319
Humberside1,354887,521
Kent1,4381,610,310
Lancashire1,1851,434,871
Leicestershire982945,480
Lincolnshire2,278673,531
Merseyside2481,365,832
Metropolitan Police Service5997,420,617
Norfolk2,067816,525
North Wales2,374674,498
North Yorkshire3,199764,866
Northamptonshire929646,731
Northumbria2,1421,396,374
Nottinghamshire8311,034,739
South Wales8001,217,660
South Yorkshire5971,278,434
Staffordshire1,0461,050,609
Suffolk1,462683,736
Surrey6431,067,186
Sussex1,4581,510,445
Thames Valley2,2112,120,859
Warwickshire761525,481
West Mercia2,8521,178,763
West Midlands3472,579,153
West Yorkshire7812,108,028
Wiltshire1,342626,809




Notes:


1. Police force population data are based on Office for National Statistics Mid-2004 Population Estimates.


2. Force geographic area is rounded to the nearest square mile.







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